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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Bolivian Commuters Soar Through The Sky

"The world's biggest urban gondola system, known as Mi Teleférico, opened in La Paz, Bolivia, in May 2014. The 6-mile-long system is an engineering feat."

 

Tags: transportation, South America, Bolivia, urban, planningarchitecture.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 24, 7:53 AM
The importance of services and facilities in connecting people and places to enhance liveability - social connectedness
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 26, 7:14 PM
The gondola system of La Paz, Bolivia called Mi Teleferico,  addresses the transport challenge in a large and unplanned city already overcrowded with vehicles and facing steep terrain. This short video provides a great overview of the creative response to a transport challenge and the background images provide a view of what the city is like.
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Superblocks to the rescue: Barcelona’s plan to give streets back to residents

Superblocks to the rescue: Barcelona’s plan to give streets back to residents | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Catalan capital’s radical new strategy will restrict traffic to a number of big roads, drastically reducing pollution and turning secondary streets into ‘citizen spaces’ for culture, leisure and the community.  Black routes allow public transport and cars at 50km/h, while green routes only allow private vehicles at 10km/h to prioritize pedestrians and cycling."

 

Tags: Catalonia, Spain, mobilitytransportationplaceneighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism.

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A New Map for America

A New Map for America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The 50-state model is holding the country back. It needs a new system, built around urban corridors.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great article to get students thinking about the spatial network of cities, not just the internal structure of particular cities based on some models. In this article, Parag Khanna argues that the United States is stuck in "an antiquated political structure of 50 distinct states" that isn't aligned with growing urban regions that shape our internal and external economic linkages. He proposed that our infrastruture should strengthen these networks that cut across state boundaries more so than it currently does. "Federal policy should refocus on help these nascent [urban] archipelagos prosper, and helping other emerge...collectively forming a lattice of productive metro-regions efficently through better highways, railways, and fiber-optic cables: a United City-States of America." 

 

Questions to Ponder: What political obstacles would this proposal receive?  Demographically, who would support/oppose this type of restructuring?  How would this impact the economic geographies of the United States? 

 

Tagsop-edregions, urban, transportationeconomic, planning.

 

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Jean-Simon Venne's curator insight, April 28, 8:13 AM
We should build a similar map for technology innovaton
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Urban Observatory

Urban Observatory | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Urban Observatory city comparison app enables you to explore the living fabric of great cities by browsing a variety of cities and themes."

Seth Dixon's insight:

At the 2013 ESRI User Conference, the Urban Observatory was unveiled (I shared this earlier, but the URL has since changed, I'm sharing it again).  The physical display contained images from cities around the world to compare and contrast diverse urban environments.  The online version of this was announced during in a 10 minute talk by Jack Dangermond and Hugh Keegan.  This interactive mapping platform let's users access 'big data' and have it rendered in thematic maps.  These maps cover population patterns, transportation networks, and weather systems.  This is a must see.  Read Forbes' article on the release of Urban Observatory here.

 

Tags: transportation, urban, GIS, geospatial, ESRI.

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Brian Weekley's comment, April 14, 8:20 AM
This is fabulous, Seth! Thanks for sharing.
Brian Weekley's curator insight, April 14, 8:21 AM
This is just spectacular.
Tony Hall's curator insight, April 15, 12:20 AM
This is really very cool. The ability to compare urban areas allover the world is brilliant. I can see lots of discussions generated by this.
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Analog GPS: Scrolling Wrist & Car-Mounted Maps of the Roaring 20s & 30s

Analog GPS: Scrolling Wrist & Car-Mounted Maps of the Roaring 20s & 30s | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Long before the days of celebrity voices calling out directions while you drive, paper-based attempts at mobile mapping generated an intriguing array of proto-GPS systems, including this quirky pair of manual and automated moving map displays.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I typically really enjoy the thoughtful exploration of the untold stories that make up our world found in  99 Percent Invisible.  Of course I would be especially drawn to this particular podcast--an historical glimpse at information overload in the analogy era, mapping technologies to aid navigation--this is just fascinating. 

 

Tagspodcasttransportationmapping, GPS, cartographyhistorical.

