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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Not dead yet: The American shopping mall is changing, not going away

Not dead yet: The American shopping mall is changing, not going away | Geography Education | Scoop.it
J.C. Penny in peril, Sears is sinking. Is this the end of the American shopping mall?


Last Friday sandwich chain Quiznos filed for bankruptcy protection citing high debt loads and heavy completion. Coming just days after a similar filing from pizza chain Sbarro, Quiznos’ bankruptcy was the second half of a one-two gut punch for shopping malls at a time when they’ve never been more vulnerable. A decade ago there were more than 1,100 enclosed shopping malls in the U.S. Since then more than 400 have  either been “re-purposed” or closed outright. No new malls have been completed since at least 2009.

Seth Dixon's insight:

While all malls aren't dead, this chilling photo gallery of abandoned malls in a fascinating landscape portrayal of economic over-reach. 

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3 Cities With Freeways Going Nowhere

3 Cities With Freeways Going Nowhere | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Once thought to be symbols of prosperity, innercity highways are now just eyesores — and sources of civic dysfunction — to some new urbanists.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED Talk also explores what cities should be with old freeways, suggesting that they should be dismantled and the spaces revitalized (and yes, my inner-Californian linguistic roots demands that I call them freeways).


Tags: transportation, urban, planning.

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Cycling Infrastructure

The Netherlands is well known for its excellent cycling infrastructure. How did the Dutch get this network of bicycle paths? Read more: http://bicycledutch.w...
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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 1:35 PM

This video depicts the way that the Dutch got there cycling in the early years and it also shows the maufacturing process in which goes into making a bike. In this video it goes flashbacks of how the bike has evolved throughtout generations and time.

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Walmart Slumber Party

Walmart Slumber Party | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Who wants to spend the night in a Walmart parking lot?


There are a few generally accepted principles when it comes to the etiquette of spending the night in a vehicle in a Walmart parking lot. One night only. No chairs or barbecue grills outside an R.V. Shop at the store for gas, food or supplies, if you can, as a way of saying thanks. Walmart, the country’s largest discount retailer, says you’re welcome: its Web site says that R.V. travelers are “among our best customers.” The photographer Nolan Conway has been taking pictures of Walmart’s resident guests at several stores in central Arizona. Sophia Stauffer, a 20-year-old who travels the country in a van with her boyfriend and their dog, describes their lots, which usually feel quiet and safe, as their best option for most nights. “We really don’t want to work or live in a house,” she says.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Mobility studies and movement are key elements within geography.  This photo gallery is an intriguing glimpse into a distinct way of experiencing the United States that highlights a hyper-mobile subculture.  When discussing place we often think of the residents and workers, and think of those that use the place with some degree of permanence.  However, many people’s personal geographies are much more ephemeral, and some places are defined by their impermanence and flows.  Wanderlust can strike those in all socioeconomic sectors, and this is a great preview of those on the road.  Fittingly, the dog in this image is named Kerouc.   

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Darien Southall's comment, March 2, 10:23 PM
When I was younger my family went on a road trip before heading to a family reunion. The half a week we were on the road we stopped in Walmart parking lots during the nights. Honestly, I think that staying in a Walmart parking lot is something everyone should experience while on the road (whether it be good or bad).
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, March 3, 9:26 AM

We see this all the time at our Walmarts in Fresno!

 

Willow Weir's comment, March 10, 9:07 AM
I can see the appeal of safety and the inexpensive nature compared to a camp. I don't think the ability to camp in their parking lots makes up for walmarts many ills considering how many families they keep in poverty
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9 Reasons the U.S. Ended Up So Much More Car-Dependent Than Europe

9 Reasons the U.S. Ended Up So Much More Car-Dependent Than Europe | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Understanding mistakes of the past can help guide U.S. transportation policy in the future.


