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Empathy and HealthCare
The latest news about Empathy and Heathcare from around the world - CultureOfEmpathy.com
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Newspaper Front Page: All Sections

Newspaper Front Page: All Sections | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Empathy And Health Care Conference http://j.mp/N98AoS

Empathy Cafe Magazine 
Front Page


Visit the individual magazines specifically for empathy and;

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The Next Revolution in Health Care? Empathy | Paul Rosen

Paul Rosen, MD, a pediatric rheumatologist, serves as the Clinical Director of Service and Operational Excellence at Nemours. He received a masters of public health degree from Harvard University and a masters of medical management degree from Carnegie Mellon University.


[Talks about the need for empathy in the hospitals.]

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For Some Doctors, Empathy Is in Short Supply

For Some Doctors, Empathy Is in Short Supply | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Doctors are missing their cues when it comes to opportunities to empathize with the plight of their cancer patients, a new study suggests.


While doctors are able to address such concerns as medication issues, missed appointments, or pain, they tended to skirt "existential" issues, such as questions dealing with life and death, which are of paramount importance to most patients, the study authors said.


By Amanda Gardner

Sept. 22, 2008 

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Do Doctors Have Time for Empathy?

Do Doctors Have Time for Empathy? | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

A new study this week found that doctors often miss opportunities to express empathy to their patients. Does this mean doctors don’t care? Or could it be they just don’t have the time?

In her latest “Doctor and Patient” column, surgeon Dr. Pauline W. Chen writes about the new research and her own experiences talking — and empathizing — with patients.

Read the full column here, “Taking Time for Empathy,” and please share your thoughts with Dr. Chen below.

By TARA PARKER-POPE

 

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EmpathyWorks: Several Recent Articles Stress the Value of Empathy in Medical Care.

EmpathyWorks: Several Recent Articles Stress the Value of Empathy in Medical Care. | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Several Recent Articles Stress the Value of Empathy in Medical Care.
The importance of empathy in medical care is the focus of several articles recently published in the medical literature. See below for a brief comment on each and a link or reference to the article.

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Ethics: Beyond Patient Care: Practicing Empathy in the Workplace

Ethics: Beyond Patient Care: Practicing Empathy in the Workplace | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Christine Sorrell Dinkins, PhD 


One of the basic building blocks of ethics and ethical conduct toward others is empathy. Without empathy it is difficult for any of us to understand the needs and wants of others so that we may know how to treat them kindly and generously, or to practice any other virtue in our day-to-day relations with them.

Empathy is a much-discussed and much-debated topic in the nursing literature. Some have questioned whether empathy is the best mode for nurse-patient interactions (Morse et al., 1992); others have struggled with how to define the unique kind of empathy that plays a part in the complex relationships nurses have with patients (Yu & Kirk, 2008). However, less attention has been paid to empathy’s role in other (non-direct care) interactions of a nurse’s work and life.


Michie (2002) has suggested that for people in many work situations, their jobs and lives may become more manageable and less stressful if they can practice empathy both in their professional environment and in their everyday interactions with those around them.


Since nurses navigate a complex and varied network of contacts from hospital administrators to physicians and aides, empathy may be especially helpful in their daily interactions.


image http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nursing

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Empathy Simulator: Curtin develops hi-tech simulations for healthcare trainees - YouTube

http://healthsciences.curtin.edu.au/index.cfm Press play, and meet “Jim”. Jim is a virtual reality creation, designed to simulate patients for health care se...
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Stefanie Mietzner's curator insight, August 30, 5:01 AM

Perfect solution for understanding students academic worrieso or  problems. Could help reducing worries while writing an outline for a research paper or college essay.

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Be a better CEO: The chief empathy officer

Be a better CEO: The chief empathy officer | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Some organizations, such as the Cleveland Clinic, which sponsored the Patient Experience: Empathy and Innovation Summit for the past five years, push the motto that providers must offer not only excellent clinical and physical experiences, but emotional ones as well.


The University of Utah now publishes ratings based on patient surveys regarding the personal treatment they received from staff during their stay. The survey asks whether doctors made eye contact or showed concern for the patients' questions or worries, Hall says.


Healthcare providers must put themselves in their patients' shoes, and think about emotional treatment from their perspective, according to Hall. "We need people like that in healthcare, caregivers who have both brains and heart," he says.


