Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section
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Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section
Laboratory Medicine at the Clinical Interface
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Laboratory Medicine and Medical Biopathology

is the new name of the UEMS section.

http://www.uems-slm.org/uems/

Laboratory Medicine is the name of a medical specialty where specialists are involved in medical diagnosis using laboratory assays to characterize molecular and cellular parameters in blood, biological fluids and tissues;

It is called also clinical pathology.

This page was opened in collaboration with the working group of EFLM dedicated to Distance Learning and e-Learning

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It covers disciplines such as

(Biochemistry http://www.scoop.it/search?q=biochemistry)

Haematology

http://www.scoop.it/t/hematology

(Microbiology http://www.scoop.it/search?q=microbiology 130 users)

Immunology

http://www.scoop.it/t/immunology

(Genetics http://www.scoop.it/search?q=genetics)

some of them already covered by the curator of this topic

check also

http://www.scoop.it/t/autoimmunity

 

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App Shopper: Lab Values Medical Reference (Medical)

App Shopper: Lab Values Medical Reference (Medical) | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Mac Apps, Mac App Store, iPad, iPhone and iPod touch app store listings, news, and price drops...
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Cardiac biomarkers – 2019 : Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)

Cardiac troponins (cTn) and natriuretic peptides are two examples of extremely successful novel laboratory tests introduced in the last three decades. In particular cTn have profoundly changed our understanding of acute coronary syndrome and myocardial infarction and Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) has regularly published articles on this topic including thematic issues [1]. In fact, cTn have become part of the universal definition of myocardial infarction [2]. Starting with the early assay formats for cTnI and cTnT there has been continuous improvement of the analytical performance of the assays. For the central laboratories this means shorter times for analysis and increased analytical sensitivity leading to lower limits of detection (LoD) and improved coefficients of variation (CV) in particular in the low concentration range. At the same time numerous assays for the point-of-care have been devised. While these assay formats permit even shorter times to results they still lag behind in terms of sensitivity and precision. This has led to a plethora of commercially available assays for cTn which are very difficult to oversee for professionals in the field. About 10 years ago, before the advent of the current high sensitive (hs) assays, Jill Tate, our esteemed colleague who died much too early last year, undertook the task to compile the analytical characteristics of the cTn assays available at that time [3]. She summarized the information on 14 assays for automated platforms (13 cTnI and one cTnT) as well as four point-of-care tests (3 cTnI and one cTnT). At that time no assay was available which met the 10% CV-recommendation at the 99th percentile of a healthy reference population. In this issue the IFCC Committee on Cardiac Biomarkers (IFCC C-CB) presents a novel compilation of the currently available cTn assays with their analytical and diagnostic performances [4]. An immediate conclusion which can be extracted from the tables is the poor status of harmonization not to mention standardization of hs-cTnI assays. It is very obvious that clinical decision limits currently depend on the assay used. As a consequence diagnostic algorithms for rapid rule-out and/or rule-in of myocardial infarction which have been developed in recent years are assay specific [5], [6], [7], [8], [9]. In fact, currently there are many attempts underway to develop novel algorithms for patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome. These are based on single or consecutive troponin measurements combined with clinical data and will provide meaningful and robust negative and