Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking
15.2K views | +15 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
onto Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking
Scoop.it!

(Empathic Design) Inclusive Design: Building Empathy

(Empathic Design) Inclusive Design: Building Empathy | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

Rituals and Habits to Build Empathy

So, what can you do to build empathy?

 

Practice rituals and habits like these:

  • Listen, care deeply, and be open to making connections with people — whether existing customers, a potential customer, neighbors, friends, and family — everyonefits into this category.
  • Seek out new advisors, refresh my mentors, travel someplace new and different, and read a lot more. Tip: ask your peers and community for a diverse set of authors and books — women, minorities, under-represented voices — and not just from the same type of author, or same subject.
  • Use the products that you make daily to understand your customers’ point of view, the pain points, the dead ends, and any broken flow.
  • Practice de-biasing activities with people you encounter, and those you work with. Don’t assume what you see on the surface is representative of their entire person and life experience.
  • Ask active questions and approach everything with an open mind.
  • Discover many more practical examples we use at Automattic: How We Build Empathy With Our Customers, from Filippo Di Trapani.
  • Find inspiration from the WordPress mobile team’s Quarterly Rituals: Empathy Challenges, by Cate Huston.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking
International information about empathy related to empathic design, human-centered design, design thinking.
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

See Magazine Front Page: All Sections

See Magazine Front Page: All Sections | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

Photo of the Empathy Team doing the Acumen/IDEO Design Course.


More Empathic Design Links


Visit the individual magazines specifically for empathy and;



====================

Please Click 'Follow' to receive updates.
It also helps us rise in the rankings 
and gives us more exposure
on Scoop.it. 

===========

Thanks so much.

Edwin Rutsch, Editor

Our Website CultureOfEmpathy.com

Join us on Facebook Center for Building a Culture of Empathy

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

The Future of Healing: Shifting From Trauma Informed Care to Healing Centered Engagement

Start by building empathy
Healing centered engagement begins by building empathy with young people who experience trauma. This process takes time, is an ongoing process and sometimes may feel like taking two steps forward, and three steps back.

 

However, building empathy is critical to healing centered engagement. To create this empathy, I encourage adult staff to share their story first, and take an emotional risk by being more vulnerable, honest and open to young people. This process creates an empathy exchange between the adult, and the young people which is the foundation for healing centered engagement (Payne 2013).

 

This process also strengthens emotional literacy which allows youth to discuss the complexity of their feelings. Fostering empathy allows for young people to feel safe sharing their experiences and emotions. The process ultimately restores their sense of well-being because they have the power name and respond to their emotional states.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Why empathy is critical for good design

Why empathy is critical for good design | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Should toilets in refugee camps have built-in lights? That might seem like a no-brainer – it certainly did to us when we were faced with this question. As it turns out, that’s a terrible idea.

This is an example that illustrates why we need to take the time to understand and build empathy for the people we’re designing for. Otherwise, we risk doing more harm than good.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Learning empathizing with myself through user experience design.

Learning empathizing with myself through user experience design. | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

This first encounter with design thinking helped me or rather reminded me of the thing that was never accentuated enough, EMPATHY.

 

The underlying principle behind all the great products is empathy, it all narrows down to how well is a product or a service designed according to the people who are actually supposed to use it.

 

In a world where there are copious choices available on everything, the one that we as humans gravitate towards happens to be the one that is actually designed for us.

 

Yes ,there are other factors like brand, price to name a few but in long run we only tend to stick to things that doesn’t seem like work, that doesn’t feel like work, things that just gets inculcated in our daily life seamlessly.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Insights on Human-Centered Design From Jane Fulton Suri

Insights on Human-Centered Design From Jane Fulton Suri | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
(19:05) Creating time for empathic work: Doing something is better than nothing. Make explicit the things you don’t know and seek out opportunities to go learn.

