NinaNutriNet
967 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
onto NinaNutriNet
Scoop.it!

Le microbiote intestinal, miroir de notre thyroïde ? | Biocodex Microbiote Institut

Le microbiote intestinal, miroir de notre thyroïde ? | Biocodex Microbiote Institut | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Notre microbiote intestinal reflèterait l’état de santé de notre thyroïde, selon une étude chinoise, qui met en évidence un lien entre sa composition et le risque de nodule et de cancer thyroïdiens. Un premier pas vers la mise au point de probiotiques potentiellement utiles ?
No comment yet.
NinaNutriNet
You are what you eat !
Curated by Ines Jurisic
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Poor gut health connected to severe COVID-19 – Medical Update Online

People infected with COVID-19 experience a wide range of symptoms and severities, the most commonly reported including high fevers and respiratory problems. However, autopsy and other studies have also revealed that the infection can affect the liver, kidney, heart, spleen–and even the gastrointestinal tract. A sizeable fraction of patients hospitalized with breathing problems also have diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, suggesting that when the virus does get involved in the GI tract it increases the severity of the disease. Severe cases of COVID-19 often include GI symptoms Chronic diseases associated with severe COVID-19 are also associated with altered gut microbiota A growing body of evidence suggests poor gut health adversely affects prognosis If studies do empirically demonstrate a connection between the gut microbiota and COVID-19 severity, then interventions like probiotics or fecal transplants may help patients In a review published this week microbiologist Heenam Stanley Kim, Ph.D, from Korea University’s Laboratory for Human-Microbial Interactions, in Seoul, examined emerging evidence suggesting that poor gut health adversely affects COVID-19 prognosis. Based on his analysis, Kim proposed that gut dysfunction–and its associated leaky gut–may exacerbate the severity of infection by enabling the virus to access the surface of the digestive tract and internal organs. These organs are vulnerable to infection because they have widespread ACE2–a protein target of SARS-CoV-2–on the surface. “There seems to be a clear connection between the altered gut microbiome and severe COVID-19,” Kim said. Studies have demonstrated that people with underlying medical conditions including high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity face a higher risk of severe COVID-19. Risk also increases with age, with older adults most vulnerable to the most serious complications and likelihood of hospitalization. But both of these factors–advanced age and chronic conditions–have a well-known association with an altered gut microbiota. This imbalance can affect gut barrier integrity, Kim noted, which can allow pathogens and pathobionts easier access to cells in the intestinal lining. So far, the link between gut health and COVID-19 prognosis hasn’t been empirically demonstrated, Kim noted. Some researchers have argued, he said, that unhealthy gut microbiomes may be an underlying reason for why some people have such severe infections. What studies have been done hint at a complicated relationship. A study on symptomatic COVID-19 patients in Singapore, for example, found that about half had a detectable level of the coronavirus in fecal tests–but only about half of those experienced GI symptoms. That study suggests that even if SARS-CoV-2 reaches the GI tract, it may not cause problems. Kim also noted that a person’s gut health at the time of infection may be critical for symptom development. Many recent studies have found reduced bacterial diversity in gut samples collected from COVID-19 patients, compared to samples from healthy people. The disease has also been linked to a depletion of beneficial bacterial species – and the enrichment of pathogenic ones. A similar imbalance has been associated with influenza A infection, though the 2 viruses differ in how they change the overall microbial composition. The depleted bacterial species associated with COVID-19 infection include some families that are responsible for producing butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid, which plays a pivotal role in gut health by reinforcing gut-barrier function. Kim said he started analyzing the studies after realizing that wealthy countries with a good medical infrastructure–including the United States and nations in Western Europe–were among the hardest hit by the virus. The “western diet” that’s common in these countries is low in fiber, and “a fiber-deficient diet is one of the main causes of altered gut microbiomes,” he said, “and such gut microbiome dysbiosis leads to chronic diseases.” The pathogenesis of COVID-19 is still not fully understood. If future studies do show that gut health affects COVID-19 prognosis, Kim argued, then clinicians and researchers should exploit that connection for better strategies aimed at preventing and managing the disease. Eating more fiber, he said, may lower a person’s risk of serious disease. And fecal microbiota transplantation might be a treatment worth considering for patients with the worst cases of COVID-19. The problem with gut health goes beyond COVID-19, though, he said. Once the pandemic passes, the world will still have to reckon with chronic diseases and other problems associated with poor gut health. “The whole world is suffering from this COVID-19 pandemic,” Kim said, “but what people do not realize is that the pandemic of damaged gut microbiomes is far more serious now.”
Ines Jurisic's insight:

The depleted bacterial species associated with COVID-19 infection include some families that are responsible for producing butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid, which plays a pivotal role in gut health by reinforcing gut-barrier function.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Glucose Metabolism is a Better Marker for Predicting Clinical Alzheimer’s Disease than Amyloid or Tau - PMC

