Empathy and Justice
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Empathy and Justice
International News about Empathy applied to Conflict, Justice, Restorative Justice, Mediation and the Law. (more at CultureOfEmpathy.com)”
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
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Empathy Movement Magazine Front Page

Empathy Movement Magazine Front Page | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

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Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page


Visit the individual magazines specifically for empathy and;

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Join us on Facebook Center for Building a Culture of Empathy
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Support Empathy Dialogue Circles with Police, Black Lives Matter and Community.

Support Empathy Dialogue Circles with Police, Black Lives Matter and Community. | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

How might we improve police and community relations?

 

This is a project to organize and host a series of Empathy Circles with Police Officers, Black Lives Matter and other Community Members. The best way for communities to come together is foster mutual and relational empathic dialog and understanding that results in shared action.  We can start with a series of online Empathy Circles and then move towards hosting local community circles in larger groups.

 

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Former president George W. Bush honored the slain Dallas officers with a message of unity and empathy

Former president George W. Bush honored the slain Dallas officers with a message of unity and empathy | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

And this has strained our bonds of understanding and common purpose. But Americans have a great advantage. To renew our unity, we only need to remember our values. We have never been held together by blood or background. We are bound by things as the spirit, by shared commitments to common ideals.

At our best we practice empathy, imagining ourselves in the lives and circumstances of others. This is the bridge across our nation’s deepest divisions. And it’s not nearly a matter of tolerance. But of learning of the struggles and stories of our fellow citizens and finding our better selves in the process

 

 

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Sowing the seeds of empathy - Queensland Police News

Sowing the seeds of empathy - Queensland Police News | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Inspector Allen said the theme of the TEDx talk was ‘#challenge accepted’, with speakers expected to put a challenge out to their listeners.

“Police have always felt empathy, but now they do more than feel it—they act on it. My challenge was for other organisations to take on empathy and act on it. It might be out of the scope of their core business but it makes them better people,” he said.

Watch Inspector Allen’s talk below or visit TEDxSouthBank website here.
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Thomas College instructor teaches empathy in criminal justice course: "exposing his students to a wide range of cultures, ideologies and viewpoints, an “empathy-based” approach" 

Thomas College instructor teaches empathy in criminal justice course: "exposing his students to a wide range of cultures, ideologies and viewpoints, an “empathy-based” approach"  | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Steven Dyer believes tuning in to other cultures prevents overreaction by police, but not all agree.

 

...Dyer is now exposing his students to a wide range of cultures, ideologies and viewpoints, an “empathy-based” approach that he hopes will prepare them for the diverse world they’ll face....

 

But so far he’s in a minority. Police officers and those involved in criminal justice education in Maine say the answer to current problems in law enforcement are simpler, and that empathy for other points of view won’t help.

 

BY MADELINE ST. AMOUR

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(Empathic Policing) Richmond police chief: That's really what community policing should be about.'

(Empathic Policing) Richmond police chief:  That's really what community policing should be about.' | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Richmond police chief: 'All lives matter. That's really what community policing should be about.'


When Chris Magnus first moved to Richmond, Calif., in 2006, he would hear gunshots at night, sometimes very close to his house. That would be disturbing to anyone, but it was especially so to Magnus, as he had just been hired to be Richmond's new chief of police....


The term “community policing” has become such a buzz phrase that “Pretty much every department, if you ask them, would say they're doing community policing,” says Magnus, “And I think most believe it. But the challenge is: is community policing really policing the community in the way that the community wants to be policed, or is it driven by the police department?”


Magnus' approach has been to build partnerships with the community at every opportunity, learning from the residents what their priorities are, in order to define where resources should go.


by Brad Marshland


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(Empathic Policing) Empathy with a badge and a gun: EMPATHY TRAINING

(Empathic Policing) Empathy with a badge and a gun:  EMPATHY TRAINING | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

EMPATHY TRAINING

The way law enforcement deals with the mentally ill has come under scrutiny following a spate of officer-involved shootings across the nation. But Hulse said news reports miss the success stories between law enforcement and the public they protect.

"We handle literally hundreds and hundreds of cases where everything went right and we de-escalated the individual and nobody got hurt," Hulse said.

