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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Nicaragua unveils major canal route

Nicaragua unveils major canal route | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Nicaraguan government and the company behind plans to build a canal linking the Atlantic and the Pacific Ocean have settled on a route."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A Chinese firm (HKND) is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  I've been following this issue as I prepared to co-author an article  for Maps 101 with Julie Dixon and it is clearly a major environmental issue.  However, this issue is much more geographic than just the angle; China and Nicaragua are vying for greater control and access to the shipping lanes that dominate the global economy and international trade.  This shows that they are each attempting to bolster their regional and international impact compared to their rivals (the United States for China and Panama for Nicaragua).   


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, July 29, 4:55 AM

Now, who will pay for it?

Dave Cottrell's comment, July 31, 11:37 AM
You can be sure this will accommodate ships much larger than what the Panama Canal will accommodate.
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The Silk Road: Connecting the ancient world through trade

"With modern technology, a global exchange of goods and ideas can happen at the click of a button. But what about 2,000 years ago? Shannon Harris Castelo unfolds the history of the 5,000-mile Silk Road, a network of multiple routes that used the common language of commerce to connect the world's major settlements, thread by thread."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED-ED lesson was produced in part by an AP Human Geography teacher and the strands of geographic thought in this video are evident.  More geographers should make their own TED ED lessons; thanks for blazing the trail Shannon! 


Tags: TED, worldwide, transportation, globalization, diffusion, historical, and video.

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The Ship-Breakers

The Ship-Breakers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Bangladesh men desperate for work perform one of the world’s most dangerous jobs.
Seth Dixon's insight:

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal, but they aren't

designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.


Tags: Bangladesh South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, May 25, 3:04 PM

Where there is a need there is a way.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 27, 9:23 AM

This article shows how parts of the world plays host to some of the more dangerous industries in existence because they are desperate for jobs and will take any work that comes their way. The ship-breakers are mostly men that work to recycle retired cargo ships. This job is extraordinary dangerous due to the fact that the ships are built not to be taken apart. We can see the lack of development in some parts of the world through this industry's presence in southwest Asia. 

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, June 4, 6:28 PM

Despite massive advances in transporting goods rapidly around our ever increasing connected world, little thought is spared for how we mamage the waste stream. MEDC benefitf rom accessing the range of goods but LEDC have to deal with the dismantling of the transport modes. 

Suggested by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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Sports Movies and Globalization

Hamm said he was drawn to the true story of an agent looking for India's first pro-baseball player
Seth Dixon's insight:

This 6 minute clip is a preview of the movie "Million Dollar Arm."  It looks to be a fun movie, but what I find academically interesting about the movie is that it is a portrayal of one of the countless fascinating cultural and economic interactions that was created by globalization.  The story is about the economic forces motivating baseball scouts to seek out untapped labor pools in areas such as India that were previously not a part of baseball's cultural reach (and the really cool global lives of these individuals). 


Tags: sport, globalization, popular culture, economic, labor, India.

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Nicky Mohan's curator insight, May 5, 3:31 PM

There's an absolute treasure trove of not only movies but also games that are very powerful for educational purposes. It is something that students can relate to. It is relevant & interesting.

Jyoti Chouhan's curator insight, May 13, 10:45 AM

This 6 minute clip is a preview of the movie "Million Dollar Arm."  It looks to be a fun movie, but what I find academically interesting about the movie is that it is a portrayal of one of the countless fascinating cultural and economic interactions that was created by globalization.  The story is about the economic forces motivating baseball scouts to seek out untapped labor pools in areas such as India that were previously not a part of baseball's cultural reach (and the really cool global lives of these individuals).

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Tunisia's street artist

Tunisia's street artist | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Following the uprising that toppled the government in 2011, he has become a well known graffiti artist hoping to revive and modernise the ancient art of Arabic calligraphy in Tunisia. He calls his style "calligraffiti".

Seth Dixon's insight:

This short BBC video demonstrated how cultures are dynamic and are built on past traditions to confront modern circumstances.  Cultures are performed both as resistance to and wider social influences and as a mechanism to adapt to those forces.  The street art of Karim Jabbari is an excellent example of the cultural patterns and processes by blending ancient North African calligraphy with modern Western street art to create an entirely new form of cultural expression.  This cultural production is still deeply rooted in place, but in not locked away in the past either.  After the Arab Spring, Tunisians were searching for new political identities and the street festivals sponsored in part by this artist are forging new political, cultural and urban expressions.  Watch this video to see him in action, shaping a cultural landscape and strengthening a community.    

