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Empathy and Justice
International News about Empathy applied to Conflict, Justice, Restorative Justice, Mediation and the Law. (more at CultureOfEmpathy.com)”
Curated by Edwin Rutsch
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Empathy Movement Magazine Front Page

Empathy Movement Magazine Front Page | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

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Empathy Cafe Magazine Front Page


Visit the individual magazines specifically for empathy and;

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In Defense of Empathy and Justice: John Gibbs and Edwin Rutsch Dialog

In Defense of Empathy and Justice: John Gibbs and Edwin Rutsch Dialog | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
John Gibbs is a professor of developmental psychology at The Ohio State University and the author of Moral Development and Reality: Beyond the Theories of Kohlberg, Hoffman, and Haidt. John says, my interests pertain to cross-cultural sociomoral development, parental socialization, empathy, prosocial behavior, and antisocial behavior.


I have, with students and colleagues, developed assessment measures of moral judgment, moral identity, social perspective-taking, self-serving cognitive distortions, and social skills. Together with Martin Hoffman he wrote an article, Hillary has a point: In defense of empathy and justice.


Hillary Rodham Clinton had a point when she recently urged:
"The most important thing each of us can do... is to try even harder to see the world through our neighbors' eyes, to imagine what it is like to walk in their shoes, to share their pain and their hopes and their dreams"....

we emphasize that empathy and justice are co-primary or mutual. If justice serves empathy, the reverse is certainly also true ...

Morality is most objective and compelling when justice and empathy align. That is, the moral prescription to act is strongest when victims are both wronged and harmed.

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Blythe prisons to get new victim-offender program

Blythe prisons to get new victim-offender program | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Insight Prison Project (IPP) has been awarded a grant from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to provide a program inside Ironwood State Prison and Chuckawalla State Prison...


This is a unique and critical element to VOEG, as it provides the opportunity for offenders to be accountable directly to a victim of violent crime. It also allows survivors to see and hear accountability, remorse and empathy directly from offenders.

IPP believes that meeting face to face with victims is the single most important factor in transforming harmful behavior. Inmates hear victims describe how violent crimes impacted them, and they develop empathy by interacting with them.

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Empathy Is Incompatible With Shame and Judgment

Empathy Is Incompatible With Shame and Judgment | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

I had been meaning to better understand the concept of empathy ever since the United States Supreme Court struck down the part of the Defense of Marriage Act of 1996 that denied federal benefits to legally married same-sex couples.


My interest in the concept had to do with my not understanding how so-called mediators and peacemakers could claim to be empathic people and yet make hateful comments regarding homosexuals and same-sex marriage.


I by no means expected all mediators and peacemakers to agree with the Supreme Court's decision; however, one does not have to agree in order to be empathic. What I found confusing was that self-proclaimed empathic people made such hateful comments. I needed to understand whether it was possible for an empathic person to make hateful statements. The reason this was so important to me was conveyed in my article as follows: "The first sentence in Martin Golder's article titled 'The Journey to Empathy' is 'In conflict resolution empathy is a central tool and way of being.'" You see, I am in complete agreement with Mr. Golder. As set forth in "The Power of Empathy," empathy is an emotional skill and an essential part of emotional intelligence.


By Mark Baer || 27-Jan-2015


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The Power of Empathy

The Power of Empathy | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
In actuality, empathy predominantly involves learning about someone else's worldview. Furthermore, that learning process is shaped to a very great degree by one's personal relationships.


Despite the fact that it has long-been known that empathy is a learned skill, the results of this study are incredibly meaningful and important. This is especially true, considering the information contained within Harvard University's Making Caring Common Project's report titled "The Children We Mean to Raise: The Real Messages Adults Are Sending About Values" that was published in 2014. The report stated in pertinent part as follows:


Mark Baer

Family Law Attorney, Mediator, Collaborative Law Practitioner, Speaker, and Author


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(Empathic Policing) Empathy with a badge and a gun: EMPATHY TRAINING

(Empathic Policing) Empathy with a badge and a gun:  EMPATHY TRAINING | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

EMPATHY TRAINING

The way law enforcement deals with the mentally ill has come under scrutiny following a spate of officer-involved shootings across the nation. But Hulse said news reports miss the success stories between law enforcement and the public they protect.

