Coastal Restoration
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Coastal Restoration
Coastal management and restoration of our planet's coastlines with a particular focus on California, Louisiana and the Pacific.  Emphasizing wetland restoration, aspects of agriculture in the coastal plain, fisheries, dealing with coastal hazards, and effective governance.
Curated by PIRatE Lab
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Welcome to Coastal Restoration

Welcome to Coastal Restoration | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it

Welcome to our curation site for all things coastal management-related.

 

Here you will find an array of stories, media, factoids, and updates on current events spanning a range of coastal and marine issues.  While we are interested in a great many things, most of these entries center upon our work to document, restore, and conserve coastal ecosystems and improve the overall management of these incredible, dynamic parts of our planet.

 

In particular, you'll find postings that reflect our deep, continuing interest in:

 

- riparian, wetland, beach, & reef restoration

- improved Coastal Zone Management 

- coastal agriculture/food systems

- sustainable fisheries management

- working ports & harbors

- vibrant ocean economies

- coastal ecology & natural history

- coastal energy production

- oil spills

- water quality & ecotoxicology in the coastal zone

- historical coastal perspectives & relationship to our world ocean



If any of these posts whet your appetite, you might also be interested in some of our other research, teaching, and updates:
 
- Pirate Lab's home (links to our various blogs): http://piratelab.org/
- Coastal Management podcasts: http://bit.ly/2z4oiTw
- YouTube videos (lectures, field, & lab videos): http://bit.ly/2gA7Wa9
- RestoringNOLA twiter feed: https://twitter.com/RestoringNOLA


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There’s a Booming Business in America’s Forests. Some Aren’t Happy About It. - The New York Times

There’s a Booming Business in America’s Forests. Some Aren’t Happy About It. - The New York Times | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
The fuel pellet industry is thriving. Supporters see it as a climate-friendly source of rural jobs. For others, it’s a polluter and destroyer of nature.
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Internship offers hands-on disaster recovery experience in new Dougherty Co. department

Internship offers hands-on disaster recovery experience in new Dougherty Co. department | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Dougherty County says it has an internship that’s a great opportunity for one student to gain hands-on disaster relief experience while giving them a hand.
Holly-ried Sheppard's insight:
The increase of environmental disasters there have been increase in natural disaster releif programs. Thinking the internship would last only year it has been over four years and they are still funded and active. The departments is needed in more than just Albany. Natural disaster are occurring now more than ever. The interships are directed at students like us making it clear that we are needed with in all communities. Especially to curate plans before distorters happen. 
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U.S. Forest Service suspends all prescribed fires in their Northern Region

U.S. Forest Service suspends all prescribed fires in their Northern Region | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
The stand down follows several recent accidents and burn-related injuries
Sabrina Kennedy's insight:
This is a different point of view on prescribed burns that I found interesting. Hopefully they can get to the bottom of the equipment issue and get back to safely doing burns. 
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Scooped by Kaitlin Hayes
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Flash floods kill 14, displace 8 000 in Angolan capital

Flash floods kill 14, displace 8 000 in Angolan capital | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Flash floods triggered by torrential rains in Angola have killed at least 14 people and displaced around 8 000 in the capital Luanda, the national news agency reported.
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COVID-19 cost more in 2020 than the world's combined natural disasters in any of the past 20 years

COVID-19 cost more in 2020 than the world's combined natural disasters in any of the past 20 years | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Measuring the equivalent economic cost of 'lost life years' due to the pandemic allows us to map the true scale of the crisis.
Kaitlin Hayes's comment, April 20, 5:18 PM
This is a very interesting perspective to take which I had not thought of before.
Scooped by Makayla Byerly
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San Francisco Bay protection from costly disasters is being thrown away, scientists say

For more than 100 years after California's Gold Rush, developers and city leaders filled in San Francisco Bay, shrinking it by one-third to build farms, freeways, airports and subdivisions.
Makayla Byerly's insight:
Twice the amount of sediment that was removed from the Panama Canal is needed to build up San Francisco's bay to prevent disastrous flooding in the next century. The wetland areas must be raised by 6.9 ft in order to survive the predict ocean level rise. 
morgan.plummer913@myci.csuci.edu's comment, April 16, 6:26 PM
Its crazy to think that after we harmed the bay by filling one-thirds of it with sediment and once removed all of it, we now have to refill the area in order to combat the effects of climate change and sea level rise. There may come a time in the future where we eventually fill this area again with mud, and have to restart the process all over again.
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Trillion Trees Initiative – Global greening and reforestation can reduce human-made climate change, deforestation, droughts, desertification, land degradation, global warming and pollution worldwid...