Glucose Metabolism is a Better Marker for Predicting Clinical Alzheimer’s Disease than Amyloid or Tau - PMC | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
J Cell Immunol. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2022 Apr 1.Published in final edited form as:J Cell Immunol. 2022; 4(1): 15–18. PMCID: PMC8975178NIHMSID: NIHMS1787105PMID: 35373192Glucose Metabolism is a Better Marker for Predicting Clinical Alzheimer’s Disease than Amyloid or TauTyler C. Hammond1,2 and Ai-Ling Lin1,3,4,*Author information Copyright and License information DisclaimerSee the article "β-amyloid and tau drive early Alzheimer’s disease decline while glucose hypometabolism drives late decline" in Commun Biol, volume 3, 352.Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research has long been dominated with communications regarding the amyloid hypothesis and targeting amyloid clearance through pharmacological therapies from the brain [1]. Unfortunately, this research strategy has yielded only one new FDA-accelerated approved therapeutic for early AD, and its clinical benefit still needs to be verified [2]. It may be time to employ a new strategy in AD therapeutics research. Hammond et al. reported that diminished uptake of glucose in the brain is a better marker for classifying AD than beta-amyloid (Aβ) or phosphorylated tau deposition [3]. The National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer’s Association published revised guidelines for the diagnosis of AD to include the measurement of amyloid (A), tau (T), and neurodegeneration (N), when diagnosing and treating AD [4]. It is highly relevant to AD therapeutic research whether amyloid, tau, and neurodegeneration contribute equally to the progression of AD at all phases of the disease or in a matter dependent on disease phase. To be able to successfully treat or prevent AD, there is a pressing need to identify precision biomarkers that are sensitive to disease progression and able to predict onset of cognitive impairment [5].Hammond et al. used an advanced statistical learning machine learning method, random forest, on data provided by the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to measure the ability of beta-amyloid measured by positron emission tomography (Aβ-PET), phosphorylated tau measured in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF-pTau), fluorodeoxyglucose measured by positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and structural imaging measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to classify AD diagnosis. Their results demonstrated that amyloid, tau, and neurodegeneration have a phase-dependent impact on the development of AD. Aβ and pTau are better predictors of the early dementia status that is often defined as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and neurodegeneration, especially low glucose uptake, is a better predictor of later dementia status, or clinical AD. A similar pattern emerges when they correlate the biomarkers to performance on memory and executive functioning tests.Amyloid may be an appropriate target for early treatment of AD, but glucose metabolism should be investigated as a target for treating AD in later disease [6]. Targeting glucose metabolism and insulin resistance could be an important step in overcoming mitochondrial dysfunction and cholesterol metabolism failures due to aging and other AD risk factors and in restoring cognitive resilience [7]. The repeated failures in AD clinical trials could potentially be due to the attempt to treat AD by eliminating Aβ; it is likely too late to treat Aβ in the late disease that is manifested by significant cognitive decline [8]. Therefore, an appropriate treatment course for AD may include a phase-structured approach where Aβ and tau are targeted early in disease course and brain metabolic restoration is targeted in late disease. Findings from the current work may shift the paradigm for future development of AD therapeutics.Glucose hypometabolism plays a potentially very important role in the development of AD. Decreases in glucose uptake in the important areas of the brain can’t sustain the necessary support of neuronal activity and lead to reduced cognitive function [9–11]. Reduced glucose metabolism in the brain is also associated with insulin resistance, which has been associated with an exacerbation of Aβ deposition [10,12]. A key characteristic of AD includes impaired signaling of insulin in the brain [13]; because of this, some have referred to AD as type 3 diabetes due to the effects of insulin resistance on memory decline and impaired cognitive function [14,15]. In line with this characterization, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and obesity all lead to an increased risk of AD development [10,16]. Conversely, normal brain glucose metabolism is highly associated with cognitive resilience and AD treatment efforts should include a preservation of normal brain glucose uptake. Indeed, in aged individuals who were cognitively unimpaired, glucose uptake in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex and anterior temporal pole was shown to correlate highly with global cognition, despite the Aβ depositions that were present in these individuals along with their positive APOE ε4 status [17]; the findings indicate that preservation of normal cognitive performance can be achieved despite the hallmark phenotype and genotype of the disease. A different group reported that impaired glucose uptake can predict AD using deep learning methods an average of 75.8 months prior to its final diagnosis with 82% specificity and 100% sensitivity [18].The maintenance of healthy blood glucose metabolism in the brain should be a priority focus of AD treatment as a strategy of preserving cognitive resilience and ameliorating disease progression. Some example therapeutics that focus on glucose metabolism include intranasal insulin and the ketogenic diet. The goal of intranasal insulin therapy is to provide insulin to the central nervous system rapidly via the olfactory and trigeminal pathways without adversely affecting systemic insulin levels; early results showed improvement of AD symptoms [19–21]. While results from the most recent clinical trial were muddled with complications of device delivery of the insulin, further studies need to test the efficacy of intranasal insulin [22]. The administration of the ketogenic diet provides an alternative fuel to the brain in the form of ketone bodies; this is especially useful when glucose metabolism has been altered as a result of insulin resistance [23–26]. The ketogenic diet has been shown to affect Aβ and Tau deposition and Aβ clearance in MCI and AD patients while also modifying the gut microbiome and short-chain fatty acid production [27,28]. The gut microbiome is also responsible for providing secondary bile acids for digestion; it is possible that modulation of the gut microbiome by the ketogenic diet can fix bile acid production problems that have been associated with AD [29,30]. Another dietary intervention that may have promise includes the use of prebiotics, which have been shown to balance systemic metabolism and reduce neuroinflammation in the presence of the APOE ε4 genotype [31].In addition to glucose metabolism, there may be other metabolic processes that underly AD. We have new research demonstrating our use of ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy to perform a metabolomics analysis in the University of Kentucky-Alzheimer’s disease center brain bank on the dorsolateral and medial prefrontal cortex of 158 participants who were classified as AD, mixed dementia, or cognitively normal [32]. We performed various statistical analyses to determine how the metabolites differed in gray-enriched matter vs. white-enriched matter, AD vs. control, early stage vs. late stage, and APOE ε3 vs ε4. We also correlated metabolites with cognitive decline as measured by the MMSE. We found that white matter has increased lipids compared to gray matter, AD has increased metabolites related to phospholipid metabolism and decreased metabolites related to amino acid metabolism compared to controls, late ε4 has decreased metabolites that reduce atherosclerosis and decreased metabolites related to the krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation compared to early ε4, late 3 has increase metabolites related to oxidative DNA damage, inhibitory transmitters, and disruptions in neuronal membranes, and decreased metabolites related to acetylcholine synthesis compared to early ε3, ε4 at an early stages has increased metabolites related to poor kidney function and altered sterol function compared to ε3, and cognitive decline is associated with increased dipeptides and phospholipids.Our results provide evidence that metabolism may be related to the disease course and progression of AD and that these metabolic shifts differ based on disease stage and APOE genotype [33]. This evidence contributes to a fundamental understanding of metabolism in AD for designing, testing, and developing precision medicine treatments for AD. New therapies should focus on treating the underlying metabolic challenges associated with AD. There are many therapeutics that may show clinical utility in AD, including a plant-based diet to combat the effects of atherosclerosis in ε4 patients [34], a Mediterranean diet to combat DNA damage in ε3 patients [35], or intranasal insulin or the ketogenic diet for modifying metabolism as a whole [36,37].There also may be metabolic, immune, and neural associations of the gut microbiome with AD. Patients with AD and MCI have been shown to have an altered gut microbiome profile, with prominent decreases in Bacteroides, Lachnospira, and Ruminiclostridium_9 and increases in Prevotella [38]. Additionally, Escherichia is increased in AD and MCI and Escherichia coli fragments have been found to colocalize with Ab plaques [39]. Changes of the gut microbiome can lead to neuroinflammation in AD through an increase of phenylalanine and isoleucine, which help to stimulate pro-inflammatory T helper 1 (Th1) cells, leading to M1 microglia activation [40]. Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a small molecule produced by the metaorganismal metabolism of dietary choline, is also higher in individuals with MCI and AD dementia compared to cognitively-unimpaired individuals, and elevated CSF TMAO is associated with biomarkers of AD pathology (phosphorylated tau and phosphorylated tau/Aβ42) and neuronal degeneration (total tau and neurofilament light chain protein) [41]. Some fungi are also associated AD and MCI and specific diets can alter their balance with the bacteria present in the gut [42]. The administration of bifidobacteria in an AD mouse model has improved behavioral abnormalities and modulated gut dysbiosis [43].In summary, treatments for AD that focus on solely on Ab may be too simplistic to treat the complexities of the disease. It appears that Aβ and tau drive early disease, but that neurodegeneration, especially in the form of low glucose metabolism, may exacerbate later forms of the disease. It is important that normalization of healthy metabolism in the brain be investigated as a treatment. Hammond et al. showed that amyloid and tau are better predictors of MCI and that low glucose uptake is a better predictor of AD. This may explain in part why so many clinical trials attempting to modify Ab have failed: the strategy of treating Ab is employed too late after a person has already progressed to late stage disease. Thinking in the field regarding AD progression and therapeutics should be altered to reflect these findings.FundingThis research was supported by NIH grants R01 AG054459, RF1 AG062480 to Ai-Ling Lin.References1. Selkoe DJ, Hardy J. The amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease at 25 years. EMBO Molecular Medicine. 