"We handle literally hundreds and hundreds of cases where everything went right and we de-escalated the individual and nobody got hurt," Hulse said.

Hulse said the training he administers to his officers is what stops crises and protects the public. But beyond that, he said empathy with people struggling is the real key to solving these issues.

Hulse hosts a voluntary crisis intervention training every year in April. He said a number of officers participate in the 40-hour training innovated by the Memphis Police Department.


The training, called the "Memphis Method" focuses on empathy with those having a mental health crisis.


image  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Police 

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Wired for kindness: Science shows we prefer compassion, and our capacity grows with practice

Wired for kindness: Science shows we prefer compassion, and our capacity grows with practice | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Some of the evidence that compassion can be cultivated comes from studies on “social-emotional learning” (or SEL), school programs that complement the standard emphasis on academics with age-attuned lessons in self-awareness, managing upsetting emotions, empathy, relationship skills, and smart life decisions.

One SEL program, MINDUP, increased not just empathy in elementary school students, but also upped the number of their actual acts of kindness, according to a study published in January in the journal Developmental Psychology.


By Daniel Goleman 

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CNN: Are 3-year-olds mind-reading, justice-seeking superheroes? Learn the building blocks of empathy and a sense of justice

CNN: Are 3-year-olds mind-reading, justice-seeking superheroes? Learn the building blocks of empathy and a sense of justice | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

If you want to learn the building blocks of empathy and a sense of justice, just look to the nearest 3-year-old.

While these two traits seem like they might require years of experience and observation to acquire, a new study published in Current Biology reveals that children as young as 3 have a strong sense of restorative justice.

Researchers in Germany observed individual 3- and 5-year-olds in a situation in which they sat at a round table with puppets and a few items, such as cookies or toys. The children had the ability to pull a rope to turn the table. One section of the table was dubbed "the cave," which was inaccessible and could hide the items....


Origins of empathy

What are the origins of this intuitive sense of empathy?

Family environment and cognitive development, according to Dr. Norma Feshbach. There must be a family context that allows and encourages empathy for it to flourish. And cognitively, children must have a physiological readiness that allows them to see someone in an emotional state and elicit a similar response. This also enables them to see the world from another perspective, and feel and experience those emotions.


By Ashley Strickland

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Empathy and motivation for justice: Cognitive empathy and concern, but not emotional empathy, predict sensitivity to injustice for others

Empathy and motivation for justice: Cognitive empathy and concern, but not emotional empathy, predict sensitivity to injustice for others | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Why do people tend to care for upholding principles of justice? This study examined the association between individual differences in the affective, motivational and cognitive components of empathy, sensitivity to justice, and psychopathy in participants (N 265) who were also asked to rate the permissibility of everyday moral situations that pit personal benefit against moral standards of justice.


Counter to common sense, emotional empathy was not associated with sensitivity to injustice for others. Rather, individual differences in cognitive empathy and empathic concern predicted sensitivity to justice for others, as well as the endorsement of moral rules. 


Jean Decety

Keith J. Yoder


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Do Baltimore police need empathy boot camp?

Do Baltimore police need empathy boot camp? | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Would police be more empathetic if they were subject to forcible arrest techniques?


In Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby's telling of the fatal arrest of Freddie Gray, one thing in particular stands out: the complete lack of empathy and compassion allegedly shown Gray by any of the six officers charged in his death, including one woman who was specifically sent to check on his well being following two citizen complaints.


The officers put Gray into a police van face-first on his belly with his hands and feet bound, Ms. Mosby said, leaving him to roll around like loose change. They ignored his pleas for medical attention while he could still make them and continued to do nothing for a time after he couldn't, she said.

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(Empathic Policing) Police have dangerous jobs, but some empathy could make everyone safer

(Empathic Policing) Police have dangerous jobs, but some empathy could make everyone safer | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Right now, it might seem impossible to eliminate the us-versus-them mindset that permeates society, but optimistically, I do not think that we are at an impasse. What we have to do is look at a trait that all humans already possess: empathy.


