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Five ways to make a difference

Five ways to make a difference | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
We aren’t here just to generate papers, people. We’re here to make a difference, to improve things. Heaven knows, there are enough issues out there that need our help! If your research ...
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Tidbits, titbits or tipbits?
Engaging leadership ideas to get your dendrites firing
Curated by Jess Chalmers
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[Video] Work to Learn  (Heather McGowan)

The most recent talk on future of work and learning at CRA with Heather McGowan.


Via Edumorfosis, juandoming, Jess Chalmers
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A very insightful framework

A very insightful framework | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
My colleague, Jane Hart, advocates Modern Workplace Learning. To help make that clear, she's created a framework and a diagram. And it's very very good.

Via juandoming
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What Skills Will You Need to Be Employable in 2030?

What Skills Will You Need to Be Employable in 2030? | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it

Now a new report by the British innovation foundation Nesta and University of Oxford future-gazers from the Oxford Martin School tries to establish how those changes will affect skill requirements by 2030. First, the team behind the research identified occupations that look set to be automated away (such as shelf fillers, van drivers, and administrators) and those that are likely to grow in the face of technology’s encroachment (including teachers, biotech researchers, and nurses).

Then, they looked at the skills that were most common among the occupations that had the greatest prospect of growing in the future, to work out which would be most useful when the robots come. From the report, here are the top five desirable future work skills:

Judgment and decision making;
Fluency of ideas;
Active learning;
Learning strategies;
Originality.


Via Kim Flintoff
Kim Flintoff's curator insight, March 10, 2019 11:17 AM
"Now a new report by the British innovation foundation Nesta and University of Oxford future-gazers from the Oxford Martin School tries to establish how those changes will affect skill requirements by 2030. First, the team behind the research identified occupations that look set to be automated away (such as shelf fillers, van drivers, and administrators) and those that are likely to grow in the face of technology’s encroachment (including teachers, biotech researchers, and nurses). Then, they looked at the skills that were most common among the occupations that had the greatest prospect of growing in the future, to work out which would be most useful when the robots come. From the report, here are the top five desirable future work skills: Judgment and decision making; Fluency of ideas; Active learning; Learning strategies; Originality."
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Peter Senge: How to Overcome Learning Disabilities in Organizations –

Peter Senge: How to Overcome Learning Disabilities in Organizations – | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
As an organization grows, managing the flow demands work items to move from one team/department to another. In quest to make these teams accountable, very specific KPI’s are established and tha

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​How to differentiate between AI, machine learning, and deep learning

​How to differentiate between AI, machine learning, and deep learning | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
Tech leaders need to put AI and its subcategories into practice--and into common business vocabulary that everyone can understand.

Via Charles Gerth, Jess Chalmers
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Global Commission on the Future of Work: Work for a brighter future

Global Commission on the Future of Work: Work for a brighter future | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
This landmark report by the ILO Global Commission on the Future of Work examines how to achieve a better future of work for all at a time of unprecedented change and exceptional challenges in the world of work.

Via Kim Flintoff
Kim Flintoff's curator insight, February 12, 2019 11:14 PM
"This landmark report by the ILO Global Commission on the Future of Work examines how to achieve a better future of work for all at a time of unprecedented change and exceptional challenges in the world of work."
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Michael Rosen’s Sad Book: A Beautiful Anatomy of Loss, Illustrated by Quentin Blake –

Michael Rosen’s Sad Book: A Beautiful Anatomy of Loss, Illustrated by Quentin Blake – | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
"Sometimes I'm sad and I don't know why. It's just a cloud that comes along and covers me up."

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Rescooped by Jess Chalmers from Educational Technology News
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Does your smartphone control you?

Does your smartphone control you? | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it

"As a computing teacher, I obviously love technology. Also, like most people, I love my smartphone. It never leaves my side, day or night, and it is always there when I need it to fill an awkward social moment or a 2-minute wait in a supermarket queue. Recently, however, I have questioned my relationship with my smartphone. Do I really need it by my side day and night? How does it affect my real life relationships and general concentration?"


