Empathy and Healt...
Follow
Find
14.2K views | +7 today
Empathy and HealthCare
- CultureOfEmpathy.com
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Newspaper Front Page: All Sections

Newspaper Front Page: All Sections | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Empathy And Health Care Conference http://j.mp/N98AoS

Empathy Cafe Magazine 
Front Page


Visit the individual magazines specifically for empathy and;

*   Main Page All
*   Animals
*   Art
*   Compassion

*   Compassionate Communications (NVC)

*   Curriculums
*   Education
*   Empaths

*   Empathy Quotes

*   Empathic Design - Empathy in Human-Centered Design (New!)
*   Health Care

*   Justice

*   Self-Empathy & Self-Compassion
*   Teaching - Learning
*   Work 

*   etc.


Please Click 'Follow' to receive updates.
It also helps us rise in the rankings and
gives us more exposure on Scoop.it.


Thanks so much.
Edwin Rutsch, Editor
http://CultureOfEmpathy.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Why Nice Doctors Are Better Doctors - US News

Why Nice Doctors Are Better Doctors - US News | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

By Elizabeth Renter


It’s All About Empathy
In looking at bedside manner, modern practitioners are zeroing in on empathy. A paper in the International Journal of Caring Sciences describes empathy as “the ‘capacity’ to share and understand another’s ‘state of mind’ or emotion” and a “powerful communication skill” that uses active listening and deepens understanding. This skill allows some doctors to fully grasp your apprehensions, concerns and the true weight of your questions when you’re in the examining room or hospital.

Your doctor’s empathy, or the ability to stand in your shoes, not only deepens the relationship between the two of you and makes you feel more satisfied with your visit, but also has measurable effects on your health.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

The next revolution in health care? Empathy | Paul Rosen | TEDx

The next revolution in health care? Empathy | Paul Rosen | TEDxWilmington
more...
Lon Woodbury's curator insight, April 18, 12:11 AM

This concept used to be called "bedside manners" and he has a good point that medical professionals should "return" to it.  The same applies to education.  Teachers try, but it is very hard in the system we have built over the last century. to truly have that empathy based on real understanding of each student. -Lon

Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

How Advisors Can Improve Their Empathy Skills

How Advisors Can Improve Their Empathy Skills | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

How Advisors Can Improve Their Empathy Skills March 31, 2015 by Dan Solin PDF

Doctors are improving their empathy skills

Empathy is a cognitive attribute and not a personality trait, according to Mohammadreza Hojat, a research professor of psychiatry at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. This is good news because it means you can improve your ability to empathize.


Part of the credit for the new focus on physician empathy is owed to Duke University. Duke developed a required course for its oncology fellows called “Oncotalk.” The purpose of this revolutionary course is to teach oncologists “clinical empathy,” or “the ability to stand in a patient’s shoes and to convey an understanding of the patient’s situation as well as the desire to help.”

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Learning to Listen: Why Better Health Care May Start with a Simple “How Are You?”

Learning to Listen: Why Better Health Care May Start with a Simple “How Are You?” | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Halpern believes medical schools “need to stop un-teaching” empathy.

Most patients, of course, would prefer to receive care from a doctor with a compassionate bedside manner, but Halpern suggests that the effect of better empathic listening skills could be huge. Currently, an estimated half of all patients don’t take the medications they’re prescribed as directed.


This may result from poor communication, the patients’ lack of trust in the doctor, or reluctance to discuss embarrassing side effects, such as the sexual dysfunction that can accompany certain blood pressure medications. But drawing from her own experience in the field, Halpern says that when doctors really listen and show they care, patients are more likely to open up.


What’s more, doctors would likely benefit from being more empathetic. 