2016. Jun;8(6):595–608. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]2. Sevigny J, Chiao P, Bussière T, Weinreb PH, Williams L, Maier M, et al. The antibody aducanumab reduces Aβ plaques in Alzheimer’s disease. Nature. 2016. Sep;537(7618):50–6. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]3. Hammond TC, Xing X, Wang C, Ma D, Nho K, Crane PK, et al. β-amyloid and tau drive early Alzheimer’s disease decline while glucose hypometabolism drives late decline. Communications Biology. 2020. Jul 6;3(1):1–3. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]4. Jack CR Jr, Bennett DA, Blennow K, Carrillo MC, Dunn B, Haeberlein SB, et al. NIA-AA research framework: toward a biological definition of Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s & Dementia. 2018. Apr;14(4):535–62. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]5. Blennow K, Zetterberg H. Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease: current status and prospects for the future. Journal of Internal Medicine. 2018. Dec;284(6):643–63. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]6. Oboudiyat C, Glazer H, Seifan A, Greer C, Isaacson RS. Alzheimer’s disease. Semin Neurol. 2013. Sep;33(4):313–29. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]7. Liu CC, Kanekiyo T, Xu H, Bu G. Apolipoprotein E and Alzheimer disease: risk, mechanisms and therapy. Nature Reviews Neurology. 2013. Feb;9(2):106–18. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]8. Herholz K, Ebmeier K. Clinical amyloid imaging in Alzheimer’s disease. The Lancet Neurology. 2011. Jul 1;10(7):667–70. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]9. Mergenthaler P, Lindauer U, Dienel GA, Meisel A. Sugar for the brain: the role of glucose in physiological and pathological brain function. Trends in Neurosciences. 2013. Oct 1;36(10):587–97. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]10. Neth BJ, Craft S. Insulin resistance and Alzheimer’s disease: bioenergetic linkages. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience. 2017. Oct 31;9:345. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]11. Lin AL, Coman D, Jiang L, Rothman DL, Hyder F. Caloric restriction impedes age-related decline of mitochondrial function and neuronal activity. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism. 2014. Sep;34(9):1440–3. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]12. Wakabayashi T, Yamaguchi K, Matsui K, Sano T, Kubota T, Hashimoto T, et al. Differential effects of diet-and genetically-induced brain insulin resistance on amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Molecular Neurodegeneration. 2019. Dec;14(1):1–8. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]13. Craft S, Peskind E, Schwartz MW, Schellenberg GD, Raskind M, Porte D. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma insulin levels in Alzheimer’s disease: relationship to severity of dementia and apolipoprotein E genotype. Neurology. 1998. Jan 1;50(1):164–8. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]14. Kandimalla R, Thirumala V, Reddy PH. Is Alzheimer’s disease a type 3 diabetes? A critical appraisal. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA)-Molecular Basis of Disease. 2017. May 1;1863(5):1078–89. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]15. Rorbach-Dolata A, Piwowar A. Neurometabolic evidence supporting the hypothesis of increased incidence of type 3 diabetes mellitus in the 21st century. BioMed Research International. 2019. Jul 21;2019. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]16. Zhang Y, Liu S. Analysis of structural brain MRI and multi-parameter classification for Alzheimer’s disease. Biomedical Engineering/Biomedizinische Technik. 2018. Aug 1;63(4):427–37. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]17. Arenaza-Urquijo EM, Przybelski SA, Lesnick TL, Graff-Radford J, Machulda MM, Knopman DS, et al. The metabolic brain signature of cognitive resilience in the 80+: beyond Alzheimer pathologies. Brain. 2019. Apr 1;142(4):1134–47. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]18. Ding Y, Sohn JH, Kawczynski MG, Trivedi H, Harnish R, Jenkins NW, et al. A deep learning model to predict a diagnosis of Alzheimer disease by using 18F-FDG PET of the brain. Radiology. 2019. Feb;290(2):456–64. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]19. Craft S, Baker LD, Montine TJ, Minoshima S, Watson GS, Claxton A, et al. Intranasal insulin therapy for Alzheimer disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment: a pilot clinical trial. Archives of Neurology. 2012. Jan 9;69(1):29–38. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]20. De La Monte SM. Early intranasal insulin therapy halts progression of neurodegeneration: progress in Alzheimer’s disease therapeutics. Aging Health. 2012. Feb;8(1):61–4. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]21. Chapman CD, Schiöth HB, Grillo CA, Benedict C. Intranasal insulin in Alzheimer’s disease: food for thought. Neuropharmacology. 2018. Jul 1;136:196–201. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]22. Hallschmid M Intranasal insulin for Alzheimer’s disease. CNS Drugs. 2021. Jan 30:1–7. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]23. Riedel BC, Thompson PM, Brinton RD. Age, APOE and sex: triad of risk of Alzheimer’s disease. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 2016. Jun 1;160:134–47. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]24. Wang Y, Brinton RD. Triad of risk for late onset Alzheimer’s: mitochondrial haplotype, APOE genotype and chromosomal sex. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience. 2016. Oct 4;8:232. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]25. Lin AL, Zhang W, Gao X, Watts L. Caloric restriction increases ketone bodies metabolism and preserves blood flow in aging brain. Neurobiology of Aging. 2015. Jul 1;36(7):2296–303. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]26. Zhang Y, Kuang Y, Xu K, Harris D, Lee Z, LaManna J, et al. Ketosis proportionately spares glucose utilization in brain. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism. 2013. Aug;33(8):1307–11. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]27. Nagpal R, Neth BJ, Wang S, Craft S, Yadav H. Modified Mediterranean-ketogenic diet modulates gut microbiome and short-chain fatty acids in association with Alzheimer’s disease markers in subjects with mild cognitive impairment. EBioMedicine. 2019. Sep 1;47:529–42. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]28. Ma D, Wang AC, Parikh I, Green SJ, Hoffman JD, Chlipala G, et al. Ketogenic diet enhances neurovascular function with altered gut microbiome in young healthy mice. Scientific Reports. 2018. Apr 27;8(1):1–0. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]29. Dehkordi SM, Arnold M, Nho K, Ahmad S, Jia W, Xie G, et al. Altered bile acid profile associates with cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease—an emerging role for gut microbiome. Alzheimer’s & Dementia. 2019. Jan 1;15(1):76–92. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]30. Nho K, Kueider-Paisley A, MahmoudianDehkordi S, Arnold M, Risacher SL, Louie G, et al. Altered bile acid profile in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease: Relationship to neuroimaging and CSF biomarkers. Alzheimer’s & Dementia. 2019. Feb 1;15(2):232–44. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]31. Hoffman JD, Yanckello LM, Chlipala G, Hammond TC, McCulloch SD, Parikh I, et al. Dietary inulin alters the gut microbiome, enhances systemic metabolism and reduces neuroinflammation in an APOE4 mouse model. PLoS One. 2019. Aug 28;14(8):e0221828. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]32. Hammond TC, Xing X, Yanckello LM, Stromberg A, Chang Y-H, Nelson PT, et al. Human Gray and White Matter Metabolomics to Differentiate APOE and Stage Dependent Changes in Alzheimer’s Disease. J Cell Immunol. 2021;3(6):397–412. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]33. Butterfield DA, Halliwell B. Oxidative stress, dysfunctional glucose metabolism and Alzheimer disease. Nature Reviews Neuroscience. 2019. Mar;20(3):148–60. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]34. Tuso P, Stoll SR, Li WW. A plant-based diet, atherogenesis, and coronary artery disease prevention. The Permanente Journal. 2015;19(1):62. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]35. Del Bo C, Marino M, Martini D, Tucci M, Ciappellano S, Riso P, et al. Overview of human intervention studies evaluating the impact of the mediterranean diet on markers of DNA damage. Nutrients. 2019. Feb;11(2):391. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]36. Craft S, Raman R, Chow TW, Rafii MS, Sun CK, Rissman RA, et al. Safety, efficacy, and feasibility of intranasal insulin for the treatment of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease dementia: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Neurology. 2020. Sep 1;77(9):1099–109. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]37. Rusek M, Pluta R, Ułamek-Kozioł M, Czuczwar SJ. Ketogenic diet in Alzheimer’s disease. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2019. Jan;20(16):3892. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]38. Guo M, Peng J, Huang X, Xiao L, Huang F, Zuo Z. Gut microbiome features of chinese patients newly diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or mild cognitive impairment. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. 2021. Jan 1(Preprint):1–2. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]39. Li B, He Y, Ma J, Huang P, Du J, Cao L, et al. Mild cognitive impairment has similar alterations as Alzheimer’s disease in gut microbiota. Alzheimer’s & Dementia. 2019. Oct 1;15(10):1357–66. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]40. Wang X, Sun G, Feng T, Zhang J, Huang X, Wang T, et al. Sodium oligomannate therapeutically remodels gut microbiota and suppresses gut bacterial amino acids-shaped neuroinflammation to inhibit Alzheimer’s disease progression. Cell Research. 2019. Oct;29(10):787–803. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]41. Vogt NM, Romano KA, Darst BF, Engelman CD, Johnson SC, Carlsson CM, et al. The gut microbiota-derived metabolite trimethylamine N-oxide is elevated in Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy. 2018. Dec;10(1):1–8. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]42. Nagpal R, Neth BJ, Wang S, Mishra SP, Craft S, Yadav H. Gut mycobiome and its interaction with diet, gut bacteria and alzheimer’s disease markers in subjects with mild cognitive impairment: A pilot study. EBioMedicine. 2020. Sep 1;59:102950. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]43. Zhu G, Zhao J, Zhang H, Chen W, Wang G. Administration of Bifidobacterium breve Improves the Brain Function of Aβ1–42-Treated Mice via the Modulation of the Gut Microbiome. Nutrients. 2021. May;13(5):1602. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Gut microbiota as the key controllers of "healthy" aging of elderly people