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
EDTECH@UTRGV's curator insight, September 4, 2018 12:16 PM

Hmmm.... my smart devices may be getting the better of me.

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Inc. Magazine on LinkedIn: "Thinking you need to be happy all the time will backfire."

Inc. Magazine on LinkedIn: "Thinking you need to be happy all the time will backfire." | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
August 11, 2018: Inc. Magazine posted an article on LinkedIn
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The Difference Between Being Busy and Being Productive - John Spencer

The Difference Between Being Busy and Being Productive - John Spencer | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
When I was a new teacher, I believed I had to give 110% in everything I did. I thought that the best teachers were the ones who arrived first and left last. I was a busy teacher, taking on all kinds of committee work and saying yes to every project. But then I had a moment when I decided to “break up with busy.”

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How to Refocus Your Strategy and Reenergize Your Team

How to Refocus Your Strategy and Reenergize Your Team | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it

A person's passion is the sincerest definition of who they are. Passion can manifest itself in a hobby, an aspiration, or if you're really lucky, a career. Take two people, Joe and Jane, as an example. Joe has a passion outside of his career. He devotes a lot of his free time to this passion and naturally speaks about it to his peers. When his peers think of him they probably define him as "person passionate about X." Now take Jane, one of the lucky few who has made a career out of her passion. She devotes twice the amount of time, twice the amount of energy and twice the amount of conversation to her passion. How do you think her peers define her?

If you've read Simon Sinek's bestseller Start With Why, then Jane will remind you of Herb Kelleher, co-founder of Southwest Airlines, or Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Inc. Joe will remind you of the Wright Brothers. Each of these individuals built empires by undyingly following their passion. Sure, you can claim that these individuals are used as examples because of winner's bias. But they succeeded because not only were they extremely passionate. They succeeded because they were able to clearly communicate their visions.

I consider myself extremely lucky. Like Jane, I've built a career out of my passion. When I first launched my film production company, my team asked the same questions regarding our clients that our competition was asking:

What is this client doing that's different? What do they bring to the table? What problems are they solving for their customers?

While these questions helped us understand our clients, we realized they weren't getting to the core of what defined them. We were part of the same old convention of business. We were focusing on what our clients were doing and not why they were doing it in the first place. Once we realized this, we began asking ourselves different questions:

How can we harness the passion that defines the client's company to create a story? Are their employees inspired by that passion? Does the story align with their core values? How can we align the story with the company's brand mission? How is that story going to connect with their audience? How are we going to make the story authentic and engaging?
Via The Learning Factor
NeXus Portal Solutions's curator insight, January 4, 2019 12:54 AM
Teamwork
Shabbir Kabir's curator insight, May 4, 2019 5:00 PM

The beauty of these questions is that you can propose them to your clients, to your employees and even to yourself.

NeXus Portal Solutions's curator insight, January 4, 11:46 AM

Strategy and Energy and Your Team in 2020

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Stop Giving Meaningless Compliments And Do This Instead

Stop Giving Meaningless Compliments And Do This Instead | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it

You’ve probably been taught that giving compliments build relationships. In the self-help classic How to Win Friends and Influence People, Dale Carnegie stressed the importance of “giving sincere and honest appreciation” to others in life and work. He’s not wrong, but the thing is that showing real appreciation is difficult to do.

 

How many times has someone given you a “compliment” and you just know they’re trying to get something from you? Compliments can easily veer into flattery and feel insincere, leaving the recipient wondering about the giver’s hidden agenda.

 

Here’s what it takes to avoid all that–it’s easier than you think.


Via The Learning Factor
The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 1, 2018 5:26 PM

There’s a difference between a “compliment” and an “acknowledgement,” and it sometimes comes down to a single word.

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Seth's Blog: The four elements of entrepreneurship

Seth's Blog: The four elements of entrepreneurship | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
Are successful entrepreneurs made or born? We’d need to start with an understanding of what an entrepreneur is. They’re all over the map, which makes the question particularly difficult to navigate. There’s the 14-year-old girl who hitches a rid

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Asimov Predicted the State of Education in 2019. Was He Right?

