Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Cutting Haiti's Forests

The major environmental problem facing Haiti's biodiversity is explained, including video of tree-cutting within a national park.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Deforestation does not happen in a vacuum--it occurs in an economic, political, and historical context.  Having successfully staged a slave revolution against France in 1806, they were ostracized from the global community (since the powers that be did not want to see slave rebellions or colonial uprising elsewhere) and were forced to look within for their own energy resources.  The nation's forests were (and still are) converted into charcoal, leading to long-term environmental problems such as soil erosion, flooding, and habitat destruction for many species.  All of this increased  increased Haiti's disaster vulnerability in the earthquake of 2010.     

 

Tags: Haiti, biogeography, environmentecology, video, poverty, development, economic, labor.

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There has never been a country that should have been so rich but ended up this poor

There has never been a country that should have been so rich but ended up this poor | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Venezuela has become a failed state.  According to the International Monetary Fund's latest projections, it has the world's worst economic growth, worst inflation and ninth-worst unemployment rate right now. It also has the second-worst murder rate, and an infant mortality rate that's gotten 100 times worse itself the past four years. And in case all that wasn't bad enough, its currency, going by black market rates, has lost 99 percent of its value since the start of 2012. It's what you call a complete social and economic collapse. And it has happened despite the fact that Venezuela has the world's largest oil reserves. Never has a country that should have been so rich been so poor.  There's no mystery here. Venezuela's government is to blame--which is to say that Venezuela is a man-made disaster. It's a gangster state that doesn't know how to do anything other than sell drugs and steal money for itself."

 

Tags: Venezuela, South America, op-ed, economic, political, governance.

 
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Ken Feltman's curator insight, May 21, 7:44 AM
Gangster government.
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Where Ships Go to Die, Workers Risk Everything

In Bangladesh, men desperate for work perform one of the world's most dangerous jobs. They demolish huge ships in grueling conditions, braving disease
Seth Dixon's insight:

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal on these ships, but they aren't designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.

 

Tags: BangladeshNational Geographic, South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes

This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.  About 11 billion tons of stuff gets carried around the world every year by large ships. Clothes, flat-screen TVs, grain, cars, oil — transporting these goods from port to port is what makes the global economy go 'round.  And now there's a great way to visualize this entire process, through this stunning interactive map from the UCL Energy Institute."

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you haven't discovered www.shipmap.org then you are in for a treat.  This delightful geographic visualization nicely shows the shipping lanes and connectivity that makes the globalized economy flow.  

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, visualization.

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aitouaddaC's curator insight, May 2, 8:44 AM
On pourra voir aussi , en français  et en allemand :  http://ddc.arte.tv/nos-cartes/le-transport-maritime-coeur-de-la-mondialisation
South Florida Guide's curator insight, May 3, 11:40 AM
Very interesting.
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These cities will be very rich in 10 years

These cities will be very rich in 10 years | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Forget New York, London or Hong Kong. Here are seven cities that are racing up the rankings of the world's richest, and will be among the top 10 by 2025, according to researchers from McKinsey.
Seth Dixon's insight:
  1. Doha, Qatar
  2. Bergen, Norway
  3. Trondheim, Norway
  4. Hwaseong, South Korea
  5. Asan, South Korea
  6. Rhine Ruhr, Germany
  7. Macau, China

Tagsurbandevelopment, economic, planninglaborglobalization, technology.   

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Big Seed: How The Industry Turned From Small-Town Firms To Global Giants

Big Seed: How The Industry Turned From Small-Town Firms To Global Giants | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Most food, if we trace it back far enough, began as a seed. And the business of supplying those seeds to farmers has been transformed over the past half-century. Small-town companies have given way to global giants. A new round of industry consolidation is now underway. Multibillion-dollar mergers are in progress, or under discussion, that could put more than half of global seed sales in the hands of three companies."

 

Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, podcast.

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Zack Zeplin's curator insight, April 24, 5:16 PM
The seed industry, one of the largest industries in modern agribusiness, is quickly being swallowed up by the global giants that lead the seed industry. All over the world small seed businesses are being bought out by larger businesses who seek to mass produce their own genetically modified seeds and strengthen their grip on the global seed market. In American agriculture seed giants rule by providing the highest quality seeds to grow the cereal grains in the U.S. produces. But as a result the consumer benefits, farmers can now run farms that aren’t as capital-intensive because of the biotechnology that goes into these seeds. However it is also important to realize that the number of seed companies is dwindling, and that there are only a few large corporations that control all of the seeds that the world needs to grow enough food to survive. I found this article to be very helpful in shedding some light on how the seeds that go into our food is handled, and the truth on how modern agriculture is run.
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This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats

This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We know how to harvest potatoes and apples. There are other fruits and vegetables, however, which have natural habitats we can barely imagine. We see these items in the grocery store every day, but often we have no idea how they got there.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This set of teaching images hammers home how natural items become commodities that are removed from their original context.  The fact that these foods are somewhat difficult to recognize shows just how most consumers have been removed from the full geographies of their food.  