Tags: Tunisia, globalization, popular culture, unit 3 culture.

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Albert Jordan's curator insight, May 1, 10:58 AM

Considering hip hop is a distinctly American born cultural phenomenon, this goes to show how something that was born of one nations deprived social class can leap to a nation that is very different and still put forth the same message, as well as be used in the same way. Just like in the Bronx when hip hop was just starting off it was used to get people together, in Tunisia it is being used in the same way. Graffiti itself, while seen by many as simple vandalism, can be a powerful symbol of social change. As this artist is doing, using themes from hip hop and taking old Arabic calligraphy, mixing these up and then applying them to the side of a prison which has personal as well as local symbolism - it goes to show that post Arab Spring some places are seeing real change.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 2, 12:19 PM

Following the Arab Spring, Karim Jabbari is hoping to help rebuild and recreate Tunisia through his own form of cultural expression which he calls "calligraffiti".  Calligraffiti is a blend of Western Street art and North African Arabic calligraphy.  This artistic expression works to spread messages pertaining to the recreating of the social and political environment of the country and by attracting and empowering Tunisia's youth in this endeavor.  

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 8:24 PM

The video shows how Karim Jabbari, is able to combine folk culture (ancient arabic writing) in with the western graffiti art. He is able to use his art to express political ideals and beliefs

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Globalization and the Textile Industry

"On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates."

Seth Dixon's insight:

One of the first industries to be impacted by what is today called globalization was the textile industry and the successive waves of globalization continue to alter the geography of the textile industry.  This video shows how historical problems in the U.S. textile industry are seen today in countries such as Bangladesh, as does this interactive feature.  The following paragraph is from a Geography News Network podcast / article that Julie Dixon and I co-authored for Maps101 about the Bangladeshi garment industry:     


Many developing countries with the majority of their laborers working in agriculture welcome outsourced labor from the West. This is seen as a way to nurture industrialization, even if it is on the terms of trans-national corporations. Countless workers seek employment in textile factories simply because low pay is still an entry into the cash economy and it is one of the few jobs rural migrants can find when they first enter the big city. In such locations, Western labor, construction, and environmental standards are not priorities because the population’s basic needs haven’t been met, so the responsibility falls to the global companies—but their aim is to cut costs as much as possible to remain competitive.  From its emergence in textiles back in the late 1970’s, Bangladesh in 2013 made $19 billion in the export-oriented, ready-made garment industry, employing 4 million workers, most of whom are women. 


Listen to more of this Geography News Network podcast or read it here. 


Tags: Bangladesh, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Kelly Collinsworth's curator insight, April 16, 5:42 AM

For Beth Manor

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 24, 8:28 AM

unit 6

Danielle Bellefeuille's curator insight, May 10, 3:16 PM

The sad reality of the new division of labor, we are moving backwards instead of forwards with labor policies and widening the gap between core and periphery countries. We need to stand up and advocate for fair trade. These countries rely on us for sources of unemployment, and we need to give them better wages, safer working conditions, and help them push pass this dependency, and grow into more economically and socially strong countries.

 

http://www.laborrights.org

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China's Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua

China's Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By the end of this year, digging could begin on a waterway that would stretch roughly 180 miles across Nicaragua to unite the Atlantic and Pacific oceans."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America; China is strategically working on strengthening their geopolitical position in the South China Sea and all international waters.  This is one reason why a Chinese firms are planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  This article highlights the reasons for concern (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what else Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 28, 9:24 AM

This could be an economic boom for Nicaragua, one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere. However, this construction could potentially cause serious problems. The proposed canal would pass through or near nature reserves and areas inhabited by indigenous groups. Also, it would pass through Lake Nicaragua, the largest fresh water lake in Central America. This lake holds fresh drinking water for the people and is home to rare fresh water species, such as the fresh water shark, which could be effected negatively by this construction.

Although this canal could turn Nicaragua’s economy around, it could also cause negative impacts on their environment. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 3:28 PM

Although Nicaragua would benefit from this financially the whole country would be carved up because of the other nations total rule over the imports and exports in trading routes.

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Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style

Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style | Geography Education | Scoop.it
At a new restaurant, expats find a taste of home and locals try foreign treats like fortune cookies.


