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Impact of the internet age on human culture and K-20 education policy/administration
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind presently exists in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

 

Opinions expressed, scooped, or copied in this Scoop.it topic are my own, or a result of my own judgment, and should in no way be understood to reflect those of my employer.

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds :: TeachThought

10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds :: TeachThought | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Good assessment is frequent assessment.

Any assessment is designed to provide a snapshot of student understand—the more snapshots, the more complete the full picture of knowledge.

On its best day, an assessment will be 100% effective, telling you exactly what a student understands. More commonly, the return will be significantly lower as the wording of questions, the student’s sense of self-efficacy, or other factors diminish their assessment performance. It sounds obvious, but a student is a human being with an entire universe of personal problems, distraction, and related challenges in recalling the information in the form the assessment demands.

This makes a strong argument for frequent assessment, as it can be too easy to over-react and “remediate” students who may be banging against the limits of the assessment’s design rather than their own understanding. Rather than re-teaching, sometimes all that is necessary is re-measuring.

It is a huge burden (for both teachers and students) to design, write, complete, grade, and absorb the data into an instructional design sequence on a consistent basis. So why not frequent, simple assessments?
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AR Will Spark the Next Big Tech Platform—Call It Mirrorworld :: Wired magazine

AR Will Spark the Next Big Tech Platform—Call It Mirrorworld :: Wired magazine | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The first big technology platform was the web, which digitized information, subjecting knowledge to the power of algorithms; it came to be dominated by Google. The second great platform was social media, running primarily on mobile phones. It digitized people and subjected human behavior and relationships to the power of algorithms, and it is ruled by Facebook and WeChat.

We are now at the dawn of the third platform, which will digitize the rest of the world. On this platform, all things and places will be machine-­readable, subject to the power of algorithms. Whoever dominates this grand third platform will become among the wealthiest and most powerful people and companies in history, just as those who now dominate the first two platforms have. Also, like its predecessors, this new platform will unleash the prosperity of thousands more companies in its ecosystem, and a million new ideas—and problems—that weren’t possible before machines could read the world."

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

This seems to me a very keen and well-informed look into the future of digital network technology. It's this month's lead article in Wired and it excited me so much I think everyone interested in the internet ought to read it. Author Kelly is well positioned to offer up his informed thoughts.

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10 Best Practices for Creating Quality Teaching Videos.

10 Best Practices for Creating Quality Teaching Videos. | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In this blog post, SchoolTube offers 10 Best Practices for Creating Quality Teaching Videos. Driven by near-ubiquitous access to video recording devices/apps and fueled by education initiatives such as Flipped Learning and Project-Based learning, the need to create teaching videos is exploding. As such, if you are a teacher, school principal or district administrator, the need to personally create a video is likely in your future.  

To document best practices for creating quality teaching and education videos we interviewed Dena Leggett, Ph.D. Advanced Chemistry teacher at Franklin, TN High School. Dena uses the Flipped Learning process to teach Honors and AP Chemistry and has personally created over 400 videos, so she knows a thing or two about best practices for creating teaching and education videos. Here are Dena’s best education video production best practices.
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Link Between Childhood Trauma and Addiction

Link Between Childhood Trauma and Addiction | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

This image was copied from my LinkedIn feed. I have not verified the information. -JL

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Global Schools Alliance Member: Matthew Moss High School, Manchester, U.K.

Global Schools Alliance Member: Matthew Moss High School, Manchester, U.K. | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Matthew Moss has always focused on learning and that effort was recognized in 2012 by the Innovations Unit in London when they named Matthew Moss High School as the only school in the UK ready for the 21st century [emphasis added]. To get to this point, Moss High was built on the ethos of continuous improvement of learning. Teachers read, research, collaborate, and share ideas in addition to receiving training from global education experts. Their "holy grail" is to put into practice what they know about learning. To do this, the school creates opportunities for teachers to debate, argue, listen, and observe. They use the Effective Lifelong Learning Inventory (ELLI) dimensions to help them discuss learning around the school and incorporate the following seven aptitudes:

-Learning relationships

-Changing and learning

-Critical curiosity

-Creativity

-Strategic awareness

-Resilience

-Making meaning"

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

This page is a snapshot description of an extremely interesting school and the way it has gone about developing a secondary level educational program that is patient, nurturing, personalized, and "slow." 

