Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments"
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Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments"
At times the pain seems as if a scourge has befallen upon my back, hip, and leg, its victim reveals...... For this very reason, Dr. Alex Jimenez discusses sciatica, a common and frequently reported series of symptoms affecting a majority of the population. Sciatica pain can vary widely. Sciatica occurs when there is pressure or damage to the sciatic nerve, a nerve found in the lower back which runs down the back of each leg as it controls the muscles of the back of the knee and lower leg. It also provides sensation to the back of the thigh, part of the lower leg, and the sole of the foot. Dr. Jimenez explains how sciatica and its symptoms can be relieved through the use of chiropractic treatment. For more information, please feel free to contact us at (915) 850-0900 or text to call Dr. Jimenez personally at (915) 540-8444. http://bit.ly/chiropractorSciatica  Book Appointment Today: https://bit.ly/Book-Online-Appointment
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How Electroacupuncture Helps with Sciatica and Low Back Pain | Call: 915-850-0900

How Electroacupuncture Helps with Sciatica and Low Back Pain | Call: 915-850-0900 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Can the effects of electroacupuncture reduce sciatica in individuals dealing with low back pain to restore their mobility?

 

Introduction

When many people start to overuse their muscles in the lower quadrants, it can lead to numerous issues that cause pain and discomfort. One of the most common pain issues in the lower quadrants of the musculoskeletal system is sciatica, which is associated with low back pain. This pain duo can affect a person’s daily routine and lead them to pain and discomfort. This musculoskeletal condition is common, and when it affects one of the legs and lower back, many people state that it’s a radiating shooting pain that doesn’t go away for a while. Luckily, there are treatments like electroacupuncture to reduce sciatica associated with low back pain. Today’s article looks at the sciatica-low-back connection, how electroacupuncture reduces this pain connection, and how electroacupuncture can restore mobility to the individual. We talk with certified medical providers who consolidate our patients’ information to assess how to reduce the sciatica-low-back connection with electroacupuncture. We also inform and guide patients on how electroacupuncture therapy can be combined with other therapies to restore mobility to the body. We encourage our patients to ask their associated medical providers intricate and important questions about incorporating electroacupuncture therapy as part of their routine to reduce sciatica associated with low back pain. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., includes this information as an academic service. Disclaimer.

 

The Sciatica & Low Back Connection

Do you feel muscle aches or pain in your lower back or your legs? Do you experience radiating, throbbing pain in your legs that affects your walking ability? Or have you noticed that your legs and lower back ache more when carrying a heavy object? Many of these scenarios are associated with sciatica, which correlates with lower back pain. Now, sciatica is often characterized by aggravating pain traveling along the sciatic nerve from the lower back region, impairing a person’s quality of life. In the musculoskeletal system, the sciatic nerve plays an important role by providing motor function to the legs. (Davis et al., 2024) Now, when the sciatic nerve, the lumbar region also has a pivotal role. The lumbar region in the musculoskeletal region also has a crucial role in providing support, strength, and flexibility to the body. However, both the sciatic nerve and lumbar spinal region are more prone to stress and injuries from traumatic injuries and environmental factors that can impact the lumbar spinal discs and the sciatic nerve.

 

 

Repetitive motions, obesity, improper lifting, degenerative spinal issues, and musculoskeletal conditions are a few causes and risk factors contributing to the development of sciatica associated with the lower back. What eventually happens is that the water content and the progressive loss of the proteoglycans of the spinal discs break down between the vertebrae and protrude out to press on the sciatic nerve, which then can become irritated and cause referred radiating pain in the legs and lower back. (Zhou et al., 2021) The combination of sciatica and lower back pain can become a socio-economic issue depending on the severity of the pain that the sciatic nerve is causing and can make individuals miss out on any activities they are participating in. (Siddiq et al., 2020) While sciatica pain-like symptoms often correlate with the lumbar region, many individuals can find the relief they are looking for through various treatments.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Can the effects of electroacupuncture reduce sciatica in individuals dealing with low back pain to restore their mobility? If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

No comment yet.
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Get Sciatica Pain Relief with Acupuncture | Call: 915-850-0900

Get Sciatica Pain Relief with Acupuncture | Call: 915-850-0900 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Can individuals dealing with sciatica pain find the relief they need from acupuncture to restore low back mobility?

Introduction

The body’s lower extremities provide stability and movement to the individual as they are moving from one location to another without pain or discomfort. The lower extremities consist of the hips, lower back, legs, thighs, pelvis, knees, and feet; each has various muscles, nerve roots, and ligaments with a specific job to each muscle quadrant. The spinal column in the musculoskeletal system helps provide proper posture while protecting the spinal cord from injuries. However, more often than not, the lower extremities can succumb to injuries as many individuals incorporate repetitive motions that can compress the nerve roots that are spread out to the lower extremities, which can invoke pain. The most common pain that seems to affect the lower back and legs is sciatica, and when not treated, it can cause overlapping risk profiles to the lower extremities. Today’s article examines how sciatica is correlated with the lower back and how non-surgical treatments can help reduce the effects of sciatic pain. We talk with certified medical providers who consolidate our patients’ information to provide numerous treatments to relieve sciatica pain affecting their lower extremities. We also inform and guide patients on how non-surgical treatments can help reduce sciatica pain from the lower musculoskeletal extremities. We encourage our patients to ask their associated medical providers intricated and important questions about the pain-like symptoms they are experiencing from sciatica that are causing them pain. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., incorporates this information as an academic service. Disclaimer.

 

How Does Sciatica Correlate With The Lower Back?

Do you often experience numb or tingling sensations running down your leg that cause your leg or foot to lose sensation briefly? Do you feel shooting pain in your lower back after excessive sitting at your desk? Or do you find that stretching your legs or back temporarily relieves the pain, only for it to come back? Many individual who are experiencing shooting pain running down their legs are dealing with sciatica. When it comes to the lower extremities in the musculoskeletal system, many individuals make repetitive motions on their spine that can cause the spinal discs to become compressed and herniated under pressure. When the spinal disc is herniated in the lumbar spine, that disc will start to press on the surrounding nerve roots, thus sending radiating pain down the legs. Sciatica is defined as when individuals are experiencing pain coming from the lumbosacral nerve root and causing either a burning, heaviness, or tightness sensation. (Aguilar-Shea et al., 2022) Sciatica can range from mild to severe, forcing many individuals to think their foot is asleep. However, the sciatic nerve root is compressed, trapped, stuck, or pinched, which causes muscle spasms within the lower back, buttock, or legs. Hence, many individuals will explain that they are experiencing low back or leg pain when it is sciatica. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Since the sciatic nerve is a long, thick nerve in the human body, it travels from the lumbar region down to the knee and connects to other nerves to reach the foot. Sciatica pain can be two conditions with the same pain-like symptom effects known as true or sciatica-like conditions. True sciatica is where an injury is directly affecting the sciatic nerve. This can relate to a slipped disc caused by environmental factors like lifting a heavy object, aggravating the sciatic nerve root, and causing pain that worsens. (Siddiq et al., 2020) For sciatica-like conditions, this is where other musculoskeletal conditions are causing sciatic pain-like symptoms on the lower extremities. Musculoskeletal conditions like piriformis syndrome can cause sciatica pain-like symptoms where the piriformis muscle is irritated or inflamed, pressing on the sciatic nerve, which causes many people to report pain along the gluteal region that may shoot a burning, aching sensations down the back of the legs. (Hicks et al., 2024) However, there are ways to treat sciatica and reduce the pain-like effects causing mobility issues.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Can individuals dealing with sciatica pain find the relief they need from acupuncture to restore low back mobility? If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

No comment yet.
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Spinal Stenosis Physical Therapy: A Guide to Relief | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Spinal Stenosis Physical Therapy: A Guide to Relief | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Can spinal stenosis physical therapy improve quality of life and decrease pain symptoms for individuals dealing with the degenerative condition?

Spinal Stenosis Physical Therapy

Spinal stenosis causes narrowing of the openings of the vertebrae. The affected openings are either:

 

  • The central spinal canal - where the spinal cord sits.
  • Foramen - the small openings on the sides of each vertebra where nerve roots branch off from the spinal cord.
  • Spinal stenosis is most common in the lumbar spine/lower back.
  • It can also occur in the cervical spine/neck. (Jon Lurie, Christy Tomkins-Lane 2016)

 

The discs between the spine's vertebrae provide cushioning and shock absorption in the spine and the rest of the body. Degenerative changes to the discs are believed to be the start of spinal stenosis.  When the discs lack sufficient hydration/water and disc height decreases over time, the cushioning and shock absorption becomes less and less effective. The vertebrae can then become compressed, causing friction. Degenerative spinal stenosis can also develop from excess scar tissue and bone spurs (growth that develops on the edge of a bone) that can form after injury or spinal surgery.

Assessment

A physician will make a diagnosis of spinal stenosis. The doctor will take an imaging scan of the spine to determine the exact location of the degeneration and to measure how narrow the openings have become. Pain, stiffness, limited mobility, and loss of range of motion are often present. If spinal stenosis has caused nerve compression, there may also be pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the buttocks (sciatica), thighs, and lower legs. A physical therapist will determine the degree by assessing the following:

 

  • Vertebrae mobility - how the spine bends and twists in different directions.
  • Ability to change positions.
  • The strength of the core, back, and hip muscles.
  • Balance
  • Posture
  • Gait pattern
  • Nerve compression to determine if there are any symptoms in the legs.
  • Milder cases usually do not involve nerve compression, as back stiffness is more common.
  • In more severe cases, there may be significant pain, limited mobility, and nerve compression, causing leg weakness.

 

The most common symptom of spinal stenosis is increased pain with backward bending or extension of the lumbar spine. This includes positions that extend the spine, such as standing, walking, and lying on the stomach. Symptoms usually improve when bending forward and when the spine is positioned more into a flexed or bent position, like when sitting and reclining. These body positions open up the spaces in the central spinal canal.

Surgery

Spinal stenosis is the most common reason for undergoing surgery in adults 65 and older. However, surgery is almost always performed as a last resort if pain, symptoms, and disability persist after trying conservative therapies, including chiropractic, non-surgical decompression, and physical therapy, for months or years. The severity of symptoms and current state of health will determine whether a doctor will recommend surgery. (Zhuomao Mo, et al., 2018). Conservative measures can be safer and just as effective. A systematic review or study based on all available primary research found that physical therapy and exercise resulted in similar outcomes to surgery for improving pain and disability. (Zhuomao Mo, et al., 2018). Except for severe cases, surgery is often not necessary.

Physical Therapy for Spinal Stenosis

The objective of physical therapy includes:

 

  1. Decreasing pain and joint stiffness.
  2. Relieving nerve compression.
  3. Reducing tightness in the surrounding muscles.
  4. Improving the range of motion.
  5. Improving postural alignment.
  6. Strengthening the core muscles.
  7. Improving leg strength to help with balance and overall function.
  • Stretching of the back muscles, including those running vertically along the spine and those running diagonally from the pelvis to the lumbar spine, helps relieve muscle tightness and pain and can improve overall mobility and range of motion of the lumbar spine.
  • Stretching the hip muscles, including the hip flexors in the front, the piriformis in the back, and the hamstrings that run from the back of the hip down the leg to the knee, is also important as these muscles are attached to the pelvis, which directly connects to the spine.
  • Exercises for strengthening the abdominal core muscles, including the muscles in the trunk, pelvis, lower back, hips, and abdomen, help stabilize the spine and protect it from excessive movement and compressive forces.
  • With spinal stenosis, the core muscles often become weak and inactive and unable to do their job to support the spine. Core exercises often begin by activating the deep abdominal muscles while lying flat on the back with the knees bent.
  • Exercises will progress as the individual gains more strength and control as the spine stabilizes.
  • Spinal stenosis physical therapy will also involve balance training and glute exercises for strengthening the leg muscles.

Prevention

Working with a physical therapist can help prevent future problems by maintaining spinal mobility, keeping the individual active, and exercising to maintain strength and stability to provide a solid foundation to support the lower back and prevent symptoms from worsening.

Severe Spinal Stenosis Physical Therapy

Physical therapy usually involves performing stretches for the lower back, hips, and legs, mobility exercises, and core strengthening exercises to improve spinal support and decrease pain. Treatments like heat or electrical stimulation may also be used on a case-by-case basis if there is significant pain or tightness in the back muscles. However, there is not enough clinical evidence to support that there are additional benefits. (Luciana Gazzi Macedo, et al., 2013) The effectiveness of physical therapy is high because surgery alone cannot strengthen the muscles that stabilize the spine, increase the mobility or flexibility of the surrounding muscles, and improve postural alignment.

The Root Causes of Spinal Stenosis

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research studies or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to discuss the subject matter above further, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Lurie, J., & Tomkins-Lane, C. (2016). Management of lumbar spinal stenosis. BMJ (Clinical research ed.), 352, h6234. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.h6234

 

Mo, Z., Zhang, R., Chang, M., & Tang, S. (2018). Exercise therapy versus surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Pakistan journal of medical sciences, 34(4), 879–885. https://doi.org/10.12669/pjms.344.14349

 

Macedo, L. G., Hum, A., Kuleba, L., Mo, J., Truong, L., Yeung, M., & Battié, M. C. (2013). Physical therapy interventions for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic review. Physical therapy, 93(12), 1646–1660. https://doi.org/10.2522/ptj.20120379

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Learn the causes and symptoms that affect the lower back and neck. Physical therapy can help treat stenosis symptoms. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Alexander Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Chronic Sciatica: Causes, Symptoms & Treatment | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Chronic Sciatica: Causes, Symptoms & Treatment | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

For individuals dealing with chronic sciatica, when pain and other symptoms significantly impact daily activities and the ability to walk, can a musculoskeletal healthcare provider help relieve and manage symptoms through a multidisciplinary treatment plan?

Chronic Sciatica

Sciatica is a common condition that results from compression of the sciatic nerve in the lower back or leg. Chronic sciatica occurs when symptoms last for 12 months or longer.

Advanced Sciatica Symptoms

Advanced or chronic sciatica usually produces pain that radiates or travels down the back of the leg. Long-term sciatic nerve compression can result in:

 

  • Leg pain
  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Electrical or burning sensations
  • Weakness
  • Weakness
  • Instability of the legs, which can impact the ability to walk.
  1. Severe nerve compression can progress to leg paralysis if the nerve is significantly damaged from chronic compression. (Antonio L Aguilar-Shea, et al., 2022)
  2. Sciatica can progress to nerve damage of the smaller nerves and travel into the legs and feet. Nerve damage/neuropathy can result in pain, tingling, and loss of sensation. (Jacob Wycher Bosma, et al., 2014)

Disabling Sciatica Treatment Options

When sciatica becomes disabling, affecting an individual's ability to walk, more involved treatment is needed to bring relief. Many cases of chronic and disabling sciatica are caused by problems with the lumbar spine. Compression of the nerve roots that form the sciatic nerve can occur from bulging or herniated discs or spinal stenosis. If symptoms of sciatica persist beyond 12 months with little or no relief from physical therapy, non-surgical mechanical decompression, stretches and exercises, or pain management techniques, surgical procedures may be needed. (Lucy Dove, et al., 2023)

 

Lumbar decompression surgery encompasses several procedures to create more space in the lumbar spine and relieve nerve compression. Lumbar decompression surgery can include: (Mayfield Clinic. 2021)

Discectomy

  • This procedure removes a portion of a damaged disc between vertebrae to alleviate root compression from a bulging or herniated disc.