Gut microbiota as the key controllers of "healthy" aging of elderly people | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Extrinsic factors, such as lifestyle and diet, are shown to be essential in the control of human healthy aging, and thus, longevity.They do so by targeting at least in part the gut microbiome, a collection of commensal microorganisms (microbiota), which colonize the intestinal tract starting after...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Is Gut Health to Blame for Hormonal Imbalance?

Is Gut Health to Blame for Hormonal Imbalance? | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Is your hormonal imbalance tied to your gut health? Learn more about how your microbiome can affect your endocrine system and estrogen levels.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Soigner le cerveau par le système digestif | Agence Science-Presse

Soigner le cerveau par le système digestif | Agence Science-Presse | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Étudié depuis plus d’un siècle pour son rôle dans la digestion, le système gastro-intestinal, qualifié de « deuxième cerveau », n’a pas fini de surprendre. Au fil des découvertes, son rôle dans l’apparition et la progression de maladies neurologiques et psychiatriques est ainsi...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Une incroyable étude de Stanford découvre des milliers de nouvelles protéines produites par le microbiome humain ‹ infohightech

Une incroyable étude de Stanford découvre des milliers de nouvelles protéines produites par le microbiome humain ‹ infohightech | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Des chercheurs ont découvert de petites protéines produites par le microbiome humain qui n’ont pas été détectées en raison de leur petite taille Une nouvelle étude remarquable menée par des scientifiques de l’Université Stanford a révélé que des milliers de petites protéines produites par des bactéries dans le microbiome humain n’avaient jamais été découvertes auparavant. Presque toutes ces protéines nouvellement décrites remplissent des fonctions inconnues dans le corps humain et les chercheurs suggèrent que leur découverte ouvre une nouvelle frontière pour le développement futur de médicaments thérapeutiques. « Il est extrêmement important de comprendre l’interface entre les cellules humaines et le microbiome « , explique Ami Bhatt, auteure principale de l’étude récemment publiée. « Comment communiquent-elles ? Comment les souches de bactéries se protègent-elles des autres souches ? Ces fonctions sont susceptibles d’être trouvées dans de très petites protéines, qui peuvent être plus susceptibles d’être sécrétées à l’extérieur de la cellule que les protéines plus grandes. » Ces minuscules protéines ont traditionnellement été ignorées par les chercheurs en raison des difficultés fondamentales à les détecter. Leur longueur est généralement inférieure à 50 acides animés et elles remplissent très probablement des fonctions de communication essentielles entre les souches bactériennes et les hôtes qu’elles habitent. Pour traquer ces petites protéines de signalisation, les chercheurs ont fait un zoom sur les génomes bactériens. « Le génome bactérien est comme un livre avec de longues chaînes de lettres, dont certaines seulement codent l’information nécessaire à la fabrication des protéines », précise Ami Bhatt. Traditionnellement, nous identifions la présence de gènes codant pour les protéines dans ce livre en recherchant des combinaisons de lettres qui indiquent les signaux  » start  » et  » stop  » que les gènes sandwich. Cela fonctionne bien pour les protéines de plus grande taille. Mais plus la protéine est petite, plus il est probable que cette technique donne un grand nombre de faux positifs qui rendent les résultats boueux. » À l’aide d’une nouvelle approche informatique, les chercheurs ont effectué une étude comparative en génomique qui a révélé plus de 4000 familles de protéines, dont la majorité n’avaient jamais été identifiées auparavant. Le volume de la découverte a surpris l’équipe de recherche, qui s’attendait à trouver peut-être quelques centaines de nouvelles chaînes de petits gènes codant pour de petites protéines, mais a plutôt découvert des milliers. L’étude offre des hypothèses quant à la fonction de certaines de ces petites familles de protéines, en fonction de leur voisinage génomique, de leur prévalence dans certains sites du corps humain et d’autres facteurs. Certaines des petites familles de protéines nouvellement découvertes, par exemple, partagent des traits génétiques avec des protéines déjà découvertes et connues pour améliorer la résistance aux antibiotiques. L’article, publié dans la revue Cell, offre un résumé complet des 4 539 familles de petites protéines nouvellement découvertes, servant essentiellement de nouveau grand catalogue pour les recherches futures. L’étape suivante consiste à commencer à comprendre les fonctions mécaniques de ces nouvelles petites protéines, ouvrant la voie à de nouveaux antibiotiques ou d’autres médicaments à usage thérapeutique humain. « Les petites protéines peuvent être synthétisées rapidement et pourraient être utilisées par les bactéries comme commutateurs biologiques pour passer d’un état fonctionnel à un autre ou pour déclencher des réactions spécifiques dans d’autres cellules « , explique Ami Bhatt. « Elles sont également plus faciles à étudier et à manipuler que les protéines plus grosses, ce qui pourrait faciliter le développement de médicaments. Nous pensons qu’il s’agit d’un nouveau domaine de la biologie à étudier. » http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2019/08/human-microbiome-churns-out-thousands-of-tiny-novel-proteins.html https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(19)30781-0
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Découverte de milliers de nouvelles protéines produites par le microbiome humain

Découverte de milliers de nouvelles protéines produites par le microbiome humain | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Une nouvelle et étonnante étude menée par des scientifiques de l'université Stanford (États-Unis) a révélé que des milliers de petites protéines produites par des bactéries dans le microbiome humain n'avaient jamais été découvertes auparavant.
Ines Jurisic's insight:

Cette étude offre un récapitulatif complet des 4 539 familles de petites protéines découvertes, servant essentiellement de nouveau grand catalogue pour les recherches futures. L’étape suivante consiste à commencer à comprendre leurs fonctions mécaniques, ouvrant la voie à de nouveaux antibiotiques ou d’autres médicaments à usage thérapeutique humain.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Le microbiote intestinal, miroir de notre thyroïde ? | Biocodex Microbiote Institut

Le microbiote intestinal, miroir de notre thyroïde ? | Biocodex Microbiote Institut | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Notre microbiote intestinal reflèterait l’état de santé de notre thyroïde, selon une étude chinoise, qui met en évidence un lien entre sa composition et le risque de nodule et de cancer thyroïdiens. Un premier pas vers la mise au point de probiotiques potentiellement utiles ?
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Cancer du pancréas : des bactéries buccales en cause

Cancer du pancréas : des bactéries buccales en cause | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Une étude suédoise, publiée le 25 février 2019 dans la revue médicale Gut a montré que la présence de bactéries buccales pouvait être...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Candida auris, le champignon petit mais costaud qui menace la santé mondiale

Candida auris, le champignon petit mais costaud qui menace la santé mondiale | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Les pesticides mis en cause ?

Et si Candida auris peut se développer, c’est parce qu’il semble particulièrement résistant aux médicaments antifongiques. « Heureusement, dans la plupart des cas, il résiste à une classe d’antifongiques, mais parfois deux, ce qui peut être problématique si les patients ont des contre-indications avec les autres médicaments, note Katrien Lagrou. Et on peut craindre que cette résistance devienne plus forte. »

La tendance n’est pas nouvelle, et a été annoncée depuis longtemps par les médecins et les experts de la santé : à force de recourir trop souvent aux antibiotiques, on diminue l’effet des médicaments sur les bactéries. Malgré les avertissements venus des professionnels de la santé et des politiciens, on use et abuse encore des médicaments antimicrobiens contre les bactéries et les germes, notamment dans le milieu hospitalier et dans l’agriculture. Certains avancent l’idée que les fongicides utilisés sur les cultures pourraient être à l’origine du renforcement de Candida auris, tout comme les antibiotiques sur le bétail développerait la résistance des bactéries.
Ines Jurisic's insight:

"In a healthy person, this fungus is held in check by beneficial bacteria, or probiotics that cohabitate in the intestinal tract. When poor diet and/or antibiotics come on the scene killing off the beneficial microbes, however, this normally innocuous yeast takes advantage and rapidly spreads. If no attempts to repress it and bring the gut back into balance are made, it can wrest control of the gut environment from the beneficial microbes."

 

Cherish you gut more than anything nowdays! WIll share more about the topic during my next workshop on "Gut Brain axis".

 

You are what you eat ;))

 

Ines

 

No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Workshops @ NinaNutriNet

Workshops @ NinaNutriNet | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it

Nutritional Therapy uses food (nutrients) to prevent and reverse diseases such as diabetes, obesity, heart disease, arthritis, depression... mostly spread in the Western countries. Nutritional therapy includes recommendations to restore nutritional balance, which include guidance on avoiding certain toxins and allergens, detoxification and the use of supplementary nutrients such as high-dose vitamins, minerals...

Ines Jurisic's insight:

Passionate about nutrition and here to help you switch from the food dogma to the food karma so that you can act upon your own health. “You are what you eat” reminds us that we all have individual, unique and personalized nutritional backrounds. Good news is that you do not need to study genomics, microbiomics... to retrieve or maintain your health (a dream) ! All you need are essential natural nutritients from the real food, highly recognizable and able to comunicate with billions of your body cells. And because there are trillions of chemical reactions happening at any time within your body you need to act now! Check out my workshops around Burnout  and  if you are interested please get in touch via ines.jurisic@gmail.com.

Take care ;)

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ines Jurisic from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Colon Cancer Deadlier When Oral Bacterium Completes Feedback Loop -

Colon Cancer Deadlier When Oral Bacterium Completes Feedback Loop - | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it

Colon cancer is exacerbated by a common oral bacterium that works in concert with oncogenic mutations to amplify cancer signaling.

 

An oral bacterium, Fusobacterium nucleatum, was recognized years ago as a promoter of colon cancer. But exactly how F. nucleatum worsened colon cancer remained unknown. Now, thanks to research carried out at Columbia University, the bacterium’s cancer-exacerbating ways are better understood. Basically, the bacterium provides the second hit in a two-hit mechanism, completing a feedback loop that amplifies cancer signaling.

 

The Columbia scientists, led by Yiping W. Han, PhD, professor of microbial sciences,  followed up on a finding that they had uncovered earlier. They had discovered that the bacterium makes a molecule called FadA adhesin, triggering a signaling pathway in colon cells that has been implicated in several cancers. They also found that FadA adhesin stimulates the growth of cancerous cells, not that of healthy cells.