(22:58) A career in empathy: How empathy became essential to Jane’s design research methods.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Design brief - Interaction Design Student Design Charette – 5—8 February 2019 • Seattle, WA, USA

Design brief - Interaction Design Student Design Charette – 5—8 February 2019 • Seattle, WA, USA | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Empathy is critical not only to the design process but also to the framing and approach of how individuals address important social issues. Every decision we make as designers can raise or lower a person’s ability to participate in society.

 

On a larger scale, its impact manifests in the products we create, the breakdown of communication barriers, and an increased awareness of others’ lived experiences. The ability to empathize serves as a catalyst for inclusive design.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

What Is an Empathy Map & How to Create One

What Is an Empathy Map & How to Create One | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
What is an empathy map? It's a key tool that helps you better understand your customer base. Learn how to use empathy maps in this blog post.

 

How to Create an Empathy Map

1. Decide on a customer persona.

Before diving in, it's important to understand who your customer is. Start by analyzing customer data. Figure out some average demographics and psychographics associated with your customer base.

 

For instance, according to Chron.com, the average Starbucks customer profile includes high-income high-spenders, busy people living in cities, and healthier professionals, among others. Using these insights can help Starbucks come up with a customer profile, such as "Jackie, 28 years old, lives in Boston and makes an income of $90,000 as an account executive. She regularly attends spin classes, is vegetarian, and enjoys sushi and rooftop bars." Similarly, you should come up with a customer persona to which the empathy map is directed.

more...
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, January 13, 3:14 AM
What Is an Empathy Map & How to Create One
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

The relationship between empathy and design - Shepley Bulfinch

The relationship between empathy and design - Shepley Bulfinch | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Ten years ago, in a project interview, I was asked a question by Rob, CEO of a large healthcare organization: “How can design improve empathy in our organization?”

The question has stayed with me, and continues to profoundly shape my work as a designer committed to health and wellness in the built environment. I reflect on the question often, imagining and exploring potential responses—which can and do vary greatly.

Ten years ago, I did my best to respond based on work I’d done with Planetree, and our team was fortunate to be awarded the project. In truth however, my reply that day and work on the project was just the beginning of my immersion into this significant topic.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Customer Exeperience Mapping: Empathy Maps | Interactions

Customer Exeperience Mapping: Empathy Maps | Interactions | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Empathy maps describe what a customer goes through as he/she is trying to complete a task, in a product or brand agnostic way. In other words, empathy maps allow you to take a step back from your product and paint a picture of a typical customer’s experience — their needs, expectations, goal, hurdles, and behavior as they try to overcome those hurdles.

A typical empathy map has 4 main ‘observation-based’ sections – say, think, do, feel. This framework can be further evolved by adding two more ‘analysis-based’ sections: pains and gains. Open-ended empathy maps yield better results, however, to limit the scope of the exercise, it is better to limit it to a specific problem or a task at hand.

Drawing empathy maps reveals previously overlooked parts of the customer experience and helps find gaps in the current offering and future roadmaps. Empathy maps can also yield adjacent products and services that can elevate the usability of the product or simplify the task at hand.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Designers should stop talking about "empathy"

Designers should stop talking about "empathy" | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

Designers, it’s time to stop talking about “empathy.”
According to Google Trends, the term “empathy” now appears in Search more than six times as often as it did in 2004. Finding a job description for a design role that doesn’t mention “empathy” is near impossible. Undergraduate and graduate schools alike espouse “learning how to empathize” in the curricula. Empathy is everywhere, and especially in design.

 

  1. BECOME MORE EMPATHIC
  2. MAKE EMPATHY A RITUAL
  3. BROADCAST YOUR FINDINGS
  4. CREATE EMPATHY MAPS
  5. HELP OTHERS UNDERSTAND THE VALUE OF EMPATHY
  6. HIRE EMPATHIC DESIGNERS
  7. KNOW YOUR LIMITS
  8. COPY OTHERS

 

Michael Chanover is vice president of design and user experience at NerdWallet.

