Empathy and Justice
Follow
Find
5.3K views | +0 today
Empathy and Justice
International News about Empathy applied to Conflict, Justice, Restorative Justice, Mediation and the Law. (more at CultureOfEmpathy.com)”
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page

Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page


Visit the individual magazines specifically for empathy and;

*   Main Page All
*   Animals
*   Art
*   Compassion

*   Compassionate Communications (NVC)

*   Curriculums
*   Education
*   Empaths

*   Empathy Quotes

*   Empathic Design - Empathy in Human-Centered Design (New!)
*   Health Care

*   Justice

*   Self-Empathy & Self-Compassion
*   Teaching - Learning
*   Work 

*   etc.


====================

Please Click 'Follow' to receive updates.
It also helps us rise in the rankings 
and gives us more exposure
on Scoop.it. 

===========

Thanks so much.

Edwin Rutsch, Editor

Join us on Facebook Center for Building a Culture of Empathy
http://CultureOfEmpathy.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

10 Reasons to Use Child Custody Mediation

10 Reasons to Use Child Custody Mediation | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Child custody mediation provides parents with a valuable alternative to an adversarial divorce. Through the process of mediation, parents have the opportunity to work together and create a parenting plan that honors each parent's unique contribution to their children's upbringing. Consider the following benefits of child custody mediation:
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

A Restorative Circle in the Wake of a Police Shooting

A Restorative Circle in the Wake of a Police Shooting | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

In Seattle, distance, anger, and pain remain from decades of command and control policing. The success of the Williams Restorative Circle fuels the promise that we can address that painful history, find mutual understanding, ensure accountability, and find a sense of well being and trust in agreed-upon actions moving forward....


On behalf of the family, I proposed that we approach the conflict a different way and hold a Restorative Circle consistent with a restorative justice practice developed in Brazil by Dominic Barter.


I had begun learning and practicing this powerful process, and it was the best method for engaging community conflict that I knew. I offered to facilitate. Police Chief John Diaz immediately agreed to the family’s request. Faced with community outrage over a problematic shooting that would require a lengthy investigation process, Chief Diaz embraced the invitation and a cutting-edge approach that would provide him and the Seattle Police Department an immediate opportunity to address the pain and issues involving the family and the larger community.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

CARIBBEAT: Calling out for empathy

CARIBBEAT: Calling out for empathy | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Misleading and dangerous rhetoric from opposing camps skirt true goals of the continuing protests and the issue of policing practices and procedures

While Caribbean-Americans — formally and informally — are paying their respects to slain NYPD officers Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu, the city continues to wrestle with rhetoric that desperately needs some “equal empathy.”


The rhetoric continues to turn sour when PBA union president Pat Lynch, former New York Gov. George Pataki, former Mayor Rudy Giuliani and others repeatedly say the rallies are anti-police — ignoring some bad cops, ill-trained officers and some ineffective NYPD tactics.


We need “equal empathy.” This is a two-way street...


That’s on point. Moving forward into 2015 and beyond, there’s an urgent need for equal empathy — in this city, in this nation, in this world..

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Korean RC interview with Dominc Barter

A radio interview with Dominic Barter on Restorative Circles, broadcast in Korea, November 2014
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Restorative Justice in Oakland Schools: Tier One. Community Building Circle - YouTube

Restorative Justice in Oakland Schools: Tier One. Community Building Circle - YouTube | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
A pair of students at MetWest High School, an Oakland public school in Oakland, Calif., facilitate a community-building circle in their classroom.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

You Are Not My Enemy. Violence Is My Enemy: A Call to Militant Empathy

You Are Not My Enemy. Violence Is My Enemy: A Call to Militant Empathy | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

But, what about the police? Do they also deserve our empathy?

There is so much demonization of police going on right now, that we can forget that behind the uniform is a human being. Surely the unjust deaths of civilians at the hands of police are absolutely enraging, but if we want to awaken the police to be more humane and to create systemic change, will hating them advance our cause?

What’s it like for the police when they are beating on people, or killing innocents? What drew them to that kind of “work”? What kind of system of dehumanization did THEY have to go through before they were ready to brutalize others?


By Peijman Kouretchian

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

(NPR: Restorative Justice) An Alternative To Suspension And Expulsion: 'Circle Up!'

(NPR:  Restorative Justice) An Alternative To Suspension And Expulsion: 'Circle Up!' | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Oakland's restorative justice program is at the forefront of efforts to rethink school discipline.