 

“We needed to find out why F. nucleatum seems to interact only with cancerous cells,” Han pointed out. Working with cell cultures, the researchers found that noncancerous colon cells lack Annexin A1, a protein that stimulates cancer growth. The researchers then confirmed both in vitro and later in mice that disabling Annexin A1 prevented F. nucleatum from binding to the cancer cells, slowing their growth. The researchers also discovered that F. nucleatum increases production of Annexin A1, attracting more of the bacteria.

 

The implications of these findings were discussed in a paper (“Fusobacterium nucleatum promotes colorectal cancer by inducing Wnt/β‐catenin modulator Annexin A1”) that appeared March 3, 2019 in EMBO Reports.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Ines Jurisic's insight:
Le cancer du côlon est plus mortel lorsque les bactéries buccales complètent la boucle de rétroaction
 
Une bactérie orale, Fusobacterium nucleatum, a été reconnu il y a quelques années en tant que promoteur du cancer du côlon.
 
Prenez soins de votre bouche;))
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Malbouffe: Immigrer aux USA modifie le microbiote intestinal des individus

Malbouffe: Immigrer aux USA modifie le microbiote intestinal des individus | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Une étude parue le 1er novembre 2018 dans la revue CELL et menée conjointement par des chercheurs de l’université du Minnesota et des membres du SoLaHmo (Somali, Latino and Hmong Partnership for Health and Wellness) démontre que les populations qu
Ines Jurisic's insight:

Americans have the same reactions when visiting Europe like Europeans when travelling to Africa or India... Their microbiome is so poor and destroyed ( up 17 antibiotic treatments per year ) .... so they become so vulnerable.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Ginger Extract Shows Strong Senolytic Effect | Lifespan.io

Ginger Extract Shows Strong Senolytic Effect | Lifespan.io | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
  A paper supported by the National Institute on Aging has shown that gingerenone A, a component of ginger extract, is a natural senolytic that is potentially more powerful and […]...
Ines Jurisic's insight:
"Ginger extract (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) selectively caused the death of senescent cells without affecting proliferating cells. Among the major individual components of ginger extract, gingerenone A and 6-shogaol showed promising senolytic properties, with gingerenone A selectively eliminating senescent cells. Similar to the senolytic cocktail dasatinib and quercetin (D+Q), gingerenone A and 6-shogaol elicited an apoptotic program. Additionally, both D+Q and gingerenone A had a pronounced effect on suppressing the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Gingerenone A selectively promotes the death of senescent cells with no effect on non-senescent cells and these characteristics strongly support the idea that this natural compound may have therapeutic benefit in diseases characterized by senescent cell accumulation." Moaddel R, Rossi M, Rodriguez S, Munk R, Khadeer M, Abdelmohsen K, Gorospe M, Ferrucci L. Identification of gingerenone A as a novel senolytic compound. PLoS One. 2022 Mar 29;17(3):e0266135. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0266135. PMID: 35349590; PMCID: PMC8963586.

"Ginger can reduce inflammaging (low-grade inflammation that increases during the aging process), has epigenetic effects, and impacts mitochondrial functioning. The mitochondria are the powerplants of our cells. One way ginger impacts mitochondrial health is by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis, which is the creation of new mitochondria (R,R). The older we get, the fewer proper functioning mitochondria we have. Ginger can also improve cognitive function according to various studies (R,R). For example, in a study with 60 middle-aged women, the women that received ginger for two months showed improved attention and better cognitive processing (R). Attention, thinking speed and memory improved in another study (R). So ginger has two interesting advantages: in the long term, ginger can protect the body against damage caused by aging via various mechanisms, while in the short term it can improve cognitive function, so we can immediately be more productive and get more done"
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Infographic: Putting Cancer's Unique Microbiomes to Use | TS Digest | The Scientist

Infographic: Putting Cancer's Unique Microbiomes to Use | TS Digest | The Scientist | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
From diagnosis to tracking treatment responses, bacteria and other microbes in the blood, gut, and tumors of cancer patients may provide helpful hints for improving their care.
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ines Jurisic from NinaNutriNet
Scoop.it!

Les bactéries de l’intestin associées pour la première fois à la douleur chronique ‹ infohightech

Les bactéries de l’intestin associées pour la première fois à la douleur chronique ‹ infohightech | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Les personnes atteintes de fibromyalgie auraient un microbiome différent Des scientifiques ont établi une corrélation entre une maladie provoquant des douleurs chroniques et la composition du microbiome intestinal. La fibromyalgie est une maladie incurable touchant de 2 à 4 % de la population. Elle entraîne fatigue, troubles du sommeil et difficultés cognitives, mais les douleurs chroniques diffuses constituent son principal symptôme. Une équipe de chercheurs montréalaise vient de mettre en lumière, pour la toute première fois, des changements dans les bactéries peuplant les voies digestives des personnes atteintes de fibromyalgie ; leur étude fait l’objet d’un article publié aujourd’hui dans la revue Pain. En effet, une vingtaine d’espèces bactériennes étaient présentes dans le microbiome des sujets atteints soit en plus grande quantité, soit en quantité moindre, que dans celui des témoins sains. Découverte d’une corrélation directe « Nous avons eu recours à diverses techniques, dont l’intelligence artificielle, pour confirmer que les changements observés dans le microbiome des sujets atteints de fibromyalgie n’étaient pas causés par des facteurs qui modifient le microbiome, par exemple l’alimentation, les médicaments, l’activité physique et l’âge », souligne le Dr Amir Minerbi, auteur principal de l’article. Le Dr Minerbi, de l’Unité de gestion de la douleur Alan‑Edwards du Centre universitaire de santé McGill (CUSM), fait partie d’une équipe comprenant également des chercheurs de l’Université McGill, de l’Université de Montréal et de l’Institut de recherche du CUSM. Dr Amir Minerbi, clinicien-chercheur, CUSM « Nous avons constaté que la fibromyalgie et ses symptômes – douleurs, fatigue et troubles cognitifs – étaient, de tous les facteurs qui agissaient sur le microbiome des personnes atteintes, ceux dont l’effet était le plus marqué, poursuit le Dr Minerbi. Nous avons également fait une observation inédite, à savoir une corrélation directe entre la gravité des symptômes et la présence ou l’absence plus marquée de certaines bactéries ». Les bactéries, simples marqueurs? Pour l’instant, on ne saurait dire avec certitude si les variations du microbiome observées chez les patients fibromyalgiques ne sont que des marqueurs de la maladie ou jouent un rôle dans son apparition. Comme la fibromyalgie provoque divers symptômes et pas uniquement de la douleur, les chercheurs devront maintenant vérifier si le microbiome intestinal subit le même type de changements en présence d’autres douleurs chroniques, par exemple des lombalgies, des céphalées et des douleurs neuropathiques. Par ailleurs, les chercheurs veulent savoir si les bactéries peuvent provoquer la douleur et la fibromyalgie, et si leur présence peut les orienter vers un éventuel traitement curatif et accélérer la démarche diagnostique. Diagnostic et recherche d’un traitement curatif La fibromyalgie est difficile à diagnostiquer. Parfois, les patients attendent leur diagnostic pendant quatre ou cinq ans. Mais cette époque pourrait bientôt être révolue. « Nous avons scruté une multitude de données et repéré 19 espèces bactériennes dont la quantité variait à la hausse ou à la baisse chez les personnes atteintes de fibromyalgie », précise Emmanuel Gonzalez, du Centre canadien de génomique computationnelle et du Département de génétique humaine de l’Université McGill. « Grâce à l’apprentissage machine, notre ordinateur a pu diagnostiquer la fibromyalgie à partir de la seule composition du microbiome avec un taux d’exactitude de 87 %. Forts de cette première découverte, nous entendons poursuivre nos travaux dans le but d’augmenter ce taux et, peut-être, de changer la donne en matière de diagnostic. » « La fibromyalgie est source de souffrance non seulement en raison de ses symptômes, mais également de l’incompréhension de la famille, des amis et des professionnels de la santé », déclare l’auteur senior de l’article, le Dr Yoram Shir, directeur de l’Unité de gestion de la douleur Alan‑Edwards du CUSM et chercheur associé à l’IR-CUSM. « En tant que médecins spécialisés dans la prise en charge de la douleur, nous nous sentons impuissants devant cette maladie, et ce sentiment est un véritable carburant pour un chercheur. Nous venons de montrer pour la toute première fois, du moins chez l’être humain, que le microbiome peut agir sur la douleur diffuse, et en matière de douleur chronique, tout nouvel angle d’approche est franchement le bienvenu.» Méthodologie de l’étude L’effectif de l’étude compte 156 sujets de la région montréalaise, dont 77 atteints de fibromyalgie. Les participants ont été interviewés et ont fourni des échantillons de selles, de sang, de salive et d’urine, puis on a comparé les échantillons des sujets fibromyalgiques à ceux des témoins sains, dont certains vivaient avec les personnes atteintes ou étaient des parents (père, mère, enfant, frère ou sœur). Les chercheurs devront maintenant vérifier s’ils obtiennent des résultats semblables dans une autre cohorte, éventuellement recrutée ailleurs dans le monde, et réaliser des études chez l’animal pour déterminer si la variation de la composition bactérienne contribue à l’apparition de la maladie. https://cusm.ca/newsroom/nouvelles/les-bact%C3%A9ries-l%E2%80%99intestin-associ%C3%A9es-pour-premi%C3%A8re-fois-%C3%A0-douleur-chronique https://journals.lww.com/pain/Abstract/publishahead/Altered_microbiome_composition_in_individuals_with.98647.aspx
Ines Jurisic's insight:
« Nous avons eu recours à diverses techniques, dont l’intelligence artificielle, pour confirmer que les changements observés dans le microbiome des sujets atteints de fibromyalgie n’étaient pas causés par des facteurs qui modifient le microbiome, par exemple l’alimentation, les médicaments, l’activité physique et l’âge », souligne le Dr Amir Minerbi, auteur principal de l’article.
Ines Jurisic's curator insight, September 11, 2019 8:03 AM