Laminectomy

  • This procedure removes the lamina, a portion of the vertebrae causing nerve compression, especially if there is a bone spur due to arthritic and degenerative changes in the spine.

Foraminotomy

  • This procedure widens the foramina, the openings in the vertebrae where the nerve roots exit to relieve compression.

Spinal Fusion

  • This procedure takes two or more vertebrae fusing them together with metal rods and screws for stabilization.
  • The procedure can be performed if:
  • An entire disc is removed.
  • Multiple laminectomies were performed.
  • One vertebra has slipped forward over another.

Daily Relief Management for Advanced Sciatica

Achieving relief from advanced sciatica symptoms at home can include regularly practicing methods like taking a hot bath or shower massage, and applying a heating pad to the lower back or glutes to relax tight muscles to help release the tightness surrounding the sciatic nerve.

 

  • Corrective or therapeutic exercises like sciatic nerve glides can help reduce tension along the nerve while low-back exercises that move the spine into forward or backward bending can reduce compression. (Witold Golonka, et al., 2021)
  • Medications like nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs/NSAIDs, muscle relaxants, or nerve-pain medications may be recommended. (Antonio L Aguilar-Shea, et al., 2022)
  • Advanced sciatica may not be as responsive to conservative treatment methods, as the injury has set in and the nerve and surrounding tissues have become significantly restricted.
  • Sciatica symptoms lasting longer than 12 months require more involved treatment like injections or surgery to address symptoms effectively. (Antonio L Aguilar-Shea, et al., 2022)

Healing Chronic Sciatica

If the underlying cause can be effectively treated then chronic sciatica can be healed. Chronic sciatica often results from spinal conditions like herniated discs or lumbar spinal stenosis. These conditions narrow the space around the nerve roots that exit from the spinal cord and merge to form the sciatica nerve. Surgery is performed to open the space in the spine. (Mayfield Clinic. 2021) Sometimes sciatica is brought on by less common causes like a tumor or a spinal infection. In these cases, symptoms will not resolve until the underlying cause is addressed. Tumors may need to be surgically removed while infections require aggressive antibiotics to prevent spreading to other regions of the body. (Hospital for Special Surgery. 2023)

Pain Specialist Treatment Plan Development

Ongoing pain, numbness, tingling, and weakness are all symptoms that should be addressed with a healthcare provider. A pain specialist can help create a treatment plan that involves: (Hospital for Special Surgery. 2023)

 

  • Physical therapy
  • Therapeutic massage
  • Chiropractic decompression and spinal adjustments
  • Targeted stretches and exercises
  • Referrals to specialized healthcare providers 
  • Injections
  • Medications

Sciatica Causes and Treatments

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research studies or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Aguilar-Shea, A. L., Gallardo-Mayo, C., Sanz-González, R., & Paredes, I. (2022). Sciatica. Management for family physicians. Journal of family medicine and primary care, 11(8), 4174–4179. https://doi.org/10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_1061_21

 

Bosma, J. W., Wijntjes, J., Hilgevoord, T. A., & Veenstra, J. (2014). Severe isolated sciatic neuropathy due to a modified lotus position. World journal of clinical cases, 2(2), 39–41. https://doi.org/10.12998/wjcc.v2.i2.39

 

Dove, L., Jones, G., Kelsey, L. A., Cairns, M. C., & Schmid, A. B. (2023). How effective are physiotherapy interventions in treating people with sciatica? A systematic review and meta-analysis. European spine journal : official publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society, 32(2), 517–533. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00586-022-07356-y

 

Mayfield Clinic. ( 2021). Spinal decompression laminectomy & foraminotomy.

 

Golonka, W., Raschka, C., Harandi, V. M., Domokos, B., Alfredson, H., Alfen, F. M., & Spang, C. (2021). Isolated Lumbar Extension Resistance Exercise in Limited Range of Motion for Patients with Lumbar Radiculopathy and Disk Herniation-Clinical Outcome and Influencing Factors. Journal of clinical medicine, 10(11), 2430. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10112430

 

Hospital for Special Surgery. (2023). Sciatica.

 

Hospital for Special Surgery. (2023). Pain management.

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Get the help you need from a musculoskeletal healthcare provider and their multidisciplinary treatment plan to reduce leg pain, numbness, and more. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

good health's curator insight, January 12, 10:45 AM

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Compression and Irritation: Causes of Paresthesia | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Compression and Irritation: Causes of Paresthesia | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Individuals feeling tingling or pins and needles sensations that overtake the arms or legs could be experiencing paresthesia, which occurs when a nerve has been compressed or damaged. Can knowing the symptoms and causes help in diagnosis and treatment?

Paresthesia Body Sensations

The numbness or tingling feeling when an arm, leg, or foot has fallen asleep is not so much about blood circulation but nerve function.

 

  • Paresthesia is an abnormal sensation felt in the body due to the compression or irritation of nerves.
  • It can be a mechanical cause like a compressed/pinched nerve.
  • Or it may be due to a medical condition, injury, or illness.

Symptoms

Paresthesia can cause various symptoms. These symptoms can range from mild to severe and can be brief or long-lasting. Signs can include: (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. 2023)

 

  • Tingling
  • Pins and needles sensations
  • Feeling like the arm or leg has fallen asleep.
  • Numbness
  • Itching.
  • Burning sensations.
  • Difficulty contracting the muscles.
  • Difficulty using the affected arm or leg.
  1. The symptoms typically last for 30 minutes or less.
  2. Shaking the affected limb often relieves the sensations.
  3. Paresthesia usually affects only one arm or leg at a time.
  4. However, both arms and legs can be affected, depending on the cause.

 

Consult a healthcare provider if the symptoms last for more than 30 minutes. Treatment may be required if paresthesia body sensations are brought on by a serious underlying cause.

Causes

Sitting with incorrect and unhealthy postures can compress a nerve and generate symptoms. However, some causes are more concerning and can include:

 

Seeking Medical Assistance

If the symptoms don't go away after 30 minutes or keep returning for unknown reasons, call a healthcare provider to find out what is causing the abnormal sensations. A worsening case should be monitored by a healthcare provider.

 

Diagnosis

A healthcare provider will work with the individual to understand the symptoms and perform the appropriate diagnostic tests to determine the cause. A healthcare provider will choose the tests based on a physical examination. Common diagnostic procedures include: (Merck Manual Professional Version. 2022)

 

  • Magnetic resonance imaging - MRI of the spine, brain, or extremities.
  • X-ray to rule out bone abnormalities, like a fracture.
  • Blood tests.
  • Electromyography - EMG studies.
  • Nerve conduction velocity - NCV test.
  1. If paresthesia is accompanied by back or neck pain, a healthcare provider may suspect a compressed/pinched spinal nerve.
  2. If the individual has a history of diabetes that is poorly controlled, they may suspect peripheral neuropathy.

Treatment

Treatment for paresthesia depends on the diagnosis. A healthcare provider can help determine the best course of action for the specific condition.

Nervous System

  • If symptoms are triggered by a central nervous condition like MS, individuals will work closely with their healthcare provider to get the appropriate treatment.
  • Physical therapy could be recommended to help improve overall functional mobility. (Nazanin Razazian, et al., 2016)

Spinal Nerve

  • If paresthesia is caused by compression of a spinal nerve, like sciatica, individuals may be referred to a chiropractor and physical therapy team to release the nerve and pressure. (Julie M. Fritz, et al., 2021)
  • A physical therapist may prescribe spinal exercises to relieve compression of the nerve and restore normal sensations and motion.
  • Strengthening exercises to restore flexibility and mobility may be prescribed if weakness presents along with paresthesia body sensations.

Herniated Disc

  • If a herniated disc is causing the abnormal sensations, and there has been no improvement with conservative measures, a healthcare provider may suggest surgery to relieve pressure on the nerve/s. (American Association of Neurological Surgeons. 2023)
  • In surgical procedures like a laminectomy or discectomy, the objective is to restore nerve function.
  • Post-surgery, individuals may be recommended to a physical therapist to help regain mobility.

Peripheral Neuropathy

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. (2023) Paresthesia.

 

American Association of Neurological Surgeons. (2023) Herniated disc.

 

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. (2018) Peripheral neuropathy.

 

Merck Manual Professional Version. (2022) Numbness.

 

Razazian, N., Yavari, Z., Farnia, V., Azizi, A., Kordavani, L., Bahmani, D. S., Holsboer-Trachsler, E., & Brand, S. (2016). Exercising Impacts on Fatigue, Depression, and Paresthesia in Female Patients with Multiple Sclerosis. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 48(5), 796–803. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000000834

 

Fritz, J. M., Lane, E., McFadden, M., Brennan, G., Magel, J. S., Thackeray, A., Minick, K., Meier, W., & Greene, T. (2021). Physical Therapy Referral From Primary Care for Acute Back Pain With Sciatica : A Randomized Controlled Trial. Annals of internal medicine, 174(1), 8–17. https://doi.org/10.7326/M20-4187

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Individuals feeling tingling or pins and needles sensations that overtake the arms or legs could be experiencing paresthesia, which occurs when a nerve has been compressed or damaged. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Alexander Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Sciatic Endometriosis | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Sciatic Endometriosis | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Can combining chiropractic treatment with the common therapies of medication, exercise, and/or physical therapy help relieve sciatic endometriosis pain symptoms?

Sciatic Endometriosis

Sciatic endometriosis is a condition in which endometrial cells (tissue that resembles the lining of the uterus) grow outside of the uterine lining and compress the sciatic nerve. This places stress and pressure on the nerve causing back, pelvic, hip, and leg pain, especially before and during the menstrual cycle. It can also cause pain, irregular periods, and infertility. (The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 2021)

 

  • These areas of endometrial tissue growth are also known as lesions or implants.
  • Women with sciatic endometriosis often experience leg pain and weakness around the time of their menstrual cycle. (Lena Marie Seegers, et al., 2023)
  • Sciatic endometriosis can also cause pain when urinating, during a bowel movement, during sex, and fatigue, and irregular vaginal bleeding.

The Sciatic Nerve

  • Typically, endometrial lesions grow and attach to the ovaries, fallopian tubes, bladder, intestines, rectum, or peritoneum/abdominal cavity lining. (The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 2021)
  • The abnormal growth may be caused by higher-than-normal levels of estrogen.
  • Researchers believe that endometriosis is related to retrograde menstruation, which causes menstrual blood to flow back into the pelvis instead of out through the vagina. (World Health Organization. 2023)
  • Sometimes, the cells grow in the area of the pelvis right above the sciatic nerve. (Adaiah Yahaya, et al., 2021)
  • The sciatic nerve is the longest nerve in the body and travels down the back of each leg. (Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2023)
  • When endometrial lesions place pressure on the sciatic nerve, they can cause irritation and inflammation leading to severe pelvic pain, which makes it harder to conceive. (Liang Yanchun, et al., 2019)

Symptoms

Some women with endometriosis experience no symptoms or misinterpret the symptoms as typical premenstrual syndrome/PMS signs. The most common signs and symptoms of sciatic endometriosis include:

 

  • Difficulty walking or standing.
  • Loss of sensation, muscle weakness, and reflex alteration.
  • Limping.
  • Balance problems.
  • Bloating and nausea.
  • Constipation or diarrhea before or after a period.
  • Painful, heavy, and/or irregular periods.
  • Bleeding between periods.
  • Pain during sex, urination, and bowel movements.
  • Pain in the stomach, pelvis, lower back, hips, and buttocks. (MedlinePlus. 2022)
  • Weakness, numbness, tingling, burning, or dull aching sensations in the back of one or both legs.
  • Foot drop or trouble lifting the front of the foot. (Center for Endometriosis Care. 2023)
  • Infertility.
  • Fatigue.
  • Depression and anxiety.

Diagnosis

Endometriosis, including sciatic endometriosis, typically cannot be diagnosed with a pelvic examination or ultrasound by themselves. A healthcare provider may need to perform a biopsy using laparoscopy and discuss menstrual cycles, symptoms, and medical history.

 

  • The laparoscopy procedure involves making tiny incisions and taking a tissue sample with tools attached to a thin tube with a camera. (MedlinePlus. 2022)
  • Imaging tests, like magnetic resonance imaging/MRI, and computed tomography/CT scans, can help provide essential information about the location and size of any endometrial lesions. (The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 2021)

Treatment

Symptoms can sometimes be temporarily relieved with over-the-counter/OTC pain relievers. Depending on the condition and severity a healthcare provider may prescribe hormonal treatment to prevent new endometrial implants from growing. These can include:

 

  • Hormonal birth control.
  • Progestin - a synthetic form of progesterone.
  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone - GnRH agonists.
  • If pain persists or worsens, individuals may need to undergo surgery to remove the tissue.
  • In severe cases, a hysterectomy or surgical removal of the uterus may be recommended. (The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 2021)
  • Physical therapy, gentle targeted exercises, and applying heat or cold to the affected area may also help. (Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2023)

Sciatica In Depth

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Endometriosis.

 

Seegers, L. M., DeFaria Yeh, D., Yonetsu, T., Sugiyama, T., Minami, Y., Soeda, T., Araki, M., Nakajima, A., Yuki, H., Kinoshita, D., Suzuki, K., Niida, T., Lee, H., McNulty, I., Nakamura, S., Kakuta, T., Fuster, V., &amp; Jang, I. K. (2023). Sex Differences in Coronary Atherosclerotic Phenotype and Healing Pattern on Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging. Circulation. Cardiovascular imaging, 16(8), e015227. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCIMAGING.123.015227

 

World Health Organization. Endometriosis.

 

Yahaya, A., Chauhan, G., Idowu, A., Sumathi, V., Botchu, R., &amp; Evans, S. (2021). Carcinoma arising within sciatic nerve endometriosis: a case report. Journal of surgical case reports, 2021(12), rjab512. https://doi.org/10.1093/jscr/rjab512

 

Johns Hopkins Medicine. Sciatica.

 

Yanchun, L., Yunhe, Z., Meng, X., Shuqin, C., Qingtang, Z., &amp; Shuzhong, Y. (2019). Removal of an endometrioma passing through the left greater sciatic foramen using a concomitant laparoscopic and transgluteal approach: case report. BMC women's health, 19(1), 95. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12905-019-0796-0

 

MedlinePlus. Endometriosis.

 

Center for Endometriosis Care. Sciatic endometriosis.

 

Chen, S., Xie, W., Strong, J. A., Jiang, J., &amp; Zhang, J. M. (2016). Sciatic endometriosis induces mechanical hypersensitivity, segmental nerve damage, and robust local inflammation in rats. European journal of pain (London, England), 20(7), 1044–1057. https://doi.org/10.1002/ejp.827

 

Siquara de Sousa, A. C., Capek, S., Howe, B. M., Jentoft, M. E., Amrami, K. K., & Spinner, R. J. (2015). Magnetic resonance imaging evidence for perineural spread of endometriosis to the lumbosacral plexus: report of 2 cases. Neurosurgical focus, 39(3), E15. https://doi.org/10.3171/2015.6.FOCUS15208

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Can combining chiropractic treatment with medication, exercise, and/or physical therapy help relieve sciatic endometriosis pain symptoms? For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Sacral Plexus Rundown | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Sacral Plexus Rundown | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

The lumbosacral plexus is located on the posterolateral wall of the lesser pelvis, next to the lumbar spine. A plexus is a network of intersecting nerves that share roots, branches, and functions. The sacral plexus is a network that emerges from the lower part of the spine. The plexus then embeds itself into the psoas major muscle and emerges in the pelvis. These nerves provide motor control to and receive sensory information from portions of the pelvis and leg. Sacral nerve discomfort symptoms, numbness, or other sensations and pain can be caused by an injury, especially if the nerve roots are compressed, tangled, rubbing, and irritated. This can cause symptoms like back pain, pain in the back and sides of the legs, sensory issues affecting the groin and buttocks, and bladder or bowel problems. Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic can develop a personalized treatment plan to relieve symptoms, release the nerves, relax the muscles, and restore function.