positive predictive values in order to improve diagnostic and therapeutic pathways. The 99th percentile will become less important with these algorithms. Not surprisingly several thousand well- characterized patients are required for these purposes. The plethora of different assays for cTn makes this a formidable endeavor and also requires clinicians to adapt to different diagnostic algorithms depending on the locally implemented assays. This underlines the need for further efforts to harmonize the different assays which should be possible in principle [10]. A second article by IFCC C-CB also deals with the cardiac markers but focusses on two interferences – one very old, i.e. hemolysis, and one very recently observed, i.e. biotin [11]. The third article analyzes the effects of sample matrix on cTn [12]. Hemolysis is probably not only one of the longest known interferences but also the most common. In particular, emergency room blood samples are prone to hemolysis. While most laboratories will know the effect of hemolysis on their own methods, the data compiled by the IFCC C-CB are of great value, if decisions on new instrumentation have to be made or interpretations of results from point-of-care analyzers are concerned. A still rare but increasingly observed interference is biotin. As high-dose biotin supplementation enjoys growing popularity among health-conscious individuals and high-dose biotin has been evaluated for treatment of multiple sclerosis, laboratorians must be aware of this novel interference which affects assays relying on the biotin-streptavidin interaction. As interference is in theory inverse between sandwich type (commonly used for proteins) and competitive (commonly used for small molecules and metabolites) immunoassays this problem has been particularly cumbersome in endocrinology. As assays for TSH and free T4 are inversely affected, biotin supplementation has falsely led to a diagnosis of hyperthyroidism in the past [13]. Data collected by Saenger et al. show that biotin interference with biotin-streptavidin-based assays may be highly variable depending on the assay format. It should be noted that biotin serum concentrations well above 100 μg/L may be achieved in real life by therapeutic biotin administration or self-administration. Thus, it should be mandatory that concentrations up to the mg/L range are tested. Currently, there is no simple solution to this problem, because biotin leads to falsely low cTn concentrations in the affected assays. In a patient presenting with chest pain cTn concentrations within the reference range are commonly observed and are used to rule out myocardial infarction. Accordingly, different from endocrine disturbances it will be unlikely that this combination will raise immediate suspicion of a false negative cTn result. In my view the only practical solution will be to ask patients routinely for biotin supplementation if biotin sensitive assays are used. The third article in this issue deals with the matrix issue [12]. In emergency settings most laboratories nowadays rely on plasma as the preferred material, because clotting of serum samples delays analysis unacceptably. Heparin plasma is probably most widely used but EDTA plasma is also an option, in particular because brain natriuretic peptide is usually determined from EDTA plasma. The authors show that the Siemens Advia Centaur hs-cTnI measures lower concentrations of cTnI in EDTA plasma than in heparin plasma. This is similar to previous data with the Access hs-cTnI assay [14]. It is very likely that this bias between the two matrices will affect decisions based on the upcoming algorithms. Taken together, these articles impressively underscore the tremendous progress made with cardiac biomarkers in the last three decades but also remind us that there are still many issues that should and hopefully can be optimized in the future. In particular, the overview presented by Collinson et al. [4] should motivate all stakeholders to advance harmonization of cTn assays with undiminished effort. References 1. Lackner KJ. High-sensitivity assays for cardiac troponins. Clin Chem Lab Med 2015;53:631–3.  Web of SciencePubMedGoogle Scholar 2. Thygesen K, Alpert JS, Jaffe AS, Chaitman BR, Bax JJ, Morrow DA, et al. Fourth universal definition of myocardial infarction (2018). Eur Heart J 2019;40:237–69.  