Trillion Trees Initiative – Global greening and reforestation can reduce human-made climate change, deforestation, droughts, desertification, land degradation, global warming and pollution worldwid... | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
The Greening Deserts species protection projects like the Greening Camps and Trillion Trees Initiative for biodiversity conservation, climate protection, ecological education, ecosystem restoration, environmental protection, greening, reforestation and species protection can reduce climate change effects, deforestation, droughts, desertification, floods, land degradation, mass extinction, global warming and pollution worldwide. The initiative is also committed to indigenous peoples, human rights and climate justice.

Via Mallika Kumy
Natasha Booth's insight:
The Trillion Trees Initiative was founded by Oliver Gediminas Caplikas in 2017. He talks about where the trees are being planted all over the world for conservation, protection, reforestation, global warming, etc. 
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To What Extent Have Homeowners Prepared for Disaster?

To What Extent Have Homeowners Prepared for Disaster? | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Economists expect that as storms, wildfires, and rising sea levels “render more areas undesirable in the coming years, housing values in those areas will decline.”
Joseph Miller's insight:
Here are some polls and numbers detailing what percent of homeowners believe climate change will affect them and their property values. There is a large amount, ~ 35% of the sample, that still believe there will be no personal impact.
Sabrina Kennedy's comment, April 14, 4:08 PM
These figures are interesting (albeit not too surprising haha). It is always crazy to me how many homeowners are just unfazed by the reality of climate change. Like "Oh, the house I own is built on an alluvial fan AND a wildfire prone area? No worries here!"
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St. Vincent covered in ash as volcano activity continues

St. Vincent covered in ash as volcano activity continues | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Much of St. Vincent remains covered in ash, following eruptions at the island's La Soufriere volcano.
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Executives Call for Deep Emission Cuts to Combat Climate Change - The New York Times

Executives Call for Deep Emission Cuts to Combat Climate Change - The New York Times | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
More than 300 corporate leaders will ask the Biden administration to nearly double the emission reduction targets set by the Obama administration.
Holly-ried Sheppard's comment, April 14, 3:37 PM
Thank you for sharing !! this is super exciting and making up for lost time in enviornmental protection is more important now more than ever. Its exciting to see the largest companies in the world to want better for our planet. They are sculpting the future and better enhancing the utilities with in their companies. Cant wait to see what else is going to be shared.
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https://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/article250604644.html

Kaitlin Hayes's insight:
Article: ‘It was indeed terrible.’ Officials in St. Vincent get look at volcano destruction.

"But potential for destruction from the hot gas and rock flows in any mountain communities, where some 20,000 reside, however, remains high."
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Florida Crisis Highlights a Nationwide Risk From Toxic Ponds - The New York Times

Florida Crisis Highlights a Nationwide Risk From Toxic Ponds - The New York Times | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Thousands of open-air waste pools near power plants, mines and industrial farms can pose safety dangers from poor management and, increasingly, the effects of climate change.
Makayla Byerly's comment, April 10, 1:41 AM
It sounds like almost all of these open-air waste pools are mis managed and all contain some seriously dangerous chemicals to not only the environment but the people nearby. Some legislation needs to be made to help manage these issues and hopefully prevent a major catastrphe
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How the waters off Catalina became a DDT dumping ground

How the waters off Catalina became a DDT dumping ground | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
A new generation of scientists have uncovered barrels containing DDT, a toxic pesticide banned decades ago, dumped into the deep ocean.
Gabrielle Demers's insight:
DDT used to be dumped off the coast of California until we realized how bad it was for the environment. With new and improved technology researchers can observe underwater better. They found many more barrels of DDT than thought to be out on the seafloor near the California coast and especially the channel islands. To make things worse, they found that in order to make the barrels sink, holes were punched in them to reduce their buoyancy, allowing for DDT to be spilled out. This could cause harm to surrounding ecosystems and organisms, eventually working toxic effects up the food chain. 
Makayla Byerly's comment, Today, 12:25 AM
This is such a discouraging finding and its hard to believe that a chemical was just dumped off shore several years ago and could have been affecting the surrounding wildlife and people for decades. How do we find out who dumped these barrels into the ocean that many years ago and what can we do now to mitigate the affects?
sterling butler's comment, Today, 3:11 PM
So crazy I just learned about this dumping site in my Coastal Contaminants Class!
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Coral reefs prevent more than $5.3 billion in potential flood damage for U.S. property owners, study finds

