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Empathy and Justice
International News about Empathy applied to Conflict, Justice, Restorative Justice, Mediation and the Law. (more at CultureOfEmpathy.com)”
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
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Empathy Movement Magazine Front Page

Empathy Movement Magazine Front Page | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page


Visit the individual magazines specifically for empathy and;

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*   Teaching - Learning
*   Work 

*   etc.


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Do Baltimore police need empathy boot camp?

Do Baltimore police need empathy boot camp? | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Would police be more empathetic if they were subject to forcible arrest techniques?


In Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby's telling of the fatal arrest of Freddie Gray, one thing in particular stands out: the complete lack of empathy and compassion allegedly shown Gray by any of the six officers charged in his death, including one woman who was specifically sent to check on his well being following two citizen complaints.


The officers put Gray into a police van face-first on his belly with his hands and feet bound, Ms. Mosby said, leaving him to roll around like loose change. They ignored his pleas for medical attention while he could still make them and continued to do nothing for a time after he couldn't, she said.

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(Empathic Policing) Police have dangerous jobs, but some empathy could make everyone safer

(Empathic Policing) Police have dangerous jobs, but some empathy could make everyone safer | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Right now, it might seem impossible to eliminate the us-versus-them mindset that permeates society, but optimistically, I do not think that we are at an impasse. What we have to do is look at a trait that all humans already possess: empathy.


Empathy: A basic human tool with great potential
Empathy has evolved in humans and other mammals over time. It allows us to understand the emotions of others and share in those emotions. Expressing empathy has many advantages: it increases cooperation (we like to help each other out when we feel that we are understood), reduces stress and it may even feel good.


BY Chad Posick 

Assistant professor, Georgia Southern University


Culture of Empathy Builder Page http://j.mp/SRGxxu


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(Empathic Policing) Empathy on the street: How understanding between police and communities makes us safer

(Empathic Policing) Empathy on the street: How understanding between police and communities makes us safer | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

By now, no one is insulated from hearing about incidents of police shootings or violence against police officers. While fatal shootings are thankfully still rare events, this does not diminish the emotional impact of hearing about a violent death....


Right now, it might seem impossible to eliminate the us-versus-them mindset that permeates society, but optimistically, I do not think that we are at an impasse. What we have to do is look at a trait that all humans already possess: empathy.

Empathy: A basic human tool with great potential

Empathy has evolved in humans and other mammals over time. It allows us to understand the emotions of others and share in those emotions. Expressing empathy has many advantages: it increases cooperation (we like to help each other out when we feel that we are understood), reduces stress and it may even feel good.



by Chad Posick


Culture of Empathy Builder Page: Chad Posick

 http://j.mp/SRGxxu

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MSU Sociologist Calls For Greater Empathy Among Law Enforcement

MSU Sociologist Calls For Greater Empathy Among Law Enforcement | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
“It is a culture that dehumanizes and victimizes African-Americans and others,” says Taylor.


Taylor says that the leadership from the mayor and police chief in Charleston, South Carolina, has been good in this case so far.

“The chief had a great deal of empathy, and he allowed it to be said that no one is a winner here. He felt horrible for his officer, he felt horrible for the family, he felt horrible for the city. That is the right path, and this is where we begin to heal,” says Taylor.

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Police focus on empathy, diversity

Police focus on empathy, diversity | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

A new police code of conduct focusses on empathy and diversity in the police force.

 

The new code put emphasis on values such as professionalism, respect, integrity, commitment to Maori, empathy, and diversity.

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(Empathic Policing) Richmond police chief: That's really what community policing should be about.'

(Empathic Policing) Richmond police chief:  That's really what community policing should be about.' | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Richmond police chief: 'All lives matter. That's really what community policing should be about.'


When Chris Magnus first moved to Richmond, Calif., in 2006, he would hear gunshots at night, sometimes very close to his house. That would be disturbing to anyone, but it was especially so to Magnus, as he had just been hired to be Richmond's new chief of police....


The term “community policing” has become such a buzz phrase that “Pretty much every department, if you ask them, would say they're doing community policing,” says Magnus, “And I think most believe it. But the challenge is: is community policing really policing the community in the way that the community wants to be policed, or is it driven by the police department?”


