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'Where you can afford to move decides job chances'

'Where you can afford to move decides job chances' | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
For Ailsa, the big "should I stay or should I go?" decision came at a Gateshead bus stop.

"I thought 'this is not for me,'" she said, thinking about a future of unsecured jobs in a time and place where "industry was dead".

So she became the first in her family to go to university and then moved to London and left her home town behind.
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This article references research which uses data available in the UK Data Service collection:

 

British Household Panel Survey 

Understanding Society

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"Wo Sie es sich leisten können, umzuziehen, entscheidet über die Jobchancen" "Where You Can Afford To Move Decides On The Job Opportunities"

"Wo Sie es sich leisten können, umzuziehen, entscheidet über die Jobchancen" "Where You Can Afford To Move Decides On The Job Opportunities" | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Ailsa switched from a council to a bank clerk - but says it is now difficult for young people to move to London


For Ailsa the big "Should I stay or should I go?" The decision was made at a Gateshead bus stop.

"I thought it wasn't for me," she said, pondering a future of insecure jobs at a time and place where "the industry was dead."

She was the first in her family to go to university, then moved to London and left her hometown.

However, the decision to seek better-paid jobs in the capital has become a growing social divide.

 

Original article is in German, but most modern browsers can automatically translate.

UK Data Services insight:

This article references research which uses data available in the UK Data Service collection:

 

British Household Panel Survey 

Understanding Society

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'Half of women will be carers by the age of 46'

'Half of women will be carers by the age of 46' | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Women can expect to take on caring responsibilities for an older, sick or disabled relative more than a decade earlier than men, a report concludes.

Research by Sheffield and Birmingham universities shows half of women will care by the age of 46, compared with half of men, for whom the age is 57.

The research suggests two-thirds of UK adults can expect to become an unpaid carer during their lifetimes.
UK Data Services insight:

This article references research using data available in the UK Data Service collection:

 

British Household Panel Survey

Understanding Society

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Medical News Today: Is marriage the key to long-term happiness? | Stock Daily Dish

Married people exhibit higher levels of happiness and well-being than those who are single, according to recent research by the Vancouver School of Economics in Canada. Happiness levels were found to be even higher in people who consider their spouse to be their best friend.
Marriage could provide the answer to long-term happiness and life satisfaction.
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This article references research using data which is available in the UK Data Service collection:

 

Annual Population Survey

British Household Panel Survey

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How wealthy are you?

How wealthy are you? | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
The UK is in the middle of a decades-long wealth boom. Total wealth now stands at a record £12.8 trillion, or almost £13 million million.

But where you live, and when you were born plays a big part in how much of that wealth you are likely to own.

In the 1960s and 1970s, the UK's collective wealth - the value of our property, pensions and savings - was about three times as big as the UK economy's national output, or GDP.
UK Data Services insight:

This article references research using data which is part of the UK Data Service collection:

 

British Household Panel Survey 

Understanding Society – The UK Household Longitudinal Study 

Wealth and Assets Survey 

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Cash-strapped millennials are cutting back on ‘fun’ while pensioners are splashing out on good times –

Cash-strapped millennials are cutting back on ‘fun’ while pensioners are splashing out on good times – | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
CASH-STRAPPED millennials are cutting back on “fun” while pensioners splash out, a shock new report found last night.

In a report that laid bare the inter-generational divide, a think tank said 18-29 year-olds were having to spend £23 a week less on recreation, restaurants and booze than 20 years ago because of the rising cost of basics.
UK Data Services insight:

This article references research using data which is part of the UK Data Service collection:

Annual Population Survey 

Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings

British Household Panel Survey 

English Housing Survey 

English Private Landlord Survey

Family Resources Survey 

Households Below Average Income 

Labour Force Survey 

Living Costs and Food Survey

New Earnings Survey Panel Dataset

Understanding Society

Wealth and Assets Survey 

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‘Consumption crunch’: Young people spending less than they did in 2001, research finds

‘Consumption crunch’: Young people spending less than they did in 2001, research finds | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Young people today are facing a “consumption crunch” with their spending power less than it was in 2001, while baby boomers have experienced large gains in income, according to new research.