Web of SciencePubMedCrossrefGoogle Scholar 3. Tate JR. Troponin revisited 2008: assay performance. Clin Chem Lab Med 2008;46:1489–500.  PubMedWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar 4. Collinson PO, Saenger AK, Apple FS, on behalf of the IFCC C-CB. High sensitivity, contemporary and point of care cardiac troponin assays: educational aids developed by the IFCC Committee on Cardiac Biomarkers (IFCC C-CB). Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2018-1211 [Epub ahead of print].  PubMed 5. Roffi M, Patrono C, Collet JP, Mueller C, Valgimigli M, Andreotti F, et al. 2015 ESC Guidelines for the management of acute coronary syndromes in patients presenting without persistent ST-segment elevation: Task Force for the Management of Acute Coronary Syndromes in Patients Presenting without Persistent ST-Segment Elevation of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Eur Heart J 2016;37:267–315.  Web of ScienceGoogle Scholar 6. Keller T, Zeller T, Ojeda F, Tzikas S, Lillpopp L, Sinning C, et al. Serial changes in highly sensitive troponin I assay and early diagnosis of myocardial infarction. J Am Med Assoc 2011;306:2684–93.  CrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar 7. Rubini Gimenez M, Twerenbold R, Jaeger C, Schindler C, Puelacher C, Wildi K, et al. One-hour rule-in and rule-out of acute myocardial infarction using high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I. Am J Med 2015;128:861–70.  PubMedCrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar 8. Neumann JT, Sorensen NA, Schwemer T, Ojeda F, Bourry R, Sciacca V, et al. Diagnosis of myocardial infarction using a high-sensitivity troponin I 1-hour algorithm. JAMA Cardiol 2016;1:397–404.  PubMedWeb of ScienceCrossrefGoogle Scholar 9. Chapman AR, Anand A, Boeddinghaus J, Ferry AV, Sandeman D, Adamson PD, et al. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of early rule-out pathways for acute myocardial infarction. Circulation 2017;135:1586–96.  PubMedCrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar 10. Tate JR, Bunk DM, Christenson RH, Barth JH, Katrukha A, Noble JE, et al. Evaluation of standardization capability of current cardiac troponin I assays by a correlation study: results of an IFCC pilot project. Clin Chem Lab Med 2015;53:677–90.  Web of SciencePubMedGoogle Scholar 11. Saenger AK, Jaffe AS, Body R, Collinson PO, Kavsak PA, Lam CS, et al. Cardiac troponin and natriuretic peptide analytical interferences from hemolysis and biotin: educational aids from the IFCC Committee on Cardiac Biomarkers (IFCC C-CB). Clin Chem Lab Med 2018. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2018-0905 [Epub ahead of print].  PubMed 12. Kavsak PA, Roy C, Malinowski P, Clark L, Lamers S, Bamford K, et al. Sample matrix and high-sensitivity troponin I assays. Clin Chem Lab Med 2019. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2018-1100 [Epub ahead of print].  PubMed 13. Piketty ML, Prie D, Sedel F, Bernard D, Hercend C, Chanson P, et al. High-dose biotin therapy leading to false biochemical endocrine profiles: validation of a simple method to overcome biotin interference. Clin Chem Lab Med 2017;55:817–25.  PubMedCrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar 14. Kavsak PA, Malinowski P, Roy C, Clark L, Lamers S. Assessing matrix, interferences and comparability between the Abbott Diagnostics and the Beckman Coulter high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I assays. Clin Chem Lab Med 2018;56:1176–81.  Web of ScienceCrossrefPubMedGoogle Scholar About the article Published Online: 2019-03-15 Author contributions: The author has accepted responsibility for the entire content of this submitted manuscript and approved submission. Research funding: None declared. Employment or leadership: None declared. Honorarium: None declared. Citation Information: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM), 20190205, ISSN (Online) 1437-4331, ISSN (Print) 1434-6621, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2019-0205. Export Citation ©2019 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston.
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Détail d'actualité | COFRAC - Comité français d'accréditation