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

This Is Why Empathy Matters As A UX Designer

This Is Why Empathy Matters As A UX Designer | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

In my experience, the most effective way to practice empathy as a designer is to observe users interacting with your product or service in their own environment, be that home, work, or out and about. Observing users in the field allows us to glean insights that cannot be captured through other research methods. However, the reality is that observational field work rarely happens because it is time and resource intensive. How else can we build empathy for users?

Firstly, try to utilize a diverse set of research methods to gather insights about your existing or potential customers.

 

This way you can capture a range of insights from participants and gain a well-rounded picture of how they perceive and experience your product. Understanding how your product fits into and impacts the lives of your customers will help you to develop empathy for them, so create a variety of opportunities to learn as much about them as you can.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Empathy mapping

Empathy mapping | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Designing an action or an app to benefit a user is a mission in itself. We run largely on empathy. Empathy binds us and also motivates us. When we unlock the proper points and sequence we have an empathy map.

In any sort of user design action we map out a journey for the user based on their anticipated preferences. Preparing a product or service for a user is like clearing a field. You have to scope out the plot, anticipate desired usage, then position buildings and constructs to best advantage.

You must survey, clear obstacles, grade and prepare the plot for habitation. The action depicted above defines the objective of creating an effective video production. The user must be thought of every step of the way.

You are mapping actions against anticipated o
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

(Empathic Design) Empathy Mapping Projects for your Clients 

(Empathic Design) Empathy Mapping Projects for your Clients  | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
What is an Empathy Map?
Empathetic thinking might not be something you’d jump to address when outlining a basic plan of action for a client.  However, it is slowly creeping into business concept planning and product strategy in the form of an empathy map.

To put it simply, an empathy map is a tool that, if used correctly, allows you to understand your target audience.  Through filling in an empathy map you can understand and cater to the clients wants, needs, goals and feelings.

Below you can see an Example of a Map and How the Attributes of the Client are Thought About:
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Design Thinking Approach to eLearning Emphasizes Empathy

Design Thinking Approach to eLearning Emphasizes Empathy | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

Design Thinking and Human-Centered Design approaches, as applied to eLearning, focus on designing solutions that work for real learners in real workday situations. As such, empathy is an essential element in a Design Thinking approach to eLearning, and it is the first stage of any Design Thinking-based process.

Figure 1: The Design Thinking process starts with empathy

In a instructional design context, empathy requires understanding the pain points and the daily reality of your target audience; it also requires some knowledge of learners’ motivations and needs, which might not be obvious.

In some ways, this stage is similar to a conventional needs analysis: You’re defining your target audience and describing the problems the eLearning is meant to solve. You might come up with a profile of a typical learner—a persona—for whom you develop the training solution. You might brainstorm possible solutions—a conventional eLearning course, microlearning, a job aid—that could solve the learner's problem.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Personas, Empathy, and Role-Playing – Nick Dauchot  

Personas, Empathy, and Role-Playing – Nick Dauchot   | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

Empathy is a big word these days, especially in the world of design. A lot of times though people use the word empathy without giving the empathic bond the time or patience it deserves, causing it’s meaning and purpose to become convoluted.

  1. Empathy is not a hard thing to understand.
  2. Empathy helps us to feel how another person feels.
  3. Empathy provides a perspective outside of our own.
  4. Empathy is a transformation from acting as self to acting as other
  5. Role-Playing Games are in some respects an exercise in empathy
  6. An empathic bond takes time to accomplish
  7. Personas are only as useful as the designer allows them to be

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

How empathy can help you create a better work culture

How empathy can help you create a better work culture | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Empathy is one of those things that can help in any part of life whether it’s your family, friends, that special person and even also at work. Understanding what empathy is and how it effects people…

What good will empathy do?