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Digitalent's curator insight, March 23, 4:18 PM

I typically really enjoy the thoughtful exploration of the untold stories that make up our world found in  99 Percent Invisible.  Of course I would be especially drawn to this particular podcast--an historical glimpse at information overload in the analogy era, mapping technologies to aid navigation--this is just fascinating. 

 

Tags:  podcast, transportation, mapping, GPS, cartography,  historical.

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What Are You Flying Over? This App Will Tell You

What Are You Flying Over? This App Will Tell You | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Flyover Country uses maps and data from various geological and paleontological databases to identify and give information on the landscape passing beneath a plane. The user will see features tagged on a map corresponding to the ground below. To explain the features in depth, the app relies on cached Wikipedia articles. Since it works solely with a phone’s GPS, there’s no need for a user to purchase in-flight wifi. Sitting in your window seat, you can peer down on natural features like glaciers and man-made features, such as mines, and read articles about them at the same time.

 

Tagsmobilitytransportation, technology, physicalgeology.

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YEC Geo's curator insight, March 12, 10:01 AM
Kind of like your own personal Google Earth.
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Walk Appeal and Public Health

Walk Appeal and Public Health | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"The core idea of Walk Appeal is that people walk longest and most often in places that entice them, but rarely walk just because they’re told they ought to. Some Walk Appeal factors are measurable, while others are immeasurable, and it has long been clear that Walk Appeal is the best predictor of the viability of neighborhood businesses."
Seth Dixon's insight:

What is a reasonable distance to walk around town?  Research shows that cities with improved sidewalks, less parking lots, attractive storefronts and other amenities that encourage walking.  If  walking the urban environment is and of itself an experience worth having and makes the person feel like a flâneur, experiencing the city on a deeper level, automotive transport goes down and walking goes up.  Urban infrastructure is more important for most people than distance in deciding whether to get in the car or walk down the street (for distances under 2 miles).   Bottom line: neighborhoods that have an appealing sense of place are more walkable.

 

Tags: urbanplace, transportationplanning, urbanism, architecture.

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Jessica Ruddy's curator insight, March 21, 10:58 AM

What is a reasonable distance to walk around town?  Research shows that cities with improved sidewalks, less parking lots, attractive storefronts and other amenities that encourage walking.  If  walking the urban environment is and of itself an experience worth having and makes the person feel like a flâneur, experiencing the city on a deeper level, automotive transport goes down and walking goes up.  Urban infrastructure is more important for most people than distance in deciding whether to get in the car or walk down the street (for distances under 2 miles).   Bottom line: neighborhoods that have an appealing sense of place are more walkable.

 

Tags: urban, place, transportation, planning, urbanism, architecture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 16, 1:21 AM

The concepts of "liveable streets" and "placemaking" can enhance the liveability of places.

Read about " Eyes on the street" amd " broken window theory",  "walkability", "green infrastructure"  and " 20 minute neighbourhoods" and orher strategies to enhance liveability in Macmillan Geoworld 7 NSW 

10.3 Creating better communities

10..4 Places for people

10.5 Liveable streets 

10.6 Green places and open spaces 

Kristina Lemson's curator insight, April 16, 10:44 PM
Use Google Earth to examine the walkability of Banksia Grove. Can younidentify specific elements that look like they have been included to meet this aim? Conversely, what mitigates against people walking in BG?
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Cross-Canada route severed after Northern Ontario bridge splits apart

Cross-Canada route severed after Northern Ontario bridge splits apart | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A newly constructed bridge in northern Ontario has heaved apart, indefinitely closing the Trans-Canada highway — the only road connecting Eastern and Western Canada. At least one town has declared a state of emergency.
Seth Dixon's insight:

One bridge going down isn't noteworthy, but when that functionally separates Canada in two...that IS noteworthy.  A detour into the U.S. and around some Great Lakes is one heckuva detour.   

 

Tags: transportationCanada.