Empathy: A basic human tool with great potential
Empathy has evolved in humans and other mammals over time. It allows us to understand the emotions of others and share in those emotions. Expressing empathy has many advantages: it increases cooperation (we like to help each other out when we feel that we are understood), reduces stress and it may even feel good.


BY Chad Posick 

Assistant professor, Georgia Southern University


Culture of Empathy Builder Page http://j.mp/SRGxxu


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(Empathic Policing) Empathy on the street: How understanding between police and communities makes us safer

(Empathic Policing) Empathy on the street: How understanding between police and communities makes us safer | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

By now, no one is insulated from hearing about incidents of police shootings or violence against police officers. While fatal shootings are thankfully still rare events, this does not diminish the emotional impact of hearing about a violent death....


Right now, it might seem impossible to eliminate the us-versus-them mindset that permeates society, but optimistically, I do not think that we are at an impasse. What we have to do is look at a trait that all humans already possess: empathy.

Empathy: A basic human tool with great potential

Empathy has evolved in humans and other mammals over time. It allows us to understand the emotions of others and share in those emotions. Expressing empathy has many advantages: it increases cooperation (we like to help each other out when we feel that we are understood), reduces stress and it may even feel good.



by Chad Posick


Culture of Empathy Builder Page: Chad Posick

 http://j.mp/SRGxxu

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MSU Sociologist Calls For Greater Empathy Among Law Enforcement

MSU Sociologist Calls For Greater Empathy Among Law Enforcement | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
“It is a culture that dehumanizes and victimizes African-Americans and others,” says Taylor.


Taylor says that the leadership from the mayor and police chief in Charleston, South Carolina, has been good in this case so far.

“The chief had a great deal of empathy, and he allowed it to be said that no one is a winner here. He felt horrible for his officer, he felt horrible for the family, he felt horrible for the city. That is the right path, and this is where we begin to heal,” says Taylor.

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Restorative Circles Process for conflict mediation via empathic listening.

Restorative Circles Process for conflict mediation via empathic listening. | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
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Future Lawyers Should Be Screened and Trained for Empathy

Future Lawyers Should Be Screened and Trained for Empathy | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

 I recently read an article by Jill Suttie titled "Should We Train Doctors for Empathy?" ...


Those who tend to be attracted to law school in the first place tend to be logical thinkers (rule oriented) and have low EQ levels. Moreover, the research indicates that the training students receive in law school also causes an "erosion of empathy." Furthermore, the more empathic students tend to drop out of law school at a much higher rate. Moreover, "lawyers with 'higher levels of resilience, empathy, initiative and sociability' are more likely to leave law practice than those with lower levels of those traits."


In fact, "some US law firms have used this assessment metric (a scale to measure sociopaths on a scale of 0 to 40, with higher levels being extreme behaviour) in their hiring practice, preferring to employ lawyers with sociopathic index close to 29.


Image: The Village Lawyer, c. 1621, by Pieter Brueghel the Younger

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Empathy and Fairness

Empathy and Fairness (Novartis Foundation Symposia)

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Empathy is the process that allows us to share the feelings and emotions of others, in the absence of any direct emotional stimulation to the self.


Humans can feel empathy for other people in a wide array of contexts: for basic emotions and sensation such as anger, fear, sadness, joy, pain and lust as well as for more complex emotions such as guilt, embarrassment and love.


It has been proposed that, for most people, empathy is the process that prevents us doing harm to others.

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New Insights on Empathy in Intergroup Conflict

New Insights on Empathy in Intergroup Conflict | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

After spending most of my professional life in the conflict resolution field, I have to admit to experiencing a growing frustration with the state of the field in recent years. There have been times when I have felt that various parts of the field were stuck in their own ideologies, with the result that some interventions seemed to be based on little more than assumptions, research on efficacy of interventions was slow to accumulate, and mythology was revered while research results were ignored...


Parochial Empathy. Dr. Bruneau distinguishes various types of empathy and has articulated the concept of “parochial empathy,” which is experiencing greater empathy for ingroup members than outgroup members. Parochial empathy can explain behavior during intergroup conflict. Dr. Bruneau has found interventions that mitigate parochial empathy, including the use of certain kinds of narratives (Ah! Now we are in my field!)


