Allergy (and clinical immunology)
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Allergy (and clinical immunology)
Ressources et Actualités pour la spécialité Allergie
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Scooped by Gilbert C FAURE
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A topic dedicated to allergy

... dans le contexte du DESC d'Immunologie clinique et allergologie en France

 

opened for 8 years, 

> 2700 Highly selected scoops in an evolving and controversial field

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Gilbert C FAUREs insight:

Il peut être complèté par les topics suivants, couvrant des domaines fondamentaux et/ou appliqués

Immunology: http://www.scoop.it/t/immunology

Mucosal immunity: http://www.scoop.it/t/mucosal-immunity

Autoimmunity: http://www.scoop.it/t/autoimmunity

Rheumatology: http://www.scoop.it/t/rheumatology-rhumatologie

Immunology and Biotherapies: http://www.scoop.it/t/immunology-and-biotherapies

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Quality of life of children aged 8‐12 years undergoing food allergy oral immunotherapy: Child and parent perspective - Epstein‐Rigbi - 2020 - Allergy

Quality of life of children aged 8‐12 years undergoing food allergy oral immunotherapy: Child and parent perspective - Epstein‐Rigbi - 2020 - Allergy | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Abstract Background Oral immunotherapy (OIT) for food allergy improves the quality of life (QOL) of children from parental perspective but little is known about the child perception. Methods The Fo...
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Airway Microbiota-Host Interactions Regulate Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor Levels and Influence Allergic Airway Inflammation

Airway Microbiota-Host Interactions Regulate Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor Levels and Influence Allergic Airway Inflammation | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Asthma is known to be modified by airway microbes. Jaeger et al. use a murine-adapted
bacterium to show that airway colonization evokes a Th17 response associated with
increased SLPI, an antimicrobial peptide, and protection from lung inflammation.
Sara Milon's curator insight, November 27, 3:35 AM
Voilà une étude intéressante sur l'impact chronique d'une bactérie qui entre par voie respiratoire sur les muqueuses et sur le microbiote aérien. 
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Maturation of the gut microbiome during the first year of life contributes to the protective farm effect on childhood asthma

Maturation of the gut microbiome during the first year of life contributes to the protective farm effect on childhood asthma | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Growing up on a farm is associated with an asthma-protective effect, but the mechanisms underlying this effect are largely unknown. In the Protection against Allergy: Study in Rural Environments (PASTURE) birth cohort, we modeled maturation using 16S rRNA sequence data of the human gut microbiome in infants from 2 to 12 months of age. The estimated microbiome age (EMA) in 12-month-old infants was associated with previous farm exposure (β = 0.27 (0.12–0.43), P = 0.001, n = 618) and reduced risk of asthma at school age (odds ratio (OR) = 0.72 (0.56–0.93), P = 0.011). EMA mediated the protective farm effect by 19%. In a nested case–control sample (n = 138), we found inverse associations of asthma with the measured level of fecal butyrate (OR = 0.28 (0.09–0.91), P = 0.034), bacterial taxa that predict butyrate production (OR = 0.38 (0.17–0.84), P = 0.017) and the relative abundance of the gene encoding butyryl–coenzyme A (CoA):acetate–CoA-transferase, a major enzyme in butyrate metabolism (OR = 0.43 (0.19–0.97), P = 0.042). The gut microbiome may contribute to asthma protection through metabolites, supporting the concept of a gut–lung axis in humans. Growing up in the rich microbial environment of a farm strongly influences the maturation of the gut microbiome in the first year of life, which helps protect against the development of asthma in children.
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Childhood allergy is preceded by an absence of gut lactobacilli species and higher levels of atopy‐related plasma chemokines - Björkander - - Clinical & Experimental Immunology