Sacral Plexus

Anatomy

  • The sacral plexus is formed by the lumbar spinal nerves, L4 and L5, and sacral nerves S1 through S4.
  • Several combinations of these spinal nerves merge together and then divide into the branches of the sacral plexus.
  • Everybody has two sacral plexi - plural of plexus - one on the right side and left side that is symmetrical in structure and function.

Structure

There are several plexi throughout the body. The sacral plexus covers a large area of the body in terms of motor and sensory nerve function.

 

  • Spinal nerves L4 and L5 make up the lumbosacral trunk, and the anterior rami of sacral spinal nerves S1, S2, S3, and S4 join the lumbosacral trunk to form the sacral plexus.
  • Anterior rami are the branches of the nerve that are towards the front of the spinal cord/front of the body.
  • At each spinal level, an anterior motor root and a posterior sensory root join to form a spinal nerve.
  • Each spinal nerve then divides into an anterior - ventral - and a posterior - dorsal - rami portion.
  • Each can have motor and/or sensory functions.

 

The sacral plexus divides into several nerve branches, which include:

 

  • Superior gluteal nerve - L4, L5, and S1.
  • Inferior gluteal nerve - L5, S1, and S2.
  • The sciatic nerve - is the largest nerve of the sacral plexus and among the largest nerves in the body - L4, L5, S1, S2, and S3
  • The common fibular nerve - L4 through S2, and tibial nerves - L4 through S3 are branches of the sciatic nerve.
  • Posterior femoral cutaneous nerve - S1, S2, and S3.
  • Pudendal nerve - S2, S3, and S4.
  • The nerve to the quadratus femoris muscle is formed by L4, L5, and S1.
  • The obturator internus muscle nerve - L5, S1, and S2.
  • The piriformis muscle nerve - S1 and S2.

Function

The sacral plexus has substantial functions throughout the pelvis and legs. The branches provide nerve stimulation to several muscles. The sacral plexus nerve branches also receive sensory messages from the skin, joints, and structures of the pelvis and legs.

Motor

Motor nerves of the sacral plexus receive signals from the brain that travel down the column of the spine, out to the motor nerve branches of the sacral plexus to stimulate muscle contraction and movement. Motor nerves of the sacral plexus include:

Superior Gluteal Nerve

  • This nerve provides stimulation to the gluteus minimus, gluteus medius, and tensor fascia lata, which are muscles that help move the hip away from the center of the body.

Inferior Gluteal Nerve

  • This nerve provides stimulation to the gluteus maximus, the large muscle that moves the hip laterally.

Sciatic Nerve

  • The sciatic nerve has a tibial portion and a common fibular portion, which have motor and sensory functions.
  • The tibial portion stimulates the inner part of the thigh and activates muscles in the back of the leg and the sole of the foot.
  • The common fibular portion of the sciatic nerve stimulates and moves the thigh and knee.
  • The common fibular nerve stimulates muscles in the front and sides of the legs and extends the toes to straighten them out.

Pudendal Nerve

  • The pudendal nerve also has sensory functions that stimulate the muscles of the urethral sphincter to control urination and the muscles of the anal sphincter to control defecation.
  • The nerve to the quadratus femoris stimulates the muscle to move the thigh.
  • The nerve to the obturator internus muscle stimulates the muscle to rotate the hips and stabilize the body when walking.
  • The nerve to the piriformis muscle stimulates the muscle to move the thigh away from the body.

Conditions

The sacral plexus, or areas of the plexus, can be affected by disease, traumatic injury, or cancer. Because the nerve network has many branches and portions, symptoms can be confusing. Individuals may experience sensory loss or pain in regions in the pelvis and leg, with or without muscle weakness. Conditions that affect the sacral plexus include:

Injury

  • A traumatic injury of the pelvis can stretch, tear, or harm the sacral plexus nerves.
  • Bleeding can inflame and compress the nerves, causing malfunction.

Neuropathy

  • Nerve impairment can affect the sacral plexus or parts of it.
  • Neuropathy can come from:
  • Diabetes 
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency
  • Certain medications - chemotherapeutic meds
  • Toxins like lead
  • Alcohol
  • Metabolic illnesses

Infection

  • An infection of the spine or the pelvic region can spread to the sacral plexus nerves or produce an abscess, causing symptoms of nerve impairment, pain, tenderness, and sensations around the infected region.

Cancer

  • Cancer developing in the pelvis or spreading to the pelvis from somewhere else can compress or infect the sacral plexus nerves.

Treatment of the Underlying Medical Condition

Rehabilitation begins with the treatment of the underlying medical condition causing the nerve problems.

 

  • Cancer treatment - surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation.
  • Antibiotic treatment for infections.
  • Neuropathy treatment can be complicated because the cause may be unclear, and an individual can experience several causes of neuropathy simultaneously.
  • Major pelvic trauma like a vehicle collision can take months, especially if there are multiple bone fractures.

Motor and Sensory Recovery

  • Sensory problems can interfere with walking, standing, and sitting.
  • Adapting to sensory deficits is an important part of treatment, rehabilitation, and recovery.
  • Chiropractic, decompression, massage, and physical therapy can relieve symptoms, restore strength, function, and motor control.

Sciatica Secrets Revealed

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Dujardin, Franck et al. “Extended anterolateral transiliac approach to the sacral plexus.” Orthopaedics &amp; traumatology, surgery &amp; research: OTSR vol. 106,5 (2020): 841-844. doi:10.1016/j.otsr.2020.04.011

 

Eggleton JS, Cunha B. Anatomy, Abdomen and Pelvis, Pelvic Outlet. [Updated 2022 Aug 22]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2023 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK557602/

 

Garozzo, Debora et al. “In lumbosacral plexus injuries can we identify indicators that predict spontaneous recovery or the need for surgical treatment? Results from a clinical study on 72 patients.” Journal of brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injury vol. 9,1 1. 11 Jan. 2014, doi:10.1186/1749-7221-9-1

 

Gasparotti R, Shah L. Brachial and Lumbosacral Plexus and Peripheral Nerves. 2020 Feb 15. In: Hodler J, Kubik-Huch RA, von Schulthess GK, editors. Diseases of the Brain, Head and Neck, Spine 2020–2023: Diagnostic Imaging [Internet]. Cham (CH): Springer; 2020. Chapter 20. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK554335/ doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-38490-6_20

 

Norderval, Stig, et al. “Sacral nerve stimulation.” Tidsskrift for den Norske laegeforening : tidsskrift for praktisk medicin, ny raekke vol. 131,12 (2011): 1190-3. doi:10.4045/tidsskr.10.1417

 

Neufeld, Ethan A et al. “MR Imaging of the Lumbosacral Plexus: A Review of Techniques and Pathologies.” Journal of Neuroimaging: official journal of the American Society of Neuroimaging vol. 25,5 (2015): 691-703. doi:10.1111/jon.12253

 

Staff, Nathan P, and Anthony J Windebank. “Peripheral neuropathy due to vitamin deficiency, toxins, and medications.” Continuum (Minneapolis, Minn.) vol. 20,5 Peripheral Nervous System Disorders (2014): 1293-306. doi:10.1212/01.CON.0000455880.06675.5a

 

Yin, Gang, et al. “Obturator Nerve Transfer to the Branch of the Tibial Nerve Innervating the Gastrocnemius Muscle for the Treatment of Sacral Plexus Nerve Injury.” Neurosurgery vol. 78,4 (2016): 546-51. doi:10.1227/NEU.0000000000001166

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Sacral nerve discomfort can cause symptoms like back pain, pain in the back and sides of the legs, and sensory issues. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Alexander Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Glute Muscle Imbalance: EP's Chiropractic Team | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Glute Muscle Imbalance: EP's Chiropractic Team | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

The gluteal muscles/glutes comprise the buttocks. They are a powerful muscle group that consists of three muscles. The gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and gluteus minimus. The glute muscles help power physical performance and daily movements like walking, standing, and sitting and help to prevent injuries to the core, back, abdominal muscles, and other supporting muscles and tissues. Individuals can develop a glute imbalance where one side becomes more dominant and activates more or is higher than the other. An imbalance that is not addressed can lead to further muscle imbalance, posture problems, and pain issues. Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic can develop a personalized treatment plan to relieve symptoms and restore alignment, balance, and health.

Glute Muscle Imbalance

Strong, healthy glutes promote lumbopelvic stability and rhythm, meaning they keep the low back and pelvis in correct alignment to prevent strains and injuries. Glute imbalance occurs when one side of the glutes is larger, stronger, or more dominant. Glute imbalances are common and part of normal human anatomy, as the body is not perfectly symmetrical. Shifting and utilizing the more dominant side when taking on weight or picking up objects is normal, so the one side gets bigger. Just as an individual prefers one hand, arm, and leg over another, one glute side can work harder and become stronger.

Causes

There are several causes of glute muscle imbalance, including:

  • Anatomical variations- Everyone has uniquely shaped muscles, attachment points, and nerve pathways. These variations can make one side of the glutes more dominant or stronger.
  • Unhealthy posture.
  • Back pain symptoms can cause individuals to take on unhealthy postures and positioning, like leaning on one side.
  • Pre-existing injuries.
  • Inadequate rehabilitation from a previous injury.
  • Nerve injuries.
  • Ankle sprains can lead to reduced glute activation.
  • Improper training
  • Leg length discrepancies
  • Atrophy
  • Spine condition
  • Job occupation
  • Sports factors may prioritize one side of the body over the other.

Shifting the Body

When pain presents in one body area, signals are sent to caution the other muscles to contract/tighten as a protective mechanism to prevent further injury. These changes alter movement patterns, leading to muscular imbalances in the glutes and other areas. Individuals who do not rehabilitate from an injury properly can be left with an imbalance.

Chiropractic Relief and Restoration

This condition needs to be addressed to prevent further injuries and issues with posture. Treatment varies depending on the individual and the extent of the problem. A treatment plan to prevent and improve some forms of glute imbalance may include the following.

 

  • Spinal decompression will stretch out the body and muscles to a workable position.
  • Therapeutic massage will relax the muscles and increase blood flow.
  • Chiropractic adjustments to realign the spine and body.
  • Targeted stretches and exercises will be provided to maintain alignment.
  • Unilateral training or training one side of the body at a time can help build and strengthen the weaker side.
  • Core strengthening can work out the differences on both sides of the body.

Chiropractic Approach for Pain Relief

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Bini, Rodrigo Rico, and Alice Flores Bini. "Comparison of linea alba length and core-muscles engagement during core and lower back orientated exercises." Journal of Bodywork and movement therapies vol. 28 (2021): 131-137. doi:10.1016/j.jbmt.2021.07.006

 

Buckthorpe, Matthew, et al. "ASSESSING AND TREATING GLUTEUS MAXIMUS WEAKNESS - A CLINICAL COMMENTARY." International Journal of sports physical therapy vol. 14,4 (2019): 655-669.

 

Elzanie A, Borger J. Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Gluteus Maximus Muscle. [Updated 2023 Apr 1]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2023 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK538193/

 

Lin CI, Khajooei M, Engel T, et al. The effect of chronic ankle instability on muscle activations in lower extremities. Li Y, ed. PLoS ONE. 2021;16(2):e0247581. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0247581

 

Liu R, Wen X, Tong Z, Wang K, Wang C. Changes of gluteus medius muscle in the adult patients with unilateral developmental hip dysplasia. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2012;13(1):101. doi:10.1186/1471-2474-13-101

 

Pool-Goudzwaard, A. L. et al. "Insufficient lumbopelvic stability: a clinical, anatomical and biomechanical approach to 'a-specific' low back pain." Manual therapy vol. 3,1 (1998): 12-20. doi:10.1054/math.1998.0311

 

Vazirian, Milad, et al. "Lumbopelvic rhythm during trunk motion in the sagittal plane: A review of the kinematic measurement methods and characterization approaches." Physical therapy and Rehabilitation vol. 3 (2016): 5. doi:10.7243/2055-2386-3-5

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Injury Medical Chiropractic Clinic can develop a personalized glute muscle treatment plan to relieve symptoms and restore alignment. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Running Foot Numbness: EP Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Running Foot Numbness: EP Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

It's not unusual for runners to experience tingling, pins and needles, and numbness in their feet while running. Running foot numbness is a relatively common problem for runners and can be easily remedied. Numbness will present in one part of the foot or just the toes. Sometimes it can spread throughout the whole foot. Different causes, most of which are not serious, can be easily dealt with. Serious causes can be treated with chiropractic, massage, decompression therapy, and functional medicine.

Running Foot Numbness

Reasons why the feet experience numbing sensations when running, include:

 

  • Improper footwear.
  • Laces that are tied too tightly.
  • Foot strike pattern.
  • Foot structure.
  • Training schedule.
  • Muscle tightness.
  • Compressed nerve.
  • Medical conditions like neuromas or peripheral neuropathy.

Footwear

  • A common cause of running foot numbness is having overly tight shoes that place added pressure on nerves.
  • If this could be the reason, the remedy is to get new shoes.
  • Try to find a store that specializes in running shoes and ask for help.
  • Footwear professionals look at the size of the foot, the shape, and running gait.
  • For example, individuals with a wide foot may need a style with a wider/larger toebox or the front of the shoe that houses the forefoot.
  • Get a pair that's one-half to a full size larger than a regular everyday shoe size.
  • This is because when running, the feet swell, especially in hot and humid weather.
  • Going up a half or whole size will also accommodate thicker socks for individuals that run in cold weather.
  • Sometimes numbness can result from biomechanical issues that can be corrected with the proper shoe.

Tight Laces

  • Sometimes it's not the shoes but the laces that are too tight.
  • Pulling a little tighter to get a firm fit around the ankle is common, but this can entrap nerves on top of the foot at the ankle/anterior tarsal tunnel, similar to the carpal tunnel in the wrist.
  • This can be problematic for individuals with high arches.
  • Loosening the laces are recommended.
  • However, runners may feel insecure with looser laces.
  • Experimenting with different lacing techniques is recommended to find one that keeps the shoes comfortable without creating undue pressure over the top of the foot.
  • Using padding under the tongue of the shoe can help.

Foot Fall Pattern

  • Sometimes running form can put pressure on nerves that, lead to numbness.
  • Overstriding - Landing heel first with the foot ahead of the body's center of gravity places the feet on the ground for too long.
  • Correcting this issue can be achieved by shortening the stride and focusing on landing on the midsole.
  • This way, the feet will land directly under the body.
  • Running like stepping on hot coals is recommended, keeping the movements light and quick.
  • Correcting overstriding saves energy and lowers the risk of shin splints.
  • A sports chiropractor, physical therapist, or running coach can help fine-tune form for specific guidance.

