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Impact of the internet age on human culture and K-20 education policy/administration
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind presently exists in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

gurlcases's comment, July 3, 12:52 AM
good
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'Next-Generation' Total Artificial Heart Successfully Transplanted into First US Patient :: Singularity Hub

'Next-Generation' Total Artificial Heart Successfully Transplanted into First US Patient :: Singularity Hub | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Late last year, a French company called Carmat received approval in Europe for its total artificial heart. It’s exactly what it sounds like: a heart made of synthetic and biological materials intended for implantation into people who need heart transplants. Now, just half a year later, the first US patient has received one of the hearts.

 

"The transplant took place last week in a 39-year-old man at Duke University Hospital in North Carolina. The man didn’t go to the hospital expecting to have a heart transplant, but it ended up saving his life."

 

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The FTC Votes Unanimously to Enforce Right to Repair | WIRED

The FTC Votes Unanimously to Enforce Right to Repair | WIRED | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
DURING AN OPEN commission meeting Wednesday, the Federal Trade Commission voted unanimously to enforce laws around the Right to Repair, thereby ensuring that US consumers will be able to repair their own electronic and automotive devices.

The FTC’s endorsement of the rules is not a surprise outcome; the issue of Right to Repair has been a remarkably bipartisan one, and the FTC itself issued a lengthy report in May that blasted manufacturers for restricting repairs. But the 5 to 0 vote signals the commission’s commitment to enforce both federal antitrust laws and a key law around consumer warranties—the Magnuson Moss Warranty Act—when it comes to personal device repairs.

The vote, which was led by new FTC chair and known tech critic Lina Khan, also comes 12 days after President Joe Biden signed a broad executive order aimed at promoting competition in the US economy. The order addressed a wide range of industries, from banks to airlines to tech companies. But a portion of it encouraged the FTC, which operates as an independent agency, to create new rules that would prevent companies from restricting repair options for consumers.

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

This might seem trivial to some, but it's really important, in my opinion.

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The 7 Best Ways to Learn How to Code for Free :: Make Use Of

The 7 Best Ways to Learn How to Code for Free :: Make Use Of | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Coding used to be limited to computers and video games, but now it encompasses every part of our lives.

Coding is now an essential part of most major industries such as healthcare, finance, engineering, etc. The increasing impact of coding worldwide, in turn, exponentially increases the demand for proficient coders. Read on as we walk you through the basics of coding and how you, too, can learn to code." 

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

Excellent article for beginners. Introduces the most common purposes for the most popular languages and identifies free resources to learn each.

 

Jim Lerman's curator insight, July 19, 9:21 AM

Jim Lerman's insight:

Excellent article for beginners. Introduces the most common purposes for the most popular languages and identifies free resources to learn each.

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Americans and Digital Knowledge | Pew Research Center

Americans and Digital Knowledge | Pew Research Center | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Via The Scout Report

 

"This report from the Pew Research Center examines how well American adults understand a range of digital technology topics. The results of the study were rather mixed, revealing generally strong knowledge in some areas (e.g., phishing, cookies, ads) but glaring gaps in others. For example, less than 30 percent of respondents accurately answered questions about private browsers or 2-factor authentication. The study's results also highlighted considerable group-level variation, as people under 50 and with higher educational attainment tended to be more knowledgeable about digital topics. On the page linked above, visitors can find the complete report (downloadable as a PDF) and topline results under Report Materials (in the sidebar on the right). Readers may want to take the interactive Digital Knowledge Quiz found there, which features the same 10 questions asked of survey respondents. This report was based on a June 2019 nationally representative survey of 4,272 US adults conducted by the Pew Research Center's American Trends Panel. It was written by researchers Emily A. Vogels and Monica Anderson. "

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Five Steps to Embed Growth Mindset Practices into Learning Culture :: Nik Peachey

Five Steps to Embed Growth Mindset Practices into Learning Culture :: Nik Peachey | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Creating growth mindsets in learning spaces requires thoughtful and intentional practices. Here are five to explore.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 17, 1:39 AM

I know there's a lot of scepticism about growth mindset, but these steps make a lot of sense regardless of what you feel about the overall concept.

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Need to Buy Microsoft Office? Here's How to Get a Huge Discount :: Make Use Of

Need to Buy Microsoft Office? Here's How to Get a Huge Discount :: Make Use Of | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"For those of us on a budget, buying software can be expensive. With many companies switching to subscription models, the cost of paying for new versions of business essentials like Microsoft Office can ratchet up.

 

"But, there is a method for saving money on software that not many people know about—renewed software. Buying renewed license keys can save you a mint as long as you buy from a reputable online reseller. Today, we’re going to show you the best way to get Microsoft Office for a deal. This process doesn't require a physical copy of the software, and getting set up is easy. Let’s get into it."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

I "almost never" recommend anything here that isn't free. This time I'm making the rare exception. Here is a perfectly legal way to purchase a used license for a copy of Microsoft Office for quite a reasonable price. It's sort of like buying a used car...it will work perfectly fine but isn't brand, spanking new and so costs substantially less. 

 

I've found recommendations from Make Use Of to be consistently on point, so feel confident about passing this info along.

gurlcases's comment, July 3, 12:52 AM
nice
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A Lesson Plan for Learning With Our Collection of Inequality Graphs - The New York Times

A Lesson Plan for Learning With Our Collection of Inequality Graphs - The New York Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In this lesson, students will explore social inequalities in income, education and health care, many exacerbated by issues of race and gender, using New York Times graphs.
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Teach About Inequality With These 28 New York Times Graphs - The New York Times

Teach About Inequality With These 28 New York Times Graphs - The New York Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Graphs about income, education, health care and the pandemic can help students think critically about stubborn and growing inequalities in American society.
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I'm not languishing, I'm dormant :: Austin Kleon

I'm not languishing, I'm dormant :: Austin Kleon | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
A number of friends and colleagues have linked to Adam Grant’s piece, “There’s a Name for the Blah You’re Feeling: It’s Called Languishing.” In psychology, Grant says, “we think about mental health on a spectrum from depression to flourishing,” but a “term was coined by a sociologist named Corey Keyes” that describes the “void” in between them: “languishing.” It’s a state in which, Grant says, you’re not totally burned out, but you’re not full steam, either.