 

Tagsfood production, images, agriculture, foodeconomic.

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Why are there SO MANY mattress stores — and how do they stay in business?

Why are there SO MANY mattress stores — and how do they stay in business? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The showrooms appear to always be empty -- how do they stay open?
Seth Dixon's insight:

It is a sorry state of affairs when voters are tired of hearing about the U.S. presidential candidates and would prefer to discuss the seemingly inexplicable proliferation of mattress stores.  Seriously though, this is a good example of a spatial question that explains things about the world. 

 

Tagsspatial, industry, economic.

 

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The Real Irish-American Story Not Taught in Schools

The Real Irish-American Story Not Taught in Schools | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The crop failure in Ireland affected only the potato—during the worst famine years, other food production was robust. Michael Pollan notes in The Botany of Desire, 'Ireland’s was surely the biggest experiment in monoculture ever attempted and surely the most convincing proof of its folly.' But if only this one variety of potato, the Lumper, failed, and other crops thrived, why did people starve?  Thomas Gallagher points out in Paddy’s Lament, that during the first winter of famine, 1846-47, as perhaps 400,000 Irish peasants starved, landlords exported 17 million pounds sterling worth of grain, cattle, pigs, flour, eggs, and poultry—food that could have prevented those deaths. Throughout the famine, as Gallagher notes, there was an abundance of food produced in Ireland, yet the landlords exported it to markets abroad."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

TagsIreland, foodeconomiccolonialism, poverty.

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Brien Shanahan's curator insight, March 24, 10:04 AM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 27, 7:32 AM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

Bob Zavitz's curator insight, March 28, 7:05 PM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

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Soda Pop Stop

John Nese is the proprietor of Galcos Soda Pop Stop in LA. His father ran it as a grocery store, and when the time came for John to take charge, he decided to convert it into the ultimate soda-lovers destination. About 500 pops line the shelves, sourced lovingly by John from around the world. John has made it his mission to keep small soda-makers afloat and help them find their consumers. Galcos also acts as a distributor for restaurants and bars along the West Coast, spreading the gospel of soda made with cane sugar (no high-fructose corn syrup if John can avoid it).
Seth Dixon's insight:

Hearing this man talk about his business is a pure delight; even if you are not a soda afficionado, his passion will win you over (and yes I call it soda, not pop or coke).  What I find so striking is how few businesses like his exist in a way that modern consumers know about it--he is the underground indie band of soda vendors.  He has found a niche by zigging when economies of scale demand that everyone else zag.  

 

Questions to Ponder: If a store like this was close to you, would you shop there?  How come?  Why are there so few stores with this type of business model? 

 

Tags: industry, economic, scale.

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 14, 11:04 PM

Hearing this man talk about his business is a pure delight; even if you are not a soda afficionado, his passion will win you over (and yes I call it soda, not pop or coke).  What I find so striking is how few businesses like his exist in a way that modern consumers know about it--he is the underground indie band of soda vendors.  He has found a niche by zigging when economies of scale demand that everyone else zag.  

 

Questions to Ponder: If a store like this was close to you, would you shop there?  How come?  Why are there so few stores with this type of business model? 

 

Tags: industry, economic, scale.

Jessica Ruddy's curator insight, March 21, 10:57 AM

Hearing this man talk about his business is a pure delight; even if you are not a soda afficionado, his passion will win you over (and yes I call it soda, not pop or coke).  What I find so striking is how few businesses like his exist in a way that modern consumers know about it--he is the underground indie band of soda vendors.  He has found a niche by zigging when economies of scale demand that everyone else zag.  

 

Questions to Ponder: If a store like this was close to you, would you shop there?  How come?  Why are there so few stores with this type of business model? 

 

Tags: industry, economic, scale.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 4, 4:01 PM

Hearing this man talk about his business is a pure delight; even if you are not a soda afficionado, his passion will win you over (and yes I call it soda, not pop or coke).  What I find so striking is how few businesses like his exist in a way that modern consumers know about it--he is the underground indie band of soda vendors.  He has found a niche by zigging when economies of scale demand that everyone else zag.  

