Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)
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Google's 2nd try at Computer Glasses supposedly Translates Conversations in Real Time

Google's 2nd try at Computer Glasses supposedly Translates Conversations in Real Time | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

The science-fiction is harder to see in Google's 2nd try at augmented - reality glasses with a built-in computer.  A decade after the debut of Google Glass, a nubby, sci-fi-looking pair of specs that filmed what wearers saw but raised concerns about privacy and received low marks for design, the Alphabet unit on Wednesday previewed a yet-unnamed pair of standard-looking glasses that display translations of conversations in real time and showed no hint of a camera. The reveal of the new glasses reflect the company's growing caution amid greater scrutiny on Big Tech. When Google Glass was demonstrated at I/O in 2012, skydivers used it to live stream a jump onto a San Francisco building, with the company getting special air clearance for the stunt. This time around, Google showed only a video of its prototype, which displayed translations for conversations involving English, Mandarin, Spanish and American Sign Language.  It did not specify a release date or immediately confirm that the device lacked a camera. Google's hardware business remains small, with its global market share in smartphones, for instance, under 1%, according to researcher IDC.  The new AR pair of glasses was just one of several longer-term products Google unveiled at its annual Google I/O developer conference aimed at bridging the real world and the company's digital universe of search, Maps and other services using the latest advances in AI.  "What we're working on is technology that enables us to break down language barriers, taking years of research in Google Translate and bringing that to glasses," said Eddie Chung, a director of product management at Google, calling the capability "subtitles for the world." 

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Fitbit Irregular Heart Rhythm Notifications work on these trackers

Fitbit Irregular Heart Rhythm Notifications work on these trackers | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Fitbit is rolling out support for Irregular Heart Rhythm Notifications starting today for nine different fitness trackers and smartwatches.
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Earlier this month Fitbit was granted clearance by the US FDA to passively send notifications when signs of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) were detected by its smartwatches and trackers. Now, Fitbit is officially rolling out Irregular Heart Rhythm Notifications to nine of its products, including the Sense and Charge 5.  Irregular Heart Rhythm Notifications are what Fitbit has decided to call notifications that alert users of a potential heart problem. AFib is the most common form of irregular heart rhythm, affecting more than 5 million people in the United States alone according to John Hopkins Medicine, and Fitbit says over 33 million are affected globally. AFib is a serious condition that leaves those affected at 5X higher risk of a stroke, according to Fitbit. The technology that powers these notifications on Fitbit is similar to what is used for electrocardiogram (ECG) readings but doesn’t require quite as much hardware. Rather, they rely on Fitbit’s PPG (photoplethysmography) algorithm, which the company claims is 98% effective at detecting these conditions compared to a traditional ECG machine. Where ECG is restricted only to Fitbit Sense and Charge 5, Irregular Heart Rhythm Notifications will be available on nine products, as listed The technology that powers these notifications on Fitbit is similar to what is used for electrocardiogram (ECG) readings but doesn’t require quite as much hardware. Rather, they rely on Fitbit’s PPG (photoplethysmography) algorithm, which the company claims is 98% effective at detecting these conditions compared to a traditional ECG machine.

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Trial of Wearable Health Technology for Cancer patients starts

Trial of Wearable Health Technology for Cancer patients starts | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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A new trial opens in Greater Manchester (UK) to test cutting-edge wearable technologies involving patients who have received cancer treatment. The commercially-available health sensors and devices produce a digital fingerprint of vital signs that could allow doctors to assess the progress of their patients. The trial opens initially for blood cancer, lung, and colorectal cancer patients, the technologies under investigation include:  (1) a smart ring, worn on any finger made by the company Oura (2) the Withings ScanWatch, a hybrid smartwatch
(3) the Isansys system, which is worn on the chest. The technologies can assess a range of vital signs, including electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate, temperature, physical activity levels, and sleep.  Dr Anthony Wilson, Consultant in Anaesthesia and Critical Care at Manchester Royal Infirmary (MRI), part of MFT, is the clinical lead for the project. He said: "Cancer places a huge burden on the lives of people everywhere. This study uses cutting-edge technology that can monitor people during their treatment, with devices that they can wear all the time.  “We hope that it will provide new insights into how people cope with cancer treatment and what we can do to improve their recovery.”