One by one, in a room just off the gym floor at Edna Brewer Middle School in Oakland, Calif., seventh-graders go on the interview hot seat.


Some 80 students have applied to be "peer leaders" in the school's new, alternative discipline program called "restorative justice."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Why Norway's Prison System Is So Successful

Why Norway's Prison System Is So Successful | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

by CHRISTINA STERBENZ

       

"Here we pay attention to you like human beings. ... 
Based on that information, it's safe to assume Norway's criminal justice system is doing something right. Few citizens there go to prison, and those who do usually go only once. So how does Norway accomplish this feat?


The country relies on a concept called "restorative justice," which aims to repair the harm caused by crime rather than punish people. This system focuses on rehabilitating prisoners. 


more...
Chad Kaestle's comment, January 16, 10:44 PM
This is certainly a contrast from the punishment and rehabilitation focus of US prisons. One could definitely see the positive aspects of the Norway approach to deal with such crimes as nonviolent offenses (property theft or white collar crime), but I can't agree with the same approach for a violent mass shooter like Breivik.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

The Journey to Empathy

The Journey to Empathy | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
In conflict resolution empathy is a central tool and way of being. And yet I remember that when I started in my first mediation course I was unsure of what it was.


It even took a while to learn the difference between empathy and sympathy; (empathy being an intellectual and emotional awareness and understanding of another person’s thoughts and feelings; sympathy an actual sharing of another’s feelings especially in sorrow or trouble). In my search for a definition I encountered an old joke that I often now use to start a discussion on empathy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Selective empathy

Selective empathy | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
These doses of judicial empathy, delivered in oral dissents from the bench, were inflected with personal experience: Justice Sotomayor spoke from the heart in reporting how “race matters”; Justice Ginsburg’s analysis came from a woman who faced sexism in her own career; and Justice Breyer’s father worked as a lawyer for the San Francisco public schools. And it’s not just the liberals who show signs of empathy in their decision-making.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

“Empathy and Hope” a talk about Restorative Justice with Kate Johnson

Kate Johnson, BA, BSW, MDiv, RSW is a former prison chaplain and current chaplain at Queens University.   After earning her BA and BSW with a focus on criminology, Kate practiced for several years as a social worker in adolescent correctional and mental health facilities.


Seeing the link between childhood victimization and adolescent offending, Kate went on to pursue a Masters of Divinity in Restorative Justice at Queen’s.


A chaplain at Pittsburgh Institution for five years, she introduced a victim empathy program to the Correctional Service of Canada. In 2013 she was appointed chaplain to Queen’s University


Kate also serves on the board of Kingston Community Chaplaincy- an organization that supports ex-prisoners to re-integrate to community after incarceration. She maintains an avid interest in the development of correctional policies that are healthier for staff and prisoners alike.


Event Date: November 16, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

The Power of Empathy in Conflict Resolution

The Power of Empathy in Conflict Resolution | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Empathy has a profound ability to transform the way in which we resolve and understand conflicts. Empathy enables individuals to open their hearts and minds to not only see and understand the world from the perspective of others, but also to act in a way that is more likely to lead to a peaceful solution. In order to better understand empathy and its impact on conflict resolution, this paper will first address conflict, then empathy, how the two relate to one another, and finally, the essential nature of empathy in conflict resolution.

 

by Anna Titulaer

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Obama’s Empathy Rule: Alive and Well in the Second Term

Obama’s Empathy Rule: Alive and Well in the Second Term | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

The value of “empathy” as the primary criterion for selecting judges must be eradicated, as should the practical application of that value, which usually means emphasizing race, sexual preference, gender, and political affiliation over basic qualifications and standards. So long as this subversive trend continues, President Obama’s judicial nominees should receive a heightened level of scrutiny from senators.

 

With the possibility of additional Supreme Court nominations in President Obama’s second term, he must square with the Senate and the American people about his view of a judge’s proper role.

 

James Christophersen

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Restorative Justice at Work: How This Indigenous Wood Carver Is Finding Peace After a Seattle Officer Killed His Brother

Restorative Justice at Work: How This Indigenous Wood Carver Is Finding Peace After a Seattle Officer Killed His Brother | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Andrea Brenneke, Williams’ lawyer, suggested arranging a restorative circle that would bring the family and police together to candidly discuss: the effects of the shooting; how to bridge the cultural gap between Native Americans and police; and ways to prevent unwarranted killings in the future.