"And perhaps a new hospital CEO position--Chief Empathy Officer." 

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Empathy in Clinical Health Care

Empathy in Clinical Health Care | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
We believe that in many cases, medical training not only does not select for or cultivate such personality traits, but actively selects and develops barriers against them....


It is then that the student becomes a master at learning to shut down empathy. The living patient is not the primary component of education until the third year, and by then the preference is set for objective reasoning and testing versus empathy and compassion....


Internship and residency, the cornerstone of clinical training, are also closely associated with changes in mood and further loss of empathy.


Depression, anger, and fatigue increase and empathetic concern decreases [ii] -- the exact opposite of characteristics one would hope physician training would cultivate.


Even more unfortunate, empathy seems to stabilize at this level over the remainder of training rather than increase.
 

[iii] Lack of empathy is closely correlated with burnout, a psychological state of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization.



Ilyana Romanovsky

Clinician, health writer, blogger and author of Choosing Therapy: A Guide To Getting What You Need


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Training Physicians for Empathy

Training Physicians for Empathy | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

A pair of training programs exposes medical students to art and loss, teaches them about the emotional aspects of patient care, and helps them avoid burnout.

The healthcare industry is rife with change, and how it trains new doctors is no exception. Healthcare organizations, already challenged to meet the dem

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Clinical Empathy - Jodi Halperin, M.D., | Providence Oregon

Clinical Empathy - Jodi Halperin, M.D., | Providence Oregon | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Jodi Halperin, M.D., psychiatrist and clinical ethicist at University of California, Berkeley, presents in this Holzang Lecture at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center Souther Auditorium.


Providence Portland Medical Center designates this live educational activity for a maximum of 1 credit AMA PRA Category 1 Credit.™ Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 

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The Empathetic Doctor | The AMS Phoenix Project

The Empathetic Doctor | The AMS Phoenix Project | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

It is so heartening to hear about the times when doctors display tremendous empathy and compassion to their patients.


Below is one such story from one of our AMS Phoenix Fellows, Marion Briggs, and her experience in a waiting room. This post was originally written as a comment response to our blog post “The Patient Patient.”

While living the US I had occasion to visit an Ophthalmologist and found a waiting room full of anxious people waiting … and waiting … and waiting.


by Melanie Goodfellow

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How to Spread Empathy in Health Care: an “epidemic of empathy”

How to Spread Empathy in Health Care: an “epidemic of empathy” | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Social network scientists have shown that emotions and values can spread in a community with the same patterns as infectious diseases. They have described how the people who are most connected to others may be the first ones to get hot gossip, but they are also most likely to get the scary new virus that has just shown up in town.


These observations suggest an interesting opportunity for making health care better, and even more efficient – if health care organizations can figure out how to create an “epidemic of empathy.”



What would an epidemic of empathy look like? There would be a steady, relentless increase in the proportion of clinicians and other personnel who are clearly tuned in to what was really happening to patients and their families.


Coordinated and empathic care would not seem to patients as miraculous and unpredictable as the lightning bolt of love (“un colpo di fulmine,” as the Italians put it). Instead, delivery of such care would become the norm; it would become increasingly fundamental to the way health care personnel saw themselves.


by Thomas H. Lee, MD  

image: http://bit.ly-dP1O76 

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I never understood the loss of empathy during medical training. Until now.

I never understood the loss of empathy during medical training. Until now. | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

I never understood the trend of loss of empathy during medical training. Until now.


See, when you’re in so much pain that if you thought of your life past this moment, this singular point in time, you would implode, pain seems as natural as breathing. Pain is part of life. Pain is nothing. You can’t stop to nurse your own wounds, you can’t talk about how much you hurt. So how could you possibly have enough room in your broken heart to take on someone else’s pain? So you don’t. You cover your bases and survive. You become that machine that you swore you’d never become.


Because it hurts too much to feel, and it’s so much easier to float than swim.



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Aus Nurse Educator's curator insight, September 24, 3:08 PM

If you only read one blog post today, please make it this one.

 

An anonymous author writes eloquently from her perspective as a medical student, but the emotions, experiences and turmoil could so easily have been expressed by healthcare professionals from other disciplines.

 

Powerful stuff.  

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EmpathyWorks: Comment to a Paulene Chen Column

EmpathyWorks: Comment to a Paulene Chen Column | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

I hope this does not sound self-serving. My entire professional life as a physican, teacher, researcher, consultant has been devoted to promoting empathy and patient and family-centered care within the context of clinician-patient interactions.