Retrouvez la répartition de ces laboratoires, au 28 février 2019, sur une carte de France.
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Lab Tests Online

Lab Tests Online | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Lab Tests Online is an award-winning AACC resource that helps patients to better understand the many clinical laboratory tests that play a critical role in diagnosing, monitoring, and treating a broad range of conditions, including cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and infectious diseases.
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Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine

Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
“Evidence-based medicine de-emphasises intuition, unsystematic clinical experience and pathophysiological rationale as sufficient grounds for clinical decision making and stresses the examination of evidence from clinical research.”1 The principles of evidence-based medicine have been established since the nineties, although it could be argued that its origins in medicine began in the eighteenth century in the new hospitals of Paris, where autopsies were used to try to identify linkages between symptoms and pathological abnormality.2 These principles are (1) asking the question; (2) searching for evidence; (3) appraising the evidence; (4) applying the evidence; and (5) assessing the experience. Evidence-based laboratory medicine or EBLM is a separate branch of EBM which focuses on the evaluation and use of laboratory tests with an overall aim of improving patient outcomes,3 and it is on this area, that this edition of the Clinical Biochemist Reviews will concentrate. It is worth noting that, despite the inherent reasonableness of EBM, the techniques of large scale meta-analysis are not uniformly supported and are criticised as being more a statistical approach rather than a scientific philosophy.4 Why should clinical chemists be interested? It is estimated that 70% of all health care decisions affecting diagnosis or treatment involve a pathology investigation. Decisions on an individual’s diagnosis, treatment and subsequent therapeutic monitoring are often dependent on a range of pathology-based results. Yet many new laboratory tests enter clinical practice without evidence of improved patient outcomes.5 There is a greater emphasis in all countries on the ever-increasing cost of health care and laboratories play a pivotal role in the efficient use of resources. Thus the laboratory of the future will be under greater financial and demand pressures, consequently there will be a need to ensure maximum utilisation of available resources. Demand management will involve the following:6 Reducing underutilisation of laboratory testing through greater adoption of guidelines and evidence-based medicine, to ensure patients receive appropriate and timely care, Managing over-utilisation through reducing inappropriate or unnecessary laboratory testing, Participating in improving chronic care management through proper use of clinical laboratory testing, leading to improved patient compliance and fewer episodic events, Eliminating those laboratory tests that offer little clinical value and those which are ineffective or obsolete. To meet the challenge of these management imperatives, it will be essential to have highly trained staff who can critically evaluate current and potential tests, modify requester demand and manage the operations of a laboratory network as efficiently as possible. These are the objectives of EBLM. These management and consultation competencies need to be built into the future training processes for the pathologist, clinical scientist and laboratory manager. The continuing proliferation of new tests and the expectation that laboratories will provide these to the clinical community, place pressure on a laboratory’s ability to critically assess the literature. However technical articles about new tests are often focussed on analytical sensitivity and specificity rather than diagnostic accuracy and the benefit to a broad range of patients in different clinical situations. The astute laboratory must be able to put into context the usefulness of a test and its relative benefit over existing tests. There is also the very real concern that much of the research literature may not be reproducible so a critical appraisal of any paper is essential.7 It is not just in the critical evaluation of new tests that the principles of EBLM should be used, there are a number of other potential situations such as where there may be a new test which has not been described before, a different way of performing an existing test or a different application of an existing test, either using that test to diagnose or monitor a disease for which it is not currently used, or a different way of providing that test. Alternatively ‘new’ diagnostic tests entering clinical practice could be considered as replacement, triage or add-on.8 Examples of each of these situations are plentiful. New tests, particularly genetic tests, are described frequently. Adoption of a different testing modality before the test can be implemented may be involved. Using an existing test in a new role is not as common. An example would be second trimester screening using β-hCG. This example also brings us to consider derived values, where existing tests may be aggregated or mathematically transformed. A change in technology may allow an existing test to be provided using this technology in a different setting. Examples include PoCT or improved sensitivity with Troponin assays. Clinical chemists have used the concepts of quality assurance for decades and are well-versed in the broader ideas of quality improvement in terms of laboratory processes but many are unaware of the quality improvement tools used by clinicians.9 These tools are clinical guidelines,10 the equivalent of standard operating procedures, care maps similar conceptually to process maps,11 and outcome measures,11 which measure the performance of treatments as quality control measures the outcome of an assay system. These clinical improvement tools are not perfect and their value is dependent on the quality of the evidence that is used to implement them. These clinical improvement tools were developed using ever more sophisticated statistical and epidemiological techniques, which attempt to analyse multiple trials and treatments to objectively determine, for particular diseases and patient groups in particular situations, the best treatment to ensure the best outcome. Clinical chemists do not need to be able to use these tools but they should have the background skills to critically assess systematic reviews and