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Samsung Not Doing Enough as Apple in AR Headset Category, May Fall Behind Due to Increased Effort on Foldable Handsets

Samsung Not Doing Enough as Apple in AR Headset Category, May Fall Behind Due to Increased Effort on Foldable Handsets | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Samsung is reportedly too focused on foldable smartphones, and that will cause it to lose to Apple in the AR headset business
Richard Platt's insight:

We continue hearing developments regarding Apple’s highly rumored Augmented Reality headset, Samsung’s  efforts in the same category are mum. One report states that Samsung will fall behind its biggest rival in the smartphone space because it is not focused on an important product category and there are many competitors in the AR headset game; Apple, Meta, Microsoft, Sony, and to an extent, Qualcomm.  Each of these firms have invested heavily in technology that will fuel the growth of AR, and the Samsung does not appear to be bothered that it will be left behind in this category. It's unclear if Samsung is developing a competing device to take on Apple’s AR headset, which is said to be delayed to 2023 due to overheating issues and software problems.  “Big tech companies, rather than smartphone manufacturers, are leading XR devices because they have the necessary content and platforms. Google has an Android OS,  MSFT has Xbox and Sony has PlayStation. It’s risky for Samsung to roll out XR devices, so it has no choice but to stick to foldable smartphones.” Even if Samsung develops products focused on AR, the report states that the company lacks the content and platform to create a metaverse ecosystem. According to Statista, AR, VR headsets, and related devices could contribute to a $300 billion market in 2024, and there will be over 70 million devices responsible for this increase in popularity. To stay competitive with the likes of Apple, Samsung would need to find an ‘XR partner’ who has had years of experience in the content and platform category, while Samsung would offer custom-developed silicon to mass produce such a product. Microsoft and Qualcomm have created such a partnership, so there is no reason why Samsung cannot replicate a similar one.

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How US Army's new AI/AR will help Military Mechanics and Medics

How US Army's new AI/AR will help Military Mechanics and Medics | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Sometime in the future, a mechanic may need to fix a robot they've never encountered before. Here's how AI and AR could help.
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DARPA is building a manual for repairing war machines that don’t exist yet. That’s the premise of “Autonomous Multimodal Ingestion for Goal-Oriented Support,” or AMIGOS, a new program in which AI and augmented reality are used to assemble real-time training manuals for military mechanics and medics. A augmented reality company Patched Reality, was awarded a $5.8 million contract by DARPA, the Pentagon’s blue-sky projects wing. The goal is to make a program that can guide users through complex operations beyond their existing knowledge, like letting a mechanic repair a machine they’ve never seen before.  “Augmented reality, computer vision, language processing, dialogue processing and reasoning are all AI technologies that have disrupted a variety of industries individually but never in such a coordinated and synergistic fashion,” Charles Ortiz, the principal investigator for AMIGOS, said in a Xerox release. For now, the program will work on creating two component parts for AMIGOS. Xerox describes one of them as an offline tool that can scan text from manuals and other instructional material, like videos, to create the step-by-step guide needed for a task. The second component will be online, and intends to use AI to adapt the manual’s instructions into a real-time instructional guide. The offline component ingests learning material, preparing it for use by the online component, which draws on the ingested manuals to generate an updated guide in real time for the user.  Both machine and human body repair are specialized tasks, with years of training, and often professional requirements for continuing education. No part of AMIGOS seems built to replace that. Instead, by offering the knowledge of a manual in real-time and through an augmented reality headset, AMIGOS could give crucial knowledge to people who would otherwise not have it.

Learning on the fly, even with guidance, isn’t ideal, but it’s much better than a medic simply being unable to treat a life-threatening injury in the field because they are not sure about how to proceed.

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InWith promises world's first soft smart contact lens

InWith promises world's first soft smart contact lens | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
A smart lens could deliver real-time information directly to your eyes.
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The concept of contact lenses that can deliver real-time information to the human eye has been around in movies for years. InWith Corporation, which says it's developed the world's 1st soft electronic contact lens. In an interview with CNET, CEO Michael Hayes says the lenses will work with your smartphone or another external device to show you real-time information about the world around you. "You'll be able to see things such as, What is the speed limit on this road? What direction am I heading? Where is the next exit and how many miles away?"  Hayes also says the lenses will have the ability to help people who suffer from Presbyopia (the loss of your eyes' ability to focus on nearby objects) by adjusting to different scenarios in real-time, eliminating their need for multifocals or reading glasses. To be clear, we haven't seen a demonstration of InWith's technology, but Hayes says the company is aiming for FDA approval this year. For more details watch the video 