There are so many benefits of having empathy, so I’ll just state a few. The end result of it is

  • a happy team
  • a well groomed end-product
  • good work culture.


So, 
like many other problems we face as software engineers, we tend to solve problems by devising an algorithm. Here is “pseudo code” for empathy.

 

  • 1- better understanding of your colleagues: If you understand them better., you can help them better.
  • 2- The unsaid things: Your team might not share everything with you. Based on their body-language, tone, voice, you will have a better idea of their situation.
  • 3- Resolving conflicts: When you understand the unsaid things, you can address them and make your team members feel heard. This is the first step of resolving a conflict.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Building Empathy with Teachers

Building Empathy with Teachers | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Empathy is the experience of understanding another person’s thoughts and feelings  from their point of view, rather than your own. An empathy map is a tool that I like to use with teachers to take a human-centered approach when thinking about personalizing students learning. 

 

Originally designed for businesses to think about their customers needs, schools are now using them to think about their students needs. Empathy maps shed light on which problems to solve within your school or classroom through a protocol

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

This Is Why Empathy Matters As A UX Designer

This Is Why Empathy Matters As A UX Designer | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

Tips for introducing an empathic mindset in your company

Without a mutual understanding of the benefits that an empathic design approach can bring, it can be difficult to stand up to business-driven product requirements or unvalidated assumptions about the right solutions to implement.

 

One of the easiest ways to help others in your team or company to start thinking more empathically is to invite them to sit in on user research or user testing. Ask them to be your note taker, or simply have them observe. When a non-design team member can actually see and hear first hand a user experiencing and interacting with a product, it gives them an opportunity to develop empathy for that user and create a meaningful connection with them.

 

Claire Rackstraw

CareerFoundry UX Designer

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Prototyping Empathy – Microsoft Design

Here’s a common scenario: Your team just spent a crazy week pulling together a prototype for upcoming user research. Schedules are tight, pressures are high. Despite all the effort, it turns out the prototype isn’t really what you needed to have an awesome conversation with a customer.

 

But at this point, only small tweaks to the prototype are feasible — because who has time for more? And frankly, you would feel like a real jerk if you were to ask for more. The team just sunk in a massive amount of time and effort.
...

 

These are a mix of things we’ve been trying, as well ideas that emerged in conversations we’ve had with dozens of researchers (within and outside of Microsoft) about how they ensure empathy is built in — versus bolted on — while prototyping.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

4 ways to teach empathy in the classroom

4 ways to teach empathy in the classroom | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

Empathy can be thought of as a "superpower" students as young as 3rd grade can learn and develop, writes Roberto Brandao of New Jersey's Solomon Schechter Day School of Bergen County

Here are some actionable ways educators can teach empathy in the classroom.

 

Teaching empathy through project-based learning
One way that schools can teach students empathy is engaging students in creative, interdisciplinary technology projects focused on building empathy. For example, at SSDS, our 3rd graders recently collaborated with change management and marketing guru Cynthia Phillips — founder and CEO of The Disruptive Factory, a social change consultancy — as testers and ambassadors for a new animated cartoon series and a transmedia campaign called “Verti.” This year-long project introduces students to fictional characters in the animated cartoon and will ultimately culminate in students building prototypes of a space station they think would benefit the characters, promoting empathy.        

 

Creating empathy maps

Research shows the best way for students to begin to understand empathy is by doing — which is why one of the best things educators can do is to promote active learning. 

 

Designing a curriculum that teaches active listening
Another way to promote empathy is through active listening, which is why I created Pocket Empathy, an exercise that teaches 3rd graders the skill of active listening. 

 

Integrating design thinking

Teaching kids about empathy starts with demonstrating what it means to maintain a positive mindset that’s reflected in the way they speak. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Use Customer Journey Maps to Uncover Innovation Opportunities

Use Customer Journey Maps to Uncover Innovation Opportunities | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
EMPATHIZE WITH CUSTOMERS, EMPLOYEES, AND OTHER END USERS.