“Psychologists,” says Grant, “find that one of the best strategies for managing emotions is to name them.” But one has to remember that naming doesn’t just describe the world, it creates the world, too. As Brian Eno says, “Giving something a name can be just the same as inventing it.” 

We tend to see what we’re looking for, so if you hear the name for something, you start seeing it everywhere, and your eyes get trained to see that particular thing, while you miss everything else. (That’s why Paul Valery said that real seeing “is forgetting the name of the thing one sees.”)
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What Teacher Educators Should Have Learned From 2020 - Learning & Technology Library (LearnTechLib) :: FREE Download

What Teacher Educators Should Have Learned From 2020 - Learning & Technology Library (LearnTechLib) :: FREE Download | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
This book begins the hard work of synthesizing what the experiences of 2020 can show us about how to remake education for the future. As we look back and look ahead, it’s clear that education is not going to return to anything like pre-pandemic schooling. Instead, a workable balance of in-person and digital learning must be found to motivate and educate all students. While many people yearn for a “return to normal,” the shift to emergency remote teaching, accompanied by a resurgence in the civil rights movement, made clear that “normal” really only worked for the privileged few. We must see 2020 as an opportunity for an educational revolution. There is great value in what we can learn, uncover, unpack, and change from education in 2020, and this book invites us to do just that.
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Virtual Space: 21places of the future

Virtual Space: 21places of the future | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Cognizant's Center for the Future of Work discusses places of the future: Virtual Space.

Jobs of the future leveraging virtual space that adopt influence from gaming, design, storytelling, deep analytics and online congress. We'll see many new jobs as a result. Roles like VR and AR journey builders, personal memory curators, haptic interface programmers and virtual immersion counselors will take flight.


Via Edumorfosis
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5 Ways Educators Can Get More Done in Less Time | ISTE

5 Ways Educators Can Get More Done in Less Time | ISTE | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Do you manage your time or does time manage you? The lines between work and home life have blurred over the past year of remote working conditions for many educators. The feeling of always having something to do or an email to answer can be hard to turn off. Cognitive overload is real for educators.

But honing executive functioning skills will make it easier to find balance between work and life. Here are five ways to get started.

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10 assertions about the future of social :: Bert Wetmuller

10 assertions about the future of social :: Bert Wetmuller | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by Stephen Downes

 

"If I had to put these ten points into a single point, it is this: the future of social won't be more of the same. And I think this is a good point. And if I had to characterize these ten points with a single observation, it would be this: these ten points are the dead ends we've reached with existing social. We've learned centralization doesn't work. It needs to support diversity. It won't be based on a single identity. It won't be standards-based or blockchain-based. And it will be simple to set up and run. Image: Pew."

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Report gives colleges a roadmap for better online education post-pandemic :: Hechinger Report

Report gives colleges a roadmap for better online education post-pandemic :: Hechinger Report | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Though the pandemic forced colleges to make adaptations on the fly, those moves almost certainly provided a “sneak preview of higher education’s future,” according to a new report from the progressive think tank New America.  

The report, “Back to Basics: Quality in Digital Learning,” highlights successes and failures of the past 17 months and makes policy recommendations for how to make high-quality online education more accessible in the future, even as many students return to physical classrooms.  

It also lays out several essential elements of successful online education, including clear learning objectives; organized class structure and clear communication; and access to supportive technology. Online courses, like in-person courses, the report says, should also encourage student connection and community. 

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No, Mr University, I expect you to die – The Ed Techie :: Martin Weller

No, Mr University, I expect you to die – The Ed Techie :: Martin Weller | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

 

"It was a natural, I think, following the acquisition of EdX by an online program management (OPM) company, to come up with a categorization blending the two. And it's not unrealistic to imagine this new blend, which we'll call OPX, continue the undermining of the university system as it takes on more and more contracts from various institutions to manage their online programs. That's what Holon does, that's what George Siemens reports, and this is how Brian Lamb responds: "If your 'plan' for higher ed is to outsource to an OPM... maybe... quit? Don't worry, corporatization, privatization and the drive to learning as commodity will somehow manage without you." Martin Weller points out that this is only one of four scenarios for the future of online learning. Now I have a hard time seeing the university system somehow defying the odds to survive and save the day, though I guess they are best framed as defenders of class and privilege like James Bond. My preference would be to sustain a publicly-funded community-based model, as I outlined at OECD in 2006, despite the misgivings of David Wiley (who was in the room when I outlined it)."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

This is an excerpt from a well considered blog post. Still, the predictions come about the demise of the University.

 

I'd say, some universities -- basically the lower and middle tiers with wither away. At least in the US, surviving community colleges will be those that are free for all; elite universities and land-grant type institutions will survive, but the middle tier (regional publics and small privates) will indeed wither on the vine. Timeframe? Accelerating gradually over the next generation or two.

 

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The 7 Best Ways to Learn How to Code for Free :: Make Use Of

The 7 Best Ways to Learn How to Code for Free :: Make Use Of | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Coding used to be limited to computers and video games, but now it encompasses every part of our lives.

Coding is now an essential part of most major industries such as healthcare, finance, engineering, etc. The increasing impact of coding worldwide, in turn, exponentially increases the demand for proficient coders. Read on as we walk you through the basics of coding and how you, too, can learn to code.