Those aged 18 to 29 are spending £380 per week on non-housing items, the Resolution Foundation found. The figure is 7 per cent less in real terms than what those in the same age group spent in 2001. 
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This article references research using data which is part of the UK Data Service collection:

Annual Population Survey 

Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings

British Household Panel Survey 

English Housing Survey 

English Private Landlord Survey

Family Resources Survey 

Households Below Average Income 

Labour Force Survey 

Living Costs and Food Survey

New Earnings Survey Panel Dataset

Understanding Society

Wealth and Assets Survey 

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Young adults have less to spend on non-essentials, study says | Inequality | The Guardian

Young adults have less to spend on non-essentials, study says | Inequality | The Guardian | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Avocado on toast was the snack that became a synonym for millennial excess. But along with holidays and tickets to shows, dining out is proving beyond the budget of Britain’s youngest adults, who, according to new figures, have suffered a slump in their spending power for life’s non-essentials while their parents’ generation have splashed out with increasing abandon.
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This article references research using data which is part of the UK Data Service collection:

Annual Population Survey 

Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings

British Household Panel Survey 

English Housing Survey 

English Private Landlord Survey

Family Resources Survey 

Households Below Average Income 

Labour Force Survey 

Living Costs and Food Survey

New Earnings Survey Panel Dataset

Understanding Society

Wealth and Assets Survey 

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Fathers of school-age daughters become less sexist, research finds | Daily Mail

Fathers of school-age daughters become less sexist, research finds | Daily Mail | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Men who have a school-aged daughter are less sexist, a new study has found.

Research carried out by the London School of Economics said fathers become more aware of the challenges girls face when they see their own offspring grow up.

They also claimed the research dispels the notion gender stereotypes are fixed in people's minds from their formative years, and that attitudes towards genders can change.
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British Household Panel Survey 

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Why raising a daughter makes men less sexist

Why raising a daughter makes men less sexist | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
The study tracked the responses of more than 5,000 men over the course of a decade.
The results showed that men who lived with daughters were less likely to hold traditional views on gender relations and roles.
This effect seemed to be strongest as the daughters entered secondary-school age.
A new study suggests that being a father to a school-age girl causes men to hold less traditional views on gender roles and norms. This phenomenon, known as the "Mighty Girl Effect," describes the vicarious and empathetic learning that fathers undergo while witnessing the challenges their daughters face as they grow up.
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British Household Panel Survey 

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Men with school-aged daughters less likely to hold sexist views

Men with school-aged daughters less likely to hold sexist views | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Men who have daughters who are of a school age are less likely to be sexist, a recent study has found.

A team from the London School of Economics decided to explore how men’s stances on gender norms can change when raising a daughter in primary and secondary school education.

The researchers claim that men become more aware of the challenges that girls experience when they have daughters, a consequence that they describe as the "mighty girl" effect.
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British Household Panel Survey 

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Being a father to school-aged daughter 'makes men less sexist' | World news | The Guardian

Being a father to school-aged daughter 'makes men less sexist' | World news | The Guardian | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Being the father of a school-aged daughter makes men less sexist, according to a new study.

The team behind the work say the findings support the idea that men become more aware of the challenges facing women when they see the female experience of life up close through their offspring – something dubbed the “mighty girl” effect.
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British Household Panel Survey 

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Broadband Access Reduced UK Cinema Visits and Civic Engagement - ISPreview UK

Broadband Access Reduced UK Cinema Visits and Civic Engagement - ISPreview UK | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
A new IZA discussion paper has examined the impact that the early years of ADSL broadband ISP connectivity had on social capital in the UK (i.e. relationships among people who live and work in a particular society), which among other things suggests that it reduced visits to the cinema, but meeting with friends were unaffected.
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Action needed to prevent young people leaving their Northern home towns | Yorkshire Post

Action needed to prevent young people leaving their Northern home towns | Yorkshire Post | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Those who move to London and the south-east still have much better job prospects and higher pay than those who stay, irrespective of their background, a new report by the Social Mobility Commission shows.