Foot Structure

  • The anatomy of the feet, specifically the arches, can contribute to running foot numbness.
  • Flat feet mean the entire bottom of each foot is in contact with the floor when barefoot.
  • Overly flexible feet are more likely to experience nerve compression.
  • This can be corrected with shoe orthotic inserts.
  • Over-the-counter orthotics may work, but custom orthotics are another option if they don't.

Muscle Tightness

  • Stiff, inflexible muscles can lead to anatomical conditions that generate nerve pressure.
  • Warm-up exercises before running will get the muscles loose and ready.
  • Stretching is very important before and after running.
  • Individuals prone to muscle tightness should include flexibility exercises.
  • Yoga can improve flexibility and body alignment.
  • Foam rollers and other massage tools will work out kinks in areas where tightness forms and affects nerves, like the quadriceps, calves, hamstrings, and I.T. band.
  • Regular sports massage and chiropractic can help keep the body pliable.

Sciatic Nerve Issues

  • A compressed nerve causes a decrease in the sensation to the areas the nerve supplies.
  • Foot numbness, especially around the heel or the sole, can be caused by sciatic nerve compression.
  • The pain from sciatica might originate in the back but can end up causing numbness in the feet and/or toes.
  • Poor posture, tight piriformis muscles, or other back injuries can also cause sciatica.
  • A chiropractor or physical therapist can prescribe decompression therapy, MET stretches, and rehabilitative exercises.

Prevention

Most of the time, running foot numbness can be treated by adjusting footwear or technique. Here are a few tips for injury prevention:

Evaluate Shoes

  • First, make sure the shoelaces are not overly tight.
  • If the shoes are uncomfortable when running, look for another set and get a custom fitting.

Running Form

  • Avoid overstriding by focusing on landing on the midsole instead of the heel.
  • This will take the pressure off of the feet.

Foot Orthotics

  • Individuals with flat feet, high arches, or overly flexible feet should consider orthotics.

Avoid Overtraining

  • Work rest days into the training schedule and gradually build up to avoid overuse injuries.
    Stretch to prevent muscle imbalances, keep muscles loose, and improve the range of motion.

Chiropractic and Physical Therapy

  • If symptoms don't improve, see a doctor, podiatrist, or chiropractor so they can rule out conditions and develop a personalized treatment plan.

Benefits of Custom Foot Orthotics

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Aldridge, Tracy. “Diagnosing heel pain in adults.” American family physician vol. 70,2 (2004): 332-8.

 

Atik, Aziz, and Selahattin Ozyurek. “Flexible flatfoot.” Northern Clinics of Istanbul vol. 1,1 57-64. 3 Aug. 2014, doi:10.14744/nci.2014.29292

 

Jackson, D L, and B L Haglund. “Tarsal tunnel syndrome in runners.” Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.) vol. 13,2 (1992): 146-9. doi:10.2165/00007256-199213020-00010

 

Souza, Richard B. “An Evidence-Based Videotaped Running Biomechanics Analysis.” Physical Medicine and rehabilitation clinics of North America vol. 27,1 (2016): 217-36. doi:10.1016/j.pmr.2015.08.006

 

Sridhara, C R, and K L Izzo. “Terminal sensory branches of the superficial peroneal nerve: an entrapment syndrome.” Archives of physical medicine and Rehabilitation vol. 66,11 (1985): 789-91.

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Serious causes of running foot numbness can be treated with chiropractic, massage, decompression therapy, and functional medicine. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Hamstring Injuries Relieved By The MET Technique | Call: 915-850-0900

Hamstring Injuries Relieved By The MET Technique | Call: 915-850-0900 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Introduction

With the body being a complex machine with various muscle groups and sections that work to keep the body mobile, it is important to know that weak muscles in the upper and lower portions of the body can cause unwanted pain-like symptoms that can lead to dysfunction over time. When numerous environmental factors and habits affect the muscle groups, it can lead to overlapping risk factors that cause tightness in the affected muscles and lead to injuries. In the lower portions of the body, the hips, thighs, hamstrings, and glute muscles help stabilize the pelvis region. When these factors start to cause issues with these muscles, it can lead to injuries and problems for those muscle groups. Today’s article will examine how hamstring injuries occur, how it affects the lower body, and how treatments and techniques like MET (muscle energy techniques) are utilized to relieve hamstring injuries. We mention valuable information about our patients to certified medical providers who provide therapy techniques like the MET and care treatment for individuals with hamstring injuries associated with the lower body portions. We give encouragement to patients by referring them to our associated medical providers based on their diagnostic findings. We provide the support that education is a spectacular way when asking our providers the most helpful questions at the patient’s acknowledgment. Dr. Alex Jimenez, D.C., utilizes this information as an educational service. Disclaimer

 

How Do Hamstring Injuries Occur?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have you noticed that your hamstrings are feeling tight? Are you constantly sitting down for an extended period? Or are you experiencing low back pain that is affecting your hamstrings? Many individuals will usually experience low back pain along the thigh with associated symptoms of muscle weakness that causes the muscle fibers to be tighter and sore. When the muscle fibers are tight consistently, it causes the back of the leg muscles uncomfortable and can make movement difficult. Studies reveal that the back of the leg muscles or hamstrings is highly susceptible to injuries, especially in athletes. The hamstring muscles comprise three major muscles in the posterior location of the thigh. When a person is overstretching the hamstrings or having muscle tightness from being sedentary can cause these injuries and discomfort to the lower extremities. Additional research studies mentioned that hamstring injuries could range from acute muscle strain to chronic proximal hamstring tendinopathy associated with muscle ruptures. 

 

How Does It Affect The Lower Body?

Since the hamstring muscles succumb to injuries from overstretching or becoming weak, how would it affect the lower body and cause mobility issues? Well, when the hip flexors or the hamstrings become tight and tense, it can cause an altercation to the pelvis region and cause spinal misalignment. To that point, it can lead to muscle stiffness and pain in the hamstrings while correlating to low back pain and can cause the individual to be confused as they think it is sciatica instead of a hamstring injury. Studies reveal in “Clinical Applications of Neuromuscular Techniques,” written by Leon Chaitow, N.D., D.O., and Judith Walker DeLany, L.M.T., states that when there is a range of other biomechanical features that could be predisposed to hamstring injuries that can cause a chain of reactions that can involve not only the hamstrings but the toes, the spine, the trunk, and the upper extremities. Losing the ability to function in the lower extremities can cause dysfunction, muscle weakness, and instability in an individual.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Dr. Alex Jimenez gives an insightful overview of how hamstring injuries are relieved by the MET technique in the lower body. If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

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Wobble Cushions: EP's Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Wobble Cushions: EP's Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Wobble cushions are small round inflatable support pillows made of a flexible material that can be used to stand and sit on. The cushion creates instability, hence wobble, to engage the lower back, hips, and core muscles. They promote core stability, strengthen muscle tone, and improve balance and body posture. A flexible body helps in injury prevention. At Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic, we utilize innovative techniques and therapies to reduce stress, assist in healing musculoskeletal damage from injuries, disease, or conditions, and keep the spine and whole body healthy.

Wobble Cushions

A common reason for back aches and pains is sitting for long periods. Individuals unintentionally slouch or hunch over as they go through their day, causing strain to the back muscles, gluteal muscles, core muscles, hips, and spine. This causes the lower half of the body to weaken and causes the top muscles to take up the slack to support the torso and lower body.

Muscle Spasms

Muscle spasms can be the acute type that is forceful and involuntary, and chronic sustained stiffness, tightness, cramping, and pain. Lower back discomfort and/or sciatica symptoms vary depending on the cause, location, and severity of the strain or injury. Signs could be dull, burning, or sharp at a single point or over a broad region that could spread into one or both legs. Types of low back discomfort:

 

  • Acute symptoms last less than three months. Most individuals with acute episodes will have at least one recurrence.
  • Recurrent means the acute symptoms return.
  • Chronic symptoms last longer than three months.

Cushion Benefits

Encouraging active sitting improves posture allowing individuals to sit and stay focused for longer as their body awareness improves, reducing hunching, slumping, slouching, and fidgeting. Other wobble cushion benefits include:

 

  • Decreased muscle stress and strain on the joints and ligaments, which improves proprioceptive sense or body awareness.
  • Increases blood circulation and oxygenation throughout the body.
  • Helps rehydrate the discs and circulate spinal fluid. Spinal discs do not have a direct blood supply; therefore, movement is required to pump and circulate healthy fluids.
  • Allows more flexibility in the spine, hips, and core muscles.
  • Improves overall posture.

 

The purpose of wobble cushions is not to provide comfort. They are supposed to be uncomfortable and unstable to make the individual sit up straight. The cushion can be placed on a chair or the floor to effectively practice balancing without putting pressure on the back, knees, or feet. They can also be used for practicing standing balance. Various factors to consider when looking for a cushion include:

 

  • Stability
  • Comfort
  • Resilience
  • Alignment
  • All play a role in determining the best option.

 

Discussing options with a doctor or chiropractor is recommended to ensure that the cushion meets your needs and preferences.

Spinal Hygiene

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Alrwaily, Muhammad, et al. “Stabilization exercises combined with neuromuscular electrical stimulation for patients with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.” Brazilian journal of physical therapy vol. 23,6 (2019): 506-515. doi:10.1016/j.bjpt.2018.10.003

 

Haksever, Bunyamin et al. “The Dynamic Innovative Balance System Improves Balance Ability: A Single-Blind, Randomized Controlled Study.” International journal of sports physical therapy vol. 16,4 1025-1032. 1 Aug. 2021, doi:10.26603/001c.25756

 

Honert, Eric C, and Karl E Zelik. “Foot and shoe responsible for the majority of soft tissue work in the early stance of walking.” Human movement science vol. 64 (2019): 191-202. doi:10.1016/j.humov.2019.01.008

 

Ostelo, Raymond Wjg. “Physiotherapy management of sciatica.” Journal of physiotherapy vol. 66,2 (2020): 83-88. doi:10.1016/j.jphys.2020.03.005

 

Shahvarpour, A et al. “Active-passive biodynamics of the human trunk when seated on a wobble chair.” Journal of biomechanics vol. 49,6 (2016): 939-945. doi:10.1016/j.jbiomech.2016.01.042

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic utilize innovative techniques to keep the spine and whole body healthy. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Trapped Sciatic Nerve In or Around Hamstrings: Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Trapped Sciatic Nerve In or Around Hamstrings: Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Hamstring syndrome is a condition where the sciatic nerve gets pinched between the hamstring muscles and the pelvic bone or by the tissue bands that connect the hamstring muscles causing compression on and around the nerve. It is seen in individuals that play sports that involve running, kicking, or jumping, in middle-aged individuals engaged in daily activities that have suffered falls, and in individuals that sit for many hours. Chiropractic care, massage, and decompression therapy can relieve the symptoms, release the trapped nerve, relax and stretch the muscles, and restore function.

Hamstring Muscles Trapped Sciatic Nerve

Three muscles make up the hamstrings in the back of the thigh. The sciatic nerve runs from the low back down the leg into the foot. A trapped sciatic nerve can cause various symptoms and sensations in the back of the leg, hip, buttock, and foot. It may hurt to sit down or stretch the legs out, and there is usually tightness in and/or around the buttock and back of the leg. The symptoms typically recede when lying on your back.

Cause

  • Regular wear and tear on the back muscles and hamstrings can contribute to the condition.
  • Often the sciatic nerve and/or the sheath surrounding the sciatic nerve gets trapped and irritated as it travels around the ischial tuberosity. The ischial tuberosities are known as the sit bones.
  • The area where the sciatic nerve runs down the back of the leg can become narrowed, leading to nerve irritation and stinging, numbing, and tingling sensations.
  • The injury often happens during sudden, quick, forceful movements that overstretch the tendons and/or muscles but can also happen during slow movements.
  • Movement agitates the pulling and rubbing of the nerve on the muscles.
  • A non-painful pull or pop of the hamstrings can cause the muscles to spasm and wrap around the nerve.

Symptoms

Symptoms usually include the following:

 

  • Leg pain that worsens when sitting.
  • Intense electrical shooting pain that makes it hard to stand or move.
  • Difficulties moving the leg or foot.
  • Numbness and weakness in and around the leg.
  • Tingling or burning sensations running down the leg.
  • Persistent pain on one side of the lower back.

Chiropractic Care

Chiropractic treatment can relieve the symptoms and release the trapped nerve. Treatment includes:

 

  • Accurate Diagnosis - A chiropractor will examine and review physical activity, work, and medical history.
  • Ice and Heat therapies will stop the swelling and increase blood flow.
  • Massage therapy relaxes the muscles and increases circulation.
  • Decompression therapy incrementally and gently stretches the body.
  • Chiropractic adjustments realign and reset the body. 
  • Targeted stretches and exercises will keep the muscles loose and increase strength.
  • Nutritional recommendations will help reduce inflammation and prevent flare-ups.

Hamstrings and Sciatic Nerve Relationship

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Lohrer, Heinz, et al. "Nerve entrapment after a hamstring injury." Clinical journal of sports medicine: official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sports Medicine vol. 22,5 (2012): 443-5. doi:10.1097/JSM.0b013e318257d76c

 

Mattiussi, Gabriele, and Carlos Moreno. "Treatment of proximal hamstring tendinopathy-related sciatic nerve entrapment: presentation of an ultrasound-guided "Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis" application." Muscles, ligaments and tendons journal vol. 6,2 248-252. 17 Sep. 2016, doi:10.11138/mltj/2016.6.2.248

 

McGregor, Catriona, et al. "Traumatic and overuse injuries of the ischial origin of the hamstrings." Disability and rehabilitation vol. 30,20-22 (2008): 1597-601. doi:10.1080/09638280701786138

 

Saikku, Kari, et al. "Entrapment of the proximal sciatic nerve by the hamstring tendons." Acta orthopaedica Belgica vol. 76,3 (2010): 321-4.

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Chiropractic, massage, and decompression therapy can release the nerve, relax and stretch the muscles, and restore function. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Pinched Nerves and Muscle Spasms: EPs Chiropractic Team | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Pinched Nerves and Muscle Spasms: EPs Chiropractic Team | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Pinched Nerves and Muscle Spasms: A pinched or compressed nerve can occur in various body regions, from the wrist to the foot. When a nerve is compressed, a pins and needles feeling can present until the pressure is relieved, or there can be no sensation symptoms, but other symptoms like muscle spasms, especially in the arm or leg, can appear. Individuals will feel a repetitive fluttering or twitching when the arm or leg is not in motion. A pinched nerve could be the cause of spasms in the back or extremities. Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic can help if symptoms are not stopping or worsening.

Pinched Nerves and Muscle Spasms

When multiple symptoms appear, individuals may not realize they are connected. Individuals may think aches, pains, and spasms are normal aging processes. Pinched nerves occur when there is an impingement on any one of the numerous nerves of the spine. Impingements can be caused by:

 

  • Repetitive motion injuries
  • Disc degeneration
  • Herniated/ruptured discs
  • Bone spurs
  • Arthritis
  • Trauma injury

 

The pain symptoms from the spasm can be quick, sharp, or pulsating and throbbing. The muscles respond by tightening or spasming as the nerve sends interrupted/incomplete signals. In addition to muscle spasms, a pinched nerve can contribute to other symptoms, including the following.