Asimov Predicted the State of Education in 2019. Was He Right? | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it

On December 31, 1983, esteemed scholar and best-selling sci-fi writer Isaac Asimov predicted how the world would be in 2019.

He wrote: “Education, which must be revolutionized in the new world, will be revolutionized by the very agency that requires the revolution – the computer…”


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(Empathic Leadership) 3 Ways Increasing Your Empathy Makes You More Effective Leader

(Empathic Leadership) 3 Ways Increasing Your Empathy Makes You More Effective Leader | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
So, yes, empathy plays a big role in leaders creating a thriving environment where employees can do their best work, thus increasing retention, productivity, talent attraction and collaboration. And all of those "feel good" traits can lead to better market performance and profitability. Here are three ways for leaders to cultivate more empathy:

1. Practice presence.
If you feel constantly scattered and preoccupied, you’ll have no capacity to consider others’ perspectives or think clearly. You’ll be in defensive and reactive mode constantly, which is the antithesis of empathy. You’ll be too caught up in your own stuff!

Via Edwin Rutsch
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SHIFT HAPPENS 2 –

SHIFT HAPPENS 2 – | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
Visit the post for more.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, February 28, 2019 8:04 AM

"The report provides the reader a comprehensive overview of the changes in the learning-to-employment landscape, why it has happened, highlighting the dramatic increase in working learners and learning workers. These two populations – one pursuing traditional degrees while holding down jobs, and the other pursuing small increments of education to advance within their jobs – are responsible for the tremendous gains seen in online learning (520% in 10 years), MOOCs (910% in 5 years), micro-credentials, and more. The ecosystem changes drill all the way down to assessment within courses, which is starting to focus much less on “how much of the material do you remember?” and much more on demonstrations of skill mastery –i.e., “prove to us how well you know this, by what you can do with it.” The report then calls out the need for improvements in assessment to that will enable automated systems to consistently recognize and calibrate the “know” and “do” skills across the future worlds of learning and work. In response to the report Dr Edan Jorgensen, Industrial-Organizational Psychologist, reflected, ”The world is not stagnant. Hiring practices have been. Its time to shift from traditional methods that do not predict success, and look towards the future. The future is an emerging workforce that is more dynamic than degree and [job] references. They are about change and making a difference through their employment.”

 

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Predicting consumer behavior with big data

Predicting consumer behavior with big data | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
Businesses of the past operated like a rookie playing darts, throwing something and hoping it sticks.

Via Charles Gerth
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Learning and Student Success: Presenting the Results of the 2019 Key Issues Survey | EDUCAUSE

Learning and Student Success: Presenting the Results of the 2019 Key Issues Survey | EDUCAUSE | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
Each year, the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative surveys the higher education community on key issues and opportunities in postsecondary teaching and learn

Via juandoming, Jess Chalmers
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In and of itself

In and of itself | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
Culture is changed by design, and design by culture. There are things that look ‘right’, and others that don’t. We notice the mistyped word, the straight quote, the lousy kerning.…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, October 15, 2018 10:25 AM

"Culture is changed by design, and design by culture.

There are things that look ‘right’, and others that don’t. We notice the mistyped word, the straight quote, the lousy kerning.

But then, the paradigm shifts. An illuminated manuscript and a dime-store novel are both books, but neither would look right to someone accustomed to the other.

 

The challenge of breakthrough design is in doing it with intent. To deliver more, not less of the change you seek to make, the leverage you seek to provide. To do the work with knowledge and care, not laziness or haste.

 

There’s an internal consistency to breakthrough design. It’s of itself, it reflects the intent of the designer. Copying the status quo is easy, commodity work. Creating a new paradigm, one that resonates, is the real work the designer seeks to offer."

 

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Education in the Age of Automation

Education in the Age of Automation | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it

Automation is changing the nature of education and the ways people learn. More schools are using online learning to supplement in-class activities. In fact, some schools are completely online. Distributed computing on the internet and the automation that drives it makes this possible.