“Movers” will on average earn 33 per cent more than “stayers” and are 50 per cent more likely to have a degree, the research found.
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This article references research which uses data available in the UK Data Service collection:

 

British Household Panel Survey 

Understanding Society

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Green spaces in urban centres bring many health benefits

Green spaces in urban centres bring many health benefits | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
The idea that nature has the potential to promote physical health and well-being has a very long history.

Around 290 BCE, for example, the Roman-Jewish writer Josephus wrote about a remarkable feat of engineering in Babylon, with a series of ascending tiered gardens containing a wide variety of trees, shrubs and vines – what we now know as the Hanging Gardens of Babylon.

According to Josephus, the Hanging Gardens was built by the Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar for his wife Amytis, who had become ill.
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Study reveals increase in wellbeing for people who donate their time | Stock Daily Dish

Volunteering for the NHS can boost your mental health: Study reveals increase in wellbeing for people who donate their time
Volunteering can significantly boost mental health and well-being in the middle aged and the elderly, a study found.

Mental and emotional well-being was best among those who were frequent volunteers and worst in those who never offered their help.
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British Household Panel Survey

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The Importance Of Addressing Insecure Employment To Improve Population Mental Health

The Importance Of Addressing Insecure Employment To Improve Population Mental Health | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Economic insecurity arises from a fear of being exposed to adverse economic events from which an individual may have difficulty recovering. Adverse events include unemployment, an involuntary reduction in working hours, or a sudden loss of income, among other things. Since economic insecurity arises from fears regarding the future, rather than actual events, it can affect any individual within a population. In this way, it is distinct from poverty which, by definition, affects only the poorest in society.
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British Household Panel Survey 

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Millennials have less to spend on non-essentials than older generations | Daily Mail

Millennials have less to spend on non-essentials than older generations | Daily Mail | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Young people are spending 7% less on non-housing items than they were in 2001, a new study suggests.

An 'intergenerational audit' published by the Resolution Foundation assesses whether the 20th century norm of each generation enjoying higher living standards than their predecessors still holds true.

The report identified a number of intergenerational living standards challenges facing Britain, including the fall in money spent by 18 to 29-year-olds on non-housing items, including recreation and eating out, returning their pay to pre-financial crisis levels, and a 'long road' to recovery on home ownership.

UK Data Services insight:

This article references research using data which is part of the UK Data Service collection:

Annual Population Survey 

Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings

British Household Panel Survey 

English Housing Survey 

English Private Landlord Survey

Family Resources Survey 

Households Below Average Income 

Labour Force Survey 

Living Costs and Food Survey

New Earnings Survey Panel Dataset

Understanding Society

Wealth and Assets Survey 

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Pensioners now spend an extra £100-a-week on drinking and eating out, report finds

Pensioners now spend an extra £100-a-week on drinking and eating out, report finds | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Partying pensioners have been unmasked as a generation of big spenders in a report which reveals that they spend more than £100-a-week on alcohol and eating out than their predecessors.

People aged 65-and-over living in the UK are increasingly likely to enjoy their retirement.

This is not only in contrast to their previous generation, but also millenials who are devoting a smaller amount of their spending on “fun stuff” such as recreational activities, clothing and footwear, restaurants, hotels, culture, alcohol and tobacco.
UK Data Services insight:

This article references research using data which is part of the UK Data Service collection:

Annual Population Survey 

Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings

British Household Panel Survey 

English Housing Survey 

English Private Landlord Survey

Family Resources Survey 

Households Below Average Income 

Labour Force Survey 

Living Costs and Food Survey

New Earnings Survey Panel Dataset

Understanding Society

Wealth and Assets Survey 

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Under-30s 'spend less than same age group in 2001'

Under-30s 'spend less than same age group in 2001' | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Young people under 30 are spending less on non-housing items than the same age group in 2001, a new report suggests.