Imagine living in China and missing Chinese food. It happens. American expatriates who grew up with popular takeout dishes like General Tso's chicken can't find it in China because it essentially doesn't exist here. Much of the Chinese food we grew up with isn't really Chinese. It's an American version of Chinese food. Chinese immigrants created it over time, adapting recipes with U.S. ingredients to appeal to American palates.  Now, Americans living in Shanghai can get a fix of their beloved Chinatown cuisine at a new restaurant.

Seth Dixon's insight:

The is just one more delicious example of how globalization impacts cultural products.  Globalization flows in many unexpected directions.  For more, see this TED talk on the search for the origins of General Tso's chicken.    


Tags: foodglobalization, culture, China, East Asia, podcast.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:28 PM

This just gives people a bit of the American lifestyle. The Americans think its regular Chinese food, although it clearly isn't. Chinese think its American food but what would you know; its our spin on Chinese food or at least what we thought it was.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 12:17 PM

Not what most people think about in the US when they order Chinese food. I always tell my friends that if actual Chinese people ate American Chinese food everyday they would have all the obesity and heart disease issues that Americans have. The amount of sugar, fats, and cholesterol in American Chinese food is outrageous and definitely not part of a healthy diet. I can see why the Chinese public might be amused but not in love with this food.

http://yzenith.com's curator insight, June 30, 10:39 PM

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How Vietnam became a coffee giant

How Vietnam became a coffee giant | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Think of coffee and you will probably think of Brazil, Colombia, or maybe Ethiopia. But the world's second largest exporter today is Vietnam. How did its market share jump from 0.1% to 20% in just 30 years, and how has this rapid change affected the country?"


Seth Dixon's insight:

Vietnam is a historically tea-drinking country, and when the French colonized, they brought coffee.  Culturally they still prefer tea, but in the 1980s, the government say this as a major export crop that they were climatically primed to produce.  This rapid growth has bolstered the economy, but has had some adverse environmental impacts as well.  The article is rich in geographic topics to bring into the classroom.

  

Tags: Vietnamagricultureglobalization, SouthEastAsia.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 11:09 AM

This article pointed out that while Vietnam does not drink much coffee it has become a large exporter of the bean.  The article also talked about the ramifications of coffee farming on the economy as well as he geography of this country.  I also found it interesting that a country that no one ever trained to grow coffee has reached the heights it has with just farmers figuring out what needed to be done.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 8:05 AM

Coffee is in high demand. When any product is in high demand, countries want to rapidly be able to produce it before other countries. Vietnam has made its way to the top of the list of coffee producing/marketing countries. This has greatly affected the country in political/economic and financial ways.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 12:13 PM

This is a tough predicament, coffee growing is providing a stable income for many Vietnamese but land clearing is ruining the environment. Land mines are still in the soil in many places and could cause severe injury or loss of life. How long before the country cannot produce enough coffee and farmers start to suffer again?

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The Container that Moves the Global Economy

The Container that Moves the Global Economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The unsung hero of the global economy: the shipping container.
Seth Dixon's insight:


NPR's Planet Money has produced an 8-part series following the commodity chain of the T-Shirt.  This series explores cotton production, textile mills, sweatshops, outsourcing and in this podcast, the transportation infrastructure that moves goods globally.  This podcast touches on the same topic as one of my favorite TED talks, how containerization enabled globalization.   

 

Tagstransportation, industry, economic, globalization, technology, podcast.


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Patricia Flavin's curator insight, December 12, 2013 3:57 PM

loved this series - a must see and must listen.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 7:34 AM

Shipping containers has helped mordern globalization in many ways. The amount of trade we do with other countries allows for a cheaper process. The amount of items we can trade now because of containerization is way more than we did with trucks. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:16 PM
Containers have become such an essential part of our economy and shipping all together. SHipping in containers and on ships is not only cost effective but they can use machines to load them onto the decks of the ships. You can fit an obscene amount of product in the containers as well. The containers are also completely private you cannot see into the container so people are less likely to steal if they are unable to know what is inside.
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Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map from a Geography in the News article shows that Quinoa has historically been grown almost exclusively in the highlands of the Andes Mountains.  This was a localized food source for generations but this new global demand has increased the economic possibilities for Quinoa growers.  At the same time, local consumers that have traditionally depended on cheap Quinoa to supplement their diet are now effectively priced out, as stated in this Al-Jazeera article


Questions to Ponder: What modern and traditional agricultural patterns can we see in the production of Quinoa?  How have global and local forces reshaped the system?