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Ambitious Smart Ring Hopes to one day Monitor Chronic Illnesses

Ambitious Smart Ring Hopes to one day Monitor Chronic Illnesses | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Introduced at CES 2022, the Movano Ring is a smart ring that aims to one day provide FDA-cleared insights into chronic illnesses. The ring is currently undergoing clinical trials and accuracy studies for heart rate, SpO2, and respiratory rate with the aim of providing non-invasive glucose monitoring and cuffless blood pressure.
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For CES 2022, health tech company Movano is announcing the Movano Ring, a wearable that aims to help people affordably monitor chronic illnesses and better understand their data.  The Movano Ring will measure all the basic metrics, including heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV), sleep, respiration, temperature, blood oxygen levels, steps, and calories burned. However, instead of a raw data dump, Movano says it’ll distill how your metrics relate to each other “take a more proactive approach to mitigating the risks of chronic disease.” For example, the Movano app might tell you how your exercise habits impact your sleeping patterns or HRV over time.  This isn’t surprising — more wearable makers are shifting away from steps and calories in favor of simplified scores and insights. The Oura Ring, Whoop, and Fitbit all use scores to contextualize sleep and recovery data but mostly focus on telling you whether to push yourself or take it easy on a given day. They’re also accompanied by graphs and lengthy descriptions that can, at times, be overwhelming. Movano says it wants its insights to be more actionable. So far, the app screenshots that Movano showed The Verge don’t show anything groundbreaking, but the way the data is presented is more digestible than many trackers out there.

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Wearables Market Grew 10% in Q3 thanks to Hearables - IDC 

Wearables Market Grew 10% in Q3 thanks to Hearables - IDC  | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
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IDC's report on the wearables market in Q3 of 2021 shows a near 10% increase over the same period last year.  The growth was mainly down to hearables (headphones and earbuds), which grew 26.5% to capture nearly 65% of the market in Q3. Wrist-worn wearables followed with 34.7%. But according to IDC's numbers, demand is slowly shifting from wristbands to watches. Consumers are reportedly looking for more capable devices, and watches have gotten closer in price to bands. Apple held its number one spot, despite having to push the Watch Series 7 to Q4 due to supply issues. Its overall shares declined by 3.6%, but were kept solid by AirPods and Beats sales. Still, Apple grabbed over 53% of the dollar value for the entire market in Q3. Samsung tied Xiaomi for 2nd place with 12.7M shipments in Q3 - a 13.8% increase YoY. This is due to strong Galaxy Watch 4 sales. Xiaomi's market position worsened by nearly 24% over last year, due to its reliance on bands. Finally, Indian brand Imagine Marketing, which sells BoAt devices, found itself in the top 5, thanks to its strong marketing and affordable products.

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Health apps and wearables help rich people the most, study finds

Health apps and wearables help rich people the most, study finds | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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A meta-analysis found that digital health tools promoting physical activity only work for people with higher socioeconomic status. They don’t work for poorer people

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What Your Wearable Tech And Biometric Data Are Telling You About Your Health

What Your Wearable Tech And Biometric Data Are Telling You About Your Health | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Richard Platt's insight:

Wearable tech devices are as popular as ever, especially now that they’re packed with advanced capabilities for tracking sleep data and a slew of biomarkers like Heart Rate Variability/HRV, heart rate, stress, Muscle Ox %, and lactic overload for muscle fatigue. Using this data means establishing your baseline, noting patterns, and getting real-time biometric data that puts the power in your hands for positive changes toward optimized health

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Apple Watch Series 8 Suppliers Developing Blood Glucose Monitoring Components

Apple Watch Series 8 Suppliers Developing Blood Glucose Monitoring Components | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
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According to a paywalled report from DigiTimes, Apple and its suppliers have begun working on short-wavelength infrared sensors, a commonly used sensor type for health devices. The new sensors, likely to be fitted on the back of the Apple Watch, will enable the device to measure the amount of sugar in a wearer's blood. 

According to The Wall Street Journal, however, Apple is facing challenges in incorporating blood glucose capabilities into the Apple Watch. Current methods of measuring blood glucose levels include taking a sample of blood and using a medical-grade device. With the Apple Watch, Apple would be looking to take a typically invasive medical practice and make it non-invasive. The Apple Watch, over the years, has gained more comprehensive health features, most recently with the Apple Watch Series 6 that added a blood oxygen sensor. Compared to the first Apple Watch capable of measuring heart rate and primary daily activity, the Apple Watch is now capable of taking an ECG, detecting falls, high and low heart rates, blood oxygen levels, and more. In iOS 15, the Health app added blood glucose highlights as a health metric. ‌iOS 15‌‌ users have to use external hardware to provide the data, but that would change if Apple adds a glucose monitoring feature to a future Apple Watch model.

