Empathy in the Arts
Follow
Find
8.8K views | +0 today
Empathy in the Arts
Empathy and Compassion in the Arts (Drawing, Writing, Stories, Poetry, Music, Dance, Fine Art, etc) - CultureOfEmpathy.com
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page

Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Subscribe to our Emailed Empathy Newsletter

==================================


Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page

Visit the individual magazines specifically for empathy and;

*   Main Page All
*   Animals
*   Art
*   Compassion

*   Compassionate Communications (NVC)

*   Curriculums
*   Education
*   Empaths

*   Empathy Quotes

*   Empathic Design - Empathy in Human-Centered Design (New!)
*   Health Care

*   Justice

*   Self-Empathy & Self-Compassion
*   Teaching - Learning
*   Work 

*   etc.


====================

Please Click 'Follow' to receive updates.
It also helps us rise in the rankings 
and gives us more exposure
on Scoop.it. 

===========

Thanks so much.

Edwin Rutsch, Editor

Join us on Facebook Center for Building a Culture of Empathy
http://CultureOfEmpathy.com

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

How art teaches us empathy

How art teaches us empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

The arts are increasingly acknowledged as a key force in developing the capacity for human connection.


The role of art is often seen as something that must disturb and provoke but the arts also have a much gentler role: the evoking of empathy.


In a society where the need for human connection is challenged by computerisation and technological mediation, empathy is increasingly valued as a major aspect of emotional intelligence.

by MADELEINE DORE

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Watching movies may help you build empathy

Watching movies may help you build empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

But can something as simple as watching movies — and empathizing with fictional characters — help generate more compassion and understanding in the real world?

Roger Ebert thought so. “The purpose of civilization and growth is to be able to reach out and empathize a little bit with other people,” said Ebert in "Life Itself," a 2014 documentary about late film critic’s life and career. “And for me, the movies are like a machine that generates empathy. It lets you understand a little bit more about different hopes, aspirations, dreams and fears.”

Science supports Ebert’s theory. Dr. Jim Coan, associate professor of clinical psychology and director of the Virginia Affective Neuroscience Laboratory at the University of Virginia, says Ebert was right. We “immerse ourselves in the perspective of another person,” Coan said. “And in doing that, we start to subtly accrue those perspectives into our own universe ... and that’s how empathy is generated.”


By Christopher Zumski Finke 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Realistic Fiction Books That Develop Empathy - Imagination Soup

Realistic Fiction Books That Develop Empathy - Imagination Soup | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

One of the best things about reading realistic fiction is that you don’t have to always experience something to experience it.


In other words, you can experience poverty, death, heartbreak, loneliness through the characters. In fact, it creates empathy to have experienced these things in literature. It creates compassion.

“A great book should leave you with many experiences, and slightly exhausted at the end. You live several lives while reading.”  – William Styron


by Melissa Taylor 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Columbia University scholar, author to give humanities talk | Creative Writing and the Capacity for Empathy

Columbia University scholar, author to give humanities talk |  Creative Writing and the Capacity for Empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

The powers of creative writing to build empathy will come into focus in October when a Columbia University scholar and novelist visits Western Michigan University as part of the University Center for the Humanities 2015-16 Speaker Series: Reimagining Community.

Nellie Hermann, creative director of the Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia, will speak at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 8, in 2452 Knauss Hall. Her presentation, titled "Creative Writing and the Capacity for Empathy," is free and open to the public.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Empathy: Cantor Arts Center: Stanford

Empathy: Cantor Arts Center: Stanford | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Empathy
Through January 25, 2016

Robert Mondavi Family Gallery


“Empathy” entered the English language via aesthetics and
psychology in the late 19th century. Today, empathy is discussed not only in the arts and humanities, but also in Silicon Valley, Stanford’s d.school, and the latest neuroscience.


