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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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All the roads that lead to Rome

All the roads that lead to Rome | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"As the saying goes, 'All roads lead to Rome.' Folks at the moovel lab were curious about how true this statement is, so they tested it out. They laid a grid on top of Europe, and then algorithmically found a route from each cell in the grid to Rome, resulting in about half a million routes total. Yep, there seems to be a way from Rome from every point."

 

Tags: fluvial, mobility, transportationmapping.

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Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's comment, January 24, 11:09 AM
a new geography of europe! fascinating for politicians
Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's curator insight, January 24, 11:10 AM

une nouvelle géographie de l'Europe! pour les politiques!!

Leonardo Wild's curator insight, January 24, 1:00 PM

But many roads didn't leave Rome ... a small detail that has been lost to history.

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Don’t make bicyclists more visible. Make drivers stop hitting them.

Don’t make bicyclists more visible. Make drivers stop hitting them. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Mandatory helmet laws and glow-in-the-dark spray paint just show who really owns the roads.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This op-ed is good discussion fodder to discuss the urban planning preferences embedded within our transportation choices. 

 

Tagsop-ed, urban, transportation, planning.

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My Car Pays Cheaper Rent Than Me

My Car Pays Cheaper Rent Than Me | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In our dense cities where land is valuable and housing is expensive, why do our cars pay cheaper rent than people?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Everyone searching for a parking space has at one time felt that there are not enough spaces where and when you need them...did you know that their are at least 3 surface lot parking spaces for every car in the United States (not including garages, driveways, etc)?  With 250 million passenger vehicles for 316 million people, that means there are 800 million surface lot parking spaces (that account for only 60-70% of our parking needs).  Parking, and the ways in which parking is subsidized, are much bigger issues than many want to believe, especially when cars are given breaks that people don't.  We cant forget that there is a high cost for free parking.  

 

Tags: urban, transportation, planning.

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Most Cyclists Are Working-Class Immigrants, Not Hipsters

Most Cyclists Are Working-Class Immigrants, Not Hipsters | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Urban planners are noticing a cultural gap between bike advocates and others who bike. Planners see a particular type of cyclist: a working-class person – usually a minority and often a recent immigrant – riding to work on whatever type of bike he can get his hands on. Those cyclists are men and women for whom biking isn’t an environmental cause or a response to an urban trend but a means of transportation that’s cheaper than a car and faster than walking."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Those that fight for bike lanes are not representative of all the cyclists.  These invisible cyclists are show that the cycling is an economic strategy for many of the urban poor, just as it can be a social statement for wealthy bike riders.


Tags: mobility, transportation, socioeconomic, class, planning.

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Jim Crow-Era Travel Guides

Jim Crow-Era Travel Guides | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"From 1936 to 1966, the 'Green Book' was a travel guide that provided black motorists with peace of mind while they drove through a country where racial segregation was the norm and sundown towns — where African-Americans had to leave after dark — were not uncommon."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The effects of globalization and technologies are uneven; this is a very clear example of how mobility and access to other places can be limited based on various segments of the population. It is repugnant to think that such a book was ever necessary in this country, but it is heartening to see the evidence of an organized network that worked to lessen the pain of those oppressed by it.    


This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme is "Explore! The Power of Maps."  Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.  


Tags: mobility, transportation, race, class, culture, historical, USA, ethnicity.

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John Puchein's curator insight, November 12, 2015 8:08 AM

All I have to say is....wow. 

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Reefer Madness

Reefer Madness | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"There are around 6,000 cargo vessels out on the ocean right now, carrying 20,000,000 shipping containers, which are delivering most of the products you see around you. And among all the containers are a special subset of temperature-controlled units known in the global cargo industry, in all seriousness, as reefers.

70% of what we eat passes through the global cold chain, a series of artificially-cooled spaces, which is where the reefer comes into play."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I have written in the past about how containerization has remade the world we live in, but not much about the role of the refrigerated container (reefer).  So many economic geographies and agricultural geographies in the our consumer-based society hinge of this technological innovation.  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content.  


Tags: transportationfood distributiontechnology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, podcast.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:19 PM

An interesting addition to any study of global trade connections 

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Travel speeds in the U.S. in the 1800s

Travel speeds in the U.S. in the 1800s | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Maps from the 1932 Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States put travel in the 1800s into perspective.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This series of maps shows the great leaps and bounds that were made during the 19th century in transportation technology in the United States.  This impacted population settlement, economic interactions and functionally made the great distances seem smaller.  This is what many call the time-space compression; the friction of distance is diminished as communication and transportation technologies improve.  