Tags: agriculture, food production, foodglobalization, South America, folk cultures, culture, Bolivia.

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Pranav Pradeep's curator insight, February 27, 8:23 AM

Its crazy how something grown so far away can become such a dominant aspect in the food consupmtion of people in such distant place.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 11:01 AM

Quinoa is the new food to lose weight with. People all over the world have discovered its health benefits and can't get enough of it. However, quinoa only grows in certain climates and places. Since its supply is in high demand, finding places for it to grow would be beneficial to those trying to market and sell the grain. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 3:55 PM

Quinoa has been a staple crop in the Andes mountains for many years. It has only been recently that people in other parts of the world have recognized its health benefits. Since it is grown in only a tiny part of the world, the supply may easily fall behind the demand. Finding a similar geographic area to grow crops in may be what is needed in order to increase the supply.

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Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan

Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Pakistan's tribal areas, alcohol bootleggers, lured by enormous profits, have created clandestine delivery services to evade recent crackdowns by the Taliban and the police.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This 2010 New York Times video shows in a poignant way how the past and the present, the global and the local comibine to create underground cultural practices among the wealthy in Pakistan. 


Tags: Pakistan, popular culture, SouthAsiaglobalization, culture, Islam.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 6:21 AM

The video showed an interesting report on bootlegging in Pakistan.  The comment at the end was the most interesting to me.  A person interviewed said that the society used to be more open and free but now they are not.  The rich can do as they like but the people cannot.  The dangers of bootlegging is such that if the police catch you then you will be arrested or have to pay a bribe but if the Taliban catch you then you will be killed.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 3:47 PM

Other than the actual product, there is no difference between these bootleggers and the illegal drug trade in the US. Even when they said that people that drink the alcohol get arrested, there is no difference. In the US we put heroin addicts in jail every day. Also, in the US the illegal drug trade is very lucrative, but also very dangerous.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 5:48 PM

Alcohol bootleggers have been getting shutdown by the police force. Without this service, the bootleggers would be out of business and probably in jail. This is like prohibition in the U.S. and those who sold alcohol were fined and also arrested. The same thing is happening here where the bootleggers are trying to make huge money by selling something thats outlawed.

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Follow the Things

"Who makes the things that we buy?  Few of us know. They seem untouched by human hands. Occasionally there's a news story, a documentary film, or an artwork showing the hidden ingredients in our coffee, t-shirts, or iPads. They often 'expose' unpleasant working conditions to encourage more 'ethical' consumer or corporate behaviour. followthethings.com is this work's 'online store'. Here you can find out who has followed what, why and how; the techniques used to 'grab' its audiences; the discussions and impacts that this has provoked; and how to follow things yourself."
Seth Dixon's insight:

Where did your T-Shirt come from?   Where did the food your parents bought at the grocery store come from?  What's the origin of the components in your cell phone?  These questions all allude to what geographers call a commodity chain analysis.  Analyzing where the consumer goods that we use every day came from can make global issues hit a little closer to home and reinforce concepts such as globalization. The website Follow the Things is a great resource for teaching students about commodity chains and mapping out your own personal geographies.


Tags: industry, economic, globalization, consumption.

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Fran Martin's curator insight, September 10, 2013 12:37 AM

Great website by colleague Ian Cook at Exeter University

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, September 10, 2013 12:56 AM

About Globalisation, flows and production today. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 9:32 AM

Where did your T-Shirt come from?   Where did the food your parents bought at the grocery store come from?  What's the origin of the components in your cell phone?  These questions all allude to what geographers call a commodity chain analysis.  Analyzing where the consumer goods that we use every day came from can make global issues hit a little closer to home and reinforce concepts such as globalization. The website Follow the Things is a great resource for learning  about commodity chains and mapping out your own personal geographies.