Childhood allergy is preceded by an absence of gut lactobacilli species and higher levels of atopy‐related plasma chemokines - Björkander - - Clinical & Experimental Immunology | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Detection of lactobacilli (L. casei, L. paracasei and L. rhamnosus) in feces during the first 2 months of life associates with reduced allergy‐prevalence and lower levels of atopy‐related chemokine...
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Programme de DPC 2020 • Société Française d'Immunologie

Programme de DPC 2020 • Société Française d'Immunologie | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Programme DPC n°50982000002
Gilbert C FAUREs insight:

pas covid-19, basophiles et cytométrie

Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, October 12, 8:24 AM

centré allergologie et cytométrie de flux, pas covid-19

Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, October 12, 8:25 AM

pas covid, flow cytometry et basophiles en allergie

 

autres ressources sur ces pages

https://www.scoop.it/topic/from-flow-cytometry-to-cytomics?q=basophil

 

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Examining breastmilk for clues in the fight against food allergies

Research examining the roles of human milk oligosaccharides in infant immunity suggests that these breastmilk components may help suppress allergic responses and boost gut health.
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Novel Insight into the in vivo Function of Mast Cell Chymase: Lessons from Knockouts and Inhibitors - FullText - Journal of Innate Immunity 2020, Vol. 12, No. 5 - Karger Publishers

Novel Insight into the in vivo Function of Mast Cell Chymase: Lessons from Knockouts and Inhibitors - FullText - Journal of Innate Immunity 2020, Vol. 12, No. 5 - Karger Publishers | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Mast cells are now recognized as key players in diverse pathologies, but the mechanisms by which they contribute in such settings are only partially understood.Mast cells are packed with secretory gr...
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#ALLERGYONLINE: Rapid Steps in Managing Allergies (RCGP Event) - Programme | Allergy Academy

#ALLERGYONLINE: Rapid Steps in Managing Allergies (RCGP Event) - Programme | Allergy Academy | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Morning Session  Morning Chair: Dr Tom Marrs 09:00 Welcome and Introduction Dr Tom Marrs Consultant in Paediatric Allergy St Thomas' Hospital, London 09:10 Remote managment of eczema and urticaria in primary care  Dr Alya Abdul-Wahab Consultant Dermatologist St George's Hospital, London 09:50 How to fix common gastro-intestinal symptoms in children Dr Rakesh Vora Paediatric Gastroenterology Consultant St Thomas' Hospital, London 10:35 << BREAK >>   11:00 How to manage IgE and non-IgE food allergies Dr Tom Marrs Consultant in Paediatric Allergy St Thomas' Hospital, London 11:40 How to recomment avoidance of egg and nuts  Rebecca Brocklehurst Paediatric Allergy Dietitian St Thomas' Hospital, London 12:20 << LUNCH >>  Afternoon Session Afternoon Chair: Dr Rosy Wells 13:00 Preventing food allergy: what to tell parents Dr Michael Perkin Consultant Allergist and Reader in Clinical Epidemiology St George's Hospital, London 13:30 Priorities to Tell Families Living With Food Allergy Professor Adam Fox   Professor in Paediatric Allergy St Thomas' Hospital, London 14:00 QUICK FIRE: Adrenaline auto-injector guide IN PRACTICE: Spare pens in schools Alia Boardman Clinical Nurse Specialst in Paediatric Allergy St George's Hospital, London 14:30 << BREAK >>  15:00 Managing Long-Term Asthma in a Virtual World  Dr Richard Iles Paediatric Respirology Consultant St Thomas' Hospital, London 15:40 How to recognise and treat allergic rhinitis Dr Anne Chsitopher Consultant Paediatrician and Allergist St George's Hospital, London 16:10  New inhalers and nasal sprays Katherine Knight Clinical Nurse Specialist in Paediatric Allergy St Thomas' Hospital, London  16:40 Webinar feedback and Close of meeting
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Role of Zinc Signaling in the Regulation of Mast Cell-, Basophil-, and T Cell-Mediated Allergic Responses

