Empathy in the Arts
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Empathy in the Arts
Empathy and Compassion in the Arts (Drawing, Writing, Stories, Poetry, Music, Dance, Fine Art, etc) - CultureOfEmpathy.com
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Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page

Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Click here to go to the Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page http://bit.ly/dSXjfF


More about Empathy and: 
* Animals  http://bit.ly/heHOFR
* Art  http://bit.ly/kazC0N
* Compassion  http://bit.ly/dSEr3G
* Education http://bit.ly/jV91lN
* Empaths  http://bit.ly/eapWwd
* Health Care   http://bit.ly/hxdqCw
* Learning Empathy and Compassion  http://bit.ly/gLhxJH

* Justice   http://j.mp/WcrKMY
* Teaching    http://bit.ly/gLhxJH
* Work   http://bit.ly/dL0GRE
* Self-empathy/compassion  http://bit.ly/lyuRyn ;

Curriculum    http://bit.ly/nIUwYx
* etc.

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Thanks so much.

Edwin Rutsch, Editor

Center for Building a Culture of Empathy
http://CultureOfEmpathy.com

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Embers of Empathy artworks to be unveiled this week as part of ad campaign via GPY&R, Sydney

Embers of Empathy artworks to be unveiled this week as part of ad campaign via GPY&R, Sydney | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Artworks created from a collaboration between Australian Red Cross, GPY&R Sydney and 12 of Australia's leading and emerging artists to raise awareness about the impact of bushfires on the nation will be unveiled this week.


The campaign, 'Embers of Empathy', utilises charcoal from the 2013 bushfires in the Blue Mountains to create unique artworks that convey an emotive bushfire story, inspiring lessons for the future.

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Reader Empathy: Catch It & Keep It - by Angela Ackerman

Reader Empathy: Catch It & Keep It - by Angela Ackerman | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
Gluing readers to the page. This is a writer’s goal each step of the way, from gaining the attention of an agent, to compelling an editor to make an offer, and finally, to enthralling an audience.


We strive to make people experience something powerful when they read our words. To genuinely FEEL. To care. Sounds...um, not easy? I know! Building empathy requires skill, knowledge and practice. Writers must become deeply in tune with a reader’s emotions and learn how to use these feelings to bind them to the story...


5 Ways To Encourage Reader Empathy


  1. Humanize your character....
  2. Get inside their bones. ...
  3. Clearly define the needs, goals, and stakes....
  4. Hobble characters through challenges that readers sympathize with....
  5. ....
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The Neurochemistry of Empathy, Storytelling, and the Dramatic Arc, Animated

The Neurochemistry of Empathy, Storytelling, and the Dramatic Arc, Animated | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

This week, I’m headed to the Future of Storytelling summit, an unusual cross-disciplinary unconference exploring exactly what it says on the tin. Among the presenters is neuroeconomics pioneer Paul Zak, director of the Center for Neuroeconomic Studies and author of The Moral Molecule: The Source of Love and Prosperity.


======================

this short film on empathy,

neurochemistry, and the dramatic arc

=============


In this short film on empathy, neurochemistry, and the dramatic arc, directed and edited by my friend Kirby Ferguson and animated by Henrique Barone, Zak takes us inside his lab, where he studies how people respond to stories.


by Maria Popova


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How Theater for Young People Could Save the World: theater is like a gym for empathy

How Theater for Young People Could Save the World: theater is like a gym for empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
So much of toxicity in this world comes from a collective draining of empathy. We don't understand each other, and we don't want to. But theater forces us to empathize.


As my friend Bill English of San Francisco's SF Playhouse says, theater is like a gym for empathy. It's where we can go to build up the muscles of compassion, to practice listening and understanding and engaging with people that are not just like ourselves. 


===========================

theater is like a gym for empathy.

It's where we can go to build up the  
muscles of compassion,
to practice listening  

and understanding 

========


Kids need this kind of practice even more than adults do. 

by Lauren Gunderson Dramatist and theater essayist

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Betty Skeet's curator insight, February 17, 1:32 PM

How Drama and the use of theatre can help children and young people 'to practice empathy '

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How Narrative Relationships Overcome Empathic Bias: Elizabeth Gaskell's Empathy across Social Difference

How Narrative Relationships Overcome Empathic Bias: Elizabeth Gaskell's Empathy across Social Difference | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Modern and historical scholarship on empathy has consistently demonstrated that people are more likely to empathize with those who are similar to themselves. This empathic bias for similarity means that the affective bonds and ethical motivations that accompany empathy are significantly diminished in relationships with outgroups, as defined by sociological difference.