By Marica Petrey

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

A heart-wrenching photo of a doctor crying went viral—here’s why

A heart-wrenching photo of a doctor crying went viral—here’s why | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

1) Humans crave raw empathy

The photographer captures a poignant moment in a stoic profession that trains doctors to remain professionally distant. The voyeuristic photo reveals the emotional reality of doctoring—and a side of physicians that people don’t usually see—while uniting us all in our common humanity.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

New courses on empathy train physicians to heal by listening and caring

New courses on empathy train physicians to heal by listening and caring | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Unlike sympathy, which is defined as feeling sorry for another person, clinical empathy is the ability to stand in a patient’s shoes and to convey an understanding of the patient’s situation as well as the desire to help.

Clinical empathy was once dismissively known as “good bedside manner” and traditionally regarded as far less important than technical acumen.

But a spate of studies in the past decade has found that it is no mere frill. Increasingly, empathy is considered essential to establishing trust, the foundation of a good doctor-patient relationship.

Studies have linked empathy to greater patient satisfaction, better outcomes, decreased physician burnout and a lower risk of malpractice suits and errors.


By SANDRA G. BOODMAN

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

How to Teach Doctors Empathy

How to Teach Doctors Empathy | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Clinical empathy was once dismissively known as “good bedside manner” and traditionally regarded as far less important than technical acumen. But a spate of studies in the past decade has found that it is no mere frill. Increasingly, empathy is considered essential to establishing trust, the foundation of a good doctor-patient relationship.

Studies have linked empathy to greater patient satisfaction, better outcomes, decreased physician burnout, and a lower risk of malpractice suits and errors.


 Beginning this year, the Medical College Admission Test will contain questions involving human behavior and psychology, a recognition that being a good doctor “requires an understanding of people,” not just science, according to the American Association of Medical Colleges. Patient satisfaction scores are now being used to calculate Medicare reimbursement under the Affordable Care Act. And more than 70 percent of hospitals and health networks are using patient satisfaction scores in physician-compensation decisions.


SANDRA G. BOODMAN

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Teaching doctors how to engage more and lecture less

Teaching doctors how to engage more and lecture less | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Once known as having a “good bedside manner,” showing empathy benefits patients and physicians.


Developed by medical faculty at Duke, the University of Pittsburgh and several other medical schools, “Oncotalk” is part of a burgeoning effort to teach doctors an essential but often overlooked skill: clinical empathy.


Unlike sympathy, which is defined as feeling sorry for another person, clinical empathy is the ability to stand in a patient’s shoes and to convey an understanding of the patient’s situation as well as the desire to help.

Clinical empathy was once dismissively known as “good bedside manner” and traditionally regarded as far less important than technical acumen. But a spate of studies in the past decade has found that it is no mere frill. Increasingly, empathy is considered essential to establishing trust, the foundation of a good doctor-patient relationship.


Studies have linked empathy to greater patient satisfaction, better outcomes, decreased physician burnout and a lower risk of malpractice suits and errors. 


By Sandra G. Boodman


more...
Lon Woodbury's curator insight, March 11, 6:40 PM

"Bedside Manners" is important for all professions.  The best therapists do well at it of course, but Psychiatrists, Doctors, and all professions need a good dose of it.  I read a study many years ago when this issue was just stating to emerge that it drastically reduced malpractice suits.  I guess when a client or patient feels they are not listened to, a main motivation to go to an attorney is to make that professional listen whether they want to or not. :)  -Lon

Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Not Running a Hospital: Riess delivers on empathy

Not Running a Hospital: Riess delivers on empathy | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Empathy is a fashionable topic, but the discussion surrounding it is often a bit touchy-feely, short on rigor.  In contrast, I recently came across this excellent TEDx talk by Helen Riess delivered at Middlebury a bit over a year ago.  It's 17 minutes are worth watching in several respects--thoughtful, understated, and substantive.


Helen is local, based at MGH, so I gave her a call and she told me about some of her activities.  With the encouragement of her hospital, she's started a firm called Empathetics, which is conducting training for clinicians based on her research.