Magnus' approach has been to build partnerships with the community at every opportunity, learning from the residents what their priorities are, in order to define where resources should go.


by Brad Marshland


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(Empathic Policing) Conference Panel 23 - The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing and Justice

(Empathic Policing) Conference Panel 23 - The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing and Justice | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Panel 23 - The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing and Justice
http://j.mp/19KJVQL
The role of empathy in policing, both empathy for and by the police, is gaining attention from criminal justice researchers and practitioners. While research on the effectiveness and importance of empathy in policing is limited, the existing research indicates that empathy increases perceptions of legitimacy and trust in the police. 

This panel discusses a range of issues related to the role of empathy in criminal behavior, punishment, and policing with a specific emphasis on training police on how to incorporate empathy into their work.


========================
The role of empathy in policing,

both empathy for and by the police,

is gaining attention from 

criminal  justice researchers

and practitioners.

 ============== 


Panelists: 

Chad Posick has a B.S. degree in criminal justice and an M.S. degree in public policy from the Rochester Institute of Technology. He just finished his Ph.D in criminal justice from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. He has worked with Project Safe Neighborhoods in the Western District of New York as well as the Department of Criminal Justice Service’s Project Impact. His research areas include restorative justice, cognitive behavioral interventions and action research.

Joe Brummer Associate Executive Director at Community Mediation, Inc. in New Haven, CT. He is completely committed to the field of nonviolence and shows it in both his professional and personal decorum. His trainings are inspiring and his mediation skills are those of a seasoned professional.

Michael Rocque is the research director at the Maine Department of Corrections and an adjunct faculty member of the University of Maine’s Sociology Department. His research interests include the demography of crime, life-course criminology and crime prevention.

Edwin Rutsch
Director,   Center for Building a Culture of Empathy

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(Empathic Policing) How Empathy Matters: The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing, and Justice

(Empathic Policing) How Empathy Matters: The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing, and Justice | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Chad Posick, Georgia Southern University


My associates and I have reviewed recent research and done some additional analyses to pin down what is currently known about empathy – and perceptions of empathy – in the realm of crime and justice. When other factors, like age, sex, race, education, and income are taken into account, empathy turns out to matter in several ways:


  • Empathetic people are less likely to engage in delinquency or crime. But those who have trouble perceiving how others feel, and have difficulty sharing those feelings, are more likely to engage in wrongful acts – everything from minor juvenile delinquency to the most serious of violent crimes. 


  • Empathy affects how people think about crime and punishment in complex ways. People capable of empathy tend to support tough punishments for crime, but at the same time they are less likely to call for the harshest punishments, such as the death penalty.


  • Empathy and perceptions of empathy help to shape the interactions of police and members of the communities they are assigned to protect. Research on citizen interactions with the police has consistently indicated that the way officers behave determines how they are evaluated by people with whom they interact. When we probe in detail, it turns out community members have more positive evaluations of the police when officers communicate that they understand the issues that matter to community members. Studies specifically show that the police are more likely to be trusted and considered effective at their jobs when they display empathy with the community’s concerns. 


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(Empathic Policing) Empathy can be better than force, Twin Cities police trainers teach

(Empathic Policing) Empathy can be better than force, Twin Cities police trainers teach | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

by: NICOLE NORFLEET and KELLY SMITH


It was a rather routine call to Eden Prairie police: a domestic dispute at a house with a mentally ill, intoxicated man


Instead of confronting the man, an officer who had just completed training on defusing tense encounters calmly asked him questions and listened to his concerns.



It helped. The man cooperated, and no one was hurt.

“He was really amped up,” said Sgt. Dave Becker, who supervises the crisis intervention team. “You could see him start to calm down; they made a connection.”




As scrutiny of police intensifies in the aftermath of high-profile officer-involved shootings, there’s a renewed push for more officers to undergo de-escalation training — which emphasizes empathy over force.
 

  • Improving listening skills...
  • De-escalation can save lives...
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(Empathic Policing) Empathy Lessons: Training Police To Understand People With Mental Illness

(Empathic Policing) Empathy Lessons: Training Police To Understand People With Mental Illness | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
To help them handle the growing proportion of police work that involves mental health crises, some Massachusetts officers take advanced training that teaches them to better understand -- and empathize with -- people with mental illness.


“It’s a very lofty goal, but you’re trying to teach officers empathy for people with mental illness, and that’s why I think that ‘Hearing Voices’ training was very important,” he said.


“Officers need to have empathy today —
that’s what society expects from officers
and it’s what they deserve,
and it’s what people need.