The Resolution Foundation think tank studied changes in pay, housing, taxes and benefits to see if it was still true that newer generations are better off than their predecessors were.
UK Data Services insight:

This article references research using data which is part of the UK Data Service collection:

Annual Population Survey 

Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings

British Household Panel Survey 

English Housing Survey 

English Private Landlord Survey

Family Resources Survey 

Households Below Average Income 

Labour Force Survey 

Living Costs and Food Survey

New Earnings Survey Panel Dataset

Understanding Society

Wealth and Assets Survey 

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Contemporary Fathers in the UK: our review of research on British dads: The Fatherhood Institute

Contemporary Fathers in the UK: our review of research on British dads: The Fatherhood Institute | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
The Fatherhood Institute, supported by the Nuffield Foundation, has been compiling (and continues to compile) a literature library of mainly academic articles, book chapters and reports about fathers and fatherhood in the UK. 

This study is the most comprehensive review ever undertaken in Britain on decades of research into the roles of fathers in families. Our study period is from 1998 to the present day; and, in order to be included, publications must draw on empirical research (UK samples) or describe or reflect on relevant research methodologies, or on UK policy or practice. As of September 2017, we have collected and categorised more than 2,250 items. 
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This article references research undertaken using data in the UK Data Service, including:

British Household Panel Survey 

Understanding Society

British Social Attitudes Survey 

Millennium Cohort Study 

Work-Life Balance Study 
Flexible Working Employee Survey, 2005
Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, 1990-2003

Growing Up in Scotland 

United Kingdom Time Use Survey 

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Psychotherapy can make you richer - especially if you are a man

Psychotherapy can make you richer - especially if you are a man | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Psychotherapy is good for mental health, but it can be very expensive too. As economists we try to carefully model and evaluate the monetary effects of different actions and policies. So, for our recent study we decided to use our methodologies to look into psychotherapy, and work out how it can affect labour income.

We analysed British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) data collected between 1995 and 2008. This survey observes the characteristics and decisions of 2,943 men and 5,064 women over time. The participants are randomly selected so that they statistically represent a much larger UK population. Using this information, we looked both at the effect of psychotherapy on mental health (measured using the general health questionnaire, which is used to identify common psychiatric conditions) and income. The results are clear and robust: psychotherapy helps people improve not only their future mental health, but also their future income.
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British Household Panel Survey 

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There’s nothing like a daughter to make Dad see the world differently | Barbara Ellen | Opinion | The Guardian

There’s nothing like a daughter to make Dad see the world differently | Barbara Ellen | Opinion | The Guardian | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Could Woke Dad be a thing, when it comes to gender equality? Research from the London School of Economics says that having daughters could make fathers less sexist as they become more aware of the challenges facing women – something called the “mighty girl” effect.

The study, conducted annually between 1991 and 2012, tracked responses from 5,000 men and 6,300 women with a child living with them. The researchers found that fathers’ views weren’t necessarily fixed during their own formative years; that those with school-age daughters could change their attitudes, becoming more likely to disagree with traditional statements – “a husband’s job is to earn the money”; “a wife’s job is to look after the home and family” – than those without daughters.
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British Household Panel Survey 

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The Mighty Girl effect: why fathering a daughter protects men against sexism

The Mighty Girl effect: why fathering a daughter protects men against sexism | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Fathering a girl protects men against sexism, the London School of Economics has found.

Men with daughters are significantly less likely to believe in traditional gender roles, such as they should go out to work, while women should stay at home looking after the children.
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British Household Panel Survey 

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Dads with preteen daughters are less likely to be sexist | Metro News

Dads with preteen daughters are less likely to be sexist | Metro News | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Though we should all actively be non-sexist, those who experience sexism regularly are probably more in tune with how limiting and insidious it can be.

One group of people who may understand the trials and tribulations faced by women, other than women and girls themselves, are dads with preteen daughters.

Dads’ experiences with their daughters make them less likely to be sexist than the average man, showed research by the London School of Economics.
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British Household Panel Survey 

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