We share a deep need to walk in the shoes of another. This exhibition traces the meaning and practice of empathy through artistic representations of Buddhist compassion; Christianity’s commandment to love our neighbor; Enlightenment moral philosophy; and Civil Rights-era photography


. It accompanies the “Thinking Matters” course taught by Jane Shaw, professor of religious studies. Approximately 18 works on display. IMAGE: Hieronymus Bosch (the Netherlands, c. 1450–1516), Last Judgment, c. 1510. Oil on panel. Lent by Kirk Edward Long

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Matthew Morgan: Empathy For Inanimate Objects

Matthew Morgan: Empathy For Inanimate Objects | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

I just got some free music from Matthew Morgan and thought you might enjoy it.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Cannes 2015 Panel: "What Does Empathy Look Like on the Big Screen?" | Cannes

Cannes 2015 Panel: "What Does Empathy Look Like on the Big Screen?"  | Cannes | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
At a panel hosted by Chaz Ebert, journalists and film industry members shared their thoughts on empathy.


In a room known as the Roger Ebert Conference Center, the American Pavilion at Cannes hosted a panel this afternoon inspired by one of Ebert's most well known statements—that "movies are a machine that generates empathy."


In her introductory remarks, Chaz Ebert noted that when someone begins to talk about empathy, "people think that it's like forcing you to eat broccoli."


But she sees empathy as a more hopeful concept, and noted why empathy is important. "A lot of the ideas that people have, you get from the cinema," she said. 


Some of the panelists suggested that empathizing starts with the filmmakers themselves


by Ben Kenigsberg


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Empathy Through Art: Understanding War and PTSD by Karin Salvalaggio

Empathy Through Art: Understanding War and PTSD by Karin Salvalaggio | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

We may walk away such experiences with heavy hearts, but that’s a small price to pay for empathy. In a world dominated by sound bites, spin and winner-take-all, it’s that vital human connection that sets us apart as a civilized society.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Antoine Catala: Distant Feel looks for a new path to empathy

Antoine Catala: Distant Feel looks for a new path to empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

New York-based French artist Antoine Catala claims that "recent studies show that young people communicate more through a screen than face to face" and that "we become overwhelmed and our capacity for empathy gets challenged."


For the exhibition Antoine Catala: Distant Feel, at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Catala has "rebranded" empathy. He posits that empathy is evolving and he seems earnest enough, explaining that he worked with ad agency Droga5 to create a new term and symbol, and to "craft a message to change the world." "Distant feel" is described as "a cool, detached, focused form of empathy," expressible "through the distance of an image."


By Nadine Wasserman

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Empathy by RMS

Empathy by RMS | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Raindrops of emotion pouring down

Feelings lashing storm battered mind

Seeking a shelter buried deep within
Dry and warm where peace you'll find...





Empathy is a special quality, giving a compassionate ear to others is important but it is also important to be compassionate with ourselves. At times retreat makes us stronger.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Carnegie Museum exhibit examines detached empathy of digital age

Carnegie Museum exhibit examines detached empathy of digital age | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

The reason, Catala says, is that “empathy is too intense or too raw and can become a hindrance rather than a help.” He rebranded this feeling as something called “distant feel.”


“Distant feel is a cool, detached, focused form of empathy,” he says. “It acknowledges that it's paradoxically OK to be distant and encourages us to express our empathy in an effective way.

“Empathy is fundamental to our shared human experience, core to our biology, our evolution, our culture, our society,” he says. “It is the raw, unprocessed emotional connective tissue between people. It is the glue that holds the human race together.”

Conversely, the distant-feel symbol, those mirrored Es, is mutable. It can be drawn, typed or gestured, as in holding three fingers in each hand to make the design.


By Kurt Shaw

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Artist, students collaborate on mural at Mass MoCA's Kidspace: Fourth-graders collaborate on mural about empathy

Artist, students collaborate on mural at Mass MoCA's Kidspace: Fourth-graders collaborate on mural about empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
By Jenn Smith
The mural project, which will be unveiled on Saturday, Jan. 30, as part of Mass MoCA's annual "Free Day," hangs in the "Walk in My Shoes" exhibition.


The show represents the first year of a four-year federally funded arts education initiative partnering northern Berkshire schools with the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, with additional support from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.