 

Don't miss the 7 min. video which has students and educators talk about their personal connections with the school and with their own learning. I wish it was much longer and think you will too.

 

I find particularly noteworthy a graphic illustration in the video of how the teachers in the school modified the structure of the standard curriculum to create time and space for interdisciplinary, holistic, personalized, project-based learning.

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Black Girls Code: 15-year-old Charmienne Butterfield Started Coding at Age 8

Black Girls Code: 15-year-old Charmienne Butterfield Started Coding at Age 8 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Black Girls Code recently launched a series entitled, #FutureTechBoss where they are highlighting some extremely inspirational young girls in the field. According to a recent post, the purpose of the campaign is to serve as motivation and empowerment for the future generation of tech girls and show the world that black girls code and do so much more.

"Recently, the organization highlighted Charmienne Butterfield, a 15-year-old high school student who has been coding since she was 8 years old, who is an aspiring NASA astrophysicist.

“I’ve been with Black Girls Code since I was 8, I’m now 15,” said Butterfield. “What I absolutely love about the organization is that it lets me know that I am not alone in my love for tech, or in my goals to one day work in the tech industry. It not only brings like-minded girls together, but also introduces us to women and men of color in the tech industry, who we can look up to, and know that there are others out there who also want to see that we succeed.”

Butterfield’s dream job is to become an astrophysicist at NASA. “I’d love to study the physics of the cosmos and write computer programs that would further our knowledge about what really is out there beyond what we currently know,” she continued."

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Everything You Know About Curriculum May Be Wrong. Really. :: Teach Thought

Everything You Know About Curriculum May Be Wrong. Really. :: Teach Thought | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
A key person in the Progressive era was Ralph Tyler, the Director of Research for what came to be called the 8-Year Study – a major investigation, funded by the Carnegie Foundation, into the effects of progressive education. Tyler went on a few years later to write the modern classic text on curriculum-framing (based on his work as Director of Evaluation for the 8-Year Study) entitled The Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction. Yet, in spite of the book’s success – it is still widely read in graduate courses – Tyler’s rejection of the standard view of curriculum continues to be ignored.

He was quite blunt about the error of conventional curriculum: “it is clear that a statement of objectives in terms of content headings…is not a satisfactory basis for guiding the further development of the curriculum.” The critique resulted from a premise about the aim of education (since curriculum is the formal path by which we achieve our educational aims). What is the aim of any curriculum? According to Tyler, the general aim is “to bring about significant changes in students’ patterns of behavior.” In other words, though we often lose sight of this basic fact, the point of learning is not just to know things but to be a different person – more mature, more wise, more self-disciplined, more effective, and more productive in the broadest sense. Knowledge is an indicator of educational success, not the aim. Thus, the conventional view of curriculum and the process of conventional curriculum writing must be wrong:
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, February 25, 1:52 AM

I always suspected as much. Thanks to Jim Lerman. 

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21st Century Skill Badge Earners Poised to Test the Job Market: 5 Things We’re Learning from Tee Up the Skills »

21st Century Skill Badge Earners Poised to Test the Job Market: 5 Things We’re Learning from Tee Up the Skills » | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
7 schools. 400 students. 20 employers. 40 T-profiles. 14,000 frequent flier miles.

Our #TeeUpTheSkills travels at the end of 2018 were intense. In spite of the ambitious schedule, we traversed the country with enthusiasm. We were confident that putting boots on the ground to lead personalized design sessions with our partner schools and their employers would answer the biggest questions the Lab has about its 21st century skill digital badges.  

Will employers care about them?  
To what extent will they be valuable signals of skill readiness for hiring managers?
At what point(s) in the hiring process are they useful?
Can they provide a leg up for historically marginalized student populations?
The early results from employers (including local, national and global companies) provide encouraging answers to these questions and much, much more:

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

This initiative is new to me, however it seems quite well thought out and looks to be rather promising. It merits watching, so I joined their network.