In 2010, Americans drove for 85 percent of their daily trips, compared to car trip shares of 50 to 65 percent in Europe. Longer trip distances only partially explain the difference. Roughly 30 percent of daily trips are shorter than a mile on either side of the Atlantic. But of those under one-mile trips, Americans drove almost 70 percent of the time, while Europeans made 70 percent of their short trips by bicycle, foot, or public transportation.  The statistics don't reveal the sources of this disparity, but there are nine main reasons American metro areas have ended up so much more car-dependent than cities in Western Europe.

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Jeff Cherry's curator insight, February 12, 9:19 AM

The correlation to our obesity rates cannot e be ignored.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 7:48 AM

This article gives a nice comparison between American and European car use.  It points out cultural differences as well as governmental policy differences that lead to different views on public transportation and car usage.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 25, 10:58 AM

I understand why many Europeans travel by public transportation, foot or bicycle. If gas was twice the price and tax on an automobile was more expensive than it already is, I would find another way to travel. Economically, it does not make sense to use an automobile as a daily driver in many areas of Europe. Also, public transportation in most areas of the United States is not great and many people who have to travel on the highway to work have no choice but to use an automobile. 

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Transportation and Planning

"When you combine a street and a road, you get a STROAD, one of the most dangerous and unproductive human environments. To get more for our transportation dollar, America needs an active policy of converting STROADs to productive streets or high capacity roadways."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this video, a road provides high connectivity between places, and a street is a diverse platform of social interactions that create a place.  A 'stroad' can be likened unto a spork--it tries to do it everything but does nothing especially well.  While you may debate the principle being shown, this video (found on Atlantic Cities) is a good way to show the spatial thinking that city planners need to utilize to improve the urban environment. 


Tagstransportation, urban, planning.

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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2:03 AM

the danger of stroads

François Lanthier's curator insight, January 31, 11:19 AM

The Stroad - an unfortunate phenomenon... NYC is taking action to minimize its' STROADS... more cities should do the same.

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Pipeline On Wheels: Trains Are Winning Big Off U.S. Oil

Pipeline On Wheels: Trains Are Winning Big Off U.S. Oil | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The railroad industry is eager to be the go-to oil shipper, but some worry it's moving too fast.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many hoping to stop environmental degradation of Canada's Tar Sands and the Dakotas "Kuwait on the Prairie" have opposed the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline.  It's been decades since crude oil has been shipped by rail in the United States but fracking technologies have opened up areas without oil pipelines to become major producers.  As demonstrated in this NPR podcast, the railroad industry has seized on this vacuum and since 2009 has been supplying the oil industry the means to get their product to the market.   


Tagstransportation, industry, economic, energy, resources, environment, environment modify.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 8, 2013 12:46 AM

The idea of using trains instead of oil pipelines in the North Dakota regions is smart, over the idea of the time and energy it takes to transport oil through pipes. Big industry always causes parts of the enviornment to suffer but the lesser of the evils must be chosen. In the area of shipping oil on trains it is the sandy prarie like areas that can suffer physically. With oil business fracking has also been a big issue were rocks deep beneath the ground are broken up to release oil up to the surface. Yes this brings companies lots of money, but causes harm to homes, leaking oil, causing explosions and even earthquakes. This can be tricky especially when these kinds of companies are supported by the federal government

Connie Anderson's curator insight, December 8, 2013 12:01 PM

"Forward on climate?" This news is backwards and at least 40,000 people who attended "Forward on Climate" rallies throughout our nation in February 2013 will continue to question, protest peacefully, and convince others that we MUST reduce our dependence on oil no matter how it is transported!

ManuMan's curator insight, December 8, 2013 7:55 PM

As steel and rail built this county, oil and rail will rebuild it. 

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Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach

Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A year after Superstorm Sandy stranded many New Yorkers without power for days, a federal judge has ruled that New York City's emergency plans violate the Americans with Disabilities Act. Those shortcomings, the judge found, leave almost 900,000 residents in danger, and many say the ruling could have implications for local governments across the country."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I have many more questions than answers after listening to this podcast.  Presumably, most governmental agencies during emergencies are seeking to assist the greatest number of people with limited time and resources; would this court ruling change that mandate?  How will this impact urban planning in the future?  Just how much can plans in times of emergency account for assisting the disabled?  Do you think the City of New York was negligent? 