Coral reefs provide many services to coastal communities, including critical protection from flood damage. A new study reveals how valuable coral reefs are in protecting people, structures, and economic activity in the United States from coastal flooding during storms.
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Russia Vulnerable to Climate Change, Causing Expensive Natural Disasters

Russia Vulnerable to Climate Change, Causing Expensive Natural Disasters | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
The residents of Irkutsk, one of Russia's coldest regions, are used to harsh winters. But when the temperature dropped to negative 60 degrees Celsius (-76
Makayla Byerly's insight:
Parts of Russia are experienced extreme winter conditions such as heavy snowfall during the winter and extremely low temperatures. These conditions are making parts of the county very vulnerable to natural disasters such as flooding. Some parts are warming about twice as fast compared to the rest of the world. Permafrost melting is also a major concern. 
Sabrina Kennedy's comment, April 21, 4:23 PM
Yikes! This paper noted that the warming arctic is causing weather events not only in Russia, but in places like Texas with the storm a few months ago. Pretty wild just how interconnected everything is.
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What was the Deepwater Horizon disaster? | Live Science

What was the Deepwater Horizon disaster? | Live Science | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
In April 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico exploded, killing 11 people. Two days later the rig capsized, and the pipe below began spewing oil.
morgan.plummer913@myci.csuci.edu's insight:
April 20th represents the 21st anniversary of the devastating explosion of the BP oil spill which effects can still be seen to this day on our environment. Although there were many warning signs during the drilling of the site, workers continued to drill into the bedrock until it was too late. 
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The Muldrow Glacier in Alaska Is Moving 100 Times Faster Than Normal - The New York Times

The Muldrow Glacier in Alaska Is Moving 100 Times Faster Than Normal - The New York Times | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
The Muldrow Glacier, on the north side of Denali, is undergoing a rare surge.
Natasha Booth's comment, April 16, 6:23 PM
I loved this article. It I can't believe it's moving so fast! And I had never heard of Glaciologists, something new to learn everyday!
sterling butler's comment, April 16, 8:25 PM
This article is insane! It moving that fast can't be a good sign.
Kaitlin Hayes's comment, April 20, 5:21 PM
This is such an interesting thing to learn about. I never knew that this is a natural process which happens to some glaciers, and that decades may pass between events.
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Streets coated with ash after Caribbean volcano eruption – video | World news | The Guardian

Streets coated with ash after Caribbean volcano eruption – video | World news | The Guardian | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Video from Georgetown, a community several kilometres away from La Soufrière volcano on the Caribbean island of St Vincent, shows buildings blanketed in a layer of ash
Gabrielle Demers's insight:
The person being interviewed said they had evacuated almost 90% of the population that was living there. After seeing the footage, the evacuation was mandatory as the whole town is covered in ash and the sky is still gray. I could imagine it would be difficult to breathe in this area, just how it would be if there was a nearby fire. It is a good thing most people evacuated to reduce health threats. 
Ashley Hollett's comment, April 15, 7:46 PM
First, I liked how you found a link with a video! Second, that is insane! I cant imagine the effects this amount of ash would have on people, animals, plants and waterways. We thought the ash from the Thomas fire was bad. These communities are going to have lasting effects because of this.
Syed (Ali) Naqvi's comment, April 16, 8:01 PM
Looking at the pictures I am quite shocked how much ash there actually is on the island. People need to be protected by the ash because ash is really bad for peoples health. I am really shocked and hope the nation stays strong.
Holly-ried Sheppard's comment, Today, 12:37 PM
Thanks for the video, its so sad seeing these situations when its something we can't really help with being so far away. From being in a community where agriculture is everywhere. Its so sad to know the results of the ash will detramentally affect their crops for years.
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What Netflix’s Seaspiracy gets wrong about fishing, explained by a marine biologist