Both Police Chief John Diaz and Williams agreed to the restorative circle. Having no previous experience in conducting them, Brenneke started researching restorative circles and how to get the best results. About two weeks after the shooting, they met.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

America’s fear of black rage: Why tragic NYPD shootings are so misunderstood

America’s fear of black rage: Why tragic NYPD shootings are so misunderstood | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

by BRITTNEY COOPER


Whipped into a predictable but regrettable frenzy, the NYPD blamed the mayor for showing empathy with protestors, declared themselves a “wartime police department,” and promised that they would “act accordingly.”


In the midst of understandable grief and perhaps fear, the NYPD and those who support them uncritically have chosen to engage in the kind of dishonest, incendiary rhetoric that only inflames an already volatile situation.


Let us not forget that the same police who claim protestors have gone to war against them antagonized demonstrators by wearing shirts proclaiming, “I can breathe” in the midst of demonstrations last week. Police also held #BlueLivesMatter rallies. Their callous disregard for Eric Garner’s life should be set alongside their demand for our automatic grief and empathy for these slain officers.

To be clear, I am deeply disheartened by the pain and grief that the families of Officers Liu and Ramos must now endure. Those officers did not deserve to lose their lives.


But the families of Eric Garner, Michael Brown, Akai Gurley, John Crawford and Tamir Rice are worthy of equal empathy.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Restorative Justice in a Nutshell - YouTube

Produced by Stories Matter Media Additional footage contributed by Kevin Rodriguez and Stories Matter Media. Soundtrack by Khalid An-Nur
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Empathy will be key for improving relations with police officers

Empathy will be key for improving relations with police officers | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

I am a former cop, but I am also an advocate for progressive criminal justice reform. This puts me in a unique position with the recent high profile cases in Ferguson and New York. Many social activists have used these cases as poster-children for racial inequality, police brutality, and all that is wrong with our justice system.....


Where is the constructive dialogue? Where is the path to progress? At this point, the details of each case do not matter. What matters is how do we move on from here?...


What if we stopped yelling and screaming at each other, and decided to proactively learn from each other? What if we seek out opportunities for dialogue between police officers and the citizens that they serve, outside of these confrontational moments?


What if officers could explain what an encounter feels like for them, how use of force works, how they perceive threats to their safety (e.g. a person who won’t take his hands out of his pockets)?


By Burke Brownfeld, 

more...
Larry Rattner's curator insight, December 22, 2014 7:44 AM

The killing of the two officers in New York is a terrible tragedy.  Police reform will save lives.  it will also make for a better relationship between law enforcement and the public.  This will make it less dangerous for law enforcement.  Here is an article from Burke Brownfeld of Alexandria, Virginia. He is a former police office who writes about need for empathy to make relations better.

 

#deadlyforcereform

Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

THE ROLE OF EMPATHY IN CRIME, POLICING, AND JUSTICE

THE ROLE OF EMPATHY IN CRIME, POLICING, AND JUSTICE | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

How Empathy Matters


My associates and I have reviewed recent research and done some additional analyses to pin down what is currently known about empathy – and perceptions of empathy – in the realm of crime and justice. When other factors, like age, sex, race, education, and income are taken into account, empathy turns out to matter in several ways:


Empathetic people are less likely to engage in delinquency or crime.

But those who have trouble perceiving how others feel, and have difficulty sharing those feelings, are more likely to engage in wrongful acts – everything from minor juvenile delinquency to the most serious of violent crimes. 


Empathy affects how people think about crime and punishment in complex ways.

People capable of empathy tend to support tough punishments for crime, but at the same time they are less likely to call for the harshest punishments, such as the death penalty.


Empathy and perceptions of empathy help to shape the interactions of police and members of the communities they are assigned to protect.

Research on citizen interactions with the police has consistently indicated that the way officers behave determines how they are evaluated by people with whom they interact. When we probe in detail, it turns out community members have more positive evaluations of the police when officers communicate that they understand the issues that matter to community members. Studies specifically show that the police are more likely to be trusted and considered effective at their jobs when they display empathy with the community’s concerns. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

(NPR: Restorative Justice) An Alternative To Suspension And Expulsion: 'Circle Up!'

(NPR:  Restorative Justice) An Alternative To Suspension And Expulsion: 'Circle Up!' | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Oakland's restorative justice program is at the forefront of efforts to rethink school discipline.


One by one, in a room just off the gym floor at Edna Brewer Middle School in Oakland, Calif., seventh-graders go on the interview hot seat.