Role of Zinc Signaling in the Regulation of Mast Cell-, Basophil-, and T Cell-Mediated Allergic Responses | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Zinc is essential for maintaining normal structure and physiological function of cells. Its deficiency causes growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and neuronal degeneration. Zinc homeostasis is tightly regulated by zinc transporters and metallothioneins that control zinc concentration and its...
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Association Between Atopic Eczema and Cancer in England and Denmark | Allergy and Clinical Immunology | JAMA Dermatology | JAMA Network

Association Between Atopic Eczema and Cancer in England and Denmark | Allergy and Clinical Immunology | JAMA Dermatology | JAMA Network | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Two large matched cohort studies using health care data from England and Denmark investigate cancer risk in people with and without atopic eczema, including variation in risk associated with eczema severity and activity.
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Guideline on diagnostic procedures for suspected hypersensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics

Guideline on diagnostic procedures for suspected hypersensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
This guideline on diagnostic procedures for suspected beta-lactam antibiotic (BLA) hypersensitivity was written by the German and Austrian professional associations for allergology, and the Paul-Ehrlich Society for Chemotherapy in a consensus procedure ...
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Interleukin‐17 is a potential player and treatment target in severe chronic spontaneous urticaria - Sabag - 2020 - Clinical & Experimental Allergy

Interleukin‐17 is a potential player and treatment target in severe chronic spontaneous urticaria - Sabag - 2020 - Clinical & Experimental Allergy | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Abstract Background Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is considered an autoimmune disorder in 50% of cases at least, in which T‐ and mast cell mediators are considered to be the primary cause of ...
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Sublingual grass allergen specific immunotherapy: a retrospective study of clinical outcome and discontinuation | Physician's Weekly

Sublingual grass allergen specific immunotherapy: a retrospective study of clinical outcome and discontinuation | Physician's Weekly | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
SLIT is effective, tolerable, and convenient for many allergic patients. Still, real-world evidence is scarce and the aim of this study is to assess the patient-reported outcome of treatment with SLIT against grass pollen allergy in a consecutive patient population. The total sample size consisted of 329 patients who were confirmed to be allergic to timothy grass and had been prescribed SLIT were consecutively enrolled in the study and completed a questionnaire online or in hard copy. 207 patients provided their responses to the administered questionnaire. 113 patients reported they had completed the full 3-year treatment period, 49 were still on treatment, and 45 had discontinued treatment prematurely. The betterment of asthma was twice as common among patients who completed compared to discontinued treatment. Younger age and a higher prevalence of reported oral and/or gastrointestinal side effects characterized the group that terminated SLIT. Forgetfulness was the most commonly reported specific reason. The study concluded through its findings that the treatment perseverance resulted in the improved patient-reported outcome. Forgetfulness was the most frequently reported reason for discontinuing SLIT treatment against grass pollen allergy. Reference: https://clinicalmolecularallergy.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12948-018-0093-8
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Alpha-gal testing [A Test in Focus]

Alpha-gal testing [A Test in Focus] | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Joshua Bornhorst, Ph.D., associate director of Mayo Clinic's Clinical Immunoassay Lab, explains how humans can develop an allergy to the [...]...
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"过敏" is a very common disease in our... - Tianjin International Chinese College | Facebook

"过敏" is a very common disease in our... - Tianjin International Chinese College | Facebook | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
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Testing for IgG4 against foods is not recommended as a diagnostic tool: EAACI Task Force Report* - Stapel - 2008 - Allergy

Serological tests for immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) against foods are persistently promoted for the diagnosis of food‐induced hypersensitivity. Since many patients believe that their symptoms are relate...
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Food Intolerance Tests Are Shoddy Science and Traps for Disordered Eating

Food Intolerance Tests Are Shoddy Science and Traps for Disordered Eating | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
People are eliminating foods based on BS intolerance tests....
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Diagnosis & management of alpha-gal syndrome: lessons from 2,500 patients: Expert Review of Clinical Immunology: Vol 0, No 0