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How To Travel While Black During Jim Crow

How To Travel While Black During Jim Crow | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A postal worker created a guide for black travelers that was published almost every year from 1936 to 1966."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The effects of globalization and technologies are uneven; this is a very clear example of how mobility and access to other places can be limited based on various segments of the population. It is repugnant to think that such a book was ever necessary in this country, but it is heartening to see the evidence of an organized network that worked to lessen the pain of those oppressed by it (podcast on the Green Book and an additional article).     

Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tagsmobilitytransportationrace, classculture, historical, USA, ethnicity.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, December 22, 2015 7:56 AM

Back in the day when one travelled while being black there were restrictions in many places. There also were places where one could not stay , and places where you would not be safe.

The confederate flag was a marker , most of the time to let you know that you were not welcome. Of course there were restrictions on busses, trains, and in some cities you had to take a black cab.

 

Lots of people belonged to social clubs , sororities, fraternities and those memberships encouraged people to invite guests into their homes. Many of us did the relatives map. ie. traveled to where family lived. It was magic to be able to go to places in New York, Philadelphia and Boston.,Still you needed to know little things.

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Transportation Geography and Religious Greetings

Transportation Geography and Religious Greetings | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Happy Hanukkah from Brooklyn! Card design by Cheryl Berkowitz, via Subway Art Blog.

 

Tagstransportation, Judaism, religionseasonal.

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The 5, the 101, the 405: Why Southern Californians Love Saying 'the' Before Freeway Numbers

The 5, the 101, the 405: Why Southern Californians Love Saying 'the' Before Freeway Numbers | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"How did Southern Californians come to treat their highway route numbers as if they were proper names?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

I can't say how delighted this native Southern Californian was to read this (and especially to rediscover the classic SNL skit).  Despite living in Rhode Island, I retain this linguistic quirk that I subconsciously learned as a kid growing up in Southern California.  This is a shibboleth of mine, a distinctive pronunciation, word choice, or manner of speaking that reveals something about the speaker (such as place of origin, ethnic background, or group membership).     

Questions to Ponder: What are other shibboleths that you know?  Do you use any? 


Tags: California, languagetransportation, toponyms.

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Every Job in America, Mapped

Every Job in America, Mapped | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Are you one of the millions of Americans opting into "job sprawl" over a short commute?


Before you dig in to “Where are the Jobs?: Employment in America 2010,” it may help to note that each dot represents a single job—and you can tell what kind of job it is because of its color. Manufacturing and trade jobs are red; professional services jobs are blue; healthcare, education, and government jobs are green; and retail, hospitality, and other service jobs are yellow. You won’t find any dots for federal jobs (no available data), and Massachusetts is missing entirely—the only state to opt out of reporting its employment trends. The end result is a highly detailed map that gives viewers a quick summary of how many and what types of jobs are a part of the economy.


Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.

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Where ‘speeding’ is legal: A map of maximum limits across the U.S.

Where ‘speeding’ is legal: A map of maximum limits across the U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An unconventional look at American roads, mapped by their speed limits.


The above map, from MetricMaps, illustrates that abrupt division using local speed limit data.  That map shows the maximum local speed limit for any local roads or highways in each Census block group in the U.S. The nationwide contrasts are striking, but so are the local ones: Zoom in to an individual city like Los Angeles, and the darker arteries effectively outline highways.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map shows some stark contrast between urban and rural land use patterns--it also shows urban networks that are designed to compression time and space.   

 

Tags: transportation, planningspatial, scale, Time-Space Compression.

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Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, October 12, 2015 2:13 PM

Speeding in America can lead to some people having road rage because they are in a hurry. However, by looking at the map of speed limits in the United States, the area that would probably see less cases of road rage is in the Central and Plains states that have a speed limit of over 75 miles per hour. This will also help reduce people who speed because they are in a rush to get from point a to point b. In areas such as Rhode Island, where the speed limits reach up to 65 miles per hour, people tend to rush and get angry with people who are going below the speed limit and lead to the need for speed to calm themselves down. Thus, it also includes a higher risk for getting a speeding ticket which will be expensive.