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6 lessons our district learned from our move to Blended Learning

6 lessons our district learned from our move to Blended Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Temple Independent School District (ISD), which is located north of Austin and south of Waco, Texas, has a very diverse student population. More than 75 percent of our students are economically disadvantaged and our ethnicity is comprised of roughly equal distribution of African-American, Hispanic, and Caucasian. Like other similar districts, we meet our students’ needs through enhancing instruction, building strong relationships between students and their teachers, and creating opportunities for students to take ownership of their learning. Despite our success, this wasn’t something that happened overnight.

"For years, we’ve been working toward blended learning because we felt it would be the answer to meeting the needs of our students. In 2015, Temple High School was chosen to be a Raising Blended Learners pilot site through Raise Your Hand Texas. For the next two years, we had 13 teachers experiment with innovative instructional models and new ways to leverage technology to enhance instruction. After the pilot, we saw how blended learning could help meet our students’ needs. Our teachers in the pilot learned to differentiate instruction, had more time to develop meaningful relationships with students, and helped students take ownership of their learning."


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How Extra Arts Education at School Boosts Students’ Writing Scores — And Their Compassion | MindShift | KQED News

How Extra Arts Education at School Boosts Students’ Writing Scores — And Their Compassion | MindShift | KQED News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Now, a new study shows that the initiative helped students in a few ways: boosting students’ compassion for their classmates, lowering discipline rates, and improving students’ scores on writing tests.


"It’s just the latest study to find that giving students more access to the arts offers measurable benefits. And adding time for dance, theater, or visual arts isn’t at odds with traditional measures of academic success, according to the research — which amounts to one of the largest gold-standard studies on arts education ever conducted.

“Arts learning experiences benefit students in terms of social, emotional, and academic outcomes,” write researchers Dan Bowen of Texas A&M and Brian Kisida of the University of Missouri.

"The study, released Tuesday through the Houston Education Research Consortium, looked at elementary and middle schools — which predominantly served low-income students of color — that expressed interest in participating in Houston’s Arts Access Initiative. There appeared to be significant need: nearly a third of elementary and middle schools in the district reported lacking a full-time arts teacher."

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Open Course Library – Home

Open Course Library – Home | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Via The Scout Report

 

"From the Washington State Board of Community and Technical Colleges comes the Open Course Library, an extensive collection of courses and course materials (such as syllabi, classroom handouts, readings, multimedia resources, and assignments) for use by college-level students and instructors. As the authors of this website emphasize, these materials are not intended to replace classroom instruction; rather, these materials are made available in order to provide affordable classroom materials for students and resources for faculty members to consider integrating into existing courses. A central stated goal of the Open Course Library is to reduce costs to students. All courses included here can be taught without a textbook or utilize textbooks that cost $30 or less. As of this write-up, the Open Course Library features over 80 courses, including courses in English composition, symbolic logic, mathematics, and foreign languages. All course materials can be easily accessed as Google Docs."

 

    

 

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3rd Grade Activists Challenge Columbus Myths

3rd Grade Activists Challenge Columbus Myths | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Third graders activists from Valleyview Elementary School in Oneonta, New York are very upset that their Math in Focus workbook, a Houghton Mifflin Harcourt product marketed under the corporate name Marshall Cavendish, reinforces myths about Christopher Columbus. On his first voyage in 1492, Columbus and his fleet reached what is now known as the Caribbean Sea and landed on a number of the islands. On his third voyage in 1498 Columbus’ fleet made landfall on the northern coast of what is now South America. On his final voyage in 1502, Columbus explored the Caribbean coast of Central America. Columbus thought he had found a water route from Europe to Asia and never believed he had “discovered” a new hemisphere. The “New World” continents are named after Amerigo Vespucci, another Italian explorer, who convincingly argued that Columbus had reached a whole new continent. An excellent response to Columbus myths for teachers and students is Rethinking Columbus, published by Rethinking Schools."

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College Closings Signal Start of a Crisis in Higher Education | Education News | US News

College Closings Signal Start of a Crisis in Higher Education | Education News | US News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"FOR ALMOST SEVEN YEARS, officials in Massachusetts – the higher education mecca of the world – cautiously monitored and prepared for the potentially devastating impact that the inevitable drop in college and university enrollment would unleash.