I am passionate about empathy.


So, soon after getting an e-mail with a link to Dr. Chen’s moving column, I eagerly read every word of every comment listed here. I found myself resonating with many comments….especially by those of you who were willing to share their stories about their experience as patients and family members.


by Michael Goldstein
July 18, 2009

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Missed Opportunities for Interval Empathy in Lung Cancer Communication

Missed Opportunities for Interval Empathy in Lung Cancer Communication | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Background
Empathy is important in patient-physician communication and is associated with improved patient satisfaction and adherence to physicians' recommendations.



 

Methods 
 To evaluate empathic opportunities and physician responses, we conducted a qualitative thematic analysis of 20 audiorecorded, transcribed consultations between patients with lung cancer and their thoracic surgeons or oncologists, from a larger observational study of 137 patients in a Veterans Affairs hospital in the southern United States. Using qualitative analysis, we collaboratively developed themes and subthemes until saturation. Then, each transcript was coded, using grounded theory methods, until consensus was achieved, counting and sequentially analyzing patient empathic opportunities and physician responses.


Diane S. Morse, MD;
Elizabeth A. Edwardsen, MD;
Howard S. Gordon, MD
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EmpathyWorks: Empathy and Reflective Statements in Primary Care Discussions About Weight

EmpathyWorks: Empathy and Reflective Statements in Primary Care Discussions About Weight | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

A recent study of discussions of weight concerns in primary care, published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22086809), 


found that physician empathy (assessed by trained raters who coded audiotapes of primary care visits) was linked to improved patient satisfaction, while physician use of reflective statements was associated with patients'  perception that the physician suppported their autonomy.


The study included 40 physicians and 320 of their overweight or obese patients.


 by Michael Goldstein

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« Moving Toward Global Compassion », a new book by Paul Ekman - Matthieu Ricard

« Moving Toward Global Compassion », a new book by Paul Ekman - Matthieu Ricard | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Renowned psychologist and emotions specialist Paul Ekman opens his recent book Moving Toward Global Compassion* with these words :


« It would be a different world, a desirable world, if all of us felt global compassion : concerned about the suffering of all people, not just those in our family, not just those with whom we are familiar, not just those who share the same skin color, language, or religion.


Some people do have global compassion, but most don’t. The big question is, why not? Why is global compassion the virtue of a few, not of the many? Is it possible, or even sensible to try to cultivate global compassion in everyone, or is that a fool’s dream? »


He also wonders about the nature of empathic concern for others’ suffering: «


Compassionate feelings or aspirations might be composed of concern for the suffering person, not requiring that the compassionate person feel the sufferer’s suffering. Concern is generally considered to be a variant of the emotion fear. ** »

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Empathy in Clinical Health Care

Empathy in Clinical Health Care | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
We believe that in many cases, medical training not only does not select for or cultivate such personality traits, but actively selects and develops barriers against them....


It is then that the student becomes a master
at learning to shut down empathy.


The living patient is not the primary component of education until the third year, and by then the preference is set for objective reasoning and testing versus empathy and compassion.


Internship and residency, the cornerstone of clinical training, are also closely associated with changes in mood and further loss of empathy. Depression, anger, and fatigue increase and empathetic concern decreases


[ii] -- the exact opposite of characteristics one would hope physician training would cultivate. Even more unfortunate, empathy seems to stabilize at this level over the remainder of training rather than increase.


[iii] Lack of empathy is closely correlated with burnout, a psychological state of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. 


Article co-authored with Ariela Marshall, M.D. trained in internal medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. A hematology-oncology fellow at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA


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Do doctors lack empathy? It might surprise you to realize who thought the answer was yes

Do doctors lack empathy? It might surprise you to realize who thought the answer was yes | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
What can humble arguably even the most prominent surgeon in the country? In a word: empathy


Cleveland Clinic CEO Dr. Toby Cosgrove was recently tapped by President Obama to lead the troubled VA, and by some accounts, there are few others who are more qualified to take the helm

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Empathy Needs to Be Part of the Medical Treatment

Empathy Needs to Be Part of the Medical Treatment | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

He was getting first rate medical care but he was not feeling cared for. What seems to be missing in this scenario is empathy, the ability to recognize emotions being experienced by another.