Everything changes when the formal education process becomes embedded in the internet. Courseware delivery becomes asynchronous; people learn what they want, when they want to. Test administration becomes more about the efficient acquisition of data and evaluation thereof. Human-to-human interaction as a basis for a meaningful educational experience becomes optional. Today, it’s entirely possible to learn all you need to know to make a good living in the modern world without ever needing to sit in a classroom or interact with a human directly. Let’s face it: You can do a lot of learning from YouTube.


Via Edumorfosis, Kim Flintoff
Edumorfosis's curator insight, September 9, 2018 12:32 PM

Learning in the 21st century does not require more presidents, chancellors, deans, directors, supervisors or teachers. Now we need learning ecology designers, cognitive coaches, influencers and makers. What our society needs is Augmented Learning: knowing how to develop superior cognitive abilities to work with machines, robots and automated systems.

Kim Flintoff's curator insight, September 9, 2018 7:13 PM
Edumorfosis's insight: Learning in the 21st century does not require more presidents, chancellors, deans, directors, supervisors or teachers. Now we need learning ecology designers, cognitive coaches, influencers and makers. What our society needs is Augmented Learning: knowing how to develop superior cognitive abilities to work with machines, robots and automated systems.
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Packing Up Trust

Packing Up Trust | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
Just a short post from the airport in DC as i set off home: i’m happy to say that ‘The Trust Sketchbook’ is being packaged up for launch next week. It’s been a long journey to get it here, mainly due to my prevarication in completing the illustrations. But we are here now, and the…

Via juandoming
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3 Easy Exercises That Will Make You Mentally Stronger in Just 5 Minutes

3 Easy Exercises That Will Make You Mentally Stronger in Just 5 Minutes | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
Everyone has the ability to build more mental muscle.
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6 Toxic Phrases That Should Never Come Out of a Leader's Mouth

6 Toxic Phrases That Should Never Come Out of a Leader's Mouth | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
This is the sure path to demoralizing your team.
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Jeff Bezos Banned PowerPoint in Meetings. His Replacement Is Brilliant

Jeff Bezos Banned PowerPoint in Meetings. His Replacement Is Brilliant | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it

In his 2018 annual letter, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos repeated his rule that PowerPoint is banned in executive meetings. What Bezos replaced it with provides even more valuable insight for entrepreneurs and leaders.

 

In his letter, and in a recent discussion at the Forum on Leadership at the Bush Center, Bezos revealed that "narrative structure" is more effective than PowerPoint. According to Bezos, new executives are in for a culture shock in their first Amazon meetings. Instead of reading bullet points on a PowerPoint slide, everyone sits silently for about 30 minutes to read a "six-page memo that's narratively structured with real sentences, topic sentences, verbs, and nouns."

 

After everyone's done reading, they discuss the topic. "It's so much better than the typical PowerPoint presentation for so many reasons," Bezos added.


Via The Learning Factor
Maggie Lawlor's curator insight, May 27, 2018 12:38 AM
So true and so important if you want to have an impact!
HOME GIRAFFE's curator insight, May 27, 2018 9:44 PM

A very interesting insight into the mind of one of the richest men in the world. Slightly different thinking and a willingness to take a different approach is what separates those who are successful from those who aren't.

Cherryl Cooley's curator insight, May 30, 2018 12:51 PM
Poets are natural storytellers. Most of the time, their craft is hard wired for narrative. Jeff Bezos tells you why you should have a poet on your payroll. And if you can't outright hire a poet, contract [her] to guide your team through its best organizational storytelling.
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Management Innovation eXchange |

Management Innovation eXchange | | Tidbits, titbits or tipbits? | Scoop.it
The Management Innovation eXchange (MIX) is an open innovation project aimed at reinventing management for the 21st century. The premise: while "modern" management is one of humankind's most important inventions, it is now a mature technology that must be reinvented for a new age. It's time to hack management.
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