« Nous avons scruté une multitude de données et repéré 19 espèces bactériennes dont la quantité variait à la hausse ou à la baisse chez les personnes atteintes de fibromyalgie », précise Emmanuel Gonzalez, du Centre canadien de génomique computationnelle et du Département de génétique humaine de l’Université McGill. « Grâce à l’apprentissage machine, notre ordinateur a pu diagnostiquer la fibromyalgie à partir de la seule composition du microbiome avec un taux d’exactitude de 87 %. Forts de cette première découverte, nous entendons poursuivre nos travaux dans le but d’augmenter ce taux et, peut-être, de changer la donne en matière de diagnostic. »

Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Worldhealth.net: Anti-Aging Medicine and Advanced Preventative Health

Worldhealth.net: Anti-Aging Medicine and Advanced Preventative Health | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it

Researchers at The Wistar Institute have discovered a new enzymatic function of the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) protein EBNA1, a critical factor in EBV’s ability to transform human cells and cause cancer. Published in Cell, this study provides new indications for inhibiting EBNA1 function, opening up fresh avenues for the development of therapies to treat EBV-associated cancers.

 

EBV establishes life-long, latent infection in B lymphocytes, which can contribute to the development of different cancer types, including Burkitt’s lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and Hodgkin’s lymphoma. 

The Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1) serves as an attractive therapeutic target for these cancers because it is expressed in all EBV-associated tumors, performs essential activities for tumorigenesis and there are no similar proteins in the human body.

“We discovered an enzymatic activity of EBNA1 that was never described before, despite the intense research efforts to characterize this protein,” said Paul M. Lieberman, Ph.D., Hilary Koprowski, M.D., Endowed Professor, leader of the Gene Expression & Regulation Program at Wistar, and corresponding author of the study. “We found that EBNA1 has the cryptic ability to cross-link and nick a single strand of DNA at the terminal stage of DNA replication.  This may have important implications for other viral and cellular DNA binding proteins that have similar cryptic enzyme-like activities.” 

Lieberman and colleagues also found that one specific EBNA1 amino acid called Y518 is essential for this process to occur and, consequently, for viral DNA persistence in the infected cells. 

They created a mutant EBNA1 protein in which the critical amino acid was substituted with another and showed that this mutant could not form covalent binding with DNA and perform the endonuclease activity responsible for generating single-strand cuts. 

In latently infected cells, the EBV genome is maintained as a circular DNA molecule, or episome, that is replicated by cellular enzymes along with the cell’s chromosomes. When the cell divides, the two episomal genomes segregate into the two daughter cells.

While it was known that EBNA1 mediates replication and partitioning of the episome during the division of the host cell, the exact mechanism was not clear. The new study sheds light on the process and describes how the newly discovered enzymatic activity of EBNA1 is required to complete replication of the viral genome and maintenance of the episomal form.

“Our findings suggest that one could create small molecules to ‘trap’ the protein bound to DNA and potentially block replication termination and episome maintenance, similar to known inhibitors of topoisomerases,” said Jayaraju Dheekollu, Ph.D., first author on the study and staff scientist in the Lieberman Lab. “Such inhibitors may be used to inhibit EBV-induced transformation and treat EBV-associated malignancies.

Co-authors: Andreas Wiedmer, Kasirajan Ayyanathan, Julianna S. Deakyne, and Troy E. Messick from The Wistar Institute. K.A. is currently employed at the University of Pennsylvania and J.S.D. is currently employed at GlaxoSmithKline.

Work supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants RO1 CA093606, RO1 423 DE017336, P30 CA010815, and T32 CA09171. 

Publication information: Cell Cycle-Dependent EBNA1-DNA Cross-Linking Promotes Replication Termination at oriP and Viral Episome Maintenance, Cell (2021). Online publication.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Les bactéries de l’intestin associées pour la première fois à la douleur chronique ‹ infohightech

Les bactéries de l’intestin associées pour la première fois à la douleur chronique ‹ infohightech | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Les personnes atteintes de fibromyalgie auraient un microbiome différent Des scientifiques ont établi une corrélation entre une maladie provoquant des douleurs chroniques et la composition du microbiome intestinal. La fibromyalgie est une maladie incurable touchant de 2 à 4 % de la population. Elle entraîne fatigue, troubles du sommeil et difficultés cognitives, mais les douleurs chroniques diffuses constituent son principal symptôme. Une équipe de chercheurs montréalaise vient de mettre en lumière, pour la toute première fois, des changements dans les bactéries peuplant les voies digestives des personnes atteintes de fibromyalgie ; leur étude fait l’objet d’un article publié aujourd’hui dans la revue Pain. En effet, une vingtaine d’espèces bactériennes étaient présentes dans le microbiome des sujets atteints soit en plus grande quantité, soit en quantité moindre, que dans celui des témoins sains. Découverte d’une corrélation directe « Nous avons eu recours à diverses techniques, dont l’intelligence artificielle, pour confirmer que les changements observés dans le microbiome des sujets atteints de fibromyalgie n’étaient pas causés par des facteurs qui modifient le microbiome, par exemple l’alimentation, les médicaments, l’activité physique et l’âge », souligne le Dr Amir Minerbi, auteur principal de l’article. Le Dr Minerbi, de l’Unité de gestion de la douleur Alan‑Edwards du Centre universitaire de santé McGill (CUSM), fait partie d’une équipe comprenant également des chercheurs de l’Université McGill, de l’Université de Montréal et de l’Institut de recherche du CUSM. Dr Amir Minerbi, clinicien-chercheur, CUSM « Nous avons constaté que la fibromyalgie et ses symptômes – douleurs, fatigue et troubles cognitifs – étaient, de tous les facteurs qui agissaient sur le microbiome des personnes atteintes, ceux dont l’effet était le plus marqué, poursuit le Dr Minerbi. Nous avons également fait une observation inédite, à savoir une corrélation directe entre la gravité des symptômes et la présence ou l’absence plus marquée de certaines bactéries ». Les bactéries, simples marqueurs? Pour l’instant, on ne saurait dire avec certitude si les variations du microbiome observées chez les patients fibromyalgiques ne sont que des marqueurs de la maladie ou jouent un rôle dans son apparition. Comme la fibromyalgie provoque divers symptômes et pas uniquement de la douleur, les chercheurs devront maintenant vérifier si le microbiome intestinal subit le même type de changements en présence d’autres douleurs chroniques, par exemple des lombalgies, des céphalées et des douleurs neuropathiques. Par ailleurs, les chercheurs veulent savoir si les bactéries peuvent provoquer la douleur et la fibromyalgie, et si leur présence peut les orienter vers un éventuel traitement curatif et accélérer la démarche diagnostique. Diagnostic et recherche d’un traitement curatif La fibromyalgie est difficile à diagnostiquer. Parfois, les patients attendent leur diagnostic pendant quatre ou cinq ans. Mais cette époque pourrait bientôt être révolue. « Nous avons scruté une multitude de données et repéré 19 espèces bactériennes dont la quantité variait à la hausse ou à la baisse chez les personnes atteintes de fibromyalgie », précise Emmanuel Gonzalez, du Centre canadien de génomique computationnelle et du Département de génétique humaine de l’Université McGill. « Grâce à l’apprentissage machine, notre ordinateur a pu diagnostiquer la fibromyalgie à partir de la seule composition du microbiome avec un taux d’exactitude de 87 %. Forts de cette première découverte, nous entendons poursuivre nos travaux dans le but d’augmenter ce taux et, peut-être, de changer la donne en matière de diagnostic. » « La fibromyalgie est source de souffrance non seulement en raison de ses symptômes, mais également de l’incompréhension de la famille, des amis et des professionnels de la santé », déclare l’auteur senior de l’article, le Dr Yoram Shir, directeur de l’Unité de gestion de la douleur Alan‑Edwards du CUSM et chercheur associé à l’IR-CUSM. « En tant que médecins spécialisés dans la prise en charge de la douleur, nous nous sentons impuissants devant cette maladie, et ce sentiment est un véritable carburant pour un chercheur. Nous venons de montrer pour la toute première fois, du moins chez l’être humain, que le microbiome peut agir sur la douleur diffuse, et en matière de douleur chronique, tout nouvel angle d’approche est franchement le bienvenu.» Méthodologie de l’étude L’effectif de l’étude compte 156 sujets de la région montréalaise, dont 77 atteints de fibromyalgie. Les participants ont été interviewés et ont fourni des échantillons de selles, de sang, de salive et d’urine, puis on a comparé les échantillons des sujets fibromyalgiques à ceux des témoins sains, dont certains vivaient avec les personnes atteintes ou étaient des parents (père, mère, enfant, frère ou sœur). Les chercheurs devront maintenant vérifier s’ils obtiennent des résultats semblables dans une autre cohorte, éventuellement recrutée ailleurs dans le monde, et réaliser des études chez l’animal pour déterminer si la variation de la composition bactérienne contribue à l’apparition de la maladie. https://cusm.ca/newsroom/nouvelles/les-bact%C3%A9ries-l%E2%80%99intestin-associ%C3%A9es-pour-premi%C3%A8re-fois-%C3%A0-douleur-chronique https://journals.lww.com/pain/Abstract/publishahead/Altered_microbiome_composition_in_individuals_with.98647.aspx
Ines Jurisic's insight:

« Nous avons scruté une multitude de données et repéré 19 espèces bactériennes dont la quantité variait à la hausse ou à la baisse chez les personnes atteintes de fibromyalgie », précise Emmanuel Gonzalez, du Centre canadien de génomique computationnelle et du Département de génétique humaine de l’Université McGill. « Grâce à l’apprentissage machine, notre ordinateur a pu diagnostiquer la fibromyalgie à partir de la seule composition du microbiome avec un taux d’exactitude de 87 %. Forts de cette première découverte, nous entendons poursuivre nos travaux dans le but d’augmenter ce taux et, peut-être, de changer la donne en matière de diagnostic. »

Ines Jurisic's curator insight, April 5, 9:30 AM
« Nous avons eu recours à diverses techniques, dont l’intelligence artificielle, pour confirmer que les changements observés dans le microbiome des sujets atteints de fibromyalgie n’étaient pas causés par des facteurs qui modifient le microbiome, par exemple l’alimentation, les médicaments, l’activité physique et l’âge », souligne le Dr Amir Minerbi, auteur principal de l’article.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Une bactérie améliorant les capacités physiques retrouvée dans le microbiote d'athlètes

Une bactérie améliorant les capacités physiques retrouvée dans le microbiote d'athlètes | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it

 Le microbiote regroupe l’ensemble des micro-organismes évoluant dans l’organisme humain. Étudiées depuis plusieurs années par les scientifiques, les interactions entre le microbiote et l’hôte humain ne cessent de surprendre les biologistes par leur grande diversité et les effets...

Ines Jurisic's insight:

Une nouvelle étude publiée dans la revue Nature Medicine a identifié un type de bactérie trouvée dans les microbiotes d’athlètes de haut niveau et qui contribue à améliorer les capacités d’exercice physique. Ces bactéries, membres du genre Veillonella, ne se trouvent pas dans les intestins des personnes sédentaires.

 

Go running !!

No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Les testicules masculins ont leur propre "microbiome"

Les testicules masculins ont leur propre "microbiome" | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Sciences, découvertes, innovations...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Microbes that live in fishes' slimy mucus coating could lead chemists to new antibiotic drugs

Microbes that live in fishes' slimy mucus coating could lead chemists to new antibiotic drugs | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
It is critically important to find the next generation of antibiotics. The incidence of bacterial infections resistant to current antibiotics continues to climb. The World Health Organization has warned that this issue will only become more serious, and a recent study anticipates that by 2050 drug-resistant infections will affect more people than cancer.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Une étude révèle que les symptômes de l'autisme ont diminué de 50% chez les enfants qui ont reçu une greffe de selles –

Une étude révèle que les symptômes de l'autisme ont diminué de 50% chez les enfants qui ont reçu une greffe de selles – | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Selon une nouvelle étude, les greffes fécales ont considérablement réduit les symptômes de l'autisme chez les enfants.Les symptômes ont été presque réduits de moitié chez 18 enfants traités, c…...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Et si la viande "de laboratoire" remplaçait les burgers dans nos supermarchés ? - Soylent green ou Soleil Vert à regarder d'urgence ...

Et si la viande "de laboratoire" remplaçait les burgers dans nos supermarchés ? - Soylent green ou Soleil Vert à regarder d'urgence ... | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Âmes sensibles s’abstenir

C’est la partie la moins ragoûtante de l’histoire… Pour cultiver des cellules, il fallait jusqu’il y a peu du sang. On peut lire dans 'Clean Meat' que ‘Depuis que l’humanité a commencé à cultiver des cellules, il y a 130 ans, la plupart des solutions utilisées pour fournir les nutriments nécessaires au bon développement des cellules musculaires contiennent du sang. En l’occurrence, du sérum de fœtus de veau qui sert à maintenir les cellules en vie dans le laboratoire. La priorité absolue des startups est de remplacer ce sérum et de réussir à cultiver des cellules sans ‘medium animal’.

Les auteurs d’une étude financée par la NASA ont obtenu des résultats corrects en remplaçant le serum en question par un extrait de champignon maitake. Paul Shapiro dit avoir goûté du foie gras développé sans medium animal… par une startup appelée Hampton Creek. Peter Verstrate, de Mosa Meat, nous affirme avoir aussi réussi à se passer de ce serum fœtal de veau, mais il veut maintenant se passer entièrement de medium d’origine animale et se laisse un an pour y arriver. Il faut dire que l’échéance de 2021 que Mosa Meat s’était fixé approche à grands pas… Et qu’avant la mise sur le marché, il faut obtenir des autorisations auprès de la Commission européenne.

« J’ai mangé de la viande propre à plusieurs reprises. J’ai mangé du canard propre, du poisson, du foie gras propre, du chorizo et du boeuf propre. C’est bon. Et ça goûte la viande parce que c’est de la viande », assène Paul Shapiro. Encore faut-il que la Commission européenne accepte que cela porte le nom de viande.
Ines Jurisic's insight:

"... En 2022, les hommes ont épuisé les ressources naturelles. Seul le "soylent " une pastille de synthèse de différentes couleurs permet de nourrir la population, qui s'entasse dans la misère d'un New York surpeuplé, devenue une mégalopole de 44 millions d'habitants..." 

 

Et avaient-ils vu si juste? Et il me semble que oui ..

 

Bonne lecture !

 

No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

La dépression se joue-t-elle aussi dans notre assiette ?

La dépression se joue-t-elle aussi dans notre assiette ? | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
L'alimentation serait-elle un facteur clef dans la lutte contre la dépression, cette maladie mentale étroitement liée à notre système immunitaire et à notre microbiote intestinal ? A la lumière des découvertes récentes sur le « deuxième cerveau », cette piste est de plus en plus étudiée.

 

 

A l'heure où le nouveau roman de Michel Houellebecq, « Sérotonine », inonde les devantures des librairies, une nouvelle étude sur la dépression, qui ne bénéficiera sans doute pas de la même couverture médiatique, doit prochainement paraître dans « La Presse médicale ». Réalisée par une équipe de chercheurs de l'université Aix-Marseille, elle montre que le taux de dépressions en France est passé de 6 % dans les années 2000 à 8 % dans les années 2010.