You see, empathy isn't just about feeling warmth and connection: The emotional connection also has roots in neurobiology and physiology.



more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Why it's so difficult for physicians to be empathetic and analytic at the same time

Why it's so difficult for physicians to be empathetic and analytic at the same time | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

For years, physicians have been urged to show more empathy during patient encounters, but most doctors would tell you it isn't quite that simple.

For physicians who struggle to balance empathy with analytic thinking during patient visits, neuroscience researcher and brain-imaging expert Anthony Jack, PhD, has a somewhat comforting explanation: It's not your fault, it's your brain's.


Jack, who leads Case Western Reserve University's Brain, Mind and Consciousness lab, has employed brain-scanning technology to discover that, the more active the region of the brain responsible for analytic thinking is, the less active the region governing empathy becomes.


In other words, the brain's analytic and empathetic systems operate in constant tension with one another.


By Brandon Glenn

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

NSB Speaker Dr. Brian Goldman on Empathy

National Speakers Bureau sits down with exclusive speaker Dr. Brian Goldman to hear his thoughts on empathy. To view more on Brian, view his NSB profile: http://bit.ly/1ksN0eJ
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

How easy is it to cultivate empathy in doctors?

How easy is it to cultivate empathy in doctors? | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Caroline Struthers takes us through a recent systematic review which looks at interventions to cultivate empathy in doctors.


One would always hope for, although sadly not necessarily expect an empathic doctor. To be honest, I’m usually quite grateful if they’re not young enough to be my daughter or son. Whilst medical education in most cultures explicitly emphasises the importance of empathy, there is evidence that this desired characteristic declines during medical education, and is “lower than ideal” in physicians.


Studies indicate that doctors overlook or miss empathic opportunities in patient encounters


by Caroline Struther


Kelm Z, Womer J, Walter JK, Feudtner C. (2014) Interventions to cultivate physician empathy: a systematic reviewBMC Medical Education 2014; 14(1): 219. doi:10.1186/1472-6920-14-219.





more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

The Role of Empathy in Healthcare - Real Balance Global Wellness Services

The Role of Empathy in Healthcare - Real Balance Global Wellness Services | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Empathy is a powerful communication skill that is often misunderstood and underused. Effective empathetic comunication enhances   the therapeutic effectiveness of the provider-client relationship.


Appropriate use of empathy as a communication tool facilitates the health related interview, increases the efficiency of gathering information, and honors the patient or client. It is one of the vital facillitative conditions of coaching mentioned by Dr. Arloski...


Practical Empathetic Communication

Making practical use of an otherwise esoteric concept such as empathy requires division of the concept into its simplest elements.


As outlined by Frederic Platt  key steps to effective empathy include:

  1. recognizing presence of strong feeling in the clinical setting (ie, fear, anger, grief, disappointment);
  2. pausing to imagine how the patient might be feeling;
  3. stating our perception of the patient's feeling (ie, "I can imagine that must be ..." or "It sounds like you're upset about ...");
  4. legitimizing that feeling;
  5. respecting the patient's effort to cope with the predicament; and
  6. offering support and partnership (ie, "I'm committed to work with you
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Showing Empathy Impacts Practices on Multiple Levels

Showing Empathy Impacts Practices on Multiple Levels | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

It was decades ago—1976 to be exact—when Elton John released his hit song “Sorry Seems to be the Hardest Word.” It was true then, and it still rings true today.
 
But if physicians want to take a positive step toward improving patient satisfaction, avoiding medical malpractice, and positively impacting their practice’s bottom line, they don’t have to go so far as to say, “I’m sorry.” All they have to do is show empathy.

However, that’s easier said than done...


Assessing the Problem ... 

Learning to Listen...