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Bad drivers are a good indicator of a corrupt government

Bad drivers are a good indicator of a corrupt government | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Traffic accidents kill 1.25 million people per year, and it’s well-known that those deaths are disproportionately in low- and middle-income countries. Over at CityMetric, writer James O’Malley has added an interesting wrinkle, by showing a correlation between the number of traffic fatalities in a country and the corruptness of its government."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I love the last paragraph in this article because it echoes the "Broken Windows" theory--not at the neighborhood scale, but for the state.  Horrible driving isn't the worse thing for a country, but it is indicative of the degree of social trust in each other and in the collective system; corruption erodes both. 

 

"Bottom line: If you’re in a country where everyone drives on the sidewalk and nobody stops at stop signs, you can be pretty sure the government isn’t working right."

 

Tags: political, governancetransportation.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 10, 2:12 PM
Será?
Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 1:05 AM
This article shows a scarily real insight into the effects of corruption on certain countries. Would be useful for situations where looking at the broad range of effects of corruption but also has some interesting statistics regarding earnings and road fatalities.
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This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes

This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.  About 11 billion tons of stuff gets carried around the world every year by large ships. Clothes, flat-screen TVs, grain, cars, oil — transporting these goods from port to port is what makes the global economy go 'round.  And now there's a great way to visualize this entire process, through this stunning interactive map from the UCL Energy Institute."

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you haven't discovered www.shipmap.org then you are in for a treat.  This delightful geographic visualization nicely shows the shipping lanes and connectivity that makes the globalized economy flow.  

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, visualization.

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aitouaddaC's curator insight, May 2, 8:44 AM
On pourra voir aussi , en français  et en allemand :  http://ddc.arte.tv/nos-cartes/le-transport-maritime-coeur-de-la-mondialisation
South Florida Guide's curator insight, May 3, 11:40 AM
Very interesting.
Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 10:25 PM
This resource shows great detail into where are products travel when they are imported but also shows us what and where Australian products are going. Good source in regards to showing how large Australia's export market is. Article contains a good amount of information as to why the routes shown on the map are taken as well as having in-depth data showing the different cargo on board ships. This data helps high light what different countries are renowned for in their exports as well as giving so information into why some countries are poorer than others when analysing their exports. Planned use within unit regarding the cost of Australian exports and its sustainability for the future.      
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The Pan American Highway: The Longest Road In The World

The Pan American Highway: The Longest Road In The World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
At its fullest extent the Pan-American Highway is a network of roads stretching from Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, to Ushuaia, Argentina, a distance of around 30,000 kilometres (19,000 miles).
Seth Dixon's insight:

I love a good road trip, and I while I love the idea of traversing the entire length of the Americas, I think that the idea of it might be better than the actual trip (at least will my kids in the back seat).

 

Tagsmobilitytransportationtourism, South America, Middle America.  

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Agra hotal's curator insight, April 16, 11:57 AM
Book Now Hotel with cheap rate near Tajmahal on http://www.hotelatagra.com
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The End of America's Love Affair With Route 66

The End of America's Love Affair With Route 66 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For a brief time in American tourism, travel was about the journey. Here's how it came to be about the destination.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Route 66 holds a special place in the America’s collective soul and taps into a feelings of nostaglia for a bygone era...but we don't really want to go back to that time (hence the economic decline of these withering small towns). "In 1956, Eisenhower's Interstate Highway System effectively bypassed Route 66. The straight-lined, speedy interstates often bifurcated cities. They also cut paths far from Route 66's small, idiosyncratic towns. The rise of modern air travel also diminished the appeal of the winding, open road.  Yet it was not only new modes of transportation that faded Route 66; it was also a changing definition of 'vacation.' Disneyland and Las Vegas staked their claims to the American travel budget in the mid '50s. Suddenly, the 'there' took precedence over the 'getting there.'"

 

Tagsmobilitytransportationplacetourism, historical.

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ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 31, 2:47 PM

Route 66 holds a special place in the America’s collective soul and taps into a feelings of nostaglia for a bygone era...but we don't really want to go back to that time (hence the economic decline of these withering small towns). "In 1956, Eisenhower's Interstate Highway System effectively bypassed Route 66. The straight-lined, speedy interstates often bifurcated cities. They also cut paths far from Route 66's small, idiosyncratic towns. The rise of modern air travel also diminished the appeal of the winding, open road.  Yet it was not only new modes of transportation that faded Route 66; it was also a changing definition of 'vacation.' Disneyland and Las Vegas staked their claims to the American travel budget in the mid '50s. Suddenly, the 'there' took precedence over the 'getting there.'"