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China’s hungry cattle feasting on alfalfa grown on Utah farm

China’s hungry cattle feasting on alfalfa grown on Utah farm | Geography Education | Scoop.it
China has long depended on the U.S. breadbasket, importing up to $26 billion in U.S. agricultural products yearly. But increasingly, Chinese investors aren’t just buying from farms abroad. They’re buying the farms.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Globalization is often described as a homogenizing force, but is also pairs together odd bed fellows.  A small Utah town near the Colorado border, Jensen is now home to the largest Chinese-owned hay farm in the United States. Utah's climate is right for growing alfalfa, and China's growing cattle industry make this a natural global partnership.  Large container ships come to the United States from China, and return fairly empty, making the transportation price relatively affordable.  While this might make economic sense on a global scale, local water concerns in the west show that this isn't without it's problems.  Water resources are scarce and many see this as a depletion of local water exported to China.  Some states see this as a threat and are considering banning foreign ownership of farmland.  This article shows the merging of various geographic themes: the global and local, the industrial and the agricultural, the human and the physical.         


Tags: agriculture, agribusinesstransportation, globalizationwaterChinaindustry, economic, physical, Utah.

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 7, 7:41 AM
strong>Seth Dixon's insight: China buying farm land
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'Neo-Andean' architecture sprouts in Bolivia

'Neo-Andean' architecture sprouts in Bolivia | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Brash, baroque and steeped in native Andean symbols, the mini-mansions are a striking sight on the caked-dirt streets of El Alto, the inexorably expanding sister city of Bolivia's capital."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The pre-Columbian symbols of the condor, serpent and Tree of Life adorn the architecture of these brightly colored ballrooms that also have European-imported chandeliers, arches and other baroque elements.  The spread of globalization is often assumed to be a homogenizing cultural force, but local cultures typically take elements of the global, and make it their own.  The global becomes local and deeply rooted in place and reshapes place.


Tags globalizationarchitecture, South America, folk cultures, culture, Bolivia.

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 27, 9:34 AM

The resurgence of old-style architecture in developed places is shown in this article. The New-Andean style of architecture showcases bright colors and traditional patterns of the natives in South America is gaining popularity once again. Old styles of living and architecture had been fading for many years, but are now coming back into popularity after many Native groups have revived their traditional cultures and ways of life. 

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Qatar government admits almost 1,000 fatalities among migrant workers

Qatar government admits almost 1,000 fatalities among migrant workers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Report details deaths of 964 workers from Nepal, India and Bangladesh from cardiac arrests, falls and suicide
Seth Dixon's insight:

Qatar's population pyramid has a very distinct shape that you will only find in places with high migrant worker populations.  This type of demographic influx is now common in oil-rich gulf states as the forces of globalization draw in pools of labor so countries like Qatar can now 'import' the low-wage workers needed to keep their economy rolling.  The economic, cultural and political power imbalance  between the classes leads to many migrant workers being exploited, leading to the social problems listed in this article.     


Tags: Middle East, Qatar, globalization, migration, economic, labor.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 17, 4:05 AM

Qatar's high migrant population is a result of its oil reserves and need for labor. 

 

Population pyramid unique to a nation with large migrant worker population http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Qatar_population_pyramid_%282005%29.jpg

Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 10:03 AM

Do migrant workers have the same rights as native workers? This continuing set of issues from Qatar brings that question to the forefront as they prepare to host the 2022 World Cup.

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 4:05 PM

Migrant workers often represent the minority group in a particular country, such as Qatar (in this example). As such, migrant workers often have little rights or worker securities that most often accompany other workers and protect their rights; however, with the current immigrant explosion in Qatar as a result of the booming oil industry, it is easy for these migrant workers to be exploited and unaccounted for. 

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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The World Bank has produced a report entitled "Prosperity for All."  In this, the extremely poor are defined as making less than $1.25 a day.  Two thirds of the extremely poor live in just 5 countries (India, China, Nigeria, Bangladesh and DR Congo).  This article from the Guardian argues that development should measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements. 


Tags: poverty, development, economic, globalization, labor, NGOs.

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Gorete Queiroga de Figueiredo's curator insight, May 4, 4:34 PM

Os extremamente pobres não vivem [existem] existem mais aqui.

dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 5:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:48 AM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

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China Has Accomplished Something In Global Trade Not Seen Since Colonial Britain

China Has Accomplished Something In Global Trade Not Seen Since Colonial Britain | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"China is a true mega-trader — a position last held by colonial Britain, with trade significant not only as a share of world trade (11.5%) but also of its own GDP (47%).  The U.S. is China's top export destination. China's trade with Latin America has risen more than 200 times since 1990 and is the fastest-growing corridor. China's trade is beginning to slow, however. Exports accounted for about 25% of GDP in 2012, down from 35% in 2007." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article is highlights what we already know; China is a dominant force in global trade (although the map should be centered on the Pacific to show China's real shipping lanes and interregional connections).  Containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries (almost 90% of everything we buy arrives via ship).  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia. 