Bottom Line Impact...  


by Ed Rabinowitz

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

KWC Graduate to Speak on a Physician's Perspective on the Uses of Empathy

KWC Graduate to Speak on a Physician's Perspective on the Uses of Empathy | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

The Kentucky Wesleyan College Ellie Magnuson Lecture Series will host Dr. James Fleming, a board certified neurologist at Nashville's Saint Thomas West Hospital and an Owensboro native, who will speak on


"The Uses of Empathy: A Physician's Perspective,"


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Instilling empathy among doctors pays off for patient care - CNN.com

Instilling empathy among doctors pays off for patient care - CNN.com | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Clinical empathy is the ability to stand in a patient's shoes and convey the desire to help


Studies have linked empathy to better outcomes and a lower risk errors


Empathy courses are rarely required in medical training but interest is growing


Because a lack of empathy and poor communication drive many malpractice cases, a large malpractice insurer, MMIC, is urging doctors it insures to take the "Empathetics" course. Another benefit: Empathy training appears to combat physician burnout.

"Empathy training is naturally self-rewarding," said Laurie Drill-Mellum, a former emergency room doctor who is chief medical officer of the Minneapolis-based insurer. "It gives [doctors] the love back," she said, referring to the positive feedback empathic doctors receive from their patients.


By Sandra G. Boodman 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Compassion fatigue' can damage caregivers' health

Compassion fatigue' can damage caregivers' health | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

“Compassion fatigue is rampant both nationally and right here in the metroplex,” Fein said. “Medical and mental health care professionals, emergency care workers, clergy, counselors and volunteers who work with very sick or troubled people are particularly susceptible to compassion fatigue.

“But anyone who is called upon to perform frequent acts of care, such as caring for a gravely ill or elderly loved one or doing volunteer work at a crisis center, is vulnerable.”


According to the Compassion Fatigue Awareness Project, other symptoms include:

  • Excessive blaming.
  • Bottled-up emotions.
  • Isolation from others.
  • Substance abuse.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

The secret of empathy | Faculty of Medicine - McGill University

The secret of empathy | Faculty of Medicine - McGill University | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
The ability to express empathy -- the capacity to share and feel another’s emotions -- is limited by the stress of being around strangers, according to a new study published today in the journal Current Biology.

“President Barack Obama has described an ‘empathy deficit’ that fuels misunderstanding, divisions, and conflict.


This research identifies a reason for the empathy gap and answers the vital question of how do we create empathy between strangers,” said McGill University psychology professor Jeffrey Mogil, senior author of the study. “In this case, creating empathy was as simple as spending 15 minutes together playing the video game Rock Band.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Design Thinking Clinical Trials

Design Thinking Clinical Trials | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

To stand in the shoes of others is to begin to both see and feel how their world is for them and thus how it needs to change to better meet their needs. Hear from patients what it is like for them in trials, as well as how they feel during the whole process.


Some will share how empathy, brought into the process changed their experiences with clinical trials and led to breakthroughs, changing their experiences.


You will, as a group, bridge the empathy gap and with your passion for drug development, capture needs and insights not yet addressed in clinical trials that we will use in the next sessions to create real innovative ideas by the end of the day.


more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Efforts to Instill Empathy Among Doctors Is Paying Dividends

Efforts to Instill Empathy Among Doctors Is Paying Dividends | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

by Sandra G. Boodman

Force credits “Oncotalk,” a course required of Duke’s oncology fellows, for the unexpected accolade. Developed by medical faculty at Duke, the University of Pittsburgh and several other medical schools, “Oncotalk” is part of a burgeoning effort to teach doctors an essential but often overlooked skill: clinical empathy. Unlike sympathy, which is defined as feeling sorry for another person, clinical empathy is the ability to stand in a patient’s shoes and to convey an understanding of the patient’s situation as well as the desire to help.

Clinical empathy was once dismissively known as “good bedside manner” and traditionally regarded as far less important than technical acumen. But a spate of studies in the past decade has found that it is no mere frill. Increasingly, empathy is considered essential to establishing trust, the foundation of a good doctor-patient relationship.