« Une augmentation de deux points en dix ans ne peut pas être le fait du hasard », commente l'un des scientifiques impliqués, Guillaume Fond, psychiatre et médecin de santé publique à l'hôpital marseillais de la Conception. En ligne de mire : tous les facteurs dépressogènes que recèlent notre environnement et notre mode de vie. Le stress, bien sûr, mais pas seulement, avertit le chercheur. La mauvaise qualité de notre alimentation jouerait aussi un rôle de premier plan dans cette inexorable montée des troubles dépressifs. Et cette même alimentation pourrait, si elle était mieux choisie, se révéler au contraire une puissante alliée dans la lutte contre cette maladie, en complément des traitements classiques par antidépresseurs.

 

 

Même s'il existe un dicton affirmant que le bonheur est dans l'assiette, le lien entre dépression et alimentation n'a a priori rien d'évident pour un non-spécialiste. Le trait d'union entre les deux est le système immunitaire. De plus en plus d'études sont venues montrer, ces dernières années, que la dépression entretenait un lien étroit avec cette réaction de défense immunitaire qu'est l'inflammation  « Or, l'alimentation moderne est de plus en plus inflammatoire », explique Guillaume Fond, car de plus en plus riche en sucres raffinés et en graisses saturées, mais aussi de plus en plus pauvre en nutriments de régulation du métabolisme, comme les vitamines ou les acides gras essentiels, dont certains ont un effet anti-inflammatoire.

 

En 2016, une  étude parue dans l'« American Journal of Psychiatry » avait démontré les effets bénéfiques, sur la dépression, d'au moins trois substances disponibles sous forme de compléments alimentaires : une famille d'acides gras, les oméga-3, et deux vitamines, la vitamine D et le méthylfolate (une forme de la vitamine B9). Il a été prouvé que, pris en adjonction à un antidépresseur, ces nutriments réduisaient les symptômes dépressifs. Pourtant, du moins en France, les psychiatres sont encore rares à les prescrire systématiquement.

 

« Il existe encore dans les esprits l'idée que les compléments alimentaires relèvent de la 'médecine douce', pour ne pas dire de la 'médecine parallèle', regrette Guillaume Fond. Pour la plupart des gens, prendre des vitamines est quelque chose qui ne peut pas faire de mal, mais qui ne constitue pas en soi un traitement. Mais notre regard change si l'on sait que la vitamine D est en réalité une hormone, et qu'elle joue un rôle dans le système immunitaire et les réactions inflammatoires. »

Autre classe de compléments alimentaires aux effets positifs avérés : les probiotiques, qui favorisent dans notre flore intestinale la présence des « bonnes » bactéries (alors que les antibiotiques tuent les « mauvaises »). En 2017,  une première méta-analyse , ayant passé au crible les résultats d'une demi-douzaine d'études, a conclu à leur efficacité en adjonction à un antidépresseur. Une nouvelle méta-analyse, portant sur plus d'une trentaine d'études mais non encore parue, ira prochainement dans le même sens.

Des neurones dans l'intestin

Même pour leurs partisans les plus convaincus, les compléments alimentaires n'ont pas vocation à se substituer aux antidépresseurs. Découverts par hasard dans les années 1950, ces psychotropes (qui restent inefficaces sur environ un tiers des patients) agissent sur la dépression en augmentant dans le cerveau la quantité d'un voire, dans certains cas, deux neurotransmetteurs clefs : la sérotonine, qui a suggéré son titre à Michel Houellebecq, et la noradrénaline (lire ci-dessous).

« Les antidépresseurs pallient le déficit de sérotonine. Ce qui est nécessaire, puisque cela entraîne une baisse des symptômes et donc un mieux-être pour le patient. Mais ils ne s'attaquent pas à la racine du mal, c'est-à-dire à la cause de ce déficit », explique le psychiatre marseillais.

Or, 95 % de la sérotonine présente dans notre corps provient... de notre ventre ! Ces dernières décennies, les progrès de la biologie ont mis en lumière l'existence et le rôle complexe de ce qu'il est convenu d'appeler notre « deuxième cerveau » (et qui est en fait le premier, puisque apparu plus tôt au cours de l'évolution). Quelque 200 millions de neurones tapissent la paroi de l'intestin d'un humain : l'équivalent du cerveau d'un chien ou d'un chat. Et ces neurones du système nerveux entérique (auxquels s'ajoutent 100.000 milliards de bactéries, dix fois plus que de cellules dans tout notre corps !) utilisent, pour communiquer entre eux, les mêmes neurotransmetteurs que ceux du système nerveux central, autrement dit de l'encéphale : sérotonine, noradrénaline, dopamine... Mais ils n'ont pas le même rôle dans le cerveau du « haut » et dans celui du « bas » : messager du sentiment de bien-être en haut, la sérotonine, qui assure aussi le bon fonctionnement de notre horloge circadienne, sert, en bas, à rythmer le transit intestinal.

A la lumière de ces découvertes, on ne s'étonne plus que la clef de certaines maladies mentales puisse se trouver dans notre intestin. De fait, il apparaît que 90 % de toutes les maladies connues ont un lien avec une perturbation du microbiote, que cette perturbation se range du côté des causes ou des effets. Est-il encore raisonnable de croire que les maladies mentales pourraient faire exception ? Et, si c'était le cas, comment s'expliqueraient les étranges résultats obtenus par les études « germ-free » pratiquées sur des rongeurs ? Plusieurs expériences de laboratoire ont montré que des souris nées en conditions stériles, et donc privées de l'apport normal en bactéries, développent des troubles du comportement qui ressemblent à des pathologies psychiatriques.

L'alimentation, la composition de notre microbiote, mais aussi l'activité physique, qui toutes ont une influence sur notre statut inflammatoire, ne devraient donc pas être négligées dans le traitement de la dépression. Dans bien des pays, ces éléments font d'ailleurs partie de la « boîte à outils » du psychiatre. La France, à cet égard, a incontestablement un train de retard.

Comment ont été découverts les antidépresseurs

C'est un bel exemple de « sérendipité », ce fait, pour une percée médicale ou scientifique, d'avoir été réalisée de façon fortuite. Les antidépresseurs n'auraient peut-être jamais été découverts si, dans des sanatoriums au début des années 1950, des médecins ne s'étaient pas rendu compte qu'un antituberculeux, l'isoniazide, avait un effet positif sur l'humeur des malades. Les recherches ont ultérieurement montré que l'isoniazide est un inhibiteur - c'est-à-dire qu'il empêche le bon fonctionnement - d'une enzyme appelée la monoamine-oxydase. Or cette enzyme a elle-même pour fonction de dégrader la noradrénaline, la sérotonine et la dopamine.

En bloquant l'enzyme, l'isoniazide augmente donc la quantité de ces trois neurotransmetteurs dans le cerveau. C'est ainsi qu'ont été progressivement développées les deux grandes familles d'antidépresseurs actuellement sur le marché : les inhibiteurs sélectifs de la recapture de sérotonine (ISRS) qui augmentent le taux de ce neurotransmetteur dans le cerveau ; et les inhibiteurs mixtes de la recapture de sérotonine et de noradrénaline (IRSN), qui agissent sur ces deux neurotransmetteurs à la fois. Parmi les premiers, citons le Prozac, le Deroxat, le Zoloft, le Seropram, le Seroplex... Parmi les seconds, l'Effexor.

Inflammation aiguë ou diffuse

Un des arguments avancés par les psychiatres pour illustrer le lien entre dépression et inflammation est celui de « comportement maladie » (« sickness behavior ») : quand une grippe cloue une personne au lit et que son organisme réagit par une inflammation aiguë, cette personne présente tous les symptômes que l'on retrouve de façon chronique dans les dépressions :

- elle n'a envie de rien ;

- elle n'a plus d'appétit ;

- elle dort mal ;

- elle est irritable ;

- elle manque d'énergie ;

- elle a plus de douleurs, etc.

L'idée-force de l'immuno-psychiatrie est que, derrière certaines maladies mentales comme la dépression, se cache une inflammation diffuse et de faible intensité, dite « de bas grade », difficilement diagnostiquable."

Yann Verdo 
Ines Jurisic's insight:

De plus en plus d'études sont venues montrer, ces dernières années, que la dépression entretenait un lien étroit avec cette réaction de défense immunitaire qu'est l'inflammation  «

No comment yet.
Scooped by Ines Jurisic
Scoop.it!

Les science « omiques » ? Du nouveau pour la biologie moléculaire et pour la planète

Les science « omiques » ? Du nouveau pour la biologie moléculaire et pour la planète | NinaNutriNet | Scoop.it
Vous avez dit « omiques » ? La biologie se renouvelle grâce aux technologies d'analyse du vivant à l'échelle moléculaire : génomique, protéomique, etc. Une voie pour saisir la vie dans sa diversité.
No comment yet.