 

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Wearable, Non-Invasive Sensor Measures Glucose in Sweat 

Wearable, Non-Invasive Sensor Measures Glucose in Sweat  | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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A Penn State research group is confident that the tiny levels of glucose found in sweat can provide a meaningful correlation with the amount found in the blood, and has designed a device to measure sweat glucose levels. The technology involves drawing sweat into a microfluidic chamber, where glucose reacts with an alkaline solution to form a compound that can react with a nickel-gold alloy present in the device. This reaction causes an electrical signal that can indicate the amount of glucose present in the sweat.  The device has numerous advantages over another sensor type, that requires enzymes to detect glucose. “An enzymatic sensor has to be kept at a certain temperature and pH, and the enzyme can’t be stored in the long term,” said Huanyu Cheng, a researcher involved in the study, in a press release. “A nonenzymatic glucose sensor, on the other hand, is advantageous in terms of stable performance and glucose sensitivity regardless of these changes.” At only the size of a quarter, the device is unobtrusive. So far, the researchers have tested it with some volunteers and found that it could successfully track changes in blood glucose before and after a meal.  “We want to work with physicians and other health care providers to see how we can apply this technology for daily monitoring of a patient,” said Cheng. “This glucose sensor serves as a foundational example to show that we can improve the detection of biomarkers in sweat at extremely low concentrations.”

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StethoMe’s Smart Stethoscope lets your kid’s Doctor listen to their lungs from afar

StethoMe’s Smart Stethoscope lets your kid’s Doctor listen to their lungs from afar | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
When you or your kid have any sort of respiratory issue, figuring out what’s happening minute-by-minute — and how well treatment is working — is a stressful, frustrating, and anxiety-filled process. I imagine it’s all of the above and more in the middle of a friggin’ RESPIRATORY DISEASE pandemic. StethoMe, a team competing in this […]
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When you or your kid have any sort of respiratory issue, figuring out what’s happening minute-by-minute — and how well treatment is working — is a stressful, frustrating, and anxiety-filled process. I imagine it’s all of the above and more in the middle of a respiratory disease pandemic.  StethoMe, a team competing in this week’s TechCrunch Disrupt Startup Battlefield competition, is looking to help alleviate some of this for children with asthma and their parents. It has built a smart, connected stethoscope that can help parents perform lung examinations at home, sending high-fidelity recordings directly to their doctor and using ML to help flag potential concerns.  Using your phone to tell it what kind of exam you want to perform, and the built-in screen will walk you through the process. It’ll tell you where on the chest to place the device, whether or not the room you’re in is quiet enough, and more. After measuring across 6-8 points, it’ll provide you a report with details like respiratory rate, heart rate, and whether or not it detected any audio abnormalities — including wheezing, rhonci (gurgling sounds caused by fluid), or crackles. From there, you’re able to send a link to the report directly to your kid’s doctor, where they can hear the recorded audio from each point on the chest. A scrubbable spectrogram, meanwhile, provides a visual overview of each recording and flags and labels any abnormalities detected by the system. StethoMe says it has raised a few rounds at this point (a $400K pre-seed, $2M seed, and $2.5M Series A) and received nearly $3M in grants from Poland’s National Center for Research and Development.

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Scientists 'knit' soft robotic wearables for easier design and fabrication

Scientists 'knit' soft robotic wearables for easier design and fabrication | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

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Scientists have developed a new way to design and build soft robots that could lead to new assistive and rehabilitative devices having made considerable progress with soft robots used for assistive wearables, rehabilitative technologies and more. Powered by compressed air, they offer advantages over regular robots like sensing capabilities, soft touch, and high power-to-input ratios.