Some 80 students have applied to be "peer leaders" in the school's new, alternative discipline program called "restorative justice."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Edwin Rutsch from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Design Against Crime – Restorative Justice Extending Empathy Workshop

Design Against Crime  – Restorative Justice Extending Empathy Workshop | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

The overarching theme is to explore what is state of the art in Restorative Justice (RJ), today and what are future ambitions for engagement with other disciplines.

The workshop will provide the opportunity to bring together academic researchers from the RJ, Theatre and Design professions who are concerned in their existing practice with building empathy. How empathy is built by each profession and the methods they use are likely to be the subject of lively discipline exchange.
'
http://www.designagainstcrime.com/files/events/extending_empathy_workshop1.pdf


Global Picture of Empathy and Restorative Justice
by Theo Gavriellides


European Picture of Empathy and Restorative Justice
by Tim Chapman


Workshop: How Can Three Disciplines Learn from One Another to Better Measure and Communicate Cultural Value and Impact? 
 Lorraine Gamman,

Robin Bryant and

Michael Kearns as workshop facilitators



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

The Emptiness of Empathetic Judging

The Emptiness of Empathetic Judging | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Dahlia Lithwick has recently complained that the Supreme Court is made up of elites. Hers is not the usual complaint of conservatives that the justices are writing their elite values into the Constitution rather than following the law. It is rather that the justices evince selective empathy—only for elites. According to Lithwick, we need justices who will decide in favor of non-elites on empathetic grounds.


If justices were to follow Lithwick’s advice, the rule of law would disappear.  Particularly in disputes that rise to the level of the Court, both parties may deserve empathy.


For example, Lithwick praises Sonia Sotomayor’s defense of preferences  in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action. And surely minorities striving for success who may gain admission to elite colleges because of such programs deserve our empathy. But why don’t those who are denied a place because of their race deserve our empathy as well?   Feeling provides no plausible rule of decision.


by JOHN O. MCGINNIS


image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Justice


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Teaching empathy to at-risk kids

Teaching empathy to at-risk kids | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

There was a debate all semester about the root cause of violence in our society. Guns. Video games. But I took the class somewhere else. We talked about empathy.

Many of these kids had horror stories for biographies. A couple of them expressed a concern to me in private that they didn't feel empathy for others. That they were cold-hearted. Dead....

Then, the teen I had spoken with said,
"There's no empathy.


The villain in the movies is always out for revenge. It's no different with kids who shoot up their schools. Those kids are out for justice, to right a wrong. That's how they see it."


by Benjamin Dancer

more...
Lon Woodbury's curator insight, October 30, 2014 3:20 PM

This lack of empathy sounds a lot like the kids that have loving middle class or above homes that are enrolled in therapeutic boarding schools and wilderness therapy programs.  This lack of empathy is not limited to the poor.  All social classes need more empathy.  -Lon  

Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Judicial Decisionmaking, Empathy, and the Limits of Perception by Nicole Negowetti

Judicial Decisionmaking, Empathy, and the Limits of Perception by Nicole Negowetti | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

This Article challenges the assumption and aspiration of neutrality in judging and proposes an approach in line with emerging research from cognitive science.


Judicial empathy — the cognitive capacity to imagine the perspective of another person — is a tool that can mitigate the inevitable implicit biases each judge brings to the bench.


By exploring the influence of implicit biases on decisions that demand a finding of “reasonableness,” such as in Fourth Amendment, discrimination, criminal, and Establishment Clause cases, this Article argues that judicial empathy is necessary to move judges away from their own biased vantage point.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Edwin Rutsch
Scoop.it!

Dominic Barter on Compassion: Why It's Time for Restorative Justice

Dominic Barter on Compassion: Why It's Time for Restorative Justice | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
In the wake of recent tragedies, Charles Eisenstein and Dominic Barter explain why restorative justice is the answer. Explore how compassion and empathy lead to healing and reconciliation.


"There's something really unique about empathy, that it clears the things that are blocking action, and that it connects both inside and to other people in a way that is transformative." - Dominic Barter

 

With the wave of tragedies hitting the news lately -- GazaMalaysia Airlines Flight 17, and countless others -- it feels both relevant and necessary to bring restorative justice into the fold. In the wake of these disasters, Charles Eisenstein (known for Occupy Love and promoting a gift economy) penned apoignant essay on viewing major conflicts through the lens of empathy and compassion.

by Kimberly Bryant

more...
No comment yet.