meta-analysis data, and perhaps more basically, the ability to appraise a research paper should be in any scientist’s skills-set. Indeed it is surprising that EBM has not has not become part of laboratory culture despite questions being raised about the appropriateness of much laboratory testing.13,14 It would seem that the use of evidence-based arguments in laboratories would be an effective way to defend the key role laboratories play. In this edition of the Clinical Biochemist Reviews, we will provide some tools that may be useful in critically appraising a research trial of a new treatment, or indeed of a new test, or the application of an old test in a new situation. But we should never lose sight of the primary reasons for evaluating the literature namely: (a) are the results of the study valid, (b) what are the results, and (c) will the results help in caring for a patient.15,16 We will focus on the key components of EBLM which are the questions of determining efficacy of a diagnostic test and broadening the narrow view of analytical sensitivity and specificity, posing the appropriate question and finding the evidence. The application of the principles of EBM to diagnostic tests is covered in the articles of Florkowski17 and of Doust and Glasziou.18 Florkowski describes the evidence used to support the adoption of HbA1c as a screening test for diabetes. The emphasis in this article is differentiating the noise from the signal in the application of diagnostic tests. This is an area where we are just starting to understand the significance of measurement uncertainty, biological variation and reference change values.19 Diagnostic tests are used to confirm, exclude, classify or monitor disease to guide treatment. The value of a new test depends on whether the information it provides, ultimately leads to better patient outcome compared with an old test. When we consider a trial or test application, a number of possible inter-related measures of success or failure become apparent. If we are interested in using a new test, or a test in a new situation, then we will be interested in the analytical performance of that test and whether it is superior to another. But for a test to be useful, it must impact on clinical decisions and improve diagnosis. In addition, the expectation would be that there would be some longer term economic benefit of introducing the new test. Each of these different, but interrelated perspectives, on a new test/treatment, will require evidence to support a claim that using this test is better than existing tests. Each claim requires evidence and finding that evidence is a key principle of EBM. The concept of a hierarchy of efficacy to produce a medical decision was first suggested by Fryback and Thornbury20 in the context of medical imaging. We have a pyramid of evaluation phases of the efficacy of a new test/treatment. At each lower level, efficacy is logically necessary, but not sufficient to ensure efficacy at higher levels. This concept has been described and these inter-relations captured in a pyramidal form by Price.21 The major phases of the evaluation are as follows: Technical quality of the test Diagnostic accuracy Change in diagnostic thinking Change in patient management Change in patient outcomes Societal costs and benefits Often the evidence required for 3, 4, 5, and 6 is neglected. In this edition, St John and Price22 have discussed the economic evidence supporting the use of PoCT in a number of situations including INR and CRP testing in community medicine, and troponin in hospital practice. They describe different types of economic study and conclude that there needs to be more emphasis on value rather than cost, which requires disinvestment in some current tests. Despite the obvious robustness of the EBM approach, many evidence-based decisions do not translate into changes in diagnostic test uptake. A recent example is the introduction of cystatin C as a marker of GFR. Cystatin C has many advantages over the traditional markers of GFR and yet it has not been adopted. There are various reasons for this and many of these can be related back to the hierarchy of efficacy described earlier. Chew et al23 have summarised some of the reasons for the lack of uptake of cystatin C: Clinicians do not like to replace familiar markers with new tests unless proven extensively to influence clinical decision making. Despite superior diagnostic accuracy, there is little evidence that cystatin C improves clinical decision making over the use of serum creatinine. The potential confounding effects of steroid therapy and thyroid disease and lack of data on other potential confounding variables such as malignancy. Different reference intervals have been published for different age groups and in addition, clinical decision points for cystatin C are not well-defined. v. Lack of uniformity and standardisation of available commercial assay formats may be contributing to this limitation. Contradicting results in the literature, although the majority of studies showed superior or at least equal performance of cystatin C in comparison with serum creatinine in the detection of renal impairment. Turnaround time and cost of cystatin C measurements. For example, a nephelometric cystatin C measurement takes approximately eighteen minutes to complete and the cost per test is approximately twenty times more than a Jaffe creatinine measurement and three times the cost of an enzymatic creatinine measurement. At present, the convenience and low cost of serum creatinine assays have allowed this marker to remain widely used at the expense of accuracy. Again this reinforces the importance of looking beyond the technical aspects of a potential new test to the broader issues of cost and the need to influence in diagnostic thinking. Evidence-based laboratory medicine is attractive to laboratorians because of its inherent logic and well-defined process. Had it been in vogue one hundred years ago laboratory practice would be far different from today. The problems with the application of the principles still occur at the point where traditional behaviours must change and new tests or procedures adopted. Doust and Glasziou36 challenge us to help clinicians by providing them with information about the imprecision of tests – both the analytic and the within-person variability. Monitoring treatment using diagnostic tests requires an understanding of the normal and unexpected variation of those tests in individuals. It is the responsibility of laboratories to understand this variation themselves as well as providing this information to clinicians in a user-friendly form.
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2013, still relevant