Studies have linked empathy to greater patient satisfaction, better outcomes, decreased physician burnout and a lower risk of malpractice suits and errors.

more...
Kathi Apostolidis's curator insight, March 15, 5:38 AM

Eίναι η συμπάθεια ίδια με την συμπόνοια, ιδιαίτερα με τη συμπόνοια σε κλινικό περιβάλλον; Οχι μας εξηγεί ο συγγραφέας του άρθρου. Διακεκριμένα Παν/μια της Αμερικής ανέπτυξαν το μάθημα "ΟncoTalk" για να διδάξουν στους γιατρούς μια ουσιαστική αλλά παραμελημένη δεξιότητα: την κλινική συμπόνοια.

Στην Ελλάδα, εξ όσων γνωρίζω, ο Καθ. Χρήστος Λιονής προσπαθεί στο Πανεπιστήμιο Κρήτης. Με αφορμή το παράδειγμα των

Αμερικανικών Πανεπιστημίων αναρωτιέμαι για οι Ελληνικές Ιατρικές Σχολές δέν έχουν μεχρι σήμερα για την ανάπτυξη παρόμοιου μαθήματος; Μάλιστα θα πρότεινα να είναι υποχρεωτικό για την ειδικότητα της Ογκολογίας...

Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

The Value of Empathy in Medicine

The Value of Empathy in Medicine | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Empathy: it’s what supposedly drives us to become physicians, and what we’re told to demonstrate through our extracurricular activities and during our interviews.


We yearn for that perfect patient interaction in which we comforted or understood in a way that changed the patient’s perspective on medical care. In our idealized view of medicine, we truly believe that empathy will be our saving grace throughout medical school, residency and beyond. If we can simply connect with our patients, then we will succeed and the patients we care for will thrive.


by Sarah Bommarito at Wayne State University School of Medicine

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Why empathy may be the best risk management strategy

Why empathy may be the best risk management strategy | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Thirty-six states have “apology laws” that prohibit certain statements or expressions of sympathy by a physician from being admissible in a lawsuit.


Experts in the field say that while the laws may help some physicians feel more comfortable about expressing empathy, they aren’t really necessary to avoid lawsuits.


Instead, good patient-physician relationships and open disclosure are the keys to responding successfully to a bad outcome.


By Beth Thomas Hertz

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Diagnosis of the absurd

Diagnosis of the absurd | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

HOW wacky can you get with a subject like Empathy in Healthcare? Well, have a look and see!


We have talked about these short ten-minute plays before – performed in December, as part of the 5th National Bioethics Conference at St John’s Medical College, Bengaluru.


They were performed in the order below:

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Dr. Brian Goldman in the IMAGINE Project: The empathy gap and problems in healthcare

Dr. Brian Goldman in the IMAGINE Project: The empathy gap and problems in healthcare | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
It’s a culture of defensiveness, a system that beats the empathy out of people, and simple lack of training, that destroys patient experience and leads to bad outcomes.


That was the message delivered by author, CBC personality and emergency room physician Dr. Brian Goldman to a packed crowd during the launch of the IMAGINE Project at the University of Calgary in January 22, 2015.


“I want to talk about… what I think is one of the common threads that makes it so difficult for us as healthcare providers to listen, and it has to do with that little problem of empathy,” said Goldman, keynote speaker at the IMAGINE Project launch.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Empathy Resurrected

Empathy Resurrected | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Editor’s note: This article is in response to “From the Editorial Board: Empathy Decline in Medical Education.”


 I’ve experienced the suppression of empathy common to graduating medical students. I’m joining a specialty considered among the most jaded: emergency medicine. Despite that, I disagree with the editorial from the in-Training editorial board on empathy....


My patient was going to die, and my actions had if anything prolonged her life. Why then did I feel so wretched? It was empathy, the thing that clinical education beats down, rising back up to the surface.


My empathy made me feel for her, and I felt a pale reflection of her and her family’s agony. Unbidden, quiet, hot tears ran down my face.

Empathy is an important characteristic, but all the more, it’s a weakness. Feeling empathetic for my patient made me feel terrible and sent me home in agony. Logic would dictate that I’d never want to feel that way.


Sarab Sodhi

more...
No comment yet.