 

Questions to Ponder: If a store like this was close to you, would you shop there?  How come?  Why are there so few stores with this type of business model? 

 

Tags: industry, economic, scale.

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The U.S. Is Pumping All This Oil, So Where Are The Benefits?

The U.S. Is Pumping All This Oil, So Where Are The Benefits? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
America has joined Saudi Arabia and Russia as one of the world's leading oil producers. Forecasters predicted this would usher in a golden age. It hasn't worked out that way.

 

Tags: environment, resources, economic.

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Why Do Some in UK Want To Leave The EU?

" Also see our video, Will The European Union Fall Apart? http://testu.be/1UYWZPm "

Seth Dixon's insight:

The European Union at one time seemed as though it would continue to further and further integrate European politics and economics.  With talk of possibly leaving the EU and a referendum on whether the UK should stay in the EU or not, the EU offered some extra special exemptions for the UK.  For a more in depth coverage, see this PBS News Hour video.  

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, political.

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Aris Pastidis's curator insight, March 11, 1:22 AM

The European Union at one time seemed as though it would continue to further and further integrate European politics and economics.  With talk of possibly leaving the EU and a referendum on whether the UK should stay in the EU or not, the EU offered some extra special exemptions for the UK.  For a more in depth coverage, see this PBS News Hour video.  

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, political.

Kate Burkart's curator insight, March 11, 8:53 AM

The European Union at one time seemed as though it would continue to further and further integrate European politics and economics.  With talk of possibly leaving the EU and a referendum on whether the UK should stay in the EU or not, the EU offered some extra special exemptions for the UK.  For a more in depth coverage, see this PBS News Hour video.  

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, political.

ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 12, 5:59 AM

The European Union at one time seemed as though it would continue to further and further integrate European politics and economics.  With talk of possibly leaving the EU and a referendum on whether the UK should stay in the EU or not, the EU offered some extra special exemptions for the UK.  For a more in depth coverage, see this PBS News Hour video.  

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, political.

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Visualizing the Global Economy

Visualizing the Global Economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The graphic above (Voronoi diagram) represents the relative size of each country’s economy in terms of nominal GDP: the larger the area, the larger the size of the economy. The areas are further divided into three sectors: services, industrial, and agricultural. The US economy is mostly composed of companies engaged in providing services (79.7% compared to the global average of 63.6%), while agriculture and industry make up smaller-than-average of portions of the economy (1.12% and 19.1% compared to averages of 5.9% and 30.5%).

 

Tags: globalization, industry, economic, visualization.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 1, 2:21 PM
VISUALIZANDO LA ECONOMÍA GLOBAL
Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 4, 10:18 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns & Trends; Interrelationships
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 8, 11:39 PM
Quem e como está dentro?! 
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Megacities, not nations, are the world’s dominant, enduring social structures

Megacities, not nations, are the world’s dominant, enduring social structures | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Cities are mankind’s most enduring and stable mode of social organization, outlasting all empires and nations over which they have presided. Today cities have become the world’s dominant demographic and economic clusters."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map is a sneak peek preview from the new book Connectography by Parag Khanna.  This main point of the book and article is that economic and social connectivity is the new driving force is of geopolitics, not just global economics.  Supply chains matter more than borders and the largest cities are the controlling nodes of those supply chains.  

 

Tags: political, globalization, urbaneconomic.

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Robotics in Agriculture

Autonomous robots created at the University of Sydney can count fruit on trees, spray weeds, and even herd cows.
Seth Dixon's insight:

We all know that agriculture is becoming increasingly mechanized.  In addition to large, expensive machinery, this video showcases some robots that are automating work that was previously very labor intensive. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How will robotics impact agriculture and other industries in the future?  Will this impact the spatial dynamics of agricultural land? 

 

Tagsfood production, agriculture, foodeconomic, industry, scale, agribusiness, technology.       

 

 

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 20, 10:08 AM
Until robots understand holism and acquire a metaphysical connection with Nature, agriculture will probably continue down a path where soon they'll design artificial bees for pollination, and chemical-exuding worms to breakdown the nutrients predigested by bacteria ... if that works, which I doubt.
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Beyond debt default and Zika, Puerto Rico struggles as trash piles up

As Puerto Rico’s government grapples with an economic crisis, a Zika outbreak, and widespread landfill closures, another disaster is brewing -- trash on the island. Whenever it rains, several feet of black, contaminated water and trash flood the homes of people living near the Martín Peña Channel.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video clip really stretches across diverse geographic strands...If you are looking for a "post-test," end-of-the-year resource to help them tie together loose strands of the curriculum, this could certainly be of use.