==========================
Modern & historical scholarship on 
empathy

has consistently demonstrated

that people are more likely to

empathize with those who

are similar to themselves.

=============


I argue that narrative empathy is uniquely capable of circumventing the similarity bias through compositional strategies related to foregrounding and perspective. Turning to modern research on reading as well as to accounts of reading in the nineteenth century, I propose a two-part argument: first, that the act of reading can overcome the bias that scholars have observed in relationships between people and, second, that narrative empathy has the potential to prevent future cases of bias by reconfiguring readers' criteria for similarity.


In an extended case study of Elizabeth Gaskell's novel Mary Barton: A Tale of Manchester Life (1848), I argue that Victorian social-problem literature thematizes empathy across difference and that the self-conscious treatment of cultural difference is particularly helpful for overcoming similarity bias.


by Mary-Catherine Harrison
Assistant Professor, English



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Try Walking in My Shoes: Empathy and Portrayals of Mental Illness on Screen

Try Walking in My Shoes: Empathy and Portrayals of Mental Illness on Screen | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

A key theme of the symposium is the emotion of empathy. Speakers are invited to examine the ways in which the viewer’s empathy is elicited (or not) by the portrayals of mental illness on screen. In addressing this theme, paper/workshop topics may include, but are not limited to:


A key theme of the symposium is the emotion 

of empathy. Speakers are invited to

examine the ways in which the

viewer’s empathy is elicited


•    The role of acting and performance in the portrayal of mental illness on screen
•    Conventions of genre and/or commercial considerations
•    Narrative and stylistic techniques eg. sound, music, mis-en-scene
•    The socio-historical context in which these portrayals are produced
•    Issues of stigma and stereotypes that are perpetuated and/or challenged by screen portrayals of mental illness
•    The relation between screen portrayals of mental illness and other forms of visual culture
•    The ways in which gender, sexuality, class or race impact upon the representation and/or interpretation of mental illness
•    The portrayal of psychiatry/psychology on screen
•    The impact of screen portrayals on the lived experience of mental illness

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The Empathy Exams - A MEDICAL ACTOR WRITES HER OWN SCRIPT

The Empathy Exams - A MEDICAL ACTOR WRITES HER OWN SCRIPT | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

My job title is Medical Actor, which means I play sick. I get paid by the hour. Medical students guess my maladies. I’m called a Standardized Patient, which means I act toward the norms of my disorders. I’m standardized-lingo SP for short. I’m fluent in the symptoms of preeclampsia and asthma and appendicitis. I play a mom whose baby has blue lips.

Medical acting works like this: you get a script and a paper gown. You get $13.50 an hour. Our scripts are ten to twelve pages long. They outline what’s wrong with us—not just what hurts but how to express it. They tell us how much to give away, and when. We are supposed to unfurl the answers according to specific protocols.

The scripts dig deep into our fictive lives: the ages of our children and the diseases of our parents, the names of our husbands’ real-estate and graphic-design firms, the amount of weight we’ve lost in the past year, the amount of alcohol we drink each week.


by Leslie Jamison 

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Oculus Rift Used in Empathy Experiments: Step into Someone’s Views

Oculus Rift Used in Empathy Experiments: Step into Someone’s Views | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

We’ve seen people use the Oculus Rift tosimulate beheadings. BeAnotherLab used the virtual reality headset for something less morbid but no less interesting. The organization’s The Machine to be Anotherwas an “artistic investigation” in which the Rift was used to give participants first person views from actual people.

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Courtney Jones's curator insight, January 23, 11:16 PM

How would your interactions with others improve if you had to walk in  (or see from) their shoes?

 

Interesting experiment using a virtual reality headset.

 

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Using Theatre and Drama to Increase Empathy in Students

Using Theatre and Drama to Increase Empathy in Students | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

There are very few “provable” things in arts education, but one thing that has been “proven” over the years in educational research is that theatre education increases empathy in students.

 

 Empathy, or the ability to understand another person’s feelings or circumstances, is a critical skill for an actor. It is how we are able to portray people who are very different from ourselves. We must imagine what it would be like to undergo the circumstances of the play in order to honesty represent those emotions and conditions on stage in a believable way.


Empathy in the classroom does not need to rise to the level of believable impersonation, but increased empathy is very helpful to students as they relate to each other and to their worlds. By integrating drama into the classroom, teachers can help students increase their empathy and meet non-arts curricular goals as well.