Perspective-taking and Perspective-giving. Dr. Bruneau found that both sides of an asymmetrical conflict were not equally affected by perspective-taking. While the more powerful side did experience positive effects from perspective-taking, the less powerful side actually benefitted more from “perspective-giving:” speaking and being listened to (Again, my field!).


Dorothy J. Della Noce


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(Empathic Policing) Training helps heighten officers’ empathy for victims

(Empathic Policing) Training helps heighten officers’ empathy for victims | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
J and his brother also donated their journals and their correspondence with friends and with the perpetrator to provide insight into what they went through for "Illuminations," a training program to build empathy.

"If you can understand truly what somebody else is feeling without judgment, you are more likely to be able to respond in the way that they need and in the end, for the criminal justice system, you're less likely to revictimize them," Pfeifer said.

"If the individual feels like you are genuinely empathic with them, they're more likely to cooperate, and you need that from an investigative standpoint," she continued.
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(Empathic Policing) How can we build better police forces? former Baltimore police officer emphasizes the need for empathy

(Empathic Policing) How can we build better police forces?  former Baltimore police officer emphasizes the need for empathy | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

A former Baltimore police officer emphasizes the need for empathy and criticizes the 'us vs. them' attitude common on police forces....


After writing a series of tweets last week naming various instances of corruption he witnessed as a cop, Sergeant Wood criticized urban police forces’ “us vs. them” mentality in an interview with The Washington Post. His prescription for the divided system, he said, is empathy.

“Police officers aren’t warriors. They aren’t soldiers,” Wood told the Post. “The important thing is to change the mindset, to foster a sense of empathy, so police officers see themselves as the protectors of these communities, not as an occupying force that’s at war with them...


Ultimately, he said, the solution "starts with empathy. We need to stop all this warrior talk, the militaristic language, and the us versus them rhetoric. We need a better metaphor. Police officers aren’t warriors. They aren’t soldiers. I don’t even like the mentality that we’re 'enforcing the laws.' Maybe a term like 'protectors.' 


Sarah Caspari

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Communities That Care: Restorative discipline holds children combines accountability, compassion

Communities That Care: Restorative discipline holds children combines accountability, compassion | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Many of us struggle with finding effective ways for our children to learn lessons from their wrongdoings. There are so many discipline techniques and no single type works for every child or every situation.


Compare these two approaches to discipline:


Blame/shame (reactive):


  • Focus is on the past
  • Preoccupied with blame
  • Punishment is selected to keep a child from repeating misbehavior


Relational/restorative (proactive):


  • Focus in past, present and future
  • Emphasis on repairing harm done and personal accountability
  • Consequences are related to the behavior and encourage making amends


BY CONNIE SCHULZ

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Toddlers have an innate sense of justice and empathy say researchers

Toddlers have an innate sense of justice and empathy say researchers | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Maybe toddlers should replace judges. Young children apparently have an innate sense of justice, and they're more interested in setting things right than in punishing wrongdoers, researchers have discovered.

Children 3 and 5 years old who watched different scenarios involving puppets, toys and cookies quickly determined whether or not a "master puppet" was being mean and who was the rightful owner of certain toys or cookies, according to a new study at the University of Manchester in England. And they were much more concerned with restorative justice than with retributive justice. They tended to restore order by returning an item to its owner rather than doling out punishment to thieves or cheaters, said researchers


By Mary Papenfuss

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(Empathic Policing) This Cop Used Empathy Instead of Force, and it Worked

(Empathic Policing) This Cop Used Empathy Instead of Force, and it Worked | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Then I think of the philosophical approaches known as restorative and transformative justice.


By viewing potential conflict situations with an emphasis on peacekeeping, rather than using force to punish wrongdoing, the goal is to find root causes for societal problems and seek alternatives to imprisonment as the solution. It is a cultural evolution as well as a tactic for restoring peace. What I witnessed on the western shores of Canada was a small event, but representative of a larger cultural difference in how criminal justice is understood.