Tags: disasters, NYC, transportationurban, planning, podcast.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:35 PM

I am disabled, and while I am not in a wheelchair, I would implore the politicians to come up with accommodations for those that are, or have other severe forms of disabilities.  I damaged my brain and spinal cord in an accident that cost me some of my psychological functions, as well as a lot of the fine motor skills in my hands and body.  I remember what it was like before my accident, and I know that there was nowhere along the line that I asked to be disabled.  The people in wheelchairs, or the people who cannot evacuate themselves from areas of danger, are people that should in fact be prioritized, not left behind, when it comes to evacuating during emergencies.  In class our group discussed that the average able-body person should be prioritized during evacuation, but I kept thinking- what if something happened to them? What if they broke their leg during a flood evacuation?  Should they be left behind?  I would suggest that rather than answer these James Wan-like instances of moral quandary, we prepare for them and come up with access for the handicapped to be evacuated- in such an instance where NO ONE would have to be prioritized OR left behind.  That is the only fair way to deal with this sort of idea, without leaving anybody behind.  I have had dealings with people with disabilities, and a guy I know that is in fact wheelchair bound, is one of the most productively creative people of his age that I have encountered- wheelchair or not, he has produced, written, and directed two full length feature films before his 22nd birthday, one of which has screened at the Sundance Film Festival.  I had the privilege of working with him during some photoshoots, and I was really quite inspired by what he does, enough to pursue film-making on my own.  I feel that people today don't really care until something affects them.  Negative thoughts against those that prioritize against the disabled in events of emergency do not enter my head; rather, I feel that there must be something we can work out now, in a time of no immediate emergency, that can save us all...

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:34 AM

In my opinion I do not think it was all of New Yorks fault that some handicapp people could not get the help they needed. There are a lot of people in New York and not everyone could make it out even if they were not handicapp. I think these people should have a back up plan as well just incase. You could have a family member, neighbor, or friend come and help you and give you a ride.  

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 8:01 AM

This subject is the definition of a gray area matter. Of course you want to treat everyone equally and have everyone come out of a sotrm unscathed, but to do soo you have to tip the scales so much that it becomes unfair for un handicapped people. Sure New York could of done this better. But also some neglegence has to fall on the citizens. If your and elderly handicap person and know a major storm is comming you should try to evacuate immediatly, you dont need the news to give you the A Ok to go. Yes the City should have gave a heads up atleast 10 hours in advance so people could better prepare better but the citizens have to be away of their own situation. This comes down to an ancient survival theme the survival of the fittest were if you weak and not smart you die off simple ass that.

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Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships."  http://geographyeducation.org/2013/10/14/ship-shipping-ships/


Seth Dixon's insight:

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce. Economies of scale infuse our transportation and communicating technologies, boosting the diffusion of countless other technologies. China's transportation infrastructure, for example has undergone some amazing physical transformations that have made their economic growth possible.  If, however, you only want to laugh at the tongue-twister of ship-shipping ships shipping shipping ships,  this is the internet meme for you


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:35 AM

First, this is a fantastic photo...a freighter shipping other freighters.  As my colleague Seth Dixon points out, this is a fantastic image of one of the important drivers of the acceleration of globalization in recent history.  

jim dzialo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 11:54 AM

Pretty sure that doesn't fit in the panama canal

 

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 1:28 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce.

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Chicago on the Eve of the Great Fire

Chicago on the Eve of the Great Fire | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This 1868 pocket map of Chicago shows the city in full-blown expansion, a mere 3 years before the infamous blaze
Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive map with a 'spyglass' feature.  Chicago is displaced during a economic boom period as the U.S. was expanding westward.  Where where the railroads located then?  Why have some of them vanished today?  Notice anything curious about the coastline along Lake Michigan?  Follow this link to see similar interactives of other major U.S. cities.