"We've been doing it relatively quietly," Carlos Santiago, the commissioner of higher education in the Bay State, says about efforts to deflect the slow-moving storm that's now engulfed more than a dozen colleges and universities, pushing them to merge, consolidate or reinvent themselves in other ways to survive.

Then something unexpected happened last spring that changed everything: On a Friday afternoon in April, the 119-year-old Mount Ida College in Newton abruptly announced it was broke and planned to shutter its doors after commencement the following month, leaving nearly a thousand students scrambling to figure out their future."

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8 Things I Learned My First Year Of Teaching With Project-Based Learning :: Rachelle Dene Poth :: TeachThought

8 Things I Learned My First Year Of Teaching With Project-Based Learning :: Rachelle Dene Poth :: TeachThought | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
My first year of teaching with project-based learning provided as much learning for me as it did my students.

Each year when I head back to my classroom in the fall, I have many ideas of new methods, new tools, and some changes that I want to make in my classes. These changes and ideas are the result of attending summer conferences, reading new books, and maybe the most helpful, student feedback that I review over the summer. The biggest change I wanted to make this year was to have my students engage in Project-Based Learning.

The biggest change I wanted to make this year was to have my students really engage in Project-Based Learning.
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joyrosario's curator insight, March 19, 2:56 AM
The 1970’s saw the introduction of what was then called resource based learning. Tried and tested it fulfills all the requirements of 21st century methodologies
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Dylan Wiliam on effective questioning in the classroom - Teacher

Dylan Wiliam on effective questioning in the classroom - Teacher | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
What’s the problem with the traditional approach then of – ask a question, hands up to answer?

Dylan Wiliam: The real problem is that teachers tend to ask a question, have the confident, articulate students volunteering to respond, the teacher gets an answer from those students and, therefore, if they give a correct answer the teacher tends to move on. All I’m saying is, if you’re only hearing from the confident, articulate students, the quality of your evidence about who is getting it and who is not is rather poor. So the big idea, in terms of classroom questioning, is ‘how good is the evidence you have?’ – and if you’re only hearing from the confident students, you can’t be making decisions that reflect the learning needs of a diverse group of 25 or 30 students. So it’s about broadening the evidence base, getting better evidence of what’s happening in the heads of the students in the classroom, there and then.
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Great Opportunity for District Leaders from Tech & Learning magazine

Great Opportunity for District Leaders from Tech & Learning magazine | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"You are probably familiar with Tech & Learning magazine. What you might not know about are our invitation-only T&L Leadership Summits – our two-day gathering for approximately 50 superintendents, CIOs, and other high-level district leaders from all across the country to focus on vital issues facing education today.

 

We are gearing up for the remaining 2018 Tech & Learning summits, which will take place:

 

June 21-22 | Philadelphia, PA (Pre-ISTE)

October 4-5 | Chicago, IL (Theme: Personalized Learning)

December 5-6 | New Orleans, LA (Theme: Digital Equity)

 

Tech & Learning covers the travel costs, hotel, food and admission for those we invite. Although we can't guarantee an invitation to all who request one, as a colleague recommended by our K-12 advisors, your invitation will be given top priority if you fill out this survey ASAP. You can read more about these events here."

 

This information is from a private communication, no links available other than the 2 at the end of the message. -JL

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Linda Darling-Hammond at AASA: Testing Is Not Reform

Linda Darling-Hammond at AASA: Testing Is Not Reform | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The newly appointed chair of the California State Board of Education Linda Darling-Hammond spoke to the national conference of the American Association of School Administrators (the School Superintendents Association) and denounced the American reliance on high-stakes testing as a reform strategy.

 

"'If America wants to be the world leader in education, then it should look to other countries as a model for success,' says Linda Darling-Hammond, a leading educational researcher, in her Thought Leader session Thursday at the AASA national conference.

 

"'Countries such as Finland and Singapore have been among the highest-scoring countries in international comparisons. Unlike the United States, these countries provide broad support for children’s welfare,' said Darling-Hammond, president and CEO of the Learning Policy Institute in Palo Alto, Calif.

 

“They take care of children. Health care is usually universal. There is income security and (state-paid) preschool,” she told a room full of superintendents, education advocates and business leaders at the AASA conference. In effect, those countries educate “the whole child,” she said.