To cite just one dramatic statistic, there have been a total of 75 people killed by Canadian police since 1932. In contrast, U.S. police killed 111 people in March alone.

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Journey To Empathy an Association for Conflict Resolution (ACR) Webniar - Martin Golder

Journey To Empathy an  Association for Conflict Resolution (ACR) Webniar - Martin Golder | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

In collaboration with the International Section of the Association for Conflict Resolution (ACR)

This presentation follows the presenter’s research into Empathy and Compassion as tools in mediation and negotiation.  Empathy is often listed as the primary skill of any successful mediator and there are many tools in the mediator’s tool box to help us towards the goal of true empathy.
 
  • What then is empathy and how do we get it?
  • Is it a learnable skill?
  • Is it just walking in someone else’s shoes?
 
At its simplest it can be described as very focused and attentive listening followed by a kind response. It could also be thought of as the conscious projection of ‘good will’.
 
The essence is based on ancient traditions from India, often now associated with Buddhism but undoubtedly predating it, called metta bhavana, which translates as the cultivation of loving kindness.

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(Empathic Policing) Conference Panel 23 - The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing and Justice

(Empathic Policing) Conference Panel 23 - The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing and Justice | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

Panel 23 - The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing and Justice
http://j.mp/19KJVQL
The role of empathy in policing, both empathy for and by the police, is gaining attention from criminal justice researchers and practitioners. While research on the effectiveness and importance of empathy in policing is limited, the existing research indicates that empathy increases perceptions of legitimacy and trust in the police. 

This panel discusses a range of issues related to the role of empathy in criminal behavior, punishment, and policing with a specific emphasis on training police on how to incorporate empathy into their work.


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The role of empathy in policing,

both empathy for and by the police,

is gaining attention from 

criminal  justice researchers

and practitioners.

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Panelists: 

Chad Posick has a B.S. degree in criminal justice and an M.S. degree in public policy from the Rochester Institute of Technology. He just finished his Ph.D in criminal justice from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. He has worked with Project Safe Neighborhoods in the Western District of New York as well as the Department of Criminal Justice Service’s Project Impact. His research areas include restorative justice, cognitive behavioral interventions and action research.

Joe Brummer Associate Executive Director at Community Mediation, Inc. in New Haven, CT. He is completely committed to the field of nonviolence and shows it in both his professional and personal decorum. His trainings are inspiring and his mediation skills are those of a seasoned professional.

Michael Rocque is the research director at the Maine Department of Corrections and an adjunct faculty member of the University of Maine’s Sociology Department. His research interests include the demography of crime, life-course criminology and crime prevention.

Edwin Rutsch
Director,   Center for Building a Culture of Empathy

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(Empathic Policing) Mindfulness in Policing

(Empathic Policing) Mindfulness in Policing | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it

by Sarah Sayeed, Ph.D. 

Incidents of police violence and discrimination against people of color evoke our raw emotions -- pain, frustration, fear, hopelessness and anger. Sometimes our emotions overwhelm us. But they can also help energize us and fuel our work for social ...


While mindfulness is rooted in Buddhism, its techniques have been embraced by a range of secular professions, from mental health to Silicon Valley, including the Navy SEALs. It is also finding its way into police departments, such as in Oregon, and thecriminal justice system as a whole. When practiced over time, mindfulness may help police officers develop their ability to more accurately read the emotions of suspects, discern threats, withstand high pressure encounters, reduce on the job stress and reduce the role of personal biases in policing practice.


By strengthening non-judgmental awareness of emotions, mindfulness can strengthen empathy and compassion in police-community interactions. It may ultimately reduce unwarranted use of excessive force.


image http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Police#/media/File:Gcp_patrol_car.jpg 

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Restorative Justice and Restorative Circles

Restorative Justice and Restorative Circles | Empathy and Justice | Scoop.it
Our country’s justice system can be understood as a Punitive Justice System.


When someone commits a crime it is committed against the state, and the state intervenes to determine what punishment a person deserves because of what was done. Victim’s needs are often forgotten except for their use as witnesses. Similarly, the greater community is often affected by the unjust act as well, and the community’s needs are overlooked in the same way that the victims often are.

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