Tags: Chicago, historical

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 8:07 AM

An interesting map which shows the difference between present day Chicago and 1868 Chicago. It illustrates what a dramatic transformation the city has undergone in the last 150 years. The trains and their tracks, which were such an important part of 1800's travel and logistics, were all removed and replaced with roads for automobiles. Lake Michigan was filled in approximately 1000 feet to expand the city to the east. Where Soldier Field now sits, was once roughly 150 feet into Lake Michigan. To the west, the 1868 map shows large squares of undeveloped city which is today subdivided into entire neighborhoods. Yet, while there are a lot of differences, it's surprising how much is still the same. Much of the developed part of 1868 Chicago has the same layout as today. The buildings may have changed, but the locations of buildings and streets are the same as they were then, a likely product of inertia since it would take more effort to restructure the city than renovate it.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 12:09 PM

This map is cool.  It lets you compare the old map to the new map by moving a lens around the satellite map.  It is a great interactive tool to compare old and new and allows the viewer to see how much the geography of the city has changed in the last 150 years or so.

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This Guy's Never Met a Map He Didn't Want to Fix

This Guy's Never Met a Map He Didn't Want to Fix | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Just not always for the better: "I've deliberately designed maps that are deliberately horrible to look at, and succeeded."
Seth Dixon's insight:

All maps are compromises; the Mercator projection preserves shape but distorts size, and so on.  What about sacrificing locational accuracy to preserve the aesthetic design or readability?  Just some things to think about as you peruse these redesigned subway maps.  


Tags: visualization, transportation, mapping, NYC.

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Urban Observatory

Urban Observatory | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Urban Observatory city comparison app enables you to explore the living fabric of great cities by browsing a variety of cities and themes.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Yesterday at the ESRI User Conference, the Urban Observatory was unveiled.  The physical display contained images from cities around the world to compare and contrast diverse urban environments.  The online version of this was announced during in a 10 minute talk by Jack Dangermond and Hugh Keegan.  This interactive mapping platform let's users access 'big data' and have it rendered in thematic maps.  These maps cover population patterns, transportation networks, and weather systems.  This is a must see.  Read Forbes' article on the release of Urban Observatory here.


Tags: transportation, urban, GIS, geospatial, ESRI.

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Utiya Chusna Sitapraptiwi's curator insight, July 15, 2013 2:44 AM

Easy to find a picture of the city in the world. 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 2:45 PM

I have been using Google Earth to check out a few different areas that I have and have not been to, particularly Washington D.C./Maryland, which I visited last month for the first time.  I thought it was truly awesome and loved all the subtle differences as well as the larger and more obvious differences from RI.  This Observatory is pretty interesting, and doesn't limit your observations to strictly visual perceptions, unlike most Astrological Observatories.  It is a compendium of knowledge, information, and facts that define and characterize, categorize and redefine areas of the world.  This seems like something out of Minority Report or Deja Vu (two really good sci-fi movies with visual observation technology that looks through time), both because of its appearance, and because of its general function.  It also reminds me of some stuff that I've seen in the 1967 "The Prisoner" series, which really blew my mind about sociological portayals of the occasionally subversive human condition from entirely oppressing parties and circumstances.  Hopefully this information will, as comes with great power, be treated with great responsibility... For all our sakes.

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Visualizing 3 Billion Tweets

Visualizing 3 Billion Tweets | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a look at 3 billion tweets - every geotagged tweet since September 2011, mapped, showing facets of Twitter's ecosystem and userbase in incredible new detail, revealing demographic, cultural, and social patterns down to city level detail, across the entire world.

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this this great social media dataset, patterns of population density are immediately evident, with areas with great population densities not surprisingly representing the greatest concentration of social media usage.  On closer inspection though, the major transportation arteries (or in this particular map map of NYC, tourism districts) become much more visible than a population density map would suggest.