 Carey Goldberg


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The Brain’s Empathy Gap

The Brain’s Empathy Gap | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Emile Bruneau at the Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department at M.I.T. Can mapping neural pathways help us make friends with our enemies?

In recent years, neuroscientists have begun to map empathy’s pathways in the brain...


How much of our empathy is innate and how much is instilled in us by our environment?...


But the picture remains incomplete. We still need to map a host of other empathy-related tasks — like judging the reasonableness of people’s arguments and sympathizing with their mental and emotional states — to specific brain regions. ..


So far, Bruneau says, the link between f.M.R.I. data and behavior has been tenuous. Many f.M.R.I. studies on empathy involve scanning subjects’ brains while they look at images of hands slammed in doors or of faces poked with needles. Scientists have shown that the same brain regions light up when you watch such things happen to someone else as when you experience them or imagine them happening to you. “To me, that’s not empathy,” Bruneau says. “It’s what you do with that information that determines whether it’s empathy or not.” A psychopath might demonstrate the same neural flashes in response to the same painful images but experience glee instead of distress.


By JENEEN INTERLANDI


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(Empathic Policing) The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing, and Justice

(Empathic Policing) The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing, and Justice | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Posick’s research focuses on the role of emotions in behavior with a particular emphasis on delinquency and criminal justice. This research was spurred by his involvement with organizations working with offenders and victims.

 

Article: The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing, and Justice

http://j.mp/XbOHV5

Empathy refers to a person’s ability to understand the emotions of others and share in their feelings. Researchers in many fields have shown that empathy – or its absence – matters greatly in many aspects of social life. For example, empathetic people are more likely to have strong ties to family members and others with whom they regularly work or interact. And individuals capable of empathy have higher self-esteem and enjoy life more fully. The flip side is also true: people who have trouble empathizing with others tend to suffer from poorer mental health and have less fulfilling social relationships.


Researchers are showing that empathy also matters in crime and punishment, and recent findings suggest important steps that can be taken to reduce juvenile delinquency and improve relationships between communities and police.


========================

How Empathy Matters...


Empathetic people are less likely to engage

in delinquency or crime.....


Empathy affects how people think about crime

and punishment in complex ways....

 ==============


Empathy and perceptions of empathy help to shape the interactions of police and  members of the communities they are assigned to protect.....

 

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(Empathic Policing) This Cop Used Empathy Instead of Force, and it Worked

(Empathic Policing) This Cop Used Empathy Instead of Force, and it Worked | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Then I think of the philosophical approaches known as restorative and transformative justice.


By viewing potential conflict situations with an emphasis on peacekeeping, rather than using force to punish wrongdoing, the goal is to find root causes for societal problems and seek alternatives to imprisonment as the solution. It is a cultural evolution as well as a tactic for restoring peace. What I witnessed on the western shores of Canada was a small event, but representative of a larger cultural difference in how criminal justice is understood.


To cite just one dramatic statistic, there have been a total of 75 people killed by Canadian police since 1932. In contrast, U.S. police killed 111 people in March alone.

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Journey To Empathy an Association for Conflict Resolution (ACR) Webniar - Martin Golder

Journey To Empathy an  Association for Conflict Resolution (ACR) Webniar - Martin Golder | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

In collaboration with the International Section of the Association for Conflict Resolution (ACR)

This presentation follows the presenter’s research into Empathy and Compassion as tools in mediation and negotiation.  Empathy is often listed as the primary skill of any successful mediator and there are many tools in the mediator’s tool box to help us towards the goal of true empathy.
 
  • What then is empathy and how do we get it?
  • Is it a learnable skill?
  • Is it just walking in someone else’s shoes?
 
At its simplest it can be described as very focused and attentive listening followed by a kind response. It could also be thought of as the conscious projection of ‘good will’.
 
The essence is based on ancient traditions from India, often now associated with Buddhism but undoubtedly predating it, called metta bhavana, which translates as the cultivation of loving kindness.

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(Empathic Policing) Conference Panel 23 - The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing and Justice

(Empathic Policing) Conference Panel 23 - The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing and Justice | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Panel 23 - The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing and Justice
http://j.mp/19KJVQL
The role of empathy in policing, both empathy for and by the police, is gaining attention from criminal justice researchers and practitioners. While research on the effectiveness and importance of empathy in policing is limited, the existing research indicates that empathy increases perceptions of legitimacy and trust in the police. 