Designing and building them has been a challenge, however, due to the need for a manual design and fabrication pipeline that has a lot of trial and error in the process. Scientists from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have come up with a new pipeline called "PneuAct" that uses computers and a special knitting process to design and digitally fabricate the soft pneumatic actuators. Their work could eventually lead to new assistive and rehabilitative devices. "PneuAct uses a machine knitting process — not dissimilar to your grandma's plastic needle knitting — but this machine operates autonomously," according to CSAIL researchers. The designer simply needs to specify the stitch and sensor design patterns in software to program actuator movements, which can be simulated before printing. The textile piece is then fabricated by the knitting machine, which is fixed to a rubber silicone tube to complete the actuator.  The new devices are considerably improved over older designs, incorporating programmed bending when inflated and the ability to incorporate feedback. "For example, the team used the actuators to build a robot that sensed when it was touched specifically by human hands, and reacted to that touch," the team wrote. The glove could be worn to supplement finger muscle movement, adding extra force for grasping to help people with finger or hand injuries.  The team plans to explore actuators with different shapes, and incorporate task-driven designs with target poses and optimal stitch patterns. "Our software tool is fast, easy to use, and it accurately previews users' designs, allowing them to quickly iterate virtually while only needing to fabricate once," said Harvard University's Andrew Spielberg, an author on the paper.

 

The actuators use conductive yarn for sensing so they can essentially "feel" or respond to what they grab. As proof of concept, the team developed several prototypes including an assistive glove, soft hand, interactive robot and a pneumatic walking quadruped, as shown in the video above.

 

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The Problem With Wearables is Bigger Than Just Wearability 

The Problem With Wearables is Bigger Than Just Wearability  | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
A survey of patients who've been prescribed wearables finds some issues with the technology and design, but also a lack of education on how to use the mHealth devices and how they'll improve care management.

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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A survey of patients who've been prescribed wearables finds some issues with the technology and design, but also a lack of education on how to use the mHealth devices and how they'll improve care management.  Read on for more details.

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Tiny Transistor Arrays Record Electrical Activity inside Human Heart Cells 

Tiny Transistor Arrays Record Electrical Activity inside Human Heart Cells  | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
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Using a novel electronic sensor array, researchers in the US have captured the flow of electrical signals within individual cells, as well as between multiple cells in artificial 3D heart tissue. The minimally invasive device, developed by a team headed up at the UCSD, revealed a significant difference between the propagation speeds of signals travelling within and between cells. the researchers studied the propagation of signals within heart muscle cell cultures and engineered 3D cardiac tissues, placed on top of the FET array. For the first time, this allowed them to measure intracellular signals in the 3D tissue. The experiment revealed some particularly intriguing behaviours: showing that electrical signals travel five times faster inside cells than between them. The technique may eventually allow researchers to study and diagnose disorders in vivo in biological tissues. The result could have broad implications for biologists’ understanding of cellular physiology. By identifying irregularities in signal propagations, the team hopes that clinicians could gain a detailed knowledge of heart disorders such as arrhythmia, heart attack and cardiac fibrosis. Although the practical medical use of the device is still some way off, the approach could eventually lead to FET arrays that can be implanted on real biological tissues, with artificial intelligence processing algorithms employed to offer valuable patient diagnoses. The researchers describe their work in Nature Nanotechnology.

 

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Abbott is working on ‘biowearables’ to measure glucose, lactate and ketones

Abbott is working on ‘biowearables’ to measure glucose, lactate and ketones | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
The devices will be able to continuously monitor your body's composition and help you take action..
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Health tech company Abbott is working on “biowearable” devices to track certain elements of one’s body, with the idea that they’ll provide users with more insights about their general health and help them take action. The Lingo devices will measure glucose, ketones and lactate, and eventually they may be able to monitor alcohol levels.

The upcoming biowearables, which aren't intended for medical use, athletes are using a version of the device to help optimize their food intake for their training and competition. The company is planning to expand glucose monitoring use cases to help the public manage things like sleep, weight and energy levels.  The aim of the ketone biowearable is to offer continuous tracking of ketones so that wearers can see how quickly they get into ketosis. That's a state in which a body doesn't have enough carbohydrates to turn into energy and instead burns fat (and generates ketones). With the lactate wearable, Abbott's goal is to continuously measure lactate build up while working out. It says that can provide insights on athletic performance.  It'll be some time before Abbott can bring this tech to the consumer market. If and when the biowearables do arrive and they work as promised, they should help those interested in keeping close tabs on the condition of their body to do so.