 

Joan Weber Director, Education Division, Creativity & Associates 

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Creating Character Empathy, Part One: having empathy as a writer

Creating Character Empathy, Part One: having empathy as a writer | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
If a writer feels nothing for her characters, how can we expect the reader to feel something? Our lack of emotional investment will show on the page. Our characters will feel wooden, stereotypical, and lacking in life. Here are some ideas for developing empathy with your characters. 1. Know your characterTo feel empathy for our characters, we need to know them like we know our best friends in real life. We need to know their strengths, flaws, quirks, fears, insecurities, and what makes them laugh Karen Schravemade
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Empathy, original painting by artist Kim Roberti | DailyPainters.com

Empathy, original painting by artist Kim Roberti | DailyPainters.com | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
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Does reading literature increase empathy?

Does reading literature increase empathy? | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Here's a report on a series of studies that purport to show that reading a few minutes of "literary fiction" improves scores on a test of emotional empathy ("Reading the Mind in the Eyes"), compared to reading non-fiction. Reading popular fiction did nothing to improve scores over those of non-reading controls.

New York Times

People ranging in age from 18 to 75 were recruited for each of five experiments. They were paid $2 or $3 each to read for a few minutes. Some were given excerpts from award-winning literary fiction (Don DeLillo, Wendell Berry). Others were given best sellers like Gillian Flynn’s “Gone Girl,” a Rosamunde Pilcher romance or a Robert Heinlein science fiction tale.

 

...As I have suggested before, I would rather engage in psychotherapy with a therapist who reads Dostoevsky and Melville than with one who reads books about the brain. It would be lovely if a case could be built that shows that the reading of literature can make you a better (e.g., more empathetic) person.

 

by Glenn Sullivan 

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Brenda J. Alegria's curator insight, December 9, 2013 6:15 PM

I found this article intresting in how studies were conducted to see if reading fiction increases empathy skills. 

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The Force of empathy in advocacy storytelling

The Force of empathy in advocacy storytelling | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

By Ted Fickes 

You need not have watched the first U.S. presidential debate on October 3rd to know what happened. Mitt Romney won the debate in the eyes of most that watched. He succeeded, in part, by creating a narrative, telling stories, and using a strong sense of empathy to connect with  citizens.


The power of empathy in Governor Romney’s debate performance (and the lack of it displayed by President Obama) has been declared significant enough to perhaps turn Romney’s campaign from a languishing also-ran to a possible winner.


But it is empathy that gives stories
their power in advocacy and
campaign communications.

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EMPATHY

EMPATHY | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
Beautiful, inspiring & mind-blowing images on HighExistence
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Building empathy in children through theater By Blair Howell,

Building empathy in children through theater By Blair Howell, | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
The Deseret News assembled a panel to review the many benefits of theater for young audiences in recognition of the World Day of Theatre for Children and Young People.


Children learn social skills through theater, and the experience gleaned through both performing and attending theater has been likened to a gym for empathy, because it’s a place where muscles of compassion can be strengthened.


=======================

Children learn to understand and engage

with people who are different from them.

=============

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self-compassion | Sacred Circle

self-compassion | Sacred Circle | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

“Healing the self means committing ourselves
to a wholehearted willingness to be what
and how we are–
beings frail and fragile,
strong and passionate,
neurotic and balanced,
diseased and whole,

...


by Lisa  

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Why childhood creativity could lead to a more empathetic world

Why childhood creativity could lead to a more empathetic world | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Childhood is so special because children have a natural tendency to be creative - every child is an artist in that way,” continues FitzGibbon.


“All that encourages creativity and imagination is linked to empathy and empathy is all about becoming a good, feeling and right-thinking adult. All the studies show that children who are read to when they are young and who are helped to draw and engage with art develop into more empathetic and well-rounded adults.


====================

All that encourages creativity

and imagination is linked

to empathy 

==============

“A lot of work has been done to show that children who are encouraged to imagine and dream become better at recognising and understanding emotion in later life, better at empathising, better at problem solving.

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Miguel Garcia's curator insight, February 19, 6:52 AM

ser niño es mirar las mismas cosas con referentes distintos, esa sería su forma de construir todo este mundo nuevo q explora. pero para el adulto esa sería la creatividad: romper algoritmos, crear otros nuevos. Y tal vez tb pueda ser uno de los caminos a la empatía, aunq no necesariamente eso lleve a la empatía.

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Interdisciplinary Symposium: Try Walking in My Shoes: Empathy and Portrayals of Mental Illness on Screen

Interdisciplinary Symposium: Try Walking in My Shoes: Empathy and Portrayals of Mental Illness on Screen | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

This interdisciplinary symposium invites scholars, filmmakers, mental health practitioners and consumers to explore questions about representations of mental illness in film and television across two days of papers, screenings and workshops. The symposium has a particular focus on women’s mental health and the portrayal of mental illness in Australian films.