This panel discusses a range of issues related to the role of empathy in criminal behavior, punishment, and policing with a specific emphasis on training police on how to incorporate empathy into their work.


========================
The role of empathy in policing,

both empathy for and by the police,

is gaining attention from 

criminal  justice researchers

and practitioners.

 ============== 


Panelists: 

Chad Posick has a B.S. degree in criminal justice and an M.S. degree in public policy from the Rochester Institute of Technology. He just finished his Ph.D in criminal justice from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. He has worked with Project Safe Neighborhoods in the Western District of New York as well as the Department of Criminal Justice Service’s Project Impact. His research areas include restorative justice, cognitive behavioral interventions and action research.

Joe Brummer Associate Executive Director at Community Mediation, Inc. in New Haven, CT. He is completely committed to the field of nonviolence and shows it in both his professional and personal decorum. His trainings are inspiring and his mediation skills are those of a seasoned professional.

Michael Rocque is the research director at the Maine Department of Corrections and an adjunct faculty member of the University of Maine’s Sociology Department. His research interests include the demography of crime, life-course criminology and crime prevention.

Edwin Rutsch
Director,   Center for Building a Culture of Empathy

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(Empathic Policing) Mindfulness in Policing

(Empathic Policing) Mindfulness in Policing | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

by Sarah Sayeed, Ph.D. 

Incidents of police violence and discrimination against people of color evoke our raw emotions -- pain, frustration, fear, hopelessness and anger. Sometimes our emotions overwhelm us. But they can also help energize us and fuel our work for social ...


While mindfulness is rooted in Buddhism, its techniques have been embraced by a range of secular professions, from mental health to Silicon Valley, including the Navy SEALs. It is also finding its way into police departments, such as in Oregon, and thecriminal justice system as a whole. When practiced over time, mindfulness may help police officers develop their ability to more accurately read the emotions of suspects, discern threats, withstand high pressure encounters, reduce on the job stress and reduce the role of personal biases in policing practice.


By strengthening non-judgmental awareness of emotions, mindfulness can strengthen empathy and compassion in police-community interactions. It may ultimately reduce unwarranted use of excessive force.


image http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Police#/media/File:Gcp_patrol_car.jpg 

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Restorative Justice and Restorative Circles

Restorative Justice and Restorative Circles | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Our country’s justice system can be understood as a Punitive Justice System.


When someone commits a crime it is committed against the state, and the state intervenes to determine what punishment a person deserves because of what was done. Victim’s needs are often forgotten except for their use as witnesses. Similarly, the greater community is often affected by the unjust act as well, and the community’s needs are overlooked in the same way that the victims often are.

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(Empathic Policing) LAPD training teaches empathy amid outcry over shootings (audio)

(Empathic Policing) LAPD training teaches empathy amid outcry over shootings (audio) | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

This exercise is part of a one-week class, the latest effort by the LAPD to train cops how to de-escalate encounters with people who may be aggressive or mentally ill. The message here: Slow down and try to empathize with the person...


The training is hardly the same as policing taught in the academy, where officers endure grueling physical training to be able to take down bad guys. The focus in the academy is on the "use of force continuum."


But in this empathy training, officers are coached to back away from the person, use your first name, employ humor, paraphrase what the person is saying.

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(Empathic Policing) Empathy will be key for improving relations with police officers

(Empathic Policing) Empathy will be key for improving relations with police officers | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

I am a former cop, but I am also an advocate for progressive criminal justice reform. This puts me in a unique position with the recent high profile cases in Ferguson and New York. Many social activists have used these cases as poster-children for racial inequality, police brutality, and all that is wrong with our justice system.....


Where is the constructive dialogue? Where is the path to progress? At this point, the details of each case do not matter. What matters is how do we move on from here?...


What if we stopped yelling and screaming at each other, and decided to proactively learn from each other? What if we seek out opportunities for dialogue between police officers and the citizens that they serve, outside of these confrontational moments?


What if officers could explain what an encounter feels like for them, how use of force works, how they perceive threats to their safety (e.g. a person who won’t take his hands out of his pockets)?


By Burke Brownfeld, 

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Larry Rattner's curator insight, December 22, 2014 7:44 AM

The killing of the two officers in New York is a terrible tragedy.  Police reform will save lives.  it will also make for a better relationship between law enforcement and the public.  This will make it less dangerous for law enforcement.  Here is an article from Burke Brownfeld of Alexandria, Virginia. He is a former police office who writes about need for empathy to make relations better.