Questions to Ponder: When someone says they live "10 minutes away," what does that say about how we think about distance, transportation infrastructure and time?  How is geography still relevant in a world where distance appears to becoming less of a factor?  

 

Tags: transportation, modelsdiffusion, globalization, diffusion, time-space.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:02 PM

unit 1

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 14, 2015 4:05 PM

This series of maps shows the great leaps and bounds that were made during the 19th century in transportation technology in the United States.  This impacted population settlement, economic interactions and functionally made the great distances seem smaller.  This is what many call the time-space compression; the friction of distance is diminished as communication and transportation technologies improve.  


Questions to Ponder: When someone says they live "10 minutes away," what does that say about how we think about distance, transportation infrastructure and time?  How is geography still relevant in a world where distance appears to becoming less of a factor?  

 

Tags: transportation, modelsdiffusion, globalization, diffusion, time-space.

Erik Glitman's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:39 AM

Comparing how long it took to travel even 150 years ago opens up a question on trust. At that time, checking accounts were rare, credit cards non-existent, and every one had to travel with cash. Yet, incidents of robbery were uncommon and trust in the stranger was high. Now travel takes a small fraction of the time it did 150 years ago and strangers are seen as a threat. Trust has eroded, but is it a fear based or fact based erosion?  Is travel less safe now than it was in the 1860's?

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How one German millennial chose to live on trains rather than pay rent

How one German millennial chose to live on trains rather than pay rent | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"When others get off the train to finally go home, Leonie Müller stays behind. That's because she already is home: The train is her apartment, and she says she likes it that way. She bought a subscription that allows her to board every train in the country free. Now, Müller washes her hair in the train bathroom and writes her college papers while traveling at a speed of up to 190 mph. She says that she enjoys the liberty she has experienced since she gave up her apartment."


Tags: mobility, transportationhousing, popular culture, Europe, Germany

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 9:46 AM

This is no question that living on a train is a radical decision to make. It is a direct challenge to the idea that you are suppose to settle into one particular area. While I doubt that this specific phenomenon will catch on, our society is becoming more mobile.  People are becoming less tied down to one specific area. The Millennial generation is changing many of the previous social norms. The Millennial generation is waiting longer than any previous generation to marry and start a family. Many are even questioning the institution of marriage itself.  Members of the older generations, will decry these changes. This is a familiar cycle that occurs through out history. The Older generation always decries the changes instituted by the Younger generation.

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Expanding the Panama Canal

Expanding the Panama Canal | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In 2006, Panamanians approved a referendum to expand the Panama Canal, doubling its capacity and allowing far larger ships to transit the 100-year-old waterway between the Atlantic and Pacific. Work began in 2007 to raise the capacity of Gatun Lake and build two new sets of locks, which would accommodate ships carrying up to 14,000 containers of freight, tripling the size limit. Sixteen massive steel gates, weighing an average of 3,100 tons each, were built in Italy and shipped to Panama to be installed in the new locks. Eight years and $5.2 billion later, the expansion project is nearing completion. The initial stages of flooding the canals have begun and the projected opening date has been set for April of 2016."


Tag: Panamaimages, transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This gallery of 29 images is filled with great teaching images.

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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

This gallery of 29 images is filled with great teaching images.

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:00 PM

I think that much of Central America is presented in Western media as an extremely violent, backwards region, where narcotics and other "hidden" markets dominate the nation's social, cultural, and political structures. Although there is some truth to this, this rendition not only exaggerates the problems these nations face, but help to reinforce negative stereotypes of the region commonly held by many Americans. A story of progress- such as this story of the Panama canal- is widely ignored, which is a shame. The Panama Canal is one of the most crucial waterways in the world, and expanding it will undoubtedly help the Panamanian economy. Although it initially served as the ultimate symbol of colonialism- the United States caused a war and unrecognizably altered the geography of the region to complete the project- it today serves as a symbol of progress in a region of the world widely ignored. It will be interesting to see the impacts this expansion has on trade in the region, as well as the local geography.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 8:31 AM

the expanding of the panama canal is a major event, as everything from flow of trade to the maximum size of ships will be impacted by this improvement. the Iowa class of us battleship was two feet then the canal, specifically so they could go through if they needed to.

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Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities

Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Beginning in the 1950s, cities demolished thousands of homes in walkable neighborhoods to make room for freeways.