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 30, 9:34 AM

It would be wiser if the Chinese used the wealth they've produced to kickstart a domestically based economy, rather than rely on international trade.  It would detach themselves from having to play nicely with others for economic reasons and enable them to take over more of a regional position.

 

However, natural law against empires is still in effect.  China can't overreach its influence or behave inappropriately if they get rejected in other parts of the world, nor can it overreact to threats against its overseas interests.

 

As for the US, it would be wiser if we were to reign in on our ideology of marginal growth, pay our current workers decent enough wages that they can afford to spend and have leisure time.  It's time that we all direct our societies against what is excessive wealth (as defined by wealth exceeding that which cannot be used in the course of the individual's lifetime) and be done with the happy horse Second Gilded Age that we've allowed ourselves to be walked into by the rich business interests and their foolish academic cohorts.  It's not in the economy's interests to have everything bunched into the hands of a few individuals, anymore than it is in a person's interests to have all of their blood rush to their feet, or a child's teddy bear to have all the stuffing bunched in one part.  We're not seeing growth anymore, except in the realm of capital investments.  More goods and services aren't being produced or sold and one has to wonder what the point of having that kind of growth is, when it buffers against our environmental and sociological concerns.

 

We will either adapt to this new knowledge or die in the process.

 

It is that simple.

 

Think about it.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 6:09 AM

This article offers an interesting piece of insight, which is that China has become the biggest trader in the world, and has even surpassed colonial Britain was at the time.  During colonial times, and throughout history, China kept to themselves.  Britain, on the other hand was becoming a world superpower because of their demands for goods.  The article offers four reasons why this trend will continue for China including a firm control of its position in the market, increasing global demand for China's services, a shift towards a more balanced trade (i.e. more imports), and its established infrastructure.  However, they do not touch upon the negative aspects of environmental and humanitarian issues that have been brought along with global trade, and which may be the demise of China's trade market.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:51 AM

China's exportation has grown so high and has reached a multitude of nations, not unlike British Imperialism. Though China has reached a lot of nation and has grown economically, it has also slowed down.

The movement of goods is greatly portrayed in economic sectors through trade patterns.

 

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.

Seth Dixon's insight:

In the Atlantic, there was an article that highlighted some incredible comparisons of Shanghai’s Pudong district that shows the impact of globalization.  This image is my rendering of the two images as a composite image.  Globalization has hit…hard and fast.  Today, we shouldn't think of Shanghai as a major city in China, but as as one of the major cities in the world.

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Tony Hall's curator insight, March 6, 3:38 AM

Wow. This is amazing. The cynical side of me wonders what the costs have been for the people of the area. Not to mention the environmental costs.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 9:38 AM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

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Are container ships getting too big?

Are container ships getting too big? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

What is blue, a quarter of a mile long, and taller than London's Olympic stadium?  The answer - this year's new class of container ship, the Triple E. When it goes into service this June, it will be the largest vessel ploughing the sea.  Each will contain as much steel as eight Eiffel Towers and have a capacity equivalent to 18,000 20-foot containers (TEU).  

Seth Dixon's insight:

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.      


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 1:32 PM

Consumed in Europe these container ships have the amount of steel of  8 Efile Towers in one container. It is a quarter mile long and taller than that of the Olympic stadium in London.  

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Does English still borrow words from other languages?

Does English still borrow words from other languages? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"English language has 'borrowed' words for centuries. But is it now lending more than it's taking, asks Philip Durkin, deputy chief editor of the Oxford English Dictionary. "


Knowledge of what is being borrowed, and from where, provides an invaluable insight into the international relations of the English language.  Today English borrows words from other languages with a truly global reach.

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Pranav Pradeep's curator insight, February 6, 12:20 PM

English is still a language that is made off of other languages, not many if any of our words were not atleast based off of someother language!

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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...


Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.