 

  • Tingling
  • Numbness
  • Pins and needles sensation
  • Reduced range of motion
  • Muscle weakness

Signs a Pinched Nerve Might Be Causing Spasms

  • Sudden shooting pain that radiates down the leg or arm.
  • Weak muscles
  • Muscle atrophy - shrinking or deteriorating.
  • Chronic tingling in the extremities.
  • A burning sensation in a specific area; this could but is not necessarily the source of the pinched nerve.
  • Electrical shock-type pain accompanies the spasms.

 

If a pinched nerve is left untreated and continues to generate symptoms, it can affect daily life and lead to uncomfortable long-term issues. Severe nerve compression combined with inflammation can cause damage to nearby soft tissues and muscles, leading to chronic conditions. When the nerves are damaged, it can be harder to control the muscles making certain motions uncomfortable or difficult to move certain body parts.

Chiropractic Care

Chiropractic care, massage, and decompression therapy will relieve pinched nerves and muscle spasms and restore neuromusculoskeletal system function. The body will be realigned, and patients will be trained on stretching exercises, muscle strengthening, posture training, and nutritional support to optimize the body’s natural healing abilities to repair the damaged nerves.

Low Back Pain

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Bustamante, S, and P G Houlton. “Swelling of the leg, deep venous thrombosis, and the piriformis syndrome.” Pain research & management vol. 6,4 (2001): 200-3. doi:10.1155/2001/104091

 

Chu, Eric Chun-Pu, and Robert J Trager. “Thoracic Schwannoma as an Unusual Cause of Sciatic Pain in the Chiropractic Office: A Case Report.” The American journal of case reports vol. 23 e938448. 16 Nov. 2022, doi:10.12659/AJCR.938448

 

Coletti, Roger H. “The ischemic model of chronic muscle spasm and pain.” European journal of translational myology vol. 32,1 10323. 18 Jan. 2022, doi:10.4081/ejtm.2022.10323

 

Hirayama, Jiro, et al. “Relationship between low-back pain, muscle spasm and pressure pain thresholds in patients with lumbar disc herniation.” The European spine journal: official publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society vol. 15,1 (2006): 41-7. doi:10.1007/s00586-004-0813-2

 

Kennedy, John G, and Donald E Baxter. “Nerve disorders in dancers.” Clinics in sports medicine vol. 27,2 (2008): 329-34. doi:10.1016/j.csm.2008.01.001

 

Waddell, Roger K. “Chiropractic care for a patient with spasmodic dysphonia associated with cervical spine trauma.” Journal of chiropractic medicine vol. 4,1 (2005): 19-24. doi:10.1016/S0899-3467(07)60108-6

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Clinic can help if pinched nerves and muscle spasms are not stopping or worsening. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Relieving Piriformis Syndrome with Acupuncture Techniques | Call: 915-850-0900

Relieving Piriformis Syndrome with Acupuncture Techniques | Call: 915-850-0900 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Can individuals with piriformis syndrome incorporate acupuncture with various therapies to reduce sciatic nerve pain and other symptoms?

 

Introduction

As many individuals move around from one location to another thanks to the lower body extremities, the surrounding muscles, ligaments, nerve roots, and tissues help contribute to the sensory-motor function of the hips, legs, buttocks, and feet. All these muscle groups factor in to ensure they can be mobile without the effects of pain or discomfort. However, many factors and issues can cause the surrounding muscles to develop musculoskeletal problems over time, affecting a person’s mobility. One of the muscles that helps share the responsibility for mobility to hips and buttocks is the piriformis muscle, which is often overlooked when various injuries or repetitive motions start to affect a person’s ability to walk. Today’s article examines how piriformis syndrome affects mobility, how sciatic pain correlates with piriformis syndrome, and how therapies like acupuncture can help reduce piriformis syndrome. We talk with certified medical providers who consolidate our patients’ information to provide numerous treatments to minimize piriformis syndrome affecting a person’s mobility. We also inform and guide patients on how treatments like acupuncture can help reduce sciatic nerve pain associated with piriformis syndrome. We encourage our patients to ask their associated medical providers intricated and important questions about the referred pain-like symptoms they are experiencing from piriformis syndrome that is affecting their ability to walk. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., incorporates this information as an academic service. Disclaimer.

 

Piriformis Syndrome Affecting Mobility

Have you been experiencing muscle tightness in your hips or buttock region, affecting your walking ability? Do you feel sensations of numbness, tingling, or burning pain traveling down to your knees and feet? Or, after a long day of work, do you feel pain when you are sitting down? Most of these symptoms are often correlated with piriformis syndrome. The six surrounding muscles surrounding the gluteal region of the thighs and hips all work together to provide lower body movement while stabilizing the hips and rotating the thighs. The piriformis muscle is a small, flat, pear-shaped muscle that runs on top of the sciatic nerve. Piriformis syndrome is a clinical musculoskeletal condition that causes sciatic nerve entrapment that causes many individuals to report shooting and burning pain down to their buttock region. (Hicks et al., 2024) This causes many people to think they are dealing with low back pain associated with sciatica. When a person is dealing with piriformis syndrome, they will experience limited mobility in their hips, which, over time, if not treated, will affect the thighs and legs. 

 

How Does Sciatic Nerve Pain correlate with Piriformis Syndrome?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additionally, since piriformis syndrome is correlated with sciatic nerve pain, some clinical findings causing overlapping risk profiles include restricted external hip rotation and muscle tightness of the lumbosacral muscles. Other clinical findings range from palpatory pain over the greater sciatic notch to aggravated pain in a seated position. (Sharma et al., 2023) Since sciatic nerve entrapment is correlated with piriformis syndrome, it is still regarded as the non-discogenic cause of sciatica. (Son & Lee, 2022) When that sciatic nerve gets trapped within the piriformis muscle, many people will experience numbness, tingling sensations, and similar pain patterns in the legs, just like sciatica; however, when individuals are looking for treatments to reduce the sciatic nerve pain and improve the piriformis muscle.

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Can individuals with piriformis syndrome incorporate acupuncture with various therapies to reduce sciatic nerve pain and other symptoms? If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

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Spinal Decompression: How to Relieve Hip Pain | Call: 915-850-0900

Spinal Decompression: How to Relieve Hip Pain | Call: 915-850-0900 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Can individuals dealing with hip pain, find the relief they are looking for from spinal decompression to reduce their sciatica pain?

 

Introduction

When it comes to individuals doing everyday movements, the body can be in weird positions without pain or discomfort. Hence, people can stand or sit for prolonged periods and feel all right when doing strenuous activities. However, as the body ages, the surrounding muscles and ligaments can become weak and tight, while the spinal joints and discs start to be compressed and wear and tear. This is because many individuals make repetitive motions on their bodies that cause pain-like symptoms in the back, hips, neck, and body extremities, leading to referred pain in different body locations. When individuals are experiencing musculoskeletal pain in their bodies, it can cause overlapping risk profiles that can hinder the individual and cause them to be miserable. Additionally, when people experience musculoskeletal pain in their bodies, many will seek treatment to reduce the referred pain-like symptoms associated with the musculoskeletal pain. Today’s article will examine one type of musculoskeletal pain on the hips, how it can cause sciatica pain-like problems, and how treatments like decompression can reduce the pain-like effects of hip pain correlated with sciatica. We talk with certified medical providers who consolidate our patients’ information to provide numerous treatments to relieve hip pain associated with sciatica. We also inform and guide patients on how decompression can help reduce pain-like symptoms like sciatica and restore hip mobility. We encourage our patients to ask their associated medical providers intricated and important questions about the pain-like symptoms they are experiencing from hip pain. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., incorporates this information as an academic service. Disclaimer.

 

Hip Pain Associated With Sciatica

Do you often experience stiffness in your lower back and hips after sitting down for an excessive period? How about feeling radiating pain running down from your lower back to your legs? Or do you think your hip and thigh muscles become tight and weak, which is affecting your gait stability? Many individuals experiencing these pain-like issues are experiencing hip pain, and it can be an issue when it is not treated over time. Since hip pain is a common and disabling condition that is challenging to diagnose, many individuals often express localized pain in one of the three anatomic regions: the anterior, posterior, and lateral hip sections. (Wilson & Furukawa, 2014) When individuals are dealing with hip pain, they will also experience referred pain in their lower backs, which causes them to be in distress and miserable. At the same time, simple ordinary movements like sitting or standing can affect the muscles and ligaments surrounding the hips and can be damaging. This can cause hip pain to be referred from the lumbar spine and spine problems, which then cause musculoskeletal issues in the lower extremities. (Lee et al., 2018

 

 

So, how would hip pain be associated with sciatica and causing pain in many lower extremities? The hip areas in the musculoskeletal system have numerous muscles surrounding the pelvic bone area that can become tight and weak, causing referred musculoskeletal pain from intrapelvic and gynecologic issues. (Chamberlain, 2021) This means that musculoskeletal disorders like piriformis syndromes associated with hip pain can lead to sciatica. The sciatic nerve travels down from the lumbar region and the buttocks and behind the leg. When a person is dealing with sciatica and is going to their primary doctor to get treated for the pain, their doctors will do a physical examination to see what factors are causing the pain. Some of the common findings during a physical exam were tenderness and palpation of the greater sciatic notch and the reproduction of pain along the hips. (Son & Lee, 2022) This causes associated symptoms that correlate with sciatica and hip pain, including:

  • Tingling/numbing sensations
  • Muscle tenderness
  • Pain while sitting or standing
  • Discomfort

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request. We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Can individuals dealing with hip pain, find the relief they are looking for from spinal decompression to reduce their sciatica pain? If you have any questions or concerns, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

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Diagnosis & Treatment of Spinal Synovial Cysts | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Diagnosis & Treatment of Spinal Synovial Cysts | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Individuals that have gone through a back injury may develop a synovial spinal cyst as a way to protect the spine that could cause pain symptoms and sensations. Can knowing the signs help healthcare providers develop a thorough treatment plan to relieve pain, prevent worsening of the condition and other spinal conditions?

Spinal Synovial Cysts

Spinal synovial cysts are benign fluid-filled sacs that develop in the spine's joints. They form because of spinal degeneration or injury. The cysts can form anywhere in the spine, but most occur in the lumbar region/lower back. They typically develop in the facet joints or junctions that keep the vertebrae/spinal bones interlocked.

Symptoms

In most cases, synovial cysts don't cause symptoms. However, the doctor or specialist will want to monitor for signs of degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, or cauda equina syndrome. When symptoms do present, they typically cause radiculopathy or nerve compression, which can cause back pain, weakness, numbness, and radiating pain caused by the irritation. The severity of symptoms depends on the size and location of the cyst. Synovial cysts can affect one side of the spine or both and can form at one spinal segment or multiple levels.

Effects Can Include

  • Radiculopathy symptoms can develop if the cyst or inflammation caused by the cyst comes into contact with a spinal nerve root. This can cause sciatica, weakness, numbness, or difficulty controlling certain muscles.
  • Neurogenic claudication/impingement and inflammation of spinal nerves can cause cramping, pain, and/or tingling in the lower back, legs, hips, and buttocks. (Martin J. Wilby et al., 2009)
  • If the spinal cord is involved, it may cause myelopathy/severe spinal cord compression that can cause numbness, weakness, and balance problems. (Dong Shin Kim et al., 2014)
  • Symptoms related to cauda equina, including bowel and/or bladder problems, leg weakness, and saddle anesthesia/loss of sensation in the thighs, buttocks, and perineum, can present but are rare, as are synovial cysts in the middle back and neck. If thoracic and cervical synovial cysts develop, they can cause symptoms like numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness in the affected area.

Causes

Spinal synovial cysts are generally caused by degenerative changes like osteoarthritis that develop in a joint over time. With regular wear and tear, facet joint cartilage/the material in a joint that provides protection, a smooth surface, friction reduction, and shock absorption begins to waste away. As the process continues, the synovium can form a cyst.

 

  • Traumas, large and small, have inflammatory and degenerative effects on joints that can result in the formation of a cyst.
  • Around a third of individuals who have a spinal synovial cyst also have spondylolisthesis.
  • This condition is when a vertebrae slips out of place or out of alignment onto the vertebra underneath.
  • It is a sign of spinal instability.
  • Instability can occur in any spine area, but L4-5 are the most common levels.
  • This segment of the spine takes most of the upper body weight.
  • If instability occurs, a cyst can develop.
  • However, cysts can form without instability.

Diagnosis

Treatment

Some cysts remain small and cause few to no symptoms. Cysts only need treatment if they are causing symptoms. (Nancy E, Epstein, Jamie Baisden. 2012)

Lifestyle Adjustments

  • A healthcare professional will recommend avoiding certain activities that worsen symptoms.
  • Individuals might be advised to begin stretching and targeted exercises.
  • Physical therapy or occupational therapy may also be recommended.
  • Intermittent use of over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories/NSAIDs like ibuprofen and naproxen can help relieve occasional pain.

Outpatient Procedures

  • For cysts that cause intense pain, numbness, weakness, and other issues, a procedure to drain fluid/aspiration from the cyst may be recommended.
  • One study found that the success rate ranges from 0 percent to 50 percent.
  • Individuals who go through aspiration usually need repeat procedures if fluid build-up returns. (Nancy E, Epstein, Jamie Baisden. 2012)
  • Epidural corticosteroid injections can reduce inflammation and could be an option to relieve pain.
  • Patients are recommended to receive no more than three injections per year.

Surgical Options

For severe or persistent cases, a doctor may recommend decompression surgery to remove the cyst and surrounding bone to relieve pressure on the nerve root. Surgical options range from minimally invasive endoscopic procedures to larger, open surgeries. The best surgical option varies based on the severity of the situation and whether associated disorders are present. Surgical options include:

 

  • Laminectomy - Removal of the bony structure that protects and covers the spinal canal/lamina.
  • Hemilaminectomy - A modified laminectomy where a smaller portion of the lamina is removed.
  • Facetectomy - The removal of part of the affected facet joint where the synovial cyst is located, usually following a laminectomy or hemilaminectomy.
  • Fusion of the facet joints and vertebra - Decreases vertebral mobility in the injured area.
  1. Most individuals experience immediate pain relief following a laminectomy or hemilaminectomy.
  2. Fusion can take six to nine months to heal completely.
  3. If surgery is performed without fusion where the cyst originated, the pain could return, and another cyst could form within two years.
  4. Surgery Complications include infection, bleeding, and injury to the spinal cord or nerve root.