At the time, this was seen as a sign of progress. Not only did planners hope to help people get downtown more quickly, they saw many of the neighborhoods being torn down as blighted and in need of urban renewal.  But tearing down a struggling neighborhood rarely made problems like crime and overcrowding go away. To the contrary, displaced people would move to other neighborhoods, often exacerbating overcrowding problems. Crime rates rose, not fell, in the years after these projects.  By cutting urban neighborhoods in half, planners undermined the blocks on either side of the freeway. The freeways made nearby neighborhoods less walkable. Reduced foot traffic made them less attractive places for stores and restaurants. And that, in turn, made them even less walkable. Those with the means to do so moved to the suburbs, accelerating the neighborhoods' decline.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Later this month I will be in Cincinnati (pictured above) and will see firsthand some of the urban changes that freeways have had on the landscape, neighborhoods, and the lives of residents.  This article has some "swipe" aerial photography on Cincinnati, Detroit, and Minneapolis for your analysis. 


Tags: urbantransportation, planning, historical, urban models, APHG, neighborhoodCincinnati

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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:34 AM

Urbanization - transportation

 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:16 AM

Industrialization changed not only the physical face of cities, but also the social. Innovations such as highways have caused transportation to become widely easier, allowing people from all different regions of the city to travel easily back and forth from place to place. 

Jill Wallace's curator insight, May 30, 2015 9:41 PM

Maps, Urbanization

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North Dakota Town Evacuated Following Fiery Oil Train Derailment

North Dakota Town Evacuated Following Fiery Oil Train Derailment | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The entire population of  Heimdal, North Dakota has been evacuated Wednesday morning after a train carrying crude oil derailed and exploded. A BNSF Railway oil train derailed around 7:30 am, setting at least 10 oil tanker cars on fire. The Bismarck Tribune spoke with emergency responders who "said the the sky was black with smoke near the derailment site."
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many hoping to stop environmental degradation of Canada's Tar Sands and the Dakotas "Kuwait on the Prairie" have opposed the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline.  It's been decades since crude oil has been shipped by rail in the United States but fracking technologies have opened up areas without oil pipelines to become major producers.  As demonstrated in this NPR podcast, the railroad industry has seized on this vacuum and since 2009 has been supplying the oil industry the means to get their product to the market.  Trains, however, are not the safest way to transport oil, even if they are efficient in the short run.    


Tagstransportationpollution, industry, economic, energy, resources, environment, environment modify.

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Living in the Age of Airplanes

"LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES is a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, it renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world." airplanesmovie.com

Seth Dixon's insight:

I was absolutely delighted to see this film on the big screen...it was as visually stunning as any film I'd ever seen.  I and my young children were mesmerized.  So much of the modern world that we take for granted is absolutely revolutionary.  This is a great teacher's guide to teaching with this film.


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economicNational Geographic, video, visualization.

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majorlever's comment, May 1, 2015 11:28 PM
Cool
majorlever's comment, May 1, 2015 11:29 PM
Good one
Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, May 2, 2015 11:57 PM

global interconnections!!

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Airport Codes

Airport Codes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Making sense of those three-letter airport codes.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I often fly into CVG (Cincinnati) and wondered why those 3 letters are used as the airport code instead of CIN.  "Serving the greater Cincinnati metro area, Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky's airport code comes from the nearby city of Covington."  So why is Chicago ORD and Washington D.C.'s airport IAD?  Airport codes has all the answers to these sorts of questions, but the great circle mapper can help you visualize how these transportation hubs are connected and make fun maps of all your travels.    


Tags: mobility, mapping, transportation.

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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, April 26, 2015 8:07 PM

Did you ever wonder.....

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Cross-Canada route severed after Northern Ontario bridge splits apart

Cross-Canada route severed after Northern Ontario bridge splits apart | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A newly constructed bridge in northern Ontario has heaved apart, indefinitely closing the Trans-Canada highway — the only road connecting Eastern and Western Canada. At least one town has declared a state of emergency.
Seth Dixon's insight:

One bridge going down isn't noteworthy, but when that functionally separates Canada in two...that IS noteworthy.  A detour into the U.S. and around some Great Lakes is one heckuva detour.   

 

Tags: transportationCanada.

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How To Travel While Black During Jim Crow

How To Travel While Black During Jim Crow | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A postal worker created a guide for black travelers that was published almost every year from 1936 to 1966."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The effects of globalization and technologies are uneven; this is a very clear example of how mobility and access to other places can be limited based on various segments of the population. It is repugnant to think that such a book was ever necessary in this country, but it is heartening to see the evidence of an organized network that worked to lessen the pain of those oppressed by it (podcast on the Green Book and an additional article).     

Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tagsmobilitytransportationrace, classculture, historical, USA, ethnicity.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, December 22, 2015 7:56 AM

Back in the day when one travelled while being black there were restrictions in many places. There also were places where one could not stay , and places where you would not be safe.

The confederate flag was a marker , most of the time to let you know that you were not welcome. Of course there were restrictions on busses, trains, and in some cities you had to take a black cab.

 

Lots of people belonged to social clubs , sororities, fraternities and those memberships encouraged people to invite guests into their homes. Many of us did the relatives map. ie. traveled to where family lived. It was magic to be able to go to places in New York, Philadelphia and Boston.,Still you needed to know little things.

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Transportation Geography and Religious Greetings

Transportation Geography and Religious Greetings | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Happy Hanukkah from Brooklyn! Card design by Cheryl Berkowitz, via Subway Art Blog.

 

Tagstransportation, Judaism, religionseasonal.

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The 5, the 101, the 405: Why Southern Californians Love Saying 'the' Before Freeway Numbers

The 5, the 101, the 405: Why Southern Californians Love Saying 'the' Before Freeway Numbers | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"How did Southern Californians come to treat their highway route numbers as if they were proper names?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

I can't say how delighted this native Southern Californian was to read this (and especially to rediscover the classic SNL skit).  Despite living in Rhode Island, I retain this linguistic quirk that I subconsciously learned as a kid growing up in Southern California.  This is a shibboleth of mine, a distinctive pronunciation, word choice, or manner of speaking that reveals something about the speaker (such as place of origin, ethnic background, or group membership).     

Questions to Ponder: What are other shibboleths that you know?  Do you use any? 


Tags: California, languagetransportation, toponyms.

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Every Job in America, Mapped

Every Job in America, Mapped | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Are you one of the millions of Americans opting into "job sprawl" over a short commute?


Before you dig in to “Where are the Jobs?: Employment in America 2010,” it may help to note that each dot represents a single job—and you can tell what kind of job it is because of its color. Manufacturing and trade jobs are red; professional services jobs are blue; healthcare, education, and government jobs are green; and retail, hospitality, and other service jobs are yellow. You won’t find any dots for federal jobs (no available data), and Massachusetts is missing entirely—the only state to opt out of reporting its employment trends. The end result is a highly detailed map that gives viewers a quick summary of how many and what types of jobs are a part of the economy.


Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.

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Where ‘speeding’ is legal: A map of maximum limits across the U.S.

Where ‘speeding’ is legal: A map of maximum limits across the U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An unconventional look at American roads, mapped by their speed limits.


The above map, from MetricMaps, illustrates that abrupt division using local speed limit data.  That map shows the maximum local speed limit for any local roads or highways in each Census block group in the U.S. The nationwide contrasts are striking, but so are the local ones: Zoom in to an individual city like Los Angeles, and the darker arteries effectively outline highways.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map shows some stark contrast between urban and rural land use patterns--it also shows urban networks that are designed to compression time and space.   

 

Tags: transportation, planningspatial, scale, Time-Space Compression.

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Anneliese Sjogren's curator insight, September 29, 2015 8:15 PM

I think that this map is really interesting. It shows that the rural areas have less limits, as compared to more urban areas that are more limited. I like how the major U.S. cities have boxes with close up views so you can get a better look at these differences.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, October 12, 2015 2:13 PM

Speeding in America can lead to some people having road rage because they are in a hurry. However, by looking at the map of speed limits in the United States, the area that would probably see less cases of road rage is in the Central and Plains states that have a speed limit of over 75 miles per hour. This will also help reduce people who speed because they are in a rush to get from point a to point b. In areas such as Rhode Island, where the speed limits reach up to 65 miles per hour, people tend to rush and get angry with people who are going below the speed limit and lead to the need for speed to calm themselves down. Thus, it also includes a higher risk for getting a speeding ticket which will be expensive.

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Amsterdam Canals

It was busy today on the Canals in Amsterdam. Especially at the junction Prinsengracht/Leidsegracht.


TagsNetherlands, transportationplace, neighborhood, landscape, time lapsevideo.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Could this transportation network and system work everywhere?  If not, geography and place are critical factors to shaping the human landscape. 

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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, August 31, 2015 2:19 PM

Look at how self-organised this works perfectly. It's just a matter of how you can solve things together.