==============================

KEYNOTE LECTURE

Professor Raymond Gaita

The University of Melbourne

The Limits of Empathy

==============


A key theme of the symposium is the emotion of empathy. If sympathy suggests feeling for someone (that is, feeling sorry for them), empathy is distinguished by feeling with them.


This sharing of emotion gives us valuable insight into how things are with another person. This insight can lead to a greater understanding that reduces stigma and discrimination, and helps us to see ‘the other’ as an equal human being. 


That is why empathy is such an important concept in philosophy, politics, psychology and human rights education.

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The Dax Centre: Shift toward empathy

The Dax Centre: Shift toward empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it
With the recent success of films such as Silver Linings Playbook and TV shows like Homeland and United States of Tara, there has been a marked shift in how mentally ill characters are portrayed on screen.


Dr Hopgood points to these guidelines as evidence of the shift towards empathy. “By moving away from stereotypes and stigmatising representations towards more accurate and sensitive portrayals, filmmakers and TV producers can develop a stronger emotional connection between a character who is mentally unwell, and the viewer,” she says. “The storytelling becomes richer, more creative, and ultimately more satisfying.”


This shift towards empathy is the focus

of an upcoming two-day event to be held

at The Dax Centre 


This shift towards empathy is the focus of an upcoming two-day event to be held at The Dax Centre on 13 and 14 February.

The interdisciplinary symposium, Try Walking in My Shoes: Empathy and Portrayals of Mental Illness on Screen, will bring together filmmakers, academics, mental health professionals and the public to explore questions such as: How is mental illness represented in film and television? What emotions are elicited from the viewer?

by Ryan Sheales

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Ten Ways to Create Character Empathy | Christian Writers Guild

Ten Ways to Create Character Empathy | Christian Writers Guild | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

At the Writing for the Soul conference, one of my six fiction classes will focus on creating immediate character empathy — in your novel’s first chapter.'

Why create empathy? Because even in a plot-driven story, characters areeverything. The most intriguing plot will fail if a reader doesn’t care about your characters.

 Most of these methods work best when combined with at least one other. (In the Writing for the Soul class, I’ll go into more detail about each.)

 Readers will empathize if the character is:

1. Clearly displaying a valued trait ...


By Brandilyn Collins

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The Machine to be Another

The Machine to be Another | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

More than individuals, we are part of a social collective called humanity. As members of this collective, the perception of our own identity is based on our relation with other people and our social environment: how people see us, how we do act and interact with them, and what self image we project to this society and to ourselves.

 

As part of this collective society, it is clear the importance of understanding the ‘Other’ and ‘Each Other’ to better understand ourselves. This artistic investigation plans to use the recent neuroscience approach of ‘embodiment’ and apply it to investigate the perception and comprehension about the Self based on the comprehension of the “Other”.

 

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Empathy

Empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

Empathy
A Poem by Arrinae'

This swirling storm around me,
It numbs my heart.
Slowly, but surely,
Its tearing my apart.

I can't stop it, no,

Though it overwhelms me so easily.The pain and turmoil I feel,

From taking their pain and misery.

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Theory of Mind: Why Art Evokes Empathy

Theory of Mind: Why Art Evokes Empathy | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

We have a sense of empathy with works of art.  If we see gestures in a portrait, we actually almost simulate those gestures in our mind.  We often implicitly act as if we are moving our arms in response empathically to what we see in the painting. 

 

We also respond empathically to what we think the sitter is experiencing in their head.  So we have what is called “a theory of mind” in which when I look at you, I have a sense of where you’re going and you have a sense of where I’m going. We have an enormous capability by just looking at the person we are interacting with, and particularly if we’re having a conversation, to predict certain aspects of future events simply by looking at them.  This is an extraordinary capability that human beings have. 

 

by ERIC KANDEL 

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Leo Tolstoy on Emotional Infectiousness and What Separates Good Art from Bad - art as a vehicle of communication and empathy:

Leo Tolstoy on Emotional Infectiousness and What Separates Good Art from Bad - art as a vehicle of communication and empathy: | Empathy in the Arts | Scoop.it

A real work of art destroys, in the consciousness of the receiver, the separation between himself and the artist."


Tolstoy puts forth a sentiment Susan Sontag would come to echo decades later in asserting that “art is a form of consciousness,” and frames the essential role of art as a vehicle of communication and empathy:


 by Maria Popova

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2013 One World Alumni Dinner - A Final Word from Empathy Factory

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