 

 

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Chief Privacy Officers: The Unicorns of K-12 Education | EdSurge News

Chief Privacy Officers: The Unicorns of K-12 Education | EdSurge News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Last month, the nonprofit Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT) published a report arguing schools and districts should go the way of other industries and hire a Chief Privacy Officer to oversee their organization’s privacy policies and practices.

"Page by page, the report explains what a CPO is, why the role is necessary and even provides a two-page sample job description districts can use to begin the hiring process for a CPO.

"The intent here is good, says Linnette Attai, a K-12 privacy expert and founder of the global compliance consulting firm PlayWell, LLC. Schools and districts collect, manage and analyze more data now than ever before. That data can be used to improve K-12 decision-making, tailor instruction to each student and flag when one student needs extra attention or assistance. But because data can also be misused, abused, exposed and manipulated, it must be protected. Thus, the need for a Chief Privacy Officer—someone who can establish and enforce privacy policies, train staff on privacy procedures and ensure that all data is collected and shared safely.

"But the reality is that Chief Privacy Officers in K-12 education are about as common as unicorns. EdSurge contacted education nonprofits, a technology association and a handful of privacy experts, and none could identify a single school district with a K-12 CPO. In fact, it is still extremely rare for districts to hire even one full-time employee dedicated to privacy—leadership or otherwise—says Attai, who frequently advises K-12 districts on privacy issues."

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Six Countries Leading the AI Race :: The Tech Advocate

Six Countries Leading the AI Race :: The Tech Advocate | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence recognizes faces, delivers better online search results, and steers autonomous cars. The AI trend has been hailed as the next industrial revolution. While AI transforms the world beyond recognition, six countries are taking the lead in the AI race.
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An Autopoietic Systems Theory for Creativity - ScienceDirect :: Takashi Iba

An Autopoietic Systems Theory for Creativity - ScienceDirect :: Takashi Iba | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"In this paper, a new, non-psychological and non-sociological approach to understanding creativity is proposed...."

 

"...the emergence of a “creative society” demands the enhancement of our creative abilities and the environment (Resnick 2002). There is, however, the crucial problem that the essential nature of creative process is still unknown. In fact, we know little about what goes on in creative process and how we can support it, although psychologists have endeavored to understand creativity. The psychological approach can reveal only one aspect of creativity, that is to say the psychological aspect, and other aspects remain to be studied. Against that background, this paper examines a new explanation of creative process using the latest system theory, namely autopoietic systems theory, which was originally proposed for explaining life and then applied for describing society.

 

"Using this theory, this paper aims to open a new way to unveil the nature of the creative process. In the first half of this paper, theoretical consideration is provided. First of all, the concept of autopoietic systems theory, which is the fundamental framework for our theory is proposed. Then, we propose a new theory, which is called "Creative Systems Theory", within that framework. After that, the social system theory proposed by Niklas Luhmann in sociology is briefly explained in order to prepare to understand the relations among the creative, psychic, and social systems. In the latter half of the paper, the coupling between creative, psychic, and social systems is discussed, and then an example based on the theory is shown. Subsequently, "Creatology" that is a new discipline for studying creativity as well as psychology and sociology is defined, and a new interdisciplinary field, "Creative Sciences," which combines the perspectives of psychology, sociology, and others is proposed."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Friends, this paper is long and deep, but (at least to me) is simultaneously accessible, clear, and points a newly practical way toward understanding and actualizing the extent and impact of creativity demanded by the accelerated pace of change in our current era.

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Education vs Learning - What exactly is the difference?

Education vs Learning - What exactly is the difference? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Most of us are very familiar with the left side of this graphic. We went to school, university, or some other formal education, and we are largely familiar with the rules of engagement. You listen to the teacher, stick it out, jump through the hoops and get your reward in the form of an accreditation. While many people flourish in this system, many others don’t. It remains the basis for most formal education around the world.

"The current paradox is that while the price of education is rising exponentially in most countries, the cost of learning is actually trending towards zero — with millions of great learning materials freely available online. As we move forward, the process of testing against a standardised curriculum will increasingly be challenged by a new collective opportunity to learn anything we want, as well as choosing the content, time, teacher and device we want to learn with."