UPDATE: See also twitter's newest visualization of this dataset where they used digital elevation tools to show "height" to represent the tweets

 

Tags: visualizationsocial media, transportation, globalization, mapping, NYC, tourism.

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MelissaRossman's curator insight, August 30, 2013 7:37 AM

nice one

MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 7:37 AM
nice one
trampolinecalf's comment, September 26, 2013 11:50 PM
well
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Great Salt Lake: Landsat Science

Great Salt Lake: Landsat Science | Geography Education | Scoop.it

With imagination one can explore and understand how very different life was for people in the United States before the Golden Spike was hammered into the ground in Utah in 1869. That was a much-hailed event that knitted the country together by linking two railroad lines from the eastern and western ends of the continent. Just ten years earlier, when the map at left was made, life was more centered on local transactions. It was hard for families with children to visit friends because travel in this part of the country was slow and arduous, over bumpy dirt roads by horse and wagon. A life involving daily travel for several miles from home each day to work was not feasible. Yet change was in the air even then.

Engineers had put together the recently-invented steam engine with the practicality of a road made of rails and cross-ties, and businessmen and politicians were envisioning a national transportation network – a railroad system. What a difference that could make in the life of this still-young nation! The federal government began sending dozens of mapmakers across the country to identify and draw the best routes for a national railroad in an initiative called “the Great Reconnaissance.”

The national railroad system brought a revolution in commerce and mind-set to the United States in the 19th century. Landsat technology has fomented a revolution of its own, making hundreds of maps of landscapes around the globe daily and becoming an integral part of our national infrastructure just as the railway system and automobile Interstate Highway Systems did in previous eras. With Landsat we have our own 21st century Great Reconnaissance.

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19th Century Ship Routes

19th Century Ship Routes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Ben Schmidt, assistant professor of history at Northeastern University, has visualized the routes of 19th Century ships using publicly available data set from NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). The resulting image is a hauntingly beautiful image that outlines the continents and highlights the trade winds. It shows major ports, and even makes a strong visual case for the need for the Panama and Suez Canals."

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, March 10, 1:29 PM

Beautiful data visualisation of 19th century ships using publicly available data set from NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration).

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 10, 3:21 PM

Lessons in GIS and Medical GIS - Examples of applications. Various Resources at hand.

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Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea

Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By the end of this year, digging could begin on a waterway that would stretch roughly 180 miles across Nicaragua to unite the Atlantic and Pacific oceans."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America; China is strategically working on strengthening their geopolitical position in the South China Sea and all international waters.  This is one reason why a Chinese firms are planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  This article highlights the reasons for concern (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what else Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 28, 9:24 AM

This could be an economic boom for Nicaragua, one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere. However, this construction could potentially cause serious problems. The proposed canal would pass through or near nature reserves and areas inhabited by indigenous groups. Also, it would pass through Lake Nicaragua, the largest fresh water lake in Central America. This lake holds fresh drinking water for the people and is home to rare fresh water species, such as the fresh water shark, which could be effected negatively by this construction.

Although this canal could turn Nicaragua’s economy around, it could also cause negative impacts on their environment. 

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Are container ships getting too big?

Are container ships getting too big? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

What is blue, a quarter of a mile long, and taller than London's Olympic stadium?  The answer - this year's new class of container ship, the Triple E. When it goes into service this June, it will be the largest vessel ploughing the sea.  Each will contain as much steel as eight Eiffel Towers and have a capacity equivalent to 18,000 20-foot containers (TEU).  

Seth Dixon's insight:

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.      


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 1:32 PM

Consumed in Europe these container ships have the amount of steel of  8 Efile Towers in one container. It is a quarter mile long and taller than that of the Olympic stadium in London.  

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What Everybody From The North Needs To Understand About The Traffic Disaster In Atlanta

What Everybody From The North Needs To Understand About The Traffic Disaster In Atlanta | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Republicans want to blame government (a Democrat thing) or Atlanta (definitely a Democrat thing). Democrats want to blame the region’s dependence on cars (a Republican thing), the state government (Republicans), and many of the transplants from more liberal, urban places feel the same way you might about white, rural, southern drivers. All of this is true to some extent but none of it is helpful."