How I Gained My Mobility Back With Chiropractic 

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research studies or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to discuss the subject matter above further, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Wilby, M. J., Fraser, R. D., Vernon-Roberts, B., & Moore, R. J. (2009). The prevalence and pathogenesis of synovial cysts within the ligamentum flavum in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and radiculopathy. Spine, 34(23), 2518–2524. https://doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181b22bd0

 

Kim, D. S., Yang, J. S., Cho, Y. J., & Kang, S. H. (2014). Acute myelopathy caused by a cervical synovial cyst. Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society, 56(1), 55–57. https://doi.org/10.3340/jkns.2014.56.1.55

 

Epstein, N. E., & Baisden, J. (2012). The diagnosis and management of synovial cysts: Efficacy of surgery versus cyst aspiration. Surgical neurology international, 3(Suppl 3), S157–S166. https://doi.org/10.4103/2152-7806.98576

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Discover what spinal synovial cysts are and why they form. Learn about symptoms such as back pain, weakness, numbness, and radiating pain. For answers to any questions you may have call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Essential Guide To Rehabilitation Exercise Program | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Essential Guide To Rehabilitation Exercise Program | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Individuals who have gone through recent low back surgery, like a lumbar laminectomy and discectomy, could they benefit from physical therapy for full recovery? (Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2008)

Rehabilitation Exercise Program

A lumbar laminectomy and discectomy is a surgical procedure performed by an orthopedic or neurologic surgeon to help decrease pain, relieve associated symptoms and sensations, and improve flexibility and mobility. The procedure involves cutting away disc and bone material that presses against, irritates, and damages the spinal nerves. (Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2023)

 

Post-Surgery

 

The therapist will work with the individual to develop a rehabilitation exercise program. The objective of a rehabilitation exercise program is to help the individual:

 

  • Relax their muscles to prevent muscle tensing and becoming over-cautious
  • Regain full range of motion
  • Strengthen their spine
  • Prevent injuries

 

A guide on what to expect in physical therapy.

Postural Retraining

  • After back surgery, individuals have to work to maintain proper posture when sitting and standing. (Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2008)
  • Postural control is important to learn as it maintains the lower back in the optimal position to protect and expedite the healing of lumbar discs and muscles.
  • A physical therapist will teach the individual how to sit with proper posture and use lumbar support.
  • Attaining and maintaining proper posture is one of the most important things to help protect the back and prevent future back problems.

Walking Exercise

Walking is one of the best exercises after lumbar surgery. (Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2008)

 

  • Walking helps to improve cardiovascular health and blood circulation throughout the body.
  • This helps to provide added oxygen and nutrients to the spinal muscles and tissues as they heal.
  • It is an upright exercise that puts the spine in a natural position, which helps to protect the discs.
  • The therapist will help set up a program tailored to the individual's condition.

Prone Press Up

One of the exercises to protect the back and lumbar discs is prone press-ups. (Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2008) This exercise helps keep the spinal discs situated in the proper position. It also helps to improve the ability to bend back into lumbar extension.

To perform the exercise:

 

  1. Lie facing down on a yoga/exercise mat and place both hands flat on the floor under the shoulders.
  2. Keep the back and hips relaxed.
  3. Use the arms to press the upper part of the body up while allowing the lower back to remain against the floor.
  4. There should be a slight pressure in the lower back while pressing up.
  5. Hold the press-up position for 2 seconds.
  6. Slowly lower back down to the starting position.
  7. Repeat for 10 to 15 repetitions.

Sciatic Nerve Gliding

Individuals who had leg pain coming from the back prior to surgery may have been diagnosed with sciatica or an irritation of the sciatic nerve. Post-surgery, individuals may notice their leg feels tight whenever straightening it out all the way. This could be a sign of an adhered/trapped sciatic nerve root, a common problem with sciatica.

 

  • After lumbar laminectomy and discectomy surgery, a physical therapist will prescribe targeted exercises called sciatic nerve glides to stretch and improve how the nerve moves. (Richard F. Ellis, Wayne A. Hing, Peter J. McNair. 2012)
  • Nerve glides can help free the stuck nerve root and allow for normal motion.

 

To perform the exercise:

 

  1. Lie on the back and bend one knee up.
  2. Grab underneath the knee with the hands.
  3. Straighten the knee while supporting it with the hands.
  4. Once the knee is fully straightened, flex and extend the ankle about 5 times.
  5. Return to the starting position.
  6. Repeat the sciatic nerve glide 10 times.
  7. The exercise can be performed several times to help improve how the nerve moves and glides in the lower back and leg.

Supine Lumbar Flexion

After surgery, gentle back flexion exercises can help safely stretch the low-back muscles and gently stretch the scar tissue from the surgical incision. Supine lumbar flexion is one of the simplest exercises to improve lumbar flexion range of motion.

To perform the exercise:

 

  1. Lie on the back with the knees bent.
  2. Slowly lift the bent knees towards the chest and grasp the knees with both hands.
  3. Gently pull the knees toward the chest.
  4. Hold the position for 1 or 2 seconds.
  5. Slowly lower the knees back to the starting position.
  6. Perform for 10 repetitions.
  7. Stop the exercise if experiencing an increase in pain in the lower back, buttocks, or legs.

Hip and Core Strengthening

Once cleared, individuals can progress to an abdominal and core strengthening program. This involves performing specific motions for the hips and legs while maintaining a pelvic neutral position. Advanced hip strengthening exercises help generate strength and stability in the muscles that surround the pelvic area and lower back. A physical therapist can help decide which exercises are recommended for the specific condition.

Return-to-Work and Physical Activities

Once individuals have gained an improved lumbar range of motion, hip, and core strength, their doctor and therapist may recommend working on specific activities to help them return to their previous level of work and recreation. Depending on job occupation, individuals may need to:

 

  • Work on proper lifting techniques.
  • Require an ergonomic evaluation if they spend time sitting at a desk or workstation.
  • Some surgeons may have restrictions on how much an individual can bend, lift, and twist from two to six weeks after surgery.

 

Low-back surgery can be difficult to rehab properly. Working with a healthcare provider and physical therapist, individuals can be sure to improve their range of motion, strength, and functional mobility to return to their previous level of function quickly and safely.

Sciatica, Causes, Symptoms and Tips

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research studies or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Johns Hopkins Medicine. (2008). The road to recovery after lumbar spine surgery.

 

Johns Hopkins Medicine. (2023). Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy.

 

Ellis, R. F., Hing, W. A., & McNair, P. J. (2012). Comparison of longitudinal sciatic nerve movement with different mobilization exercises: an in vivo study utilizing ultrasound imaging. The Journal of orthopaedic and sports physical therapy, 42(8), 667–675. https://doi.org/10.2519/jospt.2012.3854

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Rehabilitation Exercise Program for post-surgery recovery: Learn to relax muscles, regain motion, and prevent injuries. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Healing a Hamstring Muscle Tear: What You Need to Know | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Healing a Hamstring Muscle Tear: What You Need to Know | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Hamstring muscle injuries are common, especially in athletes and individuals with physically demanding jobs. Is there a better chance of full recovery with surgical repair and post-op rehabilitation?

Hamstring Muscle Tear

Most often, hamstring muscle injuries are partial tears of the muscle. These types of injuries are muscle strains that occur when the muscle fibers are stretched beyond their normal limits. Complete tears of the hamstring muscle are unusual, but they do occur in both athletes and non-athletes. Determining the optimal treatment plan depends on:

 

  • The severity of the tendon tear
  • The expectations of the injured individual.
  1. Incomplete tears are when the hamstring muscle is stretched too far, but not completely detached.
  2. If the tear completes, the injury is more significant, as the ends are no longer connected. (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2021)
  3. Complete tears usually occur at the top of the muscle where the tendon tears away from the pelvis.
  4. A complete tear usually occurs when there is a sudden flexion of the hip and extension of the knee joint - when the muscle contracts in this position, it gets stretched beyond its limits.
  5. Complete tears are recognized as different injuries and may require more invasive treatments. (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2021)
  6. Individuals who sustain this type of injury describe a sharp stabbing in the back of the thigh.
  7. The injury may occur in athletes or middle-aged individuals. (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2021)

 

Basic hamstring strains can be treated with simple steps - rest, ice, anti-inflammatory medications, and conservative therapies.

Symptoms

Symptoms of a hamstring muscle strain can include pain, bruising, swelling, and movement difficulty. (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2021) Individuals who sustain this injury typically experience sudden sharp pain. Signs of a tear can include

:

  • Sharp pain where the buttock and thigh meet.
  • Difficulty walking.
  • Sitting can be difficult as the edge of a chair can place pressure directly on the injury.
  • Spasms and cramping sensations in the back of the thigh.
  • Weakness in the leg, specifically when bending the knee or lifting the leg behind the body.
  • Numbness or burning sensations as a result of sciatic nerve irritation.
  • Swelling and bruising in the back of the thigh - over time it can travel down to the back of the knee and calf and possibly into the foot.
  • With a complete hamstring tear, there is usually significant swelling and bruising that develops in the back of the thigh.

Diagnosis

The symptoms can be difficult to spot in the early stages which is why X-rays of the hip or thigh are usually obtained.

In some situations, a fragment of bone can get pulled off the pelvis along with the hamstring muscle attachment. MRI testing can be performed to evaluate the attachment and can define critical features of a complete hamstring muscle tear, including: (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2021)

 

  • The number of tendons involved.
  • Complete versus incomplete tearing.
  • The amount of retraction - the amount the tendons have pulled back.
  • This will guide the development of treatment.

Treatment

The treatment of a complete tear will depend on different factors. The other variable is the patient and their expectations.

 

  • Treatment is more aggressive in younger individuals like high-level athletes.
  • Treatment is less aggressive in middle-aged individuals.
  • Often a single tendon tear can be treated non-surgically.
  • When one tendon is involved, it is typically not pulled very far from its normal attachment and will develop scar tissue in a positive position.
  • Conversely, when three tendons have been torn, they usually pull more than a few centimeters away from the bone. These cases have better results with surgical repair. (UW Health. 2017)
  • Surgeons will use patient characteristics - high-level athletes or less physically active individuals - to guide treatment recommendations.

Rehabilitation

  • Rehabilitation following surgery can take 3-6 months or longer.
  • The first six weeks limit weight-bearing with the use of crutches.
  • Patients may be recommended to wear a brace to reduce tension on the repaired hamstring tendons.
  • Strengthening does not begin until three months post-op, and even light activities are usually delayed. (UW Health. 2017)
  • Because this injury can have a long recovery time, some individuals may choose nonsurgical treatment.
  • Sometimes these individuals experience symptoms of discomfort from sitting and may exhibit long-term weakness of the hamstring muscle.

 

Full recovery from a complete hamstring muscle injury takes time. Studies have shown high-level athletes are able to resume competitive sports after the repair and rehabilitation of an acute hamstring muscle injury. (Samuel K. Chu, Monica E. Rho. 2016)

 

  • Delaying surgical treatment may not always lead to optimal results.
  • When the tendon is torn away from its normal attachment, it begins to scar around the surrounding soft tissues.
  • When there is a delay of more than a few weeks following the initial injury, regaining the full length of the tendon and muscle can be challenging.
  • This could delay the rehabilitation process and may limit the potential for full recovery. (Ho Yoon Kwak, et al., 2011)

 

With severe injuries, there is a better chance of full recovery with surgical repair but could involve a long recovery and commitment to a post-op rehabilitation plan.

Understanding Long-Lasting Injuries

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. (2021) Hamstring muscle injuries.

 

UW Health. (2017) Rehabilitation guidelines following proximal hamstring primary repair.

 

Chu, S. K., & Rho, M. E. (2016). Hamstring Injuries in the Athlete: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Return to Play. Current sports medicine reports, 15(3), 184–190. https://doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000264

 

Kwak, H. Y., Bae, S. W., Choi, Y. S., & Jang, M. S. (2011). Early surgical repair of acute complete rupture of the proximal hamstring tendons. Clinics in orthopedic surgery, 3(3), 249–253. https://doi.org/10.4055/cios.2011.3.3.249

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Torn hamstring muscle? Learn about complete or partial tears, their severity & opt. treatment plans for athletes and non-athletes alike. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Terms For Nerve Pain: Radiculopathy, Radiculitis, Neuritis | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Terms For Nerve Pain: Radiculopathy, Radiculitis, Neuritis | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

 Are treatments more successful when patients know key terms that describe their back pain and associated conditions?

Nerve Pain Types

When individuals need to better understand their spine diagnosis, being able to distinguish between key terms can make a significant difference in understanding the development of a personalized treatment plan. Terms that describe back pain and various associated conditions can include:

 

  • Sciatica
  • Radiating and Referred pain
  • Radiculopathy
  • Radiculitis
  • Neuropathy
  • Neuritis

Causes of Back Pain

Back pain symptoms are most commonly caused by the continued practice of unhealthy/poor posture and overcompensated and weakened muscles. Even for individuals that exercise regularly, the movement choices that are made throughout the day can disrupt the way the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and fascia function to maintain proper body alignment.

 

  • Injuries to, and conditions of, the structures of the spinal column like the bones, discs, and nerves, are generally more serious than posture problems and soft tissue-related pain.
  • Depending on the diagnosis, structural problems can cause symptoms related to nerve compression, irritation, and/or inflammation. (Michigan Medicine, 2022)

Spine and Nervous System

  • The peripheral nerves extend out to the extremities with sensation and movement capabilities.
  • Nerve roots exit the spinal canal which is part of the peripheral nervous system.
  • The spinal nerve root then exits the spinal column through the foramen. (American Academy of Neurological Surgeons, 2023)
  • The branching of nerves from the spinal cord and exit out of the foramina occurs at every level of the spine.

Terms

There are different medical terms when getting a spine diagnosis or going through the treatment process.

Radiculopathy

  • Radiculopathy is an umbrella term, describing any disease process that affects a spinal nerve root and is something that's happening to the body.
  • When a healthcare provider informs you that your pain is due to radiculopathy, a number of more specific diagnoses, clinical signs, and symptoms may be included as part of the description.
  • Common causes of radiculopathy include herniated disc/s and spinal stenosis.
  • Less common causes can include a synovial cyst or tumor that presses on the nerve root. (Johns Hopkins Medicine, 2023)
  • Radiculopathy can occur in the neck, low back, or in the thoracic area.
  • Often, radiculopathy is brought on by some form of compression of the nerve root.
  • For example, extruded material from a herniated disc can land on a nerve root, causing pressure to build.
  • This can cause symptoms associated with radiculopathy, including numbness, weakness, pain, or electrical sensations. (Johns Hopkins Medicine, 2023)

 

Even though there's a spinal nerve root on either side of the spinal column, injury, trauma, or issues stemming from degeneration affect the nerves in an asymmetric fashion. Degenerative changes, known as normal wear and tear, typically occur in this fashion. Using the previous herniated disc example, the material that leaks from the disc structure tends to travel in one direction. When this is the case, the symptoms tend to be experienced on the side where the nerve root makes contact with the disc material, but not the other side. (American Association of Neurological Surgeons, 2023)

Radiculitis

  • Radiculitis is a form of radiculopathy but it is about inflammation and not compression. (Johns Hopkins Medicine, 2023)
  • Radicu- refers to the spinal nerve root.
  • The suffix  - itis refers to inflammation.
  • The word refers to a spinal nerve root that is inflamed and/or irritated rather than compressed.
  • In disc herniations, it is the gel substance that contains various chemicals that is inflammatory.
  • When the gel substance makes contact with nerve roots, an inflammatory response is triggered. (Rothman SM, Winkelstein BA 2007)

Radiating or Referred Pain

  • Radiating pain follows the path of one of the peripheral nerves that transmit sensory information like heat, cold, pins and needles, and pain.
  • The most common cause of radiating pain is impingement/compression of a spinal nerve root. (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. OrthoInfo)
  • Referred pain is experienced in a different area of the body that is away from the pain source which tends to be an organ. (Murray GM., 2009)
  • It can be brought on by myofascial trigger points or visceral activity.
  • An example of referred pain is symptoms in the jaw or arm when an individual is having a heart attack. (Murray GM., 2009)

Radicular

  • The terms radicular pain and radiculopathy tend to get confused.
  • Radicular pain is a symptom of radiculopathy.
  • Radicular pain radiates from the spinal nerve root to either part or all the way down the limb/extremity.
  • However, radicular pain does not represent the complete symptoms of radiculopathy.
  • Radiculopathy symptoms also include numbness, weakness, or electrical sensations like pins and needles, burning, or shock that travels down the extremity. (Johns Hopkins Medicine, 2023)

Neuropathy

  • Neuropathy is another umbrella term that refers to any dysfunction or disease that affects the nerves.
  • It’s usually classified according to the cause, like diabetic neuropathy, or the location.
  • Neuropathy can occur anywhere in the body - including the peripheral nerves, the autonomic nerves/organ nerves, or nerves that are located inside the skull and innervate the eyes, ears, nose, etc.
  • An example of peripheral neuropathy is carpal tunnel syndrome. (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. OrthoInfo. 2023)
  • One spinal condition that is known to cause peripheral neuropathy is spinal stenosis. (Bostelmann R, Zella S, Steiger HJ, et al., 2016)
  • In this condition, changes in the foramina have a narrowing effect on the space that begins to compress the nerves as they exit.
  • Neuropathy can affect just one nerve or many nerves simultaneously.
  • When multiple nerves are involved it is known as polyneuropathy.
  • When it’s just one, it's known as mononeuropathy. (Cleveland Clinic. 2023)

Neuritis

Sciatica

  • Sciatica describes symptoms that include radiating pain and sensations that travel into the hip, buttock, leg, and foot.
  • One of the most common causes of sciatica is radiculopathy.
  • Another is spinal stenosis. (Cleveland Clinic. 2023)
  • Piriformis syndrome is where a tight buttock/piriformis muscle constricts the sciatic nerve, which runs underneath. (Cass SP. 2015)

Chiropractic

Chiropractic adjustments, non-surgical decompression, MET, and various massage therapies can relieve symptoms, release stuck or trapped nerves and restore function. Through the treatments, the chiropractor and therapists will explain what is happening and why they are using a specific technique. Knowing a little about how the neuromusculoskeletal operates can help the healthcare provider and the patient in developing and adjusting effective treatment strategies.