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Analysis: A Looming Legislative Backlash Against Teacher Strikes? Why Walkouts Could Become Illegal in Some States, With Strikers Facing Fines, Jail, or Loss of Their License | The 74

Analysis: A Looming Legislative Backlash Against Teacher Strikes? Why Walkouts Could Become Illegal in Some States, With Strikers Facing Fines, Jail, or Loss of Their License | The 74 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
These backlash bills hint at a much more familiar conservative education agenda of slashing funding and working to weaken teachers unions. After all, it is this agenda that led to stagnant teacher salaries, deplorable conditions in many school buildings and consequences for students whose schools were chronically underfunded in the first place.

Supporting increases to teacher pay and greater investment in schools is the right thing to do for America’s students. Unfortunately, this wave of backlash makes clear that for some policymakers, it’s all about politics — and as soon as they have the chance, they’ll once again slash education funding and attack hardworking teachers.
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How to Help Teenage Girls Reframe Anxiety and Strengthen Resilience | MindShift | KQED News

How to Help Teenage Girls Reframe Anxiety and Strengthen Resilience | MindShift | KQED News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
In the last decade, rates of anxiety-related disorders in teenagers have steadily risen, particularly in girls. Researchers and psychologists posit several hypotheses about why these rates are on the rise -- from digital hyperconnectivity to heightened external pressures to simply a greater awareness, and therefore diagnosis, of mental health concerns.

Whatever the causes, Dr. Lisa Damour has hopeful news for parents and teens: first, some degree of stress and anxiety is not only normal but essential for human growth. And if those levels become untenable, there are tested strategies for reining anxiety back in.
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Time to Take a Look at Your Dress Code

Time to Take a Look at Your Dress Code | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"One of the most common features of traditional dress codes is language that forbids clothing that shows too much skin, even a student’s collarbone in some cases. While the rules technically apply to all students, they tend to overwhelmingly impact girls.

“If we just police what girls are wearing,” Dillard says, “it implies that the onus is on the girl to prevent any kind of inappropriate behavior from someone else because of what she’s wearing. I’m not sure if schools realize how harmful that is to shame or blame girls for how someone may react rather than addressing that issue in particular. There shouldn’t be inappropriate behavior, period.”

"How a student expresses gender can also run up against restrictive dress codes, forcing students to align their appearance with other people’s gender expectations. “Does your dress code require that students’ gender expression match their sex assigned at birth?” Dillard asks. “Do you have different rules for male and female students? Because if you do, then the non-binary students are going to feel left out, they’re going to feel awkward.”

One other issue that falls into this category is menstruation. Requiring light-colored clothing can make it harder for menstruating students to cover leaks. “When administrators include in their policy where everybody wears khaki bottoms, whether it’s a skirt or pants or shorts, people who menstruate may have an accident, and that can cause a problem for the student.”

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Educators Share How Video Games Can Help Kids Build SEL Skills | EdSurge News

Educators Share How Video Games Can Help Kids Build SEL Skills | EdSurge News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Paul Darvasi is teaching his 12th graders that if there’s something about themselves they don’t like, they have the power to change it.

"To do so, he’s using a video game called “What Remains of Edith Finch,” projecting it on a screen while students take turns playing. In the game, players get to know the main character, Edith, as she returns to her empty family home to figure out what happened to her relatives. Darvasi, who teaches at Royal St. George’s College, a private all-boys school in Toronto, thinks video games like this one can help kids build certain social-emotional learning (SEL) skills.

"This year, Darvasi wants his students to use “Edith Finch” to explore identity, a topic that has a lot to do with SEL, according to Melissa Schlinger, vice president of practice and programs at CASEL, a research and policy organization devoted to SEL. “Your self awareness—how you know and understand yourself, your cultural identity and how that drives your understanding of yourself and others is key,” explains Schlinger in an email to EdSurge.

"Darvasi doesn’t want students to just play the video game and call it a day. He’s also designed a range of activities that students will complete alongside the game. He wants students to start out thinking about identity in general, and how it can change situationally or throughout a person’s life.

"Darvasi believes video games can play an important role in helping kids develop SEL competencies."

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