Seth Dixon's insight:

There are no easy answers, but that doesn't mean we people aren't trying to frame this in an easy narrative.  Also look at the Washington Post's compliation of 16 pictures that highlight the missteps in handling this unusual problem.   

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Albert Jordan's curator insight, January 29, 3:47 PM

The thing about the hoopla surrounding the "snow" storm that hit the south is that for the region unaccustomed to snow, whether it be an inch or a foot is that infrastructure, inexperience, funding, and the media play a role in the reaction to it. Politics may be behind the scenes but do not seem to really be a major role. The politics can be whatever they want to be, but at the end of the day if the snow was a major issue it will get taken care of; i.e. - Rhode Island politics are corrupt but it’ll be a cold day in Hell before snow removal is significantly affected statewide (this is different from the efficiency of low income neighborhood removal.).

One must take into effect that as roads and highways are built, depending on the region certain factors must be taken into account. For instance, asphalt seal-coat treatments which are used to treat a section of asphalt in its defense against the destructive forces that it will face in the form of nature, traffic, etc. In the Northeast, the asphalt is probably coated with substances to help salt stay in place, resist water and icing, and handle a heavy load of traffic. I would say it’s used to minimize pothole creation but apparently pothole creation is a force to be reckoned with.

This area is unaccustomed to snow and because the locals are not used to it, they immediately feel a sense of fear towards it. "Oh no, it’s snowing and I don’t know how to react so now I feel anxiety and fear." creates caution, which in turn will make a driver doing 35mph in a 35mph zone do an infuriating 5mph instead. The media is not a helpful factor either as they will continually blast the airwaves with news of impending snow doom, which adds to the personal anxiety of drivers. There are many other reasons, surely, but finally; the funding is not there to take care of proper snow removal because they plainly do not need to fund it as we do up here in New England. If we do not have ample, if not overly abundant funding and resources to deal with snow and brutal winters then we do function. Atlanta is not Providence, Boston, or NYC and should not be compared or judged in the same company as them.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 29, 7:54 PM

It is difficult for someone from New England to understand how a city like Atlanta can be shut down from such a small amount of snow. However, when snow hits an area where people have little to no experience driving in snowy or icy conditions you can not expect all to go well, especially when there is no salt and sand on the roads. I think some people who have experience driving in the snow would have a difficult time driving on roads that are not properly treated and are covered in ice. 

Phil LAUGRAND's comment, January 29, 11:24 PM
where is solidarity between drivers..? why human beings in wealthy countries have forgotten to help each other... and perhaps stop to be so selfish... and use their cars together and not one car for one person ? do they know about co-sharing driving ? Do they happen to look around them and consider they are not the center of the world ?
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The Container that Moves the Global Economy

The Container that Moves the Global Economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The unsung hero of the global economy: the shipping container.
Seth Dixon's insight:


NPR's Planet Money has produced an 8-part series following the commodity chain of the T-Shirt.  This series explores cotton production, textile mills, sweatshops, outsourcing and in this podcast, the transportation infrastructure that moves goods globally.  This podcast touches on the same topic as one of my favorite TED talks, how containerization enabled globalization.   

 

Tagstransportation, industry, economic, globalization, technology, podcast.


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Patricia Flavin's curator insight, December 12, 2013 3:57 PM

loved this series - a must see and must listen.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 7:34 AM

Shipping containers has helped mordern globalization in many ways. The amount of trade we do with other countries allows for a cheaper process. The amount of items we can trade now because of containerization is way more than we did with trucks. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:16 PM
Containers have become such an essential part of our economy and shipping all together. SHipping in containers and on ships is not only cost effective but they can use machines to load them onto the decks of the ships. You can fit an obscene amount of product in the containers as well. The containers are also completely private you cannot see into the container so people are less likely to steal if they are unable to know what is inside.
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Launch of world's biggest 'ship'