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Children and Space

"In just a few generations, we have tightly restricted American kids' freedom to roam, play, and become self-sufficient. The percentage of children walking and bicycling to school has plummeted from almost 50 percent in 1969 to about 13 percent today. Although distance from school is often cited as the main barrier to walking and bicycling, many families still drive when schools are close to home. According to the Safe Routes to School National Partnership, driving accounts for about half of school trips between 1/4- and 1/2-mile long — which in most cases shouldn't take kids much more than 10 minutes to walk."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a controversial topic and I certainly don't have all the answers. The free range parenting is a new to to our cultural conversations about parenting, but the ideas are anything but new. Most free range advocates want their children to have the rights to roam about their neighborhoods that others today would see as parental neglect. Many argue that as automobiles have become more prominent in urban design, it has come at the expense of children's ability to be in public unsupervised (yes, children used to be encouraged to go out to play in the streets). Children don't know their own neighborhoods as well anymore and this isn't just about architecture and design. Culturally our communal notions of proper parenting and child safety have shifted in the United States, but they are also very different around the world.  

 

Questions to Ponder: How is parenting shaped by cultural norms? What are the spatial implications of changing parenting strategies? What are the factors that shape your opinion about the 'proper' range for kids to roam unsupervised?  


Tags: housing, placeneighborhood, perspective, cultural norms, culture, transportation, planningspatial.

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asli telli's curator insight, August 15, 2015 1:34 AM

Also applies to unfortunate Turkey w/her recent urban transformation wave...

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Why 12-Foot Traffic Lanes Are Disastrous for Safety and Must Be Replaced Now

Why 12-Foot Traffic Lanes Are Disastrous for Safety and Must Be Replaced Now | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Let's make "10 not 12!" a new mantra for saving our cities and towns.


[12 foot lanes] are wrong because of a fundamental error that underlies the practice of traffic engineering—and many other disciplines—an outright refusal to acknowledge that human behavior is impacted by its environment.


Tags: transportation, planningspatial, scale.

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Living in the Age of Airplanes

"LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES is a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, it renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world." airplanesmovie.com

Seth Dixon's insight:

I was absolutely delighted to see this film on the big screen...it was as visually stunning as any film I'd ever seen.  I and my young children were mesmerized.  So much of the modern world that we take for granted is absolutely revolutionary.  This is a great teacher's guide to teaching with this film.


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, video, National Geographic, visualization.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:41 AM

Summer reading KQ3 What are the major contributing factors to environmental change today? key concept of transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry

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Private jets flooding the Las Vegas airport before the Mayweather-Pacquiao fight

Private jets flooding the Las Vegas airport before the Mayweather-Pacquiao fight | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The airport is reportedly closed to private jets.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In a world where money grants you certain access and privilege, this is what happens when many seek to leverage their privilege simultaneously only to realize that they have to get in line like the common folks too.


In the Pixar Movie the Incredibles, Mrs. Incredible exasperately tells her son, "Everyone is special, Dash."  Dash grumbles under his breath and replies, "Which is another way of saying no one is." 


Tags: transportationclass.

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Christian Faltado Cantos's curator insight, May 5, 2015 9:54 PM

Here what boxing and money can do....

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Ethiopia tests Sub-Saharan Africa's first light rail system

Ethiopia is due to launch a light rail transit system later this year, the first of its kind in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a very encouraging accomplishment; from Lagos to Nairobi, similar projects are now being considered. 


Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, development. transportation, planning, urban.

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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:05 PM

Finally something positive.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:59 PM

As Africa, namely Sub-Saharan Africa, lacks the technology that is required to develop and maintain this type of transportation is a great start. Time shows that if a country is given a decent amount of time to develop something good will come to it. Advances in technology today make it easier for development to happen, but once again it comes down to the ease of access to this technology in order to properly develop this and maintain it at all times.

Patty B's curator insight, Today, 4:40 PM

The fact that Ethopia just recently opened its first railway of this nature is extremely good news for Ehtopia and the Sub-Saharan region as a whole. It marks economic and industrial progress and brings the region further into the globalized economy and society. The 20th century was one of great inequalities and vast superpowers asserting dominance and becoming extremely wealthy. I think in recent times (like the past decade or two) we have witnessed more “third-world” countries make great strides toward establishing democratic, semi-capitalistic, industrialized, modernized, and prosperous governments. But in another light, I think the news still represents, in a way, the fact that such a great gap really does exist throughout the world between the rich and the poor. This gap not only exists on an individual scale, but as this news shows, between nations as well. This great news for Ethiopia is something that happened in the U.S. a century ago. And the news is certainly good for Ethiopia and the rest of the world, and it is great news for proponents for more equal wealth distribution. But it ultimately does show that there is a long way to go until we figure out how to solve the issue of poverty across the world.