Hulse said the training he administers to his officers is what stops crises and protects the public. But beyond that, he said empathy with people struggling is the real key to solving these issues.

Hulse hosts a voluntary crisis intervention training every year in April. He said a number of officers participate in the 40-hour training innovated by the Memphis Police Department.


The training, called the "Memphis Method" focuses on empathy with those having a mental health crisis.


image  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Police 

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(Empathic Policing) Empathy on the street: How understanding between police and communities makes us safer

(Empathic Policing) Empathy on the street: How understanding between police and communities makes us safer | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

By now, no one is insulated from hearing about incidents of police shootings or violence against police officers. While fatal shootings are thankfully still rare events, this does not diminish the emotional impact of hearing about a violent death....


Right now, it might seem impossible to eliminate the us-versus-them mindset that permeates society, but optimistically, I do not think that we are at an impasse. What we have to do is look at a trait that all humans already possess: empathy.

Empathy: A basic human tool with great potential

Empathy has evolved in humans and other mammals over time. It allows us to understand the emotions of others and share in those emotions. Expressing empathy has many advantages: it increases cooperation (we like to help each other out when we feel that we are understood), reduces stress and it may even feel good.



by Chad Posick


Culture of Empathy Builder Page: Chad Posick

 http://j.mp/SRGxxu

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NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness : Crisis Intervention Team (CIT)

NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness : Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

What Is CIT?

A Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) program is a model for community policing that brings together law enforcement, mental health providers, hospital emergency departments and individuals with mental illness and their families to improve responses to people in crisis. CIT programs enhance communication, identify mental health resources for assisting people in crisis and ensure that officers get the training and support that they need. 

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(Empathic Policing) Conference Panel 23 - The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing and Justice

(Empathic Policing) Conference Panel 23 - The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing and Justice | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Panel 23 - The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing and Justice
http://j.mp/19KJVQL
The role of empathy in policing, both empathy for and by the police, is gaining attention from criminal justice researchers and practitioners. While research on the effectiveness and importance of empathy in policing is limited, the existing research indicates that empathy increases perceptions of legitimacy and trust in the police. 

This panel discusses a range of issues related to the role of empathy in criminal behavior, punishment, and policing with a specific emphasis on training police on how to incorporate empathy into their work.


========================
The role of empathy in policing,

both empathy for and by the police,

is gaining attention from 

criminal  justice researchers

and practitioners.

 ============== 


Panelists: 

Chad Posick has a B.S. degree in criminal justice and an M.S. degree in public policy from the Rochester Institute of Technology. He just finished his Ph.D in criminal justice from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. He has worked with Project Safe Neighborhoods in the Western District of New York as well as the Department of Criminal Justice Service’s Project Impact. His research areas include restorative justice, cognitive behavioral interventions and action research.

Joe Brummer Associate Executive Director at Community Mediation, Inc. in New Haven, CT. He is completely committed to the field of nonviolence and shows it in both his professional and personal decorum. His trainings are inspiring and his mediation skills are those of a seasoned professional.

Michael Rocque is the research director at the Maine Department of Corrections and an adjunct faculty member of the University of Maine’s Sociology Department. His research interests include the demography of crime, life-course criminology and crime prevention.

Edwin Rutsch
Director,   Center for Building a Culture of Empathy

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Watch "Investing in Empathy | Kris Billeter | TEDxLivermore 

Watch "Investing in Empathy | Kris Billeter | TEDxLivermore  | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
"Do you understand that in the event you are taken hostage, you will not be negotiated for?" rang in Kris’ ears as she entered San Quentin for the first time.

 

In this compelling and emotionally impactful talk, Kris addresses the question of "How are we doing Prisons?" in the USA. In the $80 billion American prison system, the answer is 'not well.' Since 1980 there has been a 400% increase in incarceration & protection expenses, and a 13% decrease in higher education in America, with 1 in 34 Americans either in prison, on probation, or on parole.

 

In the Guiding Rage Into Power program (GRIP) Kris has worked with a group at San Quentin whose cumulative time-in-prison amounts to 742 years, yet when they added up the total time of the actions that put them in prison, it was a but a blip - a miniscule 25 minutes of acting in anger.