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, place, tourism, historical.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 31, 3:00 PM

Route 66 holds a special place in the America’s collective soul and taps into a feelings of nostaglia for a bygone era...but we don't really want to go back to that time (hence the economic decline of these withering small towns). "In 1956, Eisenhower's Interstate Highway System effectively bypassed Route 66. The straight-lined, speedy interstates often bifurcated cities. They also cut paths far from Route 66's small, idiosyncratic towns. The rise of modern air travel also diminished the appeal of the winding, open road.  Yet it was not only new modes of transportation that faded Route 66; it was also a changing definition of 'vacation.' Disneyland and Las Vegas staked their claims to the American travel budget in the mid '50s. Suddenly, the 'there' took precedence over the 'getting there.'"

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, place, tourism, historical.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, April 1, 12:18 AM

Route 66 holds a special place in the America’s collective soul and taps into a feelings of nostaglia for a bygone era...but we don't really want to go back to that time (hence the economic decline of these withering small towns). "In 1956, Eisenhower's Interstate Highway System effectively bypassed Route 66. The straight-lined, speedy interstates often bifurcated cities. They also cut paths far from Route 66's small, idiosyncratic towns. The rise of modern air travel also diminished the appeal of the winding, open road.  Yet it was not only new modes of transportation that faded Route 66; it was also a changing definition of 'vacation.' Disneyland and Las Vegas staked their claims to the American travel budget in the mid '50s. Suddenly, the 'there' took precedence over the 'getting there.'"

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, place, tourism, historical.

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What Computer Games Taught Me About Urban Planning

What Computer Games Taught Me About Urban Planning | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By enticing thousands and thousands of people to plan commercial, industrial, and residential districts for their virtual towns, the creators of SimCity have probably done more than anyone in the history of the world to introduce basic principles of zoning to the public.  Even though it’s just a computer game, Cities: Skylines has a lot to teach us about the unstated premises of our urban-planning conversations, and demonstrates how those premises profoundly shape what our cities can look like. When we assume the necessity of a given way of regulating cities, assume away the messiness of people and their relationships, assume away politics, and ignore major costs, we miss an awful lot of what urban-planning debates should be."


Tags: urban, transportation, planning.

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The forgotten way African Americans stayed safe in a racist America

The forgotten way African Americans stayed safe in a racist America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When racist towns used to lynch people, these guides helped keep black travelers safe
Seth Dixon's insight:

I have mentioned the Green Book before, but now there is an interactive mapping application that let's users map out a trip in the United States during the Jim Crow era (and a 99 Percent Invisible podcast to walk you through the issues). Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tagsmobilitytransportationraceclassculture, historical, ethnicity.

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Tania Gammage's curator insight, March 17, 6:58 PM

I have mentioned the Green Book before, but now there is an interactive mapping application that let's users map out a trip in the United States during the Jim Crow era (and a 99 Percent Invisible podcast to walk you through the issues). Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, race, class, culture, historical, ethnicity.

Bob Zavitz's curator insight, March 19, 8:48 PM

I have mentioned the Green Book before, but now there is an interactive mapping application that let's users map out a trip in the United States during the Jim Crow era (and a 99 Percent Invisible podcast to walk you through the issues). Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, race, class, culture, historical, ethnicity.

lpatteson's curator insight, March 23, 1:10 PM

I have mentioned the Green Book before, but now there is an interactive mapping application that let's users map out a trip in the United States during the Jim Crow era (and a 99 Percent Invisible podcast to walk you through the issues). Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, race, class, culture, historical, ethnicity.

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All the roads that lead to Rome

All the roads that lead to Rome | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"As the saying goes, 'All roads lead to Rome.' Folks at the moovel lab were curious about how true this statement is, so they tested it out. They laid a grid on top of Europe, and then algorithmically found a route from each cell in the grid to Rome, resulting in about half a million routes total. Yep, there seems to be a way from Rome from every point."