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Apple still several years away from adding major new health sensors to Apple Watch

Apple still several years away from adding major new health sensors to Apple Watch | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
A new report by Bloomberg indicates that Apple is still several years away from bringing major new health sensors to the Apple Watch.
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In the latest "Power On" newsletter, Bloomberg’s Mark Gurman talks about what sensors Apple is developing for the Apple Watch and when we’ll see them landing in the actual product. His answer, unfortunately, is not very good for those waiting for a new smartwatch. Gurman says there are 3 big new features in the works: glucose/blood sugar monitoring, the ability to take blood pressure, and determining body temperature. All of these sensors have been rumored for a while, but Bloomberg’s isn’t convinced that these features will launch anytime soon on a new Apple Watch: Don’t expect any of these soon, though. Body temperature was on this year’s roadmap, but chatter about it has slowed down recently. Blood pressure is at least 2-3 years away, while I wouldn’t be surprised if glucose monitoring doesn’t land until later in the second half of the decade  With that in mind, the only new health feature we could expect from the Apple Watch Series 8 could be the ability to detect advanced sleep patterns and sleep apnea, as reported last year by The WSJ.  Not only the next Apple Watch looks way less exciting, but Apple may need to reevaluate its one-year strategy of a new smartwatch every 12 months, as technology isn’t following its marketing strategy.

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New patent shows Apple Watch without a Digital Crown

New patent shows Apple Watch without a Digital Crown | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
A new patent from Apple shows an Apple Watch with optical sensors where the Digital Crown is currently located.
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One of the key aspects of the Apple Watch is the Digital Crown, which lets users navigate the watchOS interface without having to touch the screen all the time. However, it seems that Apple is working on ways to replace it as a new patent shows an Apple Watch with optical sensors where the Digital Crown is currently located.  As reported by Patently Apple, the USPTO this week published a new patent from Apple that reveals how the Digital Crown on the Apple Watch can be replaced by optical sensors that are able to identify user gestures.

The patent is named “Watch with optical sensor for user input” and demonstrates how the company can use new sensors to let users scroll through the interface while reducing the number of moving parts in the Apple Watch with the removal of the Digital Crown. Optical sensors would detect the gestures made by users to turn them into system controls. Apple notes in the patent that removing the Digital Crown can not only make the Apple Watch more durable, but can also free up space that can be used by other components such as new sensors or even a larger battery.  e.g. the user can provide motions and gestures near the input component that the input component can detect and interpret and user inputs to control an aspect of the watch. The motions and gestures provided by the user can be directly detected with optical systems of the input component, so that the number of moving parts are reduced and space within the watch is more efficiently utilized.

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Advancing Patient Care With Wearable Medical Devices

Advancing Patient Care With Wearable Medical Devices | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Research shows the wearables market is estimated to grow to a 19% CAGR from 2020 to 2030, representing a potential economic value of $0.5-$1.8 trillion by 2030. This growth includes consumer, industrial, and medical applications, but market activity indicates significant promise (and movement) in the healthcare domain:  In 2020, global shipments of hearables, watches, wristbands, and other wearables stand at 444.7 million units. Academia continues to drive innovation to ever-smaller technology, with advances in implantable chips, flexible batteries, and flexible sensors.  Device manufacturers are well-positioned to capitalize on this unique opportunity. However, to deliver devices useful for clinicians and patients, the wearable tech must advance further. Breakthroughs in healthcare will likely come from devices that not only accurately measure disease-specific biomarkers at home but also provide real-time contextual data on other features that affect disease management. These insights must be shared via a simple user experience to encourage patient adoption and must demonstrate improved medical care and reduced costs to providers and payers.  Based on our experience, wearable device manufacturers and service providers should focus on three areas to ensure success in the market:

(1) Meeting and exceeding user needs
(2) Delivering rigorous, compliant data and insights for the entire patient care ecosystem
(3) Crafting a viable business model

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Senseglove Nova hands-on with Haptic Gloves 

Senseglove Nova hands-on with Haptic Gloves  | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
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Senseglove Nova is an overall big improvement with regard to the previous version of Senseglove gloves. The only worsening is that the force feedback is slightly weaker, but there have been huge improvements in comfort, usability, design, and tactile feedback. Using these gloves wirelessly has been very cool and I think that with this iteration they are finally usable by every company. The price, $5000, if your company can spare the money but make sure to get good effective and efficient training. Haptics in VR is still in the early stages, so this product is not perfect: the force feedback emulation still needs a lot of work to appear realistic. But when it works well, or where the vibrations on the fingertips are coherent with what you are touching in VR can feel a bit magical, and help you see the potential of this technology, that is the one of increasing the realism of the virtual simulation. The purpose of these gloves (according to the author) is to give decent haptic feedback for an affordable price, and he thinks that it has been fulfilled. If you want perfect haptics, instead, you have probably to wait for more iterations of these devices to start seeing something meaningful for you.