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Laboratory Stewardship Focus: A New Quarterly Section in Clinical Laboratory News - AACC.org

Laboratory Stewardship Focus: A New Quarterly Section in Clinical Laboratory News - AACC.org | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Laboratory stewardship refers to correctly ordering, retrieving, and interpreting laboratory tests. Errors in these three areas cause most diagnostic errors and
the majority of significant patient harm.
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Reinvigorating stagnant science: implementation laboratories and a meta-laboratory to efficiently advance the science of audit and feedback. - PubMed - NCBI

Reinvigorating stagnant science: implementation laboratories and a meta-laboratory to efficiently advance the science of audit and feedback. - PubMed - NCBI | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
BMJ Qual Saf. 2019 Mar 9. pii: bmjqs-2018-008355. doi: 10.1136/bmjqs-2018-008355. [Epub ahead of print]
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Do you know what happens to your sample?

Do you know what happens to your sample? | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Watch our short animated videos to see how samples taken at your GP surgery are sent to hospital laboratories to be analysed by biomedical science staff
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Medical lab students, check out African... - African Society for Laboratory Medicine | Facebook

Medical lab students, check out African... - African Society for Laboratory Medicine | Facebook | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Medical lab students, check out African Union of Medical Laboratory Students, AUMLS, and similar organizations. Now is the time to join networks and make...
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Use of IP-10 detection in dried plasma spots for latent tuberculosis infection diagnosis in contacts via mail

Use of IP-10 detection in dried plasma spots for latent tuberculosis infection diagnosis in contacts via mail | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
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Laboratory tests in rheumatology: A rational approach | Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine

Laboratory tests in rheumatology: A rational approach | Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Release date: March 1, 2019Expiration date: February 29, 2020Estimated time of completion: 1 hourClick here to start this CME/MOC activity.ABSTRACTLaboratory tests are useful in diagnosing rheumatic diseases, but clinicians should be aware of the limitations of these tests.
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Implications of Monoclonal Antibody Therapeutics Use for Clinical Laboratory Testing

Implications of Monoclonal Antibody Therapeutics Use for Clinical Laboratory Testing | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
BACKGROUND: Monoclonal antibody therapeutics (MATs) represent a rapidly expanding class of biological drugs used to treat a variety of diseases. The widespread use of MATs increasingly affects clinical laboratory medicine.
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El 90% de médicos de Urgencias admite que se realizan pruebas innecesarias por miedo a problemas legales | Infobioquimica.org

El 90% de médicos de Urgencias admite que se realizan pruebas innecesarias por miedo a problemas legales | Infobioquimica.org | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
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The Saga of Theranos: Crucial Lessons for Clinicians and Pathologists

The Saga of Theranos: Crucial Lessons for Clinicians and Pathologists | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Dr. George and Dr. Gullapalli provide a thorough synopsis of the history of Theranos, a medical and technological innovations laboratory company founded by Elizabeth Holmes.
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Diagnostic Management Teams in Multi-Hospital Health Systems