One way to develop more empathy with—and gain new insights about—your customers is to look beyond the narrow definition of your offering and consider the customer’s total experience. The more broadly you define the customer experience, the more opportunities you can identify for improvement.

Say, for example, you make interior house paint. You could focus narrowly on the characteristics of the product itself, on making the paint less drippy or making it cover a surface in a single coat. But you’ll find many more opportunities for innovation if you think about the arc of the customer experience. In something as simple as repainting a bedroom, there are probably a dozen steps (each one of which is a chance to innovate): from getting customers to realize that it’s time to repaint, to helping them choose the color, to shortening the preparation and cleanup time, to keeping track of which colors are on which walls for future reference when it comes time for touch-up.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Customer Journey Mapping: Empathy Maps

Customer Journey Mapping: Empathy Maps | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
What is an Empathy Map?
Empathy maps describe what a customer goes through as he/she is trying to complete a task, in a product or brand agnostic way. In other words, empathy maps allow you to take a step back from your product and paint a picture of a typical customer’s experience — their needs, expectations, goal, hurdles, and behavior as they try to overcome those hurdles.

A typical empathy map has 4 main ‘observation-based’ sections – say, think, do, feel. This framework can be further evolved by adding two more ‘analysis-based’ sections: pains and gains. Open-ended empathy maps yield better results, however, to limit the scope of the exercise, it is better to limit it to a specific problem or a task at hand.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Why a human-centric culture matters to a finance career A human-centric culture requires a level of empathy because it focuses on the needs of others,

Why a human-centric culture matters to a finance career A human-centric culture requires a level of empathy because it focuses on the needs of others, | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

What is a human-centric culture?
A human-centric culture requires a level of empathy because it focuses on the needs of others, such as employees concerned about workloads and customers needing their product delivered on time, while fulfilling the financial team’s role to maintain profitability.

Citera says it involves the personal touch: “You don’t operate from your desk and shoot emails. You have to be face to face. You have to have a seat at the table. It’s about becoming a true business partner.”

He says the human-centric finance team must participate in conversations around the organisation, enabling team members to direct, guide and highlight issues.

more...
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, November 18, 2018 5:06 AM
Why a human-centric culture matters to a finance career A human-centric culture requires a level of empathy because it focuses on the needs of others,
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

  “Good Design Requires Two Things: Empathy To Understand A Problem, And Creativity To Solve It.  

  “Good Design Requires Two Things: Empathy To Understand A Problem, And Creativity To Solve It.   | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
 Good Design Requires Two Things: Empathy To Understand A Problem, And Creativity To Solve It.…”
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

Be Careful with Empathy – NYC Design 

Be Careful with Empathy – NYC Design  | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it

Find the optimal level of empathic engagement. There are 3 levels of empathy: cognitive, emotional, and compassionate empathy.

a. Cognitive empathy is when you put yourself into someone else’s place, and see their perspective. It is very possible that you do this without feeling any sympathy/pity.

b. Affective / emotional empathy is when you feel the other person’s emotions alongside them. Careful not to be overwhelmed by those emotions. You might have a empathy overload where you are unable to respond and might destroy the users’ trust and even destroy you.

c. The last is compassionate empathy. It is what usually understood by people as empathy. We need to first understand and then sympathise with what they are going through. Finally we take, or help them to take, action to resolve the problem.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy Circle Magazine
Scoop.it!

How Embodying Empathy Will Improve Your Leadership Skills  

How Embodying Empathy Will Improve Your Leadership Skills   | Empathic Design: Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking | Scoop.it
Michael Ventura, entrepreneur and CEO of award-winning strategy and design practice Sub Rosa, shares three things he hopes readers take away from reading his book, Applied Empathy. For more on author Michael Ventura visit http://www.simonandschuster.com/authors/Michael-Ventura/2142280932

more...
No comment yet.