Launch of world's biggest 'ship' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A floating vessel that is longer than the Empire State Building is high has taken to the water for the first time.  Despite appearances, Prelude cannot strictly be described as a ship as it needs to be towed to its destination rather than travelling under its own power."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a floating testament that economies of scale will continue to push the limits.  Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America.  This is one reason why Nicaragua is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 8, 2013 12:52 AM

The Worlds biggest ship to be launched soon by Shell is an amazing feat, created by human ingenuity. It is incredible that it is longer than the Empire state building. it is difficult to imagine how an object so long even moves by itself. Nicaragua is attempting to make a canal Bigger than Panamas to support a ship thate size of the prelude that will operate off the coast of Australia for the next 25 years. The fact that it needs to be towed to its destination makes one question if its really a ship or not. Regardless Shell will share the cost of the Oil vessell once its finished being built

Julia Rose Turco's curator insight, December 11, 2013 5:02 PM

Wow, this is interesting! I can't believe its that long! I wonder how long it took them to build it? Also, where is it going?  Also, why would they need it to be so big? Why can't they just use a smaller ship and make more trips? But overall this is very cool.

Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 9:34 AM

I've got a weak spot for massive ships, plain and simple. I think there's even a future in ship-based cities which move around the world's oceans. Eventually ships can become so large and so advanced that the normal threats associated with the open ocean will do little to scratch them. For a comparison, the ship pictured is the Prelude FLNG, and it's almost twice the length of the Titanic.

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World's Most Thrilling Airports

World's Most Thrilling Airports | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Or the world's most terrifying runways, depending on your perspective and sense of adventure.  Pictured above is the Matekane Air Strip in Lesotho.  It is too short to start flying the conventional way so you drop on a cliff until the aircraft starts flying...if that is not your kind of funmaybe some extreme tourism would suit you in your travels more.


Tags: transportation, tourism.


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Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 27, 2013 1:02 PM

Amazing !!!

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:09 AM

Most people are scared enough to even go on a plan much less having to deal with some of these runways. This horrid runways include high altitude, short runways or even 90 degree turns to even advance onto the runway. Pretty scary if i might say so myself. Im surprised the St Maartens runways didn make the list with its threat of hitting a popular beach in the local proximity.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 4:02 PM

Some of these airports look to me as if planes won't make it. The one in Portugal goes over mountains and trees and is very short. Flying can be terrifying as it is but landing on some of these airport can be more nerve racking. This raises a question, was this the only land area these countries had to build a runway? 

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Bike Lanes

Seth Dixon's insight:

In a busy city like New York, there are never enough places for parking and lanes for traffic.  There is simply not enough space for the flow to be smooth and efficient.  Cyclists that attempt to assert their right to the street are often times referred to as cyclist activists or hipsters as though their activism or cultural differences makes them synonymous with an extremism that  is more easy to dismiss.  Many hold views that privilege a motorists right to space in the city above that of a cyclist.  I saw this tweet by a NYC cycling organization that referred to "activist drivers" who park in the bike lane as attempting to create a "guerrilla can lane."  They used the terms and language used against them and superimposed it on the larger motorist community which sees itself as having a more natural right to all space in the city.  This video embedded above is an excellent spoof and highlights the dangers of being a cyclist in a motorist-centric world.

    

Tags: transportation, cycling, urban, planning, territoriality, space.

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Sofia Speranza's curator insight, October 10, 2013 11:10 AM

BIKERS. be aware of dangers on the street path

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 7:27 AM

I find this to be very true. I have gone to big cities such as Boston and New York and it is always chaotic. I find that there is always terrible parking in the big cities. Also it seems very dangerous for the average civilian trying to get to his or her job on a daily basis. Me not being from around the area found it difficult to navigate.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:45 AM

Bikers in New York City should know better not to ride their bikes around the streets because it is so busy and the traffic can be difficult. I know people use bikes to commute to work or school but this is New Yorks job to create more bike paths for people who want to use their bikes to commute. This will be safer for people to ride their bikes whenever they want. 