 

What happens between anger and a crime? Sitting in the fire, asking this question, is about sitting in pain and discomfort long enough to let it teach you.

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LAPD orders officers to show 'compassion and empathy' to homeless people

LAPD orders officers to show 'compassion and empathy' to homeless people | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
On Tuesday, the LAPD moved to reset this relationship. The Los Angeles Police Commission approved a new policy directing LAPD officers to treat homeless people with “compassion and empathy.”
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Empathy Alone Won’t Stop Police Killings

Empathy Alone Won’t Stop Police Killings | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
In a way few can do, Obama called the country together to reach across the gaping divide that was exposed this week. He summed up the divided understanding many Blacks and whites have about policing and police violence. He suggested reality is more complex than the simple rhetoric we hear in the media and encourage all sides to empathize with the other.

“Because with an open heart,” said Obama, “we can learn to stand in each other’s shoes and look at the world through each other’s eyes, so that maybe the police officer sees his own son in that teenager with a hoodie who’s kind of goofing off but not dangerous and the teenager – maybe the teenager will see in the police officer the same words and values and authority of his parents.”

Of course empathy is important and we should encourage it. But the president falls short; empathy alone will never end the regular and widespread killing of black people in disproportionate numbers.

 

It’s a racist system, not a few individual racist police that devalues black lives and leaves us dead so easily.

 

Libero Della Piana

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(Empathic Policing) Can Empathy Improve Policing? 

(Empathic Policing) Can Empathy Improve Policing?  | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Overall crime rates are down in the United States. But looking the news, it’s hard to not despair. Police killings of unarmed black citizens makes us question the integrity of our police forces, while retribution killings of innocent police officers make us fear for their safety on the job. According to a recent Gallop poll, confidence in the police has dropped to its lowest level in 22 years.

Yet, there is some hope. Social scientists have begun joining forces with police to look at how police communication protocols and training can be changed to help increase community trust for the police and reduce the use of force—and help them work together to fight crime.

While the research is largely preliminary, some of the findings suggest that empathy—being able to see interactions from another’s perspective and understand the emotions involved—may play an important role in policing

 

.By Jill Suttie

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Read President Obama's Speech From the Dallas Memorial Service: with an open heart, we can learn to stand in each other’s shoes and look at the world through each other’s eyes.

Read President Obama's Speech From the Dallas Memorial Service: with an open heart, we can learn to stand in each other’s shoes and look at the world through each other’s eyes. | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
But then I am reminded of what the Lord tells Ezekiel. “I will give you a new heart,” the Lord says, “and put a new spirit in you. I will remove from you your heart of stone, and give you a heart of flesh.”


That’s what we must pray for, each of us. A new heart. Not a heart of stone, but a heart open to the fears and hopes and challenges of our fellow citizens.


That’s what we’ve seen in Dallas these past few days, and that’s what we must sustain. Because with an open heart, we can learn to stand in each other’s shoes and look at the world through each other’s eyes.

 

So that maybe the police officer sees his own son in that teenager with a hoodie, who’s kind of goofing off but not dangerous.

 

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Can Empathy Improve Policing? 

Can Empathy Improve Policing?  | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

New training programs that help police to listen, stay calm, and communicate during charged encounters may lead to fewer arrests and less use of force.

 

While the research is largely preliminary, some of the findings suggest that empathy—being able to see interactions from another’s perspective and understand the emotions involved—may play an important role in policing.

 

Helping police to slow down their encounters with the public and to practice more respectful and empathic communication could go a long way toward reducing excessive force and unnecessary arrests, leading to more acceptance of their presence and role in the communities they are hired to protect.

 

 

By Jill Suttie

http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/

 

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(Empathic Policing) How Empathy Matters: The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing, and Justice

(Empathic Policing) How Empathy Matters: The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing, and Justice | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Chad Posick, Georgia Southern University


My associates and I have reviewed recent research and done some additional analyses to pin down what is currently known about empathy – and perceptions of empathy – in the realm of crime and justice. When other factors, like age, sex, race, education, and income are taken into account, empathy turns out to matter in several ways:


  • Empathetic people are less likely to engage in delinquency or crime. But those who have trouble perceiving how others feel, and have difficulty sharing those feelings, are more likely to engage in wrongful acts – everything from minor juvenile delinquency to the most serious of violent crimes. 