What Netflix’s Seaspiracy gets wrong about fishing, explained by a marine biologist | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Giving up seafood isn’t the best way to save the oceans.
Sabrina Kennedy's insight:
I figured this was a timely article to share here given all the hype over this documentary. I think this serves as a reminder, especially for us in ESRM, that there is nuance to everything and you have to follow the science and data. 
Gabrielle Demers's comment, April 14, 5:43 PM
Hi Sabrina, I like reading these articles that make me think differently about things that I thought were awesome. I thought seaspricay was awesome because it makes people aware of our impacts on the ocean. After reading the article I agree with some things. I think it is most important to change policy rather than simply tell people to stop eating fish. To stop eating fish is a very individualized goal, whereas changing policy is something society can do to work together to help the overall problem. When people work together, there is a better chance in helping the problem!However, I still think the documentary is overall beneficial as it gets people thinking about the oceans vulnerability.
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Monsoon in Arizona: When does it start, dust storms vs. haboobs

Monsoon in Arizona: When does it start, dust storms vs. haboobs | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Here are answers to your Arizona monsoon questions, including when it starts, what causes it, safety tips and whether to say dust storms or haboobs.
Holly-ried Sheppard's insight:
I have never experienced a monsoon and found this article very interesting just encase someone happens to be in a situation where one is active. Usually in Arizona around July-September. With travel opening back up here are some brief tips and guides just encase you run into one over the summer.

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More floods, fires and cyclones — plan for domino effects on sustainability goals

More floods, fires and cyclones — plan for domino effects on sustainability goals | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Without new models, better metrics and more investment, cascades of extreme events could derail the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.
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Global environmental disruption is most underappreciated national security threat

Global environmental disruption is most underappreciated national security threat | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
One wildlife-borne virus has proven more capable of harming our country than many conventional security threats.
morgan.plummer913@myci.csuci.edu's insight:
Although we have many issues in society concerning our well-being, one of the most important involves our impacts on the environment. In particular, exploiting animals for human benefit through hunting for ivory and hide places these animals in danger of extinction. 
Kaitlin Hayes's comment, April 12, 10:34 PM
This article highlights an interesting point, how zoonotic viruses, resulting from exploitation of exotic animals, are not even close to the first thing most people think about when they consider national security threats. Despite this, we have experienced first hand how debilitating zoonotic, highly contagious viruses are to communities across the globe.
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Piney Point: Florida crews pump wastewater into Tampa Bay

Piney Point: Florida crews pump wastewater into Tampa Bay | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Florida environmental officials last week approved the pumping of wastewater\u00a0from a reservoir\u00a0into Tampa Bay in hopes of avoiding a major collapse.
Loretta Lupian's insight:
Earlier this week there was a partial breach in one of Florida's  reservoirs. The solution they came up with was to pump millions of gallons of water into the Tampa Bay Ecosystem. Mixing different types of chemicals and waste can affect the ecosystem by potentially causing red tides in the water. Other things to think about are the toxins that can come about, will florida still be following water regulations, is there people testing this water and what is a long term solution? 
Natasha Booth's comment, April 9, 7:27 PM
Wow, I was not even aware this was happening. An leak in the wall of the containment liner could cause some big issues. A lot of toxins and wastewater are being leaked into the groundwater and ecosystem. They should be doing testing and be finding a long term solution.
Gabrielle Demers's comment, April 10, 12:41 AM
Wow, this is incredible. Either these people do not care one bit about the environment or they are ignorant. It says they were environmental officials that agreed on this, but any environmental official should know that this is mismanagement. There could have been a better solution.
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Environmental Groups Accuse Mining Project Proponents of Blocking Meaningful Public Participation in Town Hall Meeting

Environmental Groups Accuse Mining Project Proponents of Blocking Meaningful Public Participation in Town Hall Meeting | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
On Wednesday, March 24th, Mojave Precious Metals and K2 Gold hosted a virtual “Community Town Hall” about their upcoming road construction and exploratory
Makayla Byerly's insight:
Not only is this an environmental justice issue but may turn into an environmental disaster because the mining company is not following proper protocol such as getting support of tribal nations for their project along with proper regulations for the company to follow to prevent water contamination over a vast region. 
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