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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 1:35 AM

great for unit on globalisation and fair trade

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 10:26 AM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 12:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

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Launch of world's biggest 'ship'

Launch of world's biggest 'ship' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A floating vessel that is longer than the Empire State Building is high has taken to the water for the first time.  Despite appearances, Prelude cannot strictly be described as a ship as it needs to be towed to its destination rather than travelling under its own power."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a floating testament that economies of scale will continue to push the limits.  Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America.  This is one reason why Nicaragua is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 8, 2013 12:52 AM

The Worlds biggest ship to be launched soon by Shell is an amazing feat, created by human ingenuity. It is incredible that it is longer than the Empire state building. it is difficult to imagine how an object so long even moves by itself. Nicaragua is attempting to make a canal Bigger than Panamas to support a ship thate size of the prelude that will operate off the coast of Australia for the next 25 years. The fact that it needs to be towed to its destination makes one question if its really a ship or not. Regardless Shell will share the cost of the Oil vessell once its finished being built

Julia Rose Turco's curator insight, December 11, 2013 5:02 PM

Wow, this is interesting! I can't believe its that long! I wonder how long it took them to build it? Also, where is it going?  Also, why would they need it to be so big? Why can't they just use a smaller ship and make more trips? But overall this is very cool.

Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 9:34 AM

I've got a weak spot for massive ships, plain and simple. I think there's even a future in ship-based cities which move around the world's oceans. Eventually ships can become so large and so advanced that the normal threats associated with the open ocean will do little to scratch them. For a comparison, the ship pictured is the Prelude FLNG, and it's almost twice the length of the Titanic.

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Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships."  http://geographyeducation.org/2013/10/14/ship-shipping-ships/


Seth Dixon's insight:

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce. Economies of scale infuse our transportation and communicating technologies, boosting the diffusion of countless other technologies. China's transportation infrastructure, for example has undergone some amazing physical transformations that have made their economic growth possible.  If, however, you only want to laugh at the tongue-twister of ship-shipping ships shipping shipping ships,  this is the internet meme for you


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:35 AM

First, this is a fantastic photo...a freighter shipping other freighters.  As my colleague Seth Dixon points out, this is a fantastic image of one of the important drivers of the acceleration of globalization in recent history.  

jim dzialo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 11:54 AM

Pretty sure that doesn't fit in the panama canal

 

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 1:28 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce.

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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This short video on the street foods of German cities is a rich, tangible example to show cultural patterns and processes.  Culture is not static and this New York Times video can be used to teach the various concepts of culture; per the updated APHG outline, the initial concepts of culture are:  

  • Culture traits
  • Diffusion patterns
  • Acculturation, assimilation and multiculturalism
  • Culture region, vernacular region, cultural hearth
  • Globalization and the effects of technology on culture.


Question to Ponder: How are these 5 major elements of culture seen in this video?


Tags: food, migration, culturediffusion, globalization, consumption.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 1, 2013 10:13 AM

I found this video to be very interesting. The video talks about Berlin's signature dish the currywurst. Currywurst is one of most well known dishes in Berlin, and is a dish the natives say every tourist should try. What was interesting to find was that the dish had elements from a few different places. Currywurst is made of pork sausage which and fried and cut into pieces. Pork suasage is a very widely used and popular meat that have in germany. However on the curry worst dish they put ketchup, which is very american like. They also sprinkle it with curry, which comes by way of India from Great Britian. It is amazing ti me that a country's signature dish has ingredients from two other countries! You would think that a signature dish would be made entirely of ingredients from their homeland. However the country is becoming more and more like other country adding sushi bars, soup kitchens, fast food, and etc. It just goes to show how much things have changed. Before country's were trying to use their own products as much as possible. Now we have such good transportation systems that people are moving to new places and food is being transported all over the world. Now we are at a point where even a country's signature dish uses products from many different country's. We have almost completely eliminated folk culture. It is almost sad in a way. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:03 AM

All over Germany specially in Berlin you can find many varieties of foods and restaurants that were influenced by many countries all over the world. A very popular dish the currywurst is fried German sausage with American ketchup and India curry powder. This dish was influenced by two other countries and was opular during WWII. The dish is still very popular today because of its unique taste. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 7:44 AM

This is a stride of different cultures,  a little ancient and modern culture. When the Turkish immigrant came over to Germany because they needed workers (Germans stopped having so many kids) it help form the curry wurst. They also use American ketchup because Americans were over there for the war and they ate this too. The curry powder came way of United Kingdom. Basically the population learned from all these cultures and  created one huge hit.