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Seattle startup calls Meta’s VR glove prototype ‘substantively identical’ to its own Patented Tech

Seattle startup calls Meta’s VR glove prototype ‘substantively identical’ to its own Patented Tech | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

HaptX has been working on haptic gloves that employ microfluidic feedback technology, with an aim toward helping enterprise customers working in VR and robotics. In a statement to GeekWire, HaptX founder and CEO Jake Rubin said Meta’s gloves “appear to be substantively identical to HaptX’s patented technology.”  Rubin pointed to core components of the Meta prototype, including a silicone-based microfluidic tactile feedback laminate and pneumatic control architecture.  In its news release and a longer blog post Tuesday, Meta listed examples of where its team was pushing human-computer interaction forward and “creating new breakthroughs to make haptic gloves a reality.” Among those breakthroughs, Meta listed microfluidics and said it was “developing the world’s first high-speed microfluidic processor.” Rubin said HaptX welcomes “interest and competition in the field of microfluidic haptics; however, competition must be fair for the industry to thrive.”

He added that the startup has not heard from Meta but that HaptX would “look forward to working with them to reach a fair and equitable arrangement that addresses our concerns and enables them to incorporate our innovative technology into their future consumer products.” GeekWire has reached out to Meta for reaction to HaptX’s assertions and will update this story when we hear back. Update: Meta declined to respond to HaptX’s assertions.

 

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Oura adds period prediction and heart rate to its next-gen smart ring

Oura adds period prediction and heart rate to its next-gen smart ring | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
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Oura’s Generation 3 smart ring will have a whole new slate of features, including period prediction, blood oxygen monitoring, and real-time heart rate tracking. The new ring will jump from 3 to 7 temperature sensors and add a pulse oxygen sensor, Oura CEO Harpreet Rai told The Verge.  A new, green LED light will monitor heart rate throughout the day. Starting at the end of 2021, users will also be able to record their heart rate during exercise and see information about heart rate recovery after a workout is done. The upgrades underscore the company’s focus on health, Rai says, particularly the period prediction feature. The new ring will use shifts in temperature and user feedback to predict when a user might get their period up to 30 days in advance. Body temperature changes through the menstrual cycle, rising just before ovulation and falling as mensuration begins. Oura is also moving to a membership model for its app, priced at $5.99 a month. Users who upgrade from an older ring to the new model will get a discount on the hardware and a free lifetime membership.  The Generation 3 ring will start shipping November 15th. Read on for more details.

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iFixit’s Apple Watch Teardown (includes a Theory about the Device’s Delayed Launch)

iFixit’s Apple Watch Teardown (includes a Theory about the Device’s Delayed Launch) | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it
Supply challenges related to the screen may have delayed the launch.
Richard Platt's insight:

As has become something of a ritual, tools-seller and repair-advocacy group iFixit has published a detailed teardown of the latest Apple product. This time, we get a look at the innards of the Apple Watch Series 7.  Of course, iFixit's teardowns are as much about assessing the serviceability of a device as they are about geeking out about hardware changes. iFixit gave the Watch a 6/10 repairability score, citing its "modular construction" and "straightforward access to the screen and battery." Knocks against the Watch include the absence of a service manual and the fact that the screen must be unglued and reglued with every repair. The Apple Watch Series 7 appears to use an on-cell touch OLED panel, the same type seen in the iPhone 13 line. Consulting with a former Apple engineer, iFixit suggests that supply challenges related to this display tech are likely the reason the Apple Watch launched a bit late this year and why the device didn't get a release date in last month's keynote announcing it.  Oh yeah the diagnostic port is gone, iFixit speculating Apple now uses a wireless interface to service the Watch and reasonably ventures a guess that this may be a test drive for the eventual removal of the iPhone's lone port. Watch's rated battery life the same as the 2020 model, despite the larger, more power-hungry screen.

 

 

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Withings gets FDA nod for medical smartwatch ScanWatch

Withings gets FDA nod for medical smartwatch ScanWatch | Wearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot) | Scoop.it

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Richard Platt's insight:

Withings said it has received clearance from the FDA for its medical-grade ScanWatch, a smartwatch that can detect heart rate problems.

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