I have posted two notes recently about diagnostic management teams (DMTs) (see: A Major Change Now Occurring in Both Clinical Pathology and Anatomic Pathology; DMTs as an Example of a Team Approach to Clinical Lab Diagnostics). Generally speaking, DMTs have usually been deployed in a single hospital with th
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Improving diagnosis through integrated testing

Improving diagnosis through integrated testing | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
By: Tara Schoenborn, Grant Communications & Impact Associate “Integration and optimization are at the cutting edge of where diagnostic innovation is going to be in the next few years. The question is, how do we get there?
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Experts slam CAM lab tests, call for better regulation – Science-Based Medicine

Experts slam CAM lab tests, call for better regulation – Science-Based Medicine | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Experts in pathology recently published a review of the evidence for CAM laboratory tests commonly used in the U.S., the U.K., and Australia.Their article, published in the Annals of Clinical Bioche...
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Preanalytical considerations in therapeutic drug monitoring of immunosuppressants with dried blood spots. - PubMed - NCBI

Preanalytical considerations in therapeutic drug monitoring of immunosuppressants with dried blood spots. - PubMed - NCBI | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Diagnosis (Berl). 2018 Dec 18. pii: /j/dx.ahead-of-print/dx-2018-0034/dx-2018-0034.xml. doi: 10.1515/dx-2018-0034.[Epub ahead of print] Review...
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HBO Theranos documentary goes inside the secretive, failed company

HBO Theranos documentary goes inside the secretive, failed company | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes shimmying into a room filled with her employees to the tune of "Can't Touch This" is one of the more memorable, ironic scenes in an upcoming documentary about her now-disgraced startup.
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Opinion: redefining the role of the physician in laboratory medicine in the context of emerging technologies, personalised medicine and patient autonomy (‘4P medicine’)

Opinion: redefining the role of the physician in laboratory medicine in the context of emerging technologies, personalised medicine and patient autonomy (‘4P medicine’) | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
The role of clinical pathologists or laboratory-based physicians is being challenged on several fronts—exponential advances in technology, increasing patient autonomy exercised in the right to directly request tests and the use of non-medical specialists as substitutes.
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Medical Laboratory Professionals Week

Medical Laboratory Professionals Week | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Everyday medical decisions are based on data generated by highly skilled individuals who take pride in the work they do. Artel salutes medical professionals for the valuable contributions they make to the quality and standard of medical care in this country.
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Smartphone Urinalysis Test Receives FDA Approval | Dark Daily

Smartphone Urinalysis Test Receives FDA Approval | Dark Daily | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
Healthy.io receives FDA approval for Dip.io, a prescription smartphone, home-based urinalysis test that matches the quality of clinical laboratory tests.
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#DMT2019 - Diagnostic Management Team Conference 2019 - Social Media Analytics and Transcripts

#DMT2019 - Diagnostic Management Team Conference 2019 - Social Media Analytics and Transcripts | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
The 2019 meeting will be held in Galveston, Texas, at the Galveston Island Convention center on March 5 – 6. The focus of the meeting are the barriers
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underway

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Media Release: Lab Testing Misuse Costs Billions

Media Release: Lab Testing Misuse Costs Billions | Laboratory Medicine - Medical Biopathology: UEMS Section | Scoop.it
February 14, 2019 - Misuse of laboratory testing in Canada is costly and potentially harmful, according to a new report from the C.D. Howe Institute. In “What the Doctor Ordered: Improving the Use and Value of Laboratory Testing” authors Christopher Naugler and Rosalie Wyonch argue that reducing inappropriate lab testing could save costs in healthcare while improving patient outcomes and experience.
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report PDF  on https://www.cdhowe.org/sites/default/files/attachments/research_papers/mixed/Commentary_533%20final%20updated.pdf

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