 

#deadlyforcereform

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(Empathic Policing) The Role of Empathy in Crine, Policing and Jusctice

(Empathic Policing) The Role of Empathy in Crine, Policing and Jusctice | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

How Empathy Matters


My associates and I have reviewed recent research and done some additional analyses to pin down what is currently known about empathy – and perceptions of empathy – in the realm of crime and justice. When other factors, like age, sex, race, education, and income are taken into account, empathy turns out to matter in several ways:


Empathetic people are less likely to engage in delinquency or crime.

But those who have trouble perceiving how others feel, and have difficulty sharing those feelings, are more likely to engage in wrongful acts – everything from minor juvenile delinquency to the most serious of violent crimes. 


Empathy affects how people think about crime and punishment in complex ways.

People capable of empathy tend to support tough punishments for crime, but at the same time they are less likely to call for the harshest punishments, such as the death penalty.


Empathy and perceptions of empathy help to shape the interactions of police and members of the communities they are assigned to protect.

Research on citizen interactions with the police has consistently indicated that the way officers behave determines how they are evaluated by people with whom they interact. When we probe in detail, it turns out community members have more positive evaluations of the police when officers communicate that they understand the issues that matter to community members. Studies specifically show that the police are more likely to be trusted and considered effective at their jobs when they display empathy with the community’s concerns. 

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A Restorative Circle in the Wake of a Police Shooting

A Restorative Circle in the Wake of a Police Shooting | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

In Seattle, distance, anger, and pain remain from decades of command and control policing. The success of the Williams Restorative Circle fuels the promise that we can address that painful history, find mutual understanding, ensure accountability, and find a sense of well being and trust in agreed-upon actions moving forward....


On behalf of the family, I proposed that we approach the conflict a different way and hold a Restorative Circle consistent with a restorative justice practice developed in Brazil by Dominic Barter.


I had begun learning and practicing this powerful process, and it was the best method for engaging community conflict that I knew. I offered to facilitate. Police Chief John Diaz immediately agreed to the family’s request. Faced with community outrage over a problematic shooting that would require a lengthy investigation process, Chief Diaz embraced the invitation and a cutting-edge approach that would provide him and the Seattle Police Department an immediate opportunity to address the pain and issues involving the family and the larger community.

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(Empathic Policing) D.C. police chief Cathy L. Lanier urges empathy in policing

(Empathic Policing) D.C. police chief Cathy L. Lanier urges empathy in policing | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
A forum at American University focused on easing tensions, building trust and transparency.


At a town hall meeting Wednesday evening, D.C. Police Chief Cathy L. Lanier urged police departments across the nation to stop measuring success by crime statistics alone and to incorporate empathy in policing as a way to foster greater trust.


“We have to stop measuring these things by numbers,” Lanier said at the American University forum, which focused on finding ways to ease tensions following the fatal shooting in August of 18-year-old Michael Brown by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo., and other recent police-involved violent incidents across the country.


By Clarence Williams 

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(Empathic Policing) Police Academy 2.0: Less military training, more empathy

(Empathic Policing) Police Academy 2.0: Less military training, more empathy | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
As the state police academy adopts new ways to train recruits in how to deal with the public, The Seattle Times followed one class to see if the changes are taking hold.

 

Class 689, which graduated May 30, still learned the basics of police work, such as handcuffing, writing reports and handling firearms.


But the instruction also included an increased emphasis on expressing empathy, following constitutional requirements and treating citizens with respect and dignity.


========================

the instruction also included an increased

emphasis on expressing empathy 

==============


On one much-anticipated day, class members absorbed blasts of pepper spray in the face to personally experience its painful effects.

 

By Steve Miletich

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(Empathic Policing) Police Chief Urges Officers to Load Up — on Empathy - St. Louis

(Empathic Policing) Police Chief Urges Officers to Load Up — on Empathy - St. Louis | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
It's a common problem for police to come upon the scene of a shooting and have difficulty establishing rapport and trust with the people they are trying to serve.

 

Police Chief Sam Dotson spoke to commanders about the importance of absorbing the lessons of sensitivity training and encouraging officers to show more empathy.


the importance of absorbing the lessons

of sensitivity training and encouraging

officers to show more empathy.


Kevin Killeen

 

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(Empathic Policing) Baltimore police get empathy training - YouTube

No more "just the facts ma'am."
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