This first-year exhibit features the theme of "empathy," with artwork by Jamie Diamond, Jesse Fleming, and Aaron Johnson. Forthcoming exhibits will relate to themes of optimism and courage.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Empathy (Full Version)

Provided to YouTube by Believe SAS Empathy (Full Version) · Silvio Piersanti Empathy ℗ Opensound Music Released on: 2015-04-11 Author: Silvio Piersanti Compo...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Empathy

Empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Empathy is focusing on the needs of the other person
Maintaining sensitivity for the good of all
Passion to help in a non judgemental way
Attitude of comforting with heartfelt love
Trusting in the obligation you perceive while listening
Yielding with dignity and respect for self and others

Listening is an attitude of the heart, a genuine desire
to be with another which both attracts and heals?

                                                                        Sura Hart

more...
Sandy Spencer's curator insight, October 17, 2015 5:53 PM

Without Empathy, we would have no caregivers!

Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Writing | Creating Empathy with Characters

Writing | Creating Empathy with Characters | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

One of the first pieces of advice given to me when I started writing and looking for feedback on it involved building a sense of empathy between the reader and the character.


By empathy, I don’t mean making the reader feel sorry for them—I mean making them care about what happens to that character. Depending on the individual reader, the amount of time they allow an author to get to that point varies. Some people might put down a book if they feel ‘meh’ about the main character on page one. Some might give it ten, twenty, maybe even forty pages if they’re generous...

The sooner you have the reader’s attention, and empathy with the character, the better. When the reader invests, and cares what happens to the character, you’re doing it right.

Some ways to build empathy include:

Conflict ... 

Personality ...

Humanity ...

by Matthew S. Cox

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Cantor Arts Center Exhibition Schedule

Cantor Arts Center Exhibition Schedule | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Empathy
Through January 25, 2016

Robert Mondavi Family Gallery


“Empathy” entered the English language via aesthetics and
psychology in the late 19th century. Today, empathy is discussed not only in the arts and humanities, but also in Silicon Valley, Stanford’s d.school, and the latest neuroscience.


We share a deep need to walk in the shoes of another. This exhibition traces the meaning and practice of empathy through artistic representations of Buddhist compassion; Christianity’s commandment to love our neighbor; Enlightenment moral philosophy; and Civil Rights-era photography.


 It accompanies the “Thinking Matters” course taught by Jane Shaw, professor of religious studies. Approximately 18 works on display. IMAGE: Hieronymus Bosch (the Netherlands, c. 1450–1516), Last Judgment, c. 1510. Oil on panel. Lent by Kirk Edward Lon

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Empathy. ~ Susan Frybort {Poem}

Empathy. ~ Susan Frybort {Poem} | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
And I know for certain that when I look into another human being,
whether they have eyes to see or not,
I can behold them.

I can view the hurt in them and feel the wounds in me.
It is a pain that agonizes quietly inside
as we share it…
So I reach out to comfort them.
These are the opportunities to extend
and touch another soul with all that is in me now.

And that is good enough for me.



Via Susan Frybort

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

How Neuroscientist Michael Grybko Defines Empathy | Audio

How Neuroscientist Michael Grybko Defines Empathy | Audio | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Research scientist Michael Grybko — of the Department of Psychology at the University of Washington — returned to the show to help me define empathy from a scientific standpoint.


In this file Michael Grybko and I discuss:

  • How Science is Changing Our Definition of Empathy
  • Why Pathos is a Good Jumping Off Place for Writers
  • What Actors and Doctors Have in Common with Writers
  • Are Mirror Systems the Key to Human Empathy?
  • How to Resist the Dark Side of Empathy
  • The Difference Between Good Storytelling and Great Storytelling
  • Why Writers Need to Crawl Inside the Heads of Their Audience
  • How Marketers Tap into Well-Worn Paths in Our Brains
  • The Key to Empathizing with Your Readers
  • Why Great Marketing Starts with the Desire to Help People
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Chaz Ebert to Host Panel on Empathy on the Big Screen at Cannes

Chaz Ebert to Host Panel on Empathy on the Big Screen at Cannes | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
Roger Ebert’s oft-quoted line about how movies are “a machine that generates empathy” will be the topic of a panel discussion at the Cannes Film Festival. “What Does Empathy Look Like On the Big Screen?” will be held at 3pm Sunday, May 17th at the American Pavilion.