 

Tags: fluvial, mobility, transportationmapping.

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Gilbert C FAURE's comment, January 24, 11:09 AM
a new geography of europe! fascinating for politicians
Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, January 24, 11:10 AM

une nouvelle géographie de l'Europe! pour les politiques!!

Leonardo Wild's curator insight, January 24, 1:00 PM

But many roads didn't leave Rome ... a small detail that has been lost to history.

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Don’t make bicyclists more visible. Make drivers stop hitting them.

Don’t make bicyclists more visible. Make drivers stop hitting them. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Mandatory helmet laws and glow-in-the-dark spray paint just show who really owns the roads.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This op-ed is good discussion fodder to discuss the urban planning preferences embedded within our transportation choices. 

 

Tagsop-ed, urban, transportation, planning.

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My Car Pays Cheaper Rent Than Me

My Car Pays Cheaper Rent Than Me | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In our dense cities where land is valuable and housing is expensive, why do our cars pay cheaper rent than people?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Everyone searching for a parking space has at one time felt that there are not enough spaces where and when you need them...did you know that their are at least 3 surface lot parking spaces for every car in the United States (not including garages, driveways, etc)?  With 250 million passenger vehicles for 316 million people, that means there are 800 million surface lot parking spaces (that account for only 60-70% of our parking needs).  Parking, and the ways in which parking is subsidized, are much bigger issues than many want to believe, especially when cars are given breaks that people don't.  We cant forget that there is a high cost for free parking.  

 

Tags: urban, transportation, planning.

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Most Cyclists Are Working-Class Immigrants, Not Hipsters

Most Cyclists Are Working-Class Immigrants, Not Hipsters | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Urban planners are noticing a cultural gap between bike advocates and others who bike. Planners see a particular type of cyclist: a working-class person – usually a minority and often a recent immigrant – riding to work on whatever type of bike he can get his hands on. Those cyclists are men and women for whom biking isn’t an environmental cause or a response to an urban trend but a means of transportation that’s cheaper than a car and faster than walking."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Those that fight for bike lanes are not representative of all the cyclists.  These invisible cyclists are show that the cycling is an economic strategy for many of the urban poor, just as it can be a social statement for wealthy bike riders.


Tags: mobility, transportation, socioeconomic, class, planning.

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Jim Crow-Era Travel Guides

Jim Crow-Era Travel Guides | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"From 1936 to 1966, the 'Green Book' was a travel guide that provided black motorists with peace of mind while they drove through a country where racial segregation was the norm and sundown towns — where African-Americans had to leave after dark — were not uncommon."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The effects of globalization and technologies are uneven; this is a very clear example of how mobility and access to other places can be limited based on various segments of the population. It is repugnant to think that such a book was ever necessary in this country, but it is heartening to see the evidence of an organized network that worked to lessen the pain of those oppressed by it.    


This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme is "Explore! The Power of Maps."  Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.  


Tags: mobility, transportation, race, class, culture, historical, USA, ethnicity.

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John Puchein's curator insight, November 12, 2015 8:08 AM

All I have to say is....wow. 

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Reefer Madness

Reefer Madness | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"There are around 6,000 cargo vessels out on the ocean right now, carrying 20,000,000 shipping containers, which are delivering most of the products you see around you. And among all the containers are a special subset of temperature-controlled units known in the global cargo industry, in all seriousness, as reefers.

70% of what we eat passes through the global cold chain, a series of artificially-cooled spaces, which is where the reefer comes into play."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I have written in the past about how containerization has remade the world we live in, but not much about the role of the refrigerated container (reefer).  So many economic geographies and agricultural geographies in the our consumer-based society hinge of this technological innovation.  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content.  


Tags: transportationfood distributiontechnology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, podcast.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:19 PM

An interesting addition to any study of global trade connections 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:06 AM

I have written in the past about how containerization has remade the world we live in, but not much about the role of the refrigerated container (reefer).  So many economic geographies and agricultural geographies in the our consumer-based society hinge of this technological innovation.  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content.  


Tags: transportation, food distribution, technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, podcast.