 

Tags: urbanwatermedical, environmentpollution, urban ecology, Puerto Rico, economic.

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How Orange Juice Is Made

The process of making orange juice on a humongous scale. The Americans drink so much of the stuff I'm surprised they still have any left for export.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you image that your orange juice comes from farmers on ladders picking, then hand-squeezing oranges into orange juice, then you need to see just how mechanized this agribusiness is.  The machinery alone means that a small-scale farmer simply can't compete on the open market.  

 

Questions to Ponder: Why is OJ concentrate cheaper in the store if they have to work hard to extract the water out of the juice?  How would OJ concentrate be an example of either a bulk-gaining product or a bulk-reducing product?  

 

Tagsfood production, agriculture, foodeconomic, industry, economic, scale, agribusiness.

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Antonio Andrade's curator insight, May 4, 5:47 PM
Excelente conocer todo el proceso!

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A New Map for America

A New Map for America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The 50-state model is holding the country back. It needs a new system, built around urban corridors.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great article to get students thinking about the spatial network of cities, not just the internal structure of particular cities based on some models. In this article, Parag Khanna argues that the United States is stuck in "an antiquated political structure of 50 distinct states" that isn't aligned with growing urban regions that shape our internal and external economic linkages. He proposed that our infrastruture should strengthen these networks that cut across state boundaries more so than it currently does. "Federal policy should refocus on help these nascent [urban] archipelagos prosper, and helping other emerge...collectively forming a lattice of productive metro-regions efficently through better highways, railways, and fiber-optic cables: a United City-States of America." 

 

Questions to Ponder: What political obstacles would this proposal receive?  Demographically, who would support/oppose this type of restructuring?  How would this impact the economic geographies of the United States? 

 

Tagsop-edregions, urban, transportationeconomic, planning.

 

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Jean-Simon Venne's curator insight, April 28, 8:13 AM
We should build a similar map for technology innovaton
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Rostow Model

The Rostow Model
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Rostow Model is an important and influential way of thinking about industry and economic geography (and a part of the AP and IB geography curricula).  This slideshare for gives a solid overview of the 5 stages of the model and also provides examples and critiques of the model. 

 

Tags: industry, development, economic, APHG, unit 6 industry.

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$75 a day vs. $75,000 a year: How we lost jobs to Mexico

$75 a day vs. $75,000 a year: How we lost jobs to Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A college-educated, manufacturing engineer makes $1,500 a month working the production line at a GE plant in Mexico (about $75 a day). A typical manufacturing engineer that works for GE in the United States makes nearly $75,000 a year, (about $312 a day ... or 4X the rate in Mexico).  That wage gap can easily explain why so many manufacturing jobs have left the United States. Since 2000, the U.S. has lost about 5 million manufacturing jobs.  Manufacturing has crossed the Rubicon -- or Rio Grande -- and it's hard to see those jobs returning to the U.S."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A huge wage gap between American and Mexican workers stands center in the debate over how the U.S. has lost so many blue collar jobs.  We can bemoan the loss of manufacturing jobs in the United States, but it is incredibly unlikely that low-skilled manufacturing will become a viable means to achieve a middle class income in the future because of fundamental shifts in economic geography.  

 

Tags: industrymanufacturing, economic, North America, labor, USA, Mexicoglobalization, technology.  

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Leonardo Wild's curator insight, April 4, 9:35 AM

A huge wage gap between American and Mexican workers stands center in the debate over how the U.S. has lost so many blue collar jobs.  We can bemoan the loss of manufacturing jobs in the United States, but it is incredibly unlikely that low-skilled manufacturing will become a viable means to achieve a middle class income in the future because of fundamental shifts in economic geography.  

 

Tags: industry, manufacturing, economic, North America, labor, USA, Mexico, globalization, technology.  

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 4, 3:16 PM

A huge wage gap between American and Mexican workers stands center in the debate over how the U.S. has lost so many blue collar jobs.  We can bemoan the loss of manufacturing jobs in the United States, but it is incredibly unlikely that low-skilled manufacturing will become a viable means to achieve a middle class income in the future because of fundamental shifts in economic geography.  

 

Tags: industry, manufacturing, economic, North America, labor, USA, Mexico, globalization, technology.  