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The World's 25 Busiest Airports

The World's 25 Busiest Airports | Geography Education | Scoop.it
More than 1.4 billion airline passengers departed, landed, or connected through these massive facilities in 2012. Viewing them from above gives a sense of their gargantuan scale and global significance.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This ESRI storymap of the 25 busiest airports compliments nicely the storymap of the 50 busiest ports around the world.  The busiest ports interactive clearly shows how East Asian manufacturing is impacting global economics (almost 90% of everything we buy arrives via ship).  European and North American ports are few and far between on the busiest ports list but much more prominent on the busiest airport list.   


Questions to Ponder: How do places of economic flows reshape the global economics?  What do the rankings on these two lists suggest about regions of the world?  What would strengthen in a particular mode of transportation indicate?  

  

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 9, 2013 8:43 AM

Great site to see how globaliztions takes a hold.  Many of the airport on the list of in the US and many are in China.  Not surprising that the two leading economic powers in the world have the busiest airports.  Also it is interening to see Las Vegas on the list.  Seems that people need a place to blow off some steam from working so hard.

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 1:24 AM

Transport technology is a key factor that assists the operation of Global networks

 

Mickayla Graham's curator insight, March 27, 1:14 AM

People and Economic Activity

Suggested by Aulde de B
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The Detroit Bus Company

"Young entrepreneur Andy Didorosi believes that the way to Detroit’s new era depends on better leadership and a solid connection between the city and the suburbs. The city in 2012 axed its plans to build the M-1 light rail, the transit solution that would’ve bridged that vital connection, Didorosi bought a bus, had a local artist trick it out with a wicked mural, and he started the Detroit Bus Company.  Dedicated to a more connected city, Andy Didorosi is bringing Detroit home one ride at a time."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In the 1950s, Detroit was the 4th largest city in the US with a population around 2 million as seen in some vintage footage of Detroit.  As de-industrialization process restructured the US economy, globalization restructured the world’s economy, and Detroit’s local economic strategy crumbledThe tax base continued to shrink, city services were spread thin and the poor services encouraged people to migrate elsewhere, leaving current homeowners unable to sell their homes at a fair price.  Today, Detroit is $18-20 million in debt with a population around 700,000 and is unable to pull out of this nosedive.  Detroit filed for bankruptcy July 18, 2013 and became the largest U.S. city ever to file for bankruptcy and more importantly the first major American city to essentially fail (photo gallery of 'ruin photography'). 


With all this sad news, there are still glimmers of sucess as seen in this video.  Some entrepreneurs and local have stepped in as the city government has been unable to manage the needs of a large city creating organizations such as the Detroit Bus Company


Tags: transportation, urban, planning, poverty, communityeconomic, industry, Detroit

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Jackie Hinton's comment, July 19, 2013 9:18 AM
love the video,didn't know detroit was in that bad of shape.
Betty Denise's comment, July 20, 2013 2:45 AM
http://www.marchandmeffre.com/detroit/index.html (Detroit détruite)
Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 25, 2013 9:52 AM

Andy is creating a transportation system for the new Detroit.  Once the inevitable downsize takes place his idea for transportation could take off.

Suggested by Duane Hanstein, GISP
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Bike Share Map

Bike Share Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Visualisation for bike shares across the world.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many cities (including Denver) have active bike share programs to ease congestion and foster a less automobile-centric urban design.  London, Paris and Mexico City are a handful of the international cities listed here but it isn't only the largest cities (Hello Lillestrøm, Norway!).  In the U.S., it is the same with typical cities (NYC and Washington DC) as well as as some smaller cities (Chattanooga and Omaha).  Is your city on the list


Tags: transportation, urban, planning.

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Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 4, 2013 2:13 PM

This is great...They should have this on the east bay bike path in the Bristol, Warren & Barrington area. I went out on it today and it was so busy they could have set up some traffic cops on it to pull some people over with so meny near collisions of people riding and walking together.