Diagnosis & management of alpha-gal syndrome: lessons from 2,500 patients: Expert Review of Clinical Immunology: Vol 0, No 0 | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Alpha-gal Syndrome (AGS) is a unique allergy to non-primate mammalian meat (and derived-products) that is associated with tick bites and is due to a specific IgE antibody to the oligosaccharide gal...
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Early life microbial exposures and allergy risks: opportunities for prevention

Early life microbial exposures and allergy risks: opportunities for prevention | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Allergies, including asthma, food allergy and atopic dermatitis, are increasing in prevalence, particularly in westernized countries. Although a detailed mechanistic explanation for this increase is lacking, recent evidence indicates that, in addition to genetic predisposition, lifestyle changes owing to modernization have an important role. Such changes include increased rates of birth by caesarean delivery, increased early use of antibiotics, a westernized diet and the associated development of obesity, and changes in indoor and outdoor lifestyle and activity patterns. Most of these factors directly and indirectly impact the formation of a diverse microbiota, which includes bacterial, viral and fungal components; the microbiota has a leading role in shaping (early) immune responses. This default programme is markedly disturbed under the influence of environmental and lifestyle risk factors. Here, we review the most important allergy risk factors associated with changes in our exposure to the microbial world and the application of this knowledge to allergy prevention strategies. Here, the authors explore how the modern way of life increases the risk of allergy and asthma, in particular by affecting the formation and diversity of the microbiota in early life. Understanding these changes highlights strategies for allergy prevention.
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Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease | NEJM

Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease | NEJM | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease About 7% of patients with asthma have mucosal swelling, nasal polyps, and worsening of asthma in response to aspirin and other COX-1 inhibitors. Symptoms may...
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Use of Animal Models to Investigate Major Allergens Associated with Food Allergy

Use of Animal Models to Investigate Major Allergens Associated with Food Allergy | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Food allergy is an emerging epidemic that affects all age groups, with the highest prevalence rates being reported amongst Western countries such as the United States (US), United Kingdom (UK), and Australia.
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Efficacy and safety of hydrolyzed formulas for cow's milk allergy management: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials - Stróżyk - 2020 - Clinical & Experimental Allergy

Efficacy and safety of hydrolyzed formulas for cow's milk allergy management: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials - Stróżyk - 2020 - Clinical & Experimental Allergy | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Abstract Objective To summarize evidence on the efficacy and safety of the use of extensively hydrolyzed formulas (EHFs) for the treatment of children with cow's milk allergy (CMA). Design Systemat...
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Age-of-onset information helps identify 76 genetic variants associated with allergic disease

Age-of-onset information helps identify 76 genetic variants associated with allergic disease | Allergy (and clinical immunology) | Scoop.it
Author summary So far, genetic studies of allergic disease have investigated the presence of the disease rather than the age at which the first allergic symptoms develop. We aimed to identify genetic risk variants associated with the age at which symptoms of allergic disease first develop, considering information from asthma, hay fever and eczema by examining 117,130 genotyped individuals of European ancestry from the UK Biobank study. We identified 50 variants with a significant independent association (P<3x10-8) with age-of-onset. Forty-five variants had comparable effects on the onset of the three individual diseases and 38 were also associated with allergic disease case-control status in an independent study (n = 222,484). We then performed a multivariate GWAS of age-of-onset and case-control status identified a further 26 associations that were missed by the univariate analyses of age-of-onset or case-control status only. 18 of 76 variants identified represent novel associations for allergic disease. We identified 81 likely target genes of the 76 genetic variants, including ADAM15, FOSL2, TRIM8, BMPR2, CD200R1, PRKCQ, NOD2, SMAD4, ABCA7 and UBE2L3. Our results support the notion that early and late onset allergic disease have partly distinct genetic architectures, potentially explaining known differences in pathophysiology between individuals.
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