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, April 4, 9:00 PM

A huge wage gap between American and Mexican workers stands center in the debate over how the U.S. has lost so many blue collar jobs.  We can bemoan the loss of manufacturing jobs in the United States, but it is incredibly unlikely that low-skilled manufacturing will become a viable means to achieve a middle class income in the future because of fundamental shifts in economic geography.  

 

Tags: industry, manufacturing, economic, North America, labor, USA, Mexico, globalization, technology.  

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These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital

These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Just 15 years ago, cross-border digital flows were almost non-existent. Today, they exert a larger impact on global economic growth than traditional flows of goods, which developed over centuries.
Seth Dixon's insight:

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, March 31, 6:13 AM

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

Trish Harris's curator insight, March 31, 7:40 AM

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

malbert's curator insight, April 4, 4:15 PM

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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This map should change the way you think about foreign aid

This map should change the way you think about foreign aid | Geography Education | Scoop.it
As you can see, the biggest recipient by a long way is Israel (this is fiscal year 2014 data, but nothing's changing), and two other big ones are Egypt and Jordan, which both have aid packages that are tied up with their peace treaties with Israel. None of these are poor countries (indeed, Israel is downright rich), and the point of the money is to advance an American foreign policy agenda — not to help the poor. Pakistan and Afghanistan, which round out the top five, actually are pretty poor, but, again, the main American interest in them is clearly foreign policy rather than poverty.

 

Tags: political, geopolitics, development, economic.

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lpatteson's curator insight, March 23, 1:01 PM
I wonder what this would look like if it were a map of the US's federal aid to the 50 states.
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These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital

These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:31 PM
The times, they are a-changin'
Alisha Meyer's curator insight, March 24, 9:04 AM
Our world is changing, that is inevitable.  It's how we decide to use the technology and knowledge we now have to better ourselves or destroy ourselves.
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PBS Food: Potatoes

PBS Food: Potatoes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Follow America's favorite vegetable from field to factory — to see how potatoes grow and how they're turned into chips."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This 5 minute video is a good introduction to the potato, it's hearth, diffusion, population impacts, nutritional profile and industrial production.  The geography of food goes far beyond the kitchen and there are more episodes in the "How Does it Grow?" series to show that.

 

Tags: foodeconomic, food production, agribusinessindustry, video, agriculture.

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carrie's curator insight, March 18, 5:34 PM

This 5 minute video is a good introduction to the potato, it's hearth, diffusion, population impacts, nutritional profile and industrial production.  The geography of food goes far beyond the kitchen and there are more episodes in the "How Does it Grow?" series to show that.

 

Tags: food, economic, food production, agribusiness, industry, video, agriculture.

Jessica Ruddy's curator insight, March 21, 10:57 AM

This 5 minute video is a good introduction to the potato, it's hearth, diffusion, population impacts, nutritional profile and industrial production.  The geography of food goes far beyond the kitchen and there are more episodes in the "How Does it Grow?" series to show that.

 

Tags: food, economic, food production, agribusiness, industry, video, agriculture.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 22, 9:41 AM

This 5 minute video is a good introduction to the potato, it's hearth, diffusion, population impacts, nutritional profile and industrial production.  The geography of food goes far beyond the kitchen and there are more episodes in the "How Does it Grow?" series to show that.

 

Tags: food, economic, food production, agribusiness, industry, video, agriculture.

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We Don't Coast

We Don't Coast | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A celebration of who we are, where we are and how we operate. It belongs to the 30+ communities who make Omaha—Greater Omaha.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This website is a great example a city selling it's regional distinctiveness to create a sense of civic pride, promote tourism, and attract more businesses.  Often Omaha's distance for the coasts is portrayed as a major weakness, but in a clever play on words, the weakness is acknowledged and reformed into a strength.   

 

Questions to Ponder: How would you promote your own city/region/state?  What would be highlighted on a similar page for your city?  What slogan would you use?

 

Tagsplacetourism, urban, culture, economic

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 5, 12:15 AM

This website is a great example a city selling it's regional distinctiveness to create a sense of civic pride, promote tourism, and attract more businesses.  Often Omaha's distance for the coasts is portrayed as a major weakness, but in a clever play on words, the weakness is acknowledged and reformed into a strength.   

 

Questions to Ponder: How would you promote your own city/region/state?  What would be highlighted on a similar page for your city?  What slogan would you use?

 

Tags: place, tourism, urban, culture, economic.