  • Empathy affects how people think about crime and punishment in complex ways. People capable of empathy tend to support tough punishments for crime, but at the same time they are less likely to call for the harshest punishments, such as the death penalty.


  • Empathy and perceptions of empathy help to shape the interactions of police and members of the communities they are assigned to protect. Research on citizen interactions with the police has consistently indicated that the way officers behave determines how they are evaluated by people with whom they interact. When we probe in detail, it turns out community members have more positive evaluations of the police when officers communicate that they understand the issues that matter to community members. Studies specifically show that the police are more likely to be trusted and considered effective at their jobs when they display empathy with the community’s concerns. 


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Denver: Local police veteran providing empathy training for police officers

Denver: Local police veteran providing empathy training for police officers | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
He’s now a behavioral analysis expert, conducting training across the U.S. He says officers often don’t recognize the difference between someone who’s fearful and someone who’s threatening and empathy training could be a solution to some of the situations we’ve recently seen.

 

But missing from training he says, is one very important component. “The officer has no training whatsoever on emotional awareness, empathy and compassion and how to manage own emotions,” Saraff said.


Saraff says in the 1970’s, the culture of law enforcement switched from guardians to warriors...

 

He does however, believe more empathy training could be a solution to some of the situations we’ve recently seen.

 

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How Empathy Can Close the Gap Created by Crime: Edwin Rutsch interviews Pete Wallis 

How Empathy Can Close the Gap Created by Crime: Edwin Rutsch interviews Pete Wallis  | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

 "Victim empathy work helps them to acknowledge that it is real people that they have harmed. Empathy engenders a sense of shared experience, and an identification with and understanding of the other person's situation, feelings and motives. Empathy has the potential to profoundly change our interactions with one another."

 

Pete Wallis is the senior practitioner in restorative justice for Oxfordshire Youth Offending Service. He has facilitated hundreds of restorative meetings and written or co-authored several books and articles on the subject including,
Understanding Restorative Justice: How Empathy Can Close the Gap Created by Crime and
What Have I Done?: A Victim Empathy Programme for Young People

In 2011 he set up a charity to support young crime victims, and he is a consultant for the new Restorative Services Quality Mark.

 

 

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A Real Conversation Requires Empathy for Police, Too

A Real Conversation Requires Empathy for Police, Too | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Scott G. Erickson

 

Critics have suggested that much of the tension that shrouds police and community relations could be softened if only the police would better understand the unique experiences and worldview of those with whom they interact, particularly within communities of color.

This is absolutely true. Empathy is a vitally important element of effective policing. But to be truly effective, empathy must be shared and understood as a two-way street.

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(Empathic Policing) Radnor police attend diversity seminar: focused on the importance of having empathy for others. 

(Empathic Policing) Radnor police attend diversity seminar:  focused on the importance of having empathy for others.  | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Radnor police attend diversity seminar

 

A couple of dozen Radnor police officers received new training Tuesday with an all-day diversity seminar that was conducted by a retired Pennsylvania State police officer and a member of the Rosemont College faculty...

 

Another aspect of the training Brooks and Collins focused on the importance of having empathy for others.

“In life, no matter whom you are or where you are if you don’t have empathy you will never, ever be able to make an emotional connection with the people you are trying to impact or influence,” Brooks said.

 

By Richard Ilgenfritz

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The Sense of Justice: Empathy in Law and Punishment  

The Sense of Justice: Empathy in Law and Punishment (Critical America)

Product by Brand: NYU Press ~ Markus Dirk Dubber (author) More about this product
Price: $65.00

Dubber argues against simple categorization of the sense of justice. Drawing on recent work in moral philosophy, political theory, and linguistics, Dubber defines the sense of justice in terms of empathy—the emotional capacity that makes law possible by giving us vicarious access to the experiences of others.

 

From there, he explores the way it is invoked, considered, and used in the American criminal justice system. He argues that this sense is more than an irrational emotional impulse but a valuable legal tool that should be properly used and understood.