Empathy may not even be on the agenda in medical school or in hospitals.... 
 

Some have tried sprucing up the décor and
the menu, but they need to add empathy
to the menu.
 

When empathy -- or lack thereof -- in health care makes Harvard Business Review, it's time for hospitals to take notice. Dr. Thomas H. Lee wrote in HBR, "Social network scientists have shown that emotions and values can spread in a community with the same patterns as infectious diseases." He believes that if empathy was stressed in health care settings, "We would see an increase in the proportion of clinicians and other personnel who are clearly tuned in to what was really happening to patients and their families."



Eric J. Hall 

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Reflective writing and its impact on empathy in medical education: systematic review

Reflective writing and its impact on empathy in medical education: systematic review | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Purpose:
Medical schools are increasingly aware of the ways in which physician empathy can have a profound impact on patients’ lives and have developed humanities initiatives to address this concern. Reflective writing in particular is more commonly promoted in medical curricula, but there is limited research on the impact of reflective writing on medical student empathy levels. It aims to find the emotional effects of reflective writing interventions on medical and healthcare students by systemic review. 


Methods:
Two investigators independently reviewed educational publications for critical analysis. This review focused systematically on quantitative papers that measure the impact of reflective writing on empathy. 


Results:
Of the 1032 studies found on MEDLINE and CINAHL, only 8 used quantitative measures pre- and post-written reflection to measure any impact on empathy outcomes. The outcomes measured included impact of reflective writing exercises on student wellness, aptitude and/or clinical skills.


Of these studies, a significant change in student empathy was observed in 100% of the studies, demonstrating a significant change in outcomes. Conclusions: Although the lack of homogeneity in outcome measurement in the literature limits possible conclusion from this review, the overwhelmingly positive reporting of outcomes suggests that reflective writing should be considered in any medical curriculum.


Isabel Chen 

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Barbara Kerr's curator insight, August 13, 9:48 AM

Reflective writing can be helpful to many people, and now it has been shown to increase empathy in medical students. 

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Training Physicians for Empathy

Training Physicians for Empathy | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

A pair of training programs exposes medical students to art and loss, teaches them about the emotional aspects of patient care, and helps them avoid burnout.

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Not The End Of The Story: Building Empathy In Pursuit Of A Culture Of Health

Not The End Of The Story: Building Empathy In Pursuit Of A Culture Of Health | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it

Empathy may not be an intuitive aspect of a Culture of Health but, in fact, it is integral. We must all believe we have a shared stake in being healthy and in meeting people where they are with the help that they need to thrive. People who lack empathy make decisions that not only hurt themselves, but also can hurt others around them.


At the Foundation, we believe we will not be able to achieve our vision of a Culture of Health if we don't simultaneously work toward eliminating the culture of violence and trauma that defines the lives of too many Americans, including too many of our children.


Once again, empathy is imperative

to achieving this goal.


For some people who are exposed to violence or experience other forms of trauma early in their lives, it can have a lasting impact on their ability to empathize with others.


This seeming "lack of empathy" can be
a survival strategy.


For example, Senghur speaks about the abuse and neglect he experienced as a child and about his own experience as a shooting victim, which left him paranoid and willing to adopt the credo that "it's better to be the shooter than the person getting shot."

Tara OakmanBecome

Program Officer, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

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Medicine's Search for Meaning

Medicine's Search for Meaning | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
Doctors willing to heal themselves can help the medical profession recover from its own illness.


 While the training formally espouses the ethics of empathy, compassion and altruism, doctors and researchers say that the socialization process — the “hidden curriculum” — teaches something very different:

 

stay detached, objective, even a little cynical. Five out of six doctors say that medicine is in decline and close to 60 percent would not recommend it as a career for their children (pdf).



By DAVID BORNSTEIN

 

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Develop Compassion Before Medical School

Develop Compassion Before Medical School | Empathy and HealthCare | Scoop.it
It’s definitely possible to become a doctor without being compassionate, but the question is should you? If you are thinking about becoming a doctor, do your best to develop compassion before medical school.


Can someone become a doctor without being compassionate? It’s definitely possible.


Thousands of people apply and matriculate to medical school every year and not every single one of those applicants is truly compassionate.


You may know this to be true first hand. Maybe you’ve had an experience with a physician whom showed you little to no compassion. If you have had such an experience, you know how terrible it is.

 

 by  Edward Chang

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