Sciatica During Pregnancy

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Michigan Medicine. Upper and Middle Back Pain.

 

American Academy of Neurological Surgeons. Anatomy of the Spine and Peripheral Nervous System.

 

Johns Hopkins Medicine. Health Conditions. Radiculopathy.

 

American Association of Neurological Surgeons. Herniated Disc.

 

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. OrthoInfo. Cervical Radiculopathy (Pinched Nerve).

 

Rothman, S. M., &amp; Winkelstein, B. A. (2007). Chemical and mechanical nerve root insults induce differential behavioral sensitivity and glial activation that are enhanced in combination. Brain Research, 1181, 30–43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2007.08.064

 

Murray G. M. (2009). Guest Editorial: referred pain. Journal of applied oral science: Revista FOB, 17(6), i. https://doi.org/10.1590/s1678-77572009000600001

 

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. OrthoInfo. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

 

Bostelmann, R., Zella, S., Steiger, H. J., &amp; Petridis, A. K. (2016). Could Spinal Canal Compression be a Cause of Polyneuropathy? Clinics and practice, 6(1), 816. https://doi.org/10.4081/cp.2016.816

 

Cleveland Clinic. Mononeuropathy.

 

American Association of Neurological Surgeons. Glossary of Neurosurgical Terminology.

 

National Institutes of Health. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Medline Plus. Peripheral Nerve Disorders.

 

Cleveland Clinic. Spinal Stenosis.

 

Cass S. P. (2015). Piriformis syndrome: a cause of non-discogenic sciatica. Current sports medicine reports 14(1), 41–44. https://doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000110

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

 Are treatments more successful when patients know key terms that describe their back pain and associated conditions? For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Alexander Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Nocturnal Leg Cramps: EP's Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Nocturnal Leg Cramps: EP's Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Lying down on the couch or bed when the lower leg seizes with intense sensations and pain that doesn’t stop, and the muscle could be hard to the touch. When trying to move the leg, it feels paralyzed. Nocturnal leg cramps, called muscle spasms or Charley horses, occur when one or more leg muscles tighten involuntarily. Individuals can be awake or asleep when a leg cramp strikes. Chiropractic treatment, decompression, and massage therapies can help relieve symptoms, stretch and relax the muscles, and restore function and health.

Nocturnal Leg Cramps

Nocturnal leg cramps most often affect the gastrocnemius/calf muscle. However, they can also affect the muscles in the front of the thigh/quadriceps and the back of the thigh/hamstrings.

 

  • Often, the tight muscle relaxes in less than 10 minutes.
  • The leg and area can feel sore and tender afterward.
  • Frequent calf cramps at night can cause sleep problems.
  • Nocturnal leg cramps are more common among women and older adults.

Causes

There are no known exact cause/s, making most cases idiopathic. However, there are known factors that can increase the risk. These can include:

Prolonged Sitting and Position

  • Sitting with the legs crossed or the toes pointed for long periods shortens/pulls the calf muscles, which can cause cramping.

Prolonged Standing and Posture

  • Individuals standing for long periods are likelier to experience nocturnal cramps from the stressed muscles.

Muscle Overexertion

  • Too much exercise can create an overworked muscle and can contribute to cramps.

Nerve Activity Abnormalities

Lack of Physical/Exercise Activity

  • Muscles need to be stretched regularly to function correctly.
  • Lack of physical activity for long periods weakens the muscles, making them more susceptible to injury.

Shortening The Tendons

  • The tendons, which connect muscles and bones, shorten naturally over time.
  • Without stretching, this could lead to cramping.
  • Cramps may be related to foot position when sleeping, with the feet and toes extending away from the body, known as plantar flexion.
  • This shortens the calf muscles, making them more susceptible to cramping.

 

Leg cramps at night are unlikely a sign of a more serious medical condition, but they are associated with the following conditions:

 

  • Musculoskeletal disorders.
  • Structural issues - flat feet or spinal stenosis.
  • Metabolic disorders like diabetes.
  • Pregnancy.
  • Medications - statins and diuretics.
  • Neurological disorders, like motor neuron disease or peripheral neuropathy.
  • Neurodegenerative disorders.
  • Liver, kidney, and thyroid conditions.
  • Cardiovascular conditions.

Chiropractic and Physical Therapy

Rehabilitation with chiropractic, massage, and physical therapy depends on the severity of the injury and condition. A chiropractic treatment plan can include the following:

 

  • Calf muscle stretching.
  • Targeted Stretch Exercises.
  • Progressive calf stretching exercises - a regular stretching and flexibility program will increase the range of motion and prevent future calf injuries.
  • Foam rolling - gentle self-massage with a foam roller can help reduce spasms and improve blood circulation.
  • Percussive massage.
  • Muscle strengthening exercises will build muscle strength and coordination to prevent future strain injuries.

 

At-home therapy can include:

Maintain Hydration

  • Fluids allow for normal muscle function.
  • Individuals may need to adjust how much fluid is drunk based on weather, age, activity level, and medications.

Change Sleeping Position

  • Individuals should avoid sleeping in positions in which the feet are pointing downward.
  • Try sleeping on the back with a pillow behind the knees.

Self Massage

  • Massaging the affected muscles will help them relax.
  • Use one or both hands or a massage gun to knead and loosen the muscles gently.

Stretching

  • Various stretches will maintain the treatment, help keep the muscles relaxed and retrain the muscles.

Stationary Cycle

  • A few minutes of easy pedaling can help loosen the leg muscles before bed.

Walking on the Heels

  • This will activate the muscles on the other side of the calf, allowing the calves to relax.

Supportive Footwear

  • Poor footwear can aggravate issues with the nerves and muscles in the feet and legs.
  • Orthotics may help.

Heat Application

  • Heat can soothe tight muscles and increases blood flow to the area.
  • Apply a hot towel, water bottle, heating pad, or muscle topical cream to the affected area.
  • A warm bath or shower (if available, shower massage setting) can also help.

Sciatica Secrets Revealed

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Allen, Richard E, and Karl A Kirby. “Nocturnal leg cramps.” American family physician vol. 86,4 (2012): 350-5.

 

Butler, J V et al. “Nocturnal leg cramps in older people.” Postgraduate medical journal vol. 78,924 (2002): 596-8. doi:10.1136/pmj.78.924.596

 

Garrison, Scott R et al. “Magnesium for skeletal muscle cramps.” The Cochrane Database of systematic reviews vol. 2012,9 CD009402. Sep 12, 2012, doi:10.1002/14651858.CD009402.pub2

 

Giuffre BA, Black AC, Jeanmonod R. Anatomy, Sciatic Nerve. [Updated 2023 May 4]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2023 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK482431/

 

Handa, Junichi, et al. “Nocturnal Leg Cramps and Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Cross-Sectional Study in the Community.” International Journal of general medicine vol. 15 7985-7993. Nov 1 2022, doi:10.2147/IJGM.S383425

 

Hsu D, Chang KV. Gastrocnemius Strain. [Updated 2022 Aug 22]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2023 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK534766/

 

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2019). Night leg cramps. mayoclinic.org/symptoms/night-leg-cramps/basics/causes/sym-20050813

 

Monderer, Renee S et al. “Nocturnal leg cramps.” Current Neurology and Neuroscience report vol. 10,1 (2010): 53-9. doi:10.1007/s11910-009-0079-5

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Nocturnal leg cramps occur when one or more leg muscles tighten involuntarily. Chiropractic treatment can restore function and health. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Running Piriformis Syndrome: EP's Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Running Piriformis Syndrome: EP's Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

The piriformis is a large and powerful muscle beneath the gluteal/buttocks muscles. It runs from the bottom of the sacrum, where the base of the spine and pelvis converge to the top of the femur. This muscle plays a critical role in running motion; it helps externally rotate the hips and upper leg outward, provides hip flexibility and stability, and stabilizes the pelvis. The sciatic nerve passes next to, over, under, or through the piriformis muscle. When the piriformis contracts or spasms, it can irritate, become entangled and compress the nerve, resulting in painful symptoms. This can lead to various problems and is how piriformis syndrome occurs.

Running Piriformis Syndrome

The proper function of the piriformis muscle is essential for athletes who participate in running sports. Repetitive activities, like running, can fatigue the muscle and irritate and inflame the nerve.

Symptoms

Piriformis syndrome can be challenging to diagnose because it can be confused for a herniated disc, sciatica, a proximal hamstring strain/high hamstring tendinitis, or lower back problems. A few symptoms that can help determine whether the piriformis is the cause include:

Sitting, Stairs, Squatting Discomfort or Pain

  • Individuals don't always experience discomfort while running.
  • Instead, it's sitting, climbing stairs, and squatting where pain symptoms present.
  • Pain while running, specifically an overstretched sensation when going up a hill or increasing speed, is more associated with a proximal hamstring strain.

Tenderness

  • The area around the piriformis is tender.
  • Applying pressure can cause discomfort or pain around the area and radiate down the leg.

Centered Pain

  • Piriformis syndrome is usually felt in the middle of the glutes.
  • A proximal hamstring strain typically causes non-radiating pain at the bottom of the glutes, where the hamstrings connect to the pelvis.

Causes

  • Pelvic misalignment.
  • Pelvic misalignments created by other conditions, like a tilted pelvis, functional leg-length discrepancy, or practicing unhealthy posture, make the piriformis work harder to compensate, which leads to tightness and/or spasms.
  • Sudden increases in distance or workout intensity can worsen any weakness in the piriformis and other gluteal muscles.
  • Continuing to run, which is possible, can worsen and prolong the condition.
  • When running, the muscle's signal transmissions are interrupted by inflammation and/or compression and cannot synchronize with each other.
  • The result is the inability to withstand the repetitive strain of running.
  • Not warming up with glute-activation exercises increases the risk of running piriformis syndrome.

Chiropractic Treatment

Resting may not be enough to alleviate piriformis syndrome. This is especially true if the problem involves spine and pelvic misalignment. Chiropractic can provide significant relief from running piriformis syndrome. A combination of spinal, pelvic, and extremity adjustments, therapeutic massage, MET, decompression, stretches, and anti-inflammatory nutrition will take the pressure off overly tight areas, realign the body, and maintain nervous system function.

 

  • Running form could be evaluated and checked for leg-length discrepancies and muscle-strength imbalances.
  • Running can continue if the individual can do so without pain or symptoms.
  • But it is recommended to avoid slanted surfaces, which increase the risk of pelvic misalignment.
  • Avoid long runs, which increase the chance of overload and fatigue.
  • The goal is to relax and release the piriformis.
  • If it’s impinging on the sciatic nerve, loosening and releasing the muscle will significantly lessen radiating pain.
  • Orthotics may be recommended for excessive overpronation or inward movement of the foot when landing.

 

Other treatments to stop piriformis spasms.

 

  • Ice and take over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications can be used during acute phases when the area is tender.
  • Work out tight spots using a foam roller or percussive massager.
  • Stretching and loosening the muscle before and after runs can help it relax and increase blood flow.
  • Stretches like pigeon pose and standing figure four and exercises like side planks with a leg lift are recommended.

Building a Stronger Body

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Ahmad Siraj, Sidra, and Ragini Dadgal. “Physiotherapy for Piriformis Syndrome Using Sciatic Nerve Mobilization and Piriformis Release.” Cureus vol. 14,12 e32952. 26 Dec. 2022, doi:10.7759/cureus.32952

 

Chang A, Ly N, Varacallo M. Piriformis Injection. [Updated 2022 Sep 4]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2023 Jan-.

 

Heiderscheit, Bryan, and Shane McClinton. “Evaluation and Management of Hip and Pelvis Injuries.” Physical Medicine and rehabilitation clinics of North America vol. 27,1 (2016): 1-29. doi:10.1016/j.pmr.2015.08.003

 

Julsrud, M E. “Piriformis syndrome.” Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association vol. 79,3 (1989): 128-31. doi:10.7547/87507315-79-3-128

 

Kraus, Emily, et al. “Piriformis Syndrome With Variant Sciatic Nerve Anatomy: A Case Report.” PM &amp; R: the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation vol. 8,2 (2016): 176-9. doi:10.1016/j.pmrj.2015.09.005

 

Lenhart, Rachel, et al. “Hip muscle loads during running at various step rates.” The Journal of Orthopedic and sports physical therapy vol. 44,10 (2014): 766-74, A1-4. doi:10.2519/jospt.2014.5575

 

Sulowska-Daszyk, Iwona, and Agnieszka Skiba. “The Influence of Self-Myofascial Release on Muscle Flexibility in Long-Distance Runners.” International Journal of environmental research and public health vol. 19,1 457. Jan 1, 2022, doi:10.3390/ijerph19010457

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

The sciatic nerve passes next to, over, under, or through the piriformis muscle. Injury Medical Chiropractic Clinic can provide relief. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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High Hamstring Tendinopathy: EP's Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

High Hamstring Tendinopathy: EP's Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

The hamstring muscles attach, through a tendon called the proximal hamstring tendon, to the ischial tuberosity, the bones used to sit deep in the buttock muscles. When the tendon is subjected to overuse/repetitive stresses and strains, the internal structure can become compromised, leading to weakness and pain symptoms. This is known as proximal hamstring tendinopathy. Tendinopathy is an overuse injury where the tendon is repeatedly strained until microscopic tears form. It is common in athletes that do a lot of running but also in individuals that sit for prolonged periods. If left untreated, high hamstring tendinopathy can lead to progressive degeneration of the tissues, leading to chronic weakness, pain, and dysfunction.