Nate Kohn, Vice President of the Peabody Awards and Festival Director of Ebertfest, will serve as the moderator. Fittingly, the panel will be held in the Roger Ebert Conference Room of the Pavilion.

Chaz Ebert, President of The Ebert Company and Publisher of RogerEbert.com will welcome panelists John Sloss of Cinetic Media; Cameron Bailey, Artistic Director of the Toronto International Film Festival, and Anne Thompson of Indiewire and Thompson on Hollywood for a free-wheeling conversation about why empathy should be encouraged in the works of emerging writers on film and filmmakers.


Chaz says, "Empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of another. It is the antidote to the feelings of isolation and insecurity which can result in all kinds of ills in our society. Not only is it good for the bottom line (audiences hunger for films with characters they can relate to, and with themes that touch on hope rather than mere despair and destruction), but it can lead to a change in the conversations about our future." 


by The Editors

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

'Radical Empathy' Exhibit Addresses Race

'Radical Empathy' Exhibit Addresses Race | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Stephanie Seguino's exhibition of large-scale color photographs, on view at the Flynndog in Burlington, would be visually powerful even if it weren't so painfully relevant. For "Radical Empathy," she has used her camera like a pickax: to chip away at white Americans' stereotypes of black men. And she has undertaken that task at a time when hostile and fear-laden preconceptions have repeatedly proved lethal — most recently in Baltimore, Md., and before that in Cleveland, Ohio; Ferguson, Mo.; Staten Island, N.Y.; and North Charleston, S.C.


The contrast between summary judgments and actual character forms the core of "Radical Empathy." The title is meant as an appeal for understanding of black men's lives, Seguino says. Achieving such awareness amounts to a radical act, she adds, in that "empathy toward black men is the exception, not the norm."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

The Creative Power of Empathy

The Creative Power of Empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
During this week, 100 years after the birth of Elizabeth Catlett on April 15, 1915, we are reminded of her empathetic spirit, in addition to her monumental body of art and her association with Hampton University. And we are imagining what the example of her selfless spirit implies for contemporary styles of art.


Catlett empathized particularly with oppressed and struggling people and wanted her art to be a healing, motivating and empowering experience for them....


Elizabeth Catlett's empathetic mastery prompts us to consider how contemporary forms of art can be inspiring public experiences, reach people needing special support and impress critics and other art insiders.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

What the World Needs Now is Empathy By Ernie McCray

What the World Needs Now is Empathy By Ernie McCray | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
I look around me,
breathing in deeply
as I reflect on the totality
of what I see.
Before me, a man lays sleeping
on a downtown street
that jumps with a crisp
four/four time Hip-Hop beat,
bouncing from an upbeat retreat,
where folks hang out,
chillaxed to the max
as it’s the “Thank God it’s Friday,”
day of the week.
The man is wrapped up in a
tattered army sleeping bag lined with a bed sheet
that had long ago given up on the idea of being a sheet
and the forecast calls for snow or sleet
and a passerby pinches her nose with her
forefinger and her thumb,
thinking why doesn’t somebody arrest this bum?


Empathy, I’m thinking on the run,

.....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Empathy by John K Trainer

Empathy by John K Trainer | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

You seek a crown of gold
And yet the heart is fallow
A famine of the soul
Unbeknownst and unconcerned 
The poor hunger for food and shelter
And you have an appetite that’s never satiated
The many feasts of endless delicacies and wealth
Has not spoiled your cravings ...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Actors Help Inmates Develop Empathy

Actors Help Inmates Develop Empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
Sabra Williams, an actor and the Actors' Gang prison program director, explains that once inmates are given the tools and the opportunity to work as a team they develop empathy and start to create healthy relationships.


'People in prisons survive by numbing their emotions, and when people are numb they have no empathy and continue to commit crimes,' she says. One inmate confirms, 'I came here to learn how to control my emotions rather than let my emotions control me.'


Another who has done the course several times explains, 'It puts your head in a different mind-set.'

more...
No comment yet.