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Is Restorative Justice Exhausting?

Is Restorative Justice Exhausting? | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
There has long been a perception that restorative practices—a term used to describe a variety of different approaches to "doing justice" and working through conflict that focus on repairing harm and addressing underlying needs rather than identifying and punishing the "wrongdoer"—are time consuming and exhausting

 

. No doubt that narrative was further reinforced by the New York Times Sept. 11th online story on restorative justice in city high schools (the print version appears in today's Sunday magazine).

But is it true? Is exhaustion really a necessary "side-effect" of responding restoratively, rather than punitively, to school conflicts and harms?

 

Mikhail Lyubansky
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Study: A psychometric appraisal of the Jefferson Scale of
Empathy using law students

Study: A psychometric appraisal of the Jefferson Scale of<br/>Empathy using law students | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Background:

A growing body of literature indicates that empathic behaviors are positively linked, in several ways, with the professional performance and mental well-being of lawyers and law students. It is therefore important to assess empathy levels among law students using psychometrically sound tools that are suitable for this cohort.


Participants and methods:

The 20-item Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Health Profession Students Version was adapted for a law context (eg, the word “health care” became “legal”), and the new Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Law Students (JSE-L-S) version was completed by 275 students at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Data were subjected to principal component analysis.

 

Results

: Four factors emerged from the principal component analysis (“understanding the client’s perspective”, “responding to clients’ experiences and emotions”, “responding to clients’ cues and behaviors”, and “standing in clients’ shoes”), which accounted for 46.7% of the total variance. The reliability of the factors varied, but the overall 18-item JSE-L-S yielded a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.80. Several patterns among the item loadings were similar to those reported in studies using other versions of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy.


Conclusion:

The JSE-L-S appears to be a reliable measure of empathy among undergraduate law students, which could help provide insights into law student welfare and future performance as legal practitioners. Additional evaluation of the JSE-L-S is required to disambiguate some of the minor findings explored. Adjustments may improve the psychometric properties.

 

Authors

Williams B,

Sifris A,

Lynch M

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Black Lives Matter: Building Empathy Through Reading (Part I) - The Hub

Black Lives Matter: Building Empathy Through Reading (Part I) - The Hub | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Librarians are peddlers of empathy. We understand that reading is a chemical reaction between reader and writer producing a visceral engagement with the characters that allows us to live the lives of others, if only for for the space of a novel.

 

We know that when we give a book to a patron, it can be at once an act of revolution, a strike against ignorance, a catalyst for change, a necessary escape, a life-saving event, a clarion call, a moment of peace, or simply a riveting read. Whatever it turns out to be though, it is always founded in empathy. As readers, each book allows us to, at turns, discover, reaffirm or reimagine what it means to be human.

In the wake of the Ferguson verdict and in solidarity with the growing #BlackLivesMatter movement, it is empathy that we need more than ever. Indeed, as I reflect on Dr. King’s legacy, I am reminded of this quote by him: “People fail to get along because they fear each other; they fear each other because they don’t know each other; they don’t know each other because they have not communicated with each other.”

 

Alegria Barclay,

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(Empathic Policing) How can we build better police forces? former Baltimore police officer emphasizes the need for empathy

(Empathic Policing) How can we build better police forces?  former Baltimore police officer emphasizes the need for empathy | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

A former Baltimore police officer emphasizes the need for empathy and criticizes the 'us vs. them' attitude common on police forces....


After writing a series of tweets last week naming various instances of corruption he witnessed as a cop, Sergeant Wood criticized urban police forces’ “us vs. them” mentality in an interview with The Washington Post. His prescription for the divided system, he said, is empathy.

“Police officers aren’t warriors. They aren’t soldiers,” Wood told the Post. “The important thing is to change the mindset, to foster a sense of empathy, so police officers see themselves as the protectors of these communities, not as an occupying force that’s at war with them...


Ultimately, he said, the solution "starts with empathy. We need to stop all this warrior talk, the militaristic language, and the us versus them rhetoric. We need a better metaphor. Police officers aren’t warriors. They aren’t soldiers. I don’t even like the mentality that we’re 'enforcing the laws.' Maybe a term like 'protectors.' 


Sarah Caspari

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