High Hamstring Tendinopathy

The hamstrings are a powerful muscle group that extends the hip and flexes the knee. They experience stress and pressure during activity and inactivity/sitting and are susceptible to strain injuries. Tendons attach muscle to bone and are designed to take compressive and tensile weight/loads that stretch or flex. A tendon is made up of fibrous tissue containing organized type 1 collagen. Tendons receive blood; however, the supply is less where the tendon attaches to the bone and is commonly where tendinopathy occurs.

Injury

A hamstring injury involves the bruising, irritation, or tearing of the hamstring tendon or muscle tissue. Severity can range from:

 

  • Microtears that cause stiffness and pain symptoms but heal fast on their own.
  • Severe ruptures that cause debilitating pain, dysfunction and require medical intervention.

 

The tendon attaches to the ischial tuberosity or sitting buttock bone. Tendons can have a spasm-like reaction to sudden or quick shift changes. A sudden change can cause adverse changes to the tendon. Too much load on the tendon beyond its ability to recover can cause the structure to change and the collagen to break down/tear like a rope tearing and unraveling. High hamstring tendinopathy happens around the hip area and presents as buttock or upper thigh pain. Individuals report deep, dull, radiating buttock pain during walking, running, and prolonged sitting or driving. Sometimes the sciatic nerve can become irritated or entrapped by an affected tendon's scar tissue, causing sciatica-like symptoms.

Stages of Tendon Pathology

Reactive Phase

  • Caused by an acute overload of physical activity or inactivity.
  • The tendon will thicken temporarily to decrease the stress; however, there may be no inflammation.
  • The tendon can return to normal if the load is reduced or sufficient time for recovery and repair is allowed.

Disrepair

  • Chronically overloaded.
  • Unsuccessful healing.
  • More negative tendon changes occur.
  • Reversibility is possible with load management and targeted exercises to stimulate the tendon and surrounding tissues.

Degenerative

  • Continual progression of adverse tendon changes.
  • More common in older individuals.
  • Continue load management and strength training to maximize the tendon's tolerance.

Chiropractic Treatment

A chiropractic therapy team will develop a personalized treatment program to improve tendon structure and strengthen the hamstrings, gluteal, and side abdominal muscles. They will begin with tendon symptom-relieving massage to loosen the muscles and get the blood circulating, MET-targeted stretches to lengthen the muscles, and spinal and pelvic adjustments to realign the body.

Sciatica Explained

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Buckley, Mark R et al. "Distributions of types I, II and III collagen by region in the human supraspinatus tendon." Connective tissue research vol. 54,6 (2013): 374-9. doi:10.3109/03008207.2013.847096

 

Lempainen, Lasse, et al. "Expert opinion: diagnosis and treatment of proximal hamstring tendinopathy." Muscles, ligaments, and tendons journal vol. 5,1 23-8. 27 Mar. 2015

 

Mattiussi, Gabriele, and Carlos Moreno. "Treatment of proximal hamstring tendinopathy-related sciatic nerve entrapment: presentation of an ultrasound-guided "Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis" application." Muscles, ligaments, and tendons journal vol. 6,2 248-252. 17 Sep. 2016, doi:10.11138/mltj/2016.6.2.248

 

Ono, T et al. "Estimation of tensile force in the hamstring muscles during overground sprinting." International Journal of sports medicine vol. 36,2 (2015): 163-8. doi:10.1055/s-0034-1385865

 

White, Kristin E. "High hamstring tendinopathy in 3 female long-distance runners." Journal of chiropractic medicine vol. 10,2 (2011): 93-9. doi:10.1016/j.jcm.2010.10.005

 

Wilson, Thomas J et al. "Sciatic Nerve Injury After Proximal Hamstring Avulsion and Repair." Orthopedic Journal of sports medicine vol. 5,7 2325967117713685. 3 Jul. 2017, doi:10.1177/2325967117713685

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

High hamstring tendinopathy can lead to progressive degeneration, chronic weakness, pain, and dysfunction. Chiropractic can help. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Constipation Sciatica: EP's Chiropractic Injury Specialists | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Constipation Sciatica: EP's Chiropractic Injury Specialists | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Constipation is a leading cause of low back pain in America and can cause a chain reaction in the rest of the body. When the digestional tract swells, it generates added stress on the back and surrounding nerves. Prolonged constipation and pressure can cause sciatica symptoms. Constipation sciatica can be relieved through chiropractic treatment, therapeutic massage, non-surgical spinal decompression, and functional medicine to alleviate symptoms and restore optimal body function.

Constipation Sciatica

Sciatica is irritation, compression, and inflammation of the sciatic nerve, which supplies the thighs, lower legs, and feet. It is usually caused by a pinched/compressed of one or more spinal nerve roots between the vertebrae of the lower back. The buildup of stool in the intestines can cause a dull aching sensation in the low back that can radiate to surrounding areas. Common causes of constipation include:

 

  • Insufficient water/hydration levels.
  • An unhealthy diet.
  • Vitamin deficiency.
  • Stress.
  • Little to no physical activity.
  • Sporadic and unhealthy bowel movements.
  • Overuse of laxatives or enemas.

 

Other causes of constipation include:

 

  • Medication reactions.
  • Antacids that contain aluminum or calcium.
  • Calcium channel blockers.
  • Iron supplements.
  • Pain medications, especially narcotics.
  • Sedatives.
  • Antispasmodics.
  • Antidepressants.
  • Anticonvulsants.

Symptoms

Bowel movements vary for everyone, and not having a movement daily does not mean constipation is occurring. Some individuals have only three movements a week, while others have multiple movements daily. A recommended indicator of constipation is if there has been a sudden decrease in typical bowel movements. The digestive tract occupies a significant region of the lower torso. Back pain symptoms can present after the rectum becomes obstructed or stools have solidified in the colon. Once constipation has developed, the blockage presses against the nerves and muscles of the back. This causes a range of discomfort signaling by the brain, which worsens as the backup grows. Symptoms of general constipation include:

 

  • Feeling full despite not eating anything.
  • Bloating.
  • Swelling.
  • Abdominal cramping.
  • Infrequent bowel movements.
  • Discomfort or aching when trying to pass a stool.
  • Hard and/or lumpy stool.

 

Constipation is considered chronic when two or more of the following symptoms occur for at least three months:

 

  • Further decreased bowel movements.
  • Straining to defecate.
  • Stools do not loosen without the use of laxatives.
  • Passage of hard pebble/pellet stools.
  • Consistent abdominal pain that is relieved by even slight movement.
  • Feeling as if the bowels are not fully emptied or a blockage in the rectum.
  • Feeling the need to assist the release by pressing on the abdomen.

Chiropractic Treatment

Chiropractic treatment can realign the spine, release compressed nerves, increase the frequency of bowel movements, and through the massage and relaxation of the muscles, help to soften stools. Intestinal muscles push the stool to the anus, where it leaves/evacuates the body. Special nerve cells in the intestine, known as ganglion cells, innervate the muscles to push. These nerves connect to the celiac ganglion, which connects to the spinal cord through nerve roots that exit the spine in the lower thoracic and upper lumbar region. The celiac ganglion innervates the liver, stomach, gallbladder, spleen, kidneys, small intestine, and the ascending and transverse colon. Treatment for constipation and back pain depends on the cause of the symptoms. For example, if the constipation is caused by dehydration, a chiropractor will instruct the patient on water intake as part of the personalized treatment plan.

Diagnosis to Recovery

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to contact Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Fernandes, Walkyria Vilas Boas, et al. “The effect of a six-week osteopathic visceral manipulation in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain and functional constipation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.” Trials vol. 19,1 151. 2 Mar. 2018, doi:10.1186/s13063-018-2532-8

 

Panarese, Alba, et al. “Chronic functional constipation is strongly linked to vitamin D deficiency.” World journal of gastroenterology vol. 25,14 (2019): 1729-1740. doi:10.3748/wjg.v25.i14.1729

 

Rédly, Monika. “The effects of chiropractic care on a patient with chronic constipation.” The Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association vol. 45,3 (2001): 185–191.

 

Trager, Robert James, et al. “Association between radicular low back pain and constipation: a retrospective cohort study using a real-world national database.” Pain reports vol. 6,3 e954. 26 Aug. 2021, doi:10.1097/PR9.0000000000000954

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Chiropractic treatment can relieve constipation sciatica to alleviate symptoms and restore optimal body function. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Sciatica Foot Symptoms: EP's Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Sciatica Foot Symptoms: EP's Sciatica Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Sciatica can range from mild to severe. Most individuals are familiar with severe cases because of the intense shooting throbbing pain. On the other hand, mild cases can present with little to no discomfort or pain but involve tingling, pins and needles, electrical buzzing, and numbing sensations. This can make individuals think there is nothing wrong and their foot just fell asleep. It can come from nowhere, as there was no obvious back or leg trauma causing injury. However, somewhere along the nerve's path, the nerve has become compressed, pinched, trapped, stuck, or twisted, most likely from a spasming muscle group in the low back, buttocks, or legs causing the sciatica foot symptoms. Chiropractic, massage, and decompression therapy can relax the muscles, relieve the symptoms, release the nerve, and restore function.

Sciatica Foot Symptoms

The sciatic nerve extends from the lower spine to the feet. Sciatica foot symptoms could be caused by several possibilities that range from piriformis syndrome to a developing slipped disc or spasming muscles. The symptoms travel through the nerve and can be felt anywhere along the nerve's path, not necessarily at the source. This is why mild cases may only present with slight pricking/tingling sensations. However, left untreated, the cause can progress and develop into a severe case of sciatica.

Symptoms

The length of time that sciatica foot symptoms last will depend on the underlying cause. For example, if a herniated disc is the cause, the numbness may last for a few weeks or months until the disc heals. However, the numbness may be more long-lasting if sciatica is caused by degenerative disc disease. Sometimes, the nerve can be permanently damaged, leading to chronic pain and numbness. This is more likely to occur in individuals with diabetes or another condition that causes nerve damage.

 

  • A varying degree of leg weakness can present as the spinal nerve root issues interfere with effective signal communication between the brain and the leg muscles.
  • Leg weakness may also be interpreted as a pulling sensation in the leg.
  • Weakness in the foot or toe muscles can also present.
  • Leg movements such as walking, running, lifting the leg, or flexing the foot can also be affected.
  • The tingling and numbing sensations may worsen when sitting or standing for long periods or moving the back in certain ways.

Treatment

Chiropractic care is an excellent option for treating sciatica foot symptoms and starts with a personalized plan based on individual symptoms, injury, and medical history. Chiropractors are neuromusculoskeletal experts on the spine, vertebrae, surrounding muscles, tissues, and nerves. Treatment includes spinal and extremity adjustments to realign the body, decrease inflammation, relieve pressure, release the nerve, and ultimately allow the body to activate its natural healing processes.

Massage

  • Massage therapy can relieve muscle tension and spasms in the back and legs, reducing pressure on the sciatic nerve.
  • Massage also increases blood circulation and relaxes the muscles, speeding healing and recovery.

Electrical Stimulation

  • Electrical stimulation activates the nerves and muscles and reduces symptoms by blocking signals.

Physical Therapy

  • Physical therapy exercises can help stretch and strengthen the back and leg muscles.
  • Targeted exercises can be done at home to continue strengthening and maintaining the muscles.

Foot Orthotics

  • Using orthotic devices such as arch supports or heel cups can help relieve pressure on the feet.
  • Arch supports are especially helpful if sciatica foot symptoms are exacerbated by flat feet or other foot conditions.
  • Heel cups can help with the frequent use of high heels.

Sciatica Specialists

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. "Sciatica." https://orthoinfo.org/en/diseases--conditions/sciatica/

 

Cleveland Clinic. "Sciatica." https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/12792-sciatica#management-and-treatment

 

Emary, Peter C. "Evidence-based prognostication in a case of sciatica." The Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association vol. 59,1 (2015): 24-9.

 

Frost, Lydia R et al. "Deficits in foot skin sensation are related to alterations in balance control in chronic low back patients experiencing clinical signs of lumbar nerve root impingement." Gait & posture vol. 41,4 (2015): 923-8. doi:10.1016/j.gaitpost.2015.03.345

 

Mayo Clinic. "Sciatica." https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sciatica/symptoms-causes/syc-20377435?p=1

 

National Institutes of Health. "Sciatica." https://medlineplus.gov/sciatica.html

 

Shakeel, Muhammad, et al. "An uncommon cause of sciatica." Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons--Pakistan: JCPSP vol. 19,2 (2009): 127-9.

 

Tampin, Brigitte, et al. "Disentangling 'sciatica' to understand and characterize somatosensory profiles and potential pain mechanisms." Scandinavian journal of pain vol. 22,1 48-58. 2 Aug. 2021, doi:10.1515/sjpain-2021-0058

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Chiropractic treatment, massage, and decompression therapy can relax the muscles, release the nerve, and restore function. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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Sciatica From Working Out: EP Functional Wellness Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

Sciatica From Working Out: EP Functional Wellness Clinic | Call: 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677 | Sciatica "The Scourge & The Treatments" | Scoop.it

Sciatica From Working Out: There are benefits from strenuous exercise and a level of acceptance of the discomfort that goes with exertion. While this is true to a certain degree, when individuals feel the pump and are in the workout zone, it can be very easy to take off and overdo it. This is when the body and the back become susceptible to injuries. Sciatica from working out occurs when added pressure on the sciatic nerve results in a compressed/pinched nerve. Left untreated can lead to further back problems and other health issues. The Injury Medical Chiropractic and Functional Medicine Team can relieve the compression, release the nerve, relax the muscles, and restore function.

Sciatica From Working Out

Microtrauma

Building muscle and increasing strength require a certain amount of physical damage to the muscles for successful progress. Intense and heavy exercise tear the muscle tissues causing microtrauma that triggers a healing response that creates muscle mass. These micro-injuries can cause the back muscles to tighten up, shifting the spine out of alignment, causing the discs to slip and compress nerves, or by tight leg muscles like the piriformis swelling and squeezing the sciatic nerve.

Causes

Rest and Recovery

  • It’s important to understand that proper recovery is essential to an exercise program.
  • It can take up to 72 hours to recover from the microtears.
  • Individuals that go right back for a similar workout can aggravate existing micro tears while creating more, resulting in a downward cycle of symptoms that can lead to other problems or become a chronic condition.
  • Rotating to exercises that go easy on the back and leg muscles assists in the normal healing and development of muscle tissue.

Not Warming up Before Workout

  • Not warming up before exercising can cause injuries.
  • When muscles are cold and not warmed up properly, they can become stiff and inflexible, causing them to strain and tear when exposed to sudden, intense exertion.
  • Before performing any exercise, always start with a low-impact, gentle warm-up.

Not Stretching Properly or at All

  • Full-body stretching is necessary as the torn, tight muscles need to be relaxed and kept loose.
  • Make sure to stretch the hamstrings and hips thoroughly.
  • After each workout, take 10 minutes and stretch.

Not Stretching After

  • Always do some stretching after a workout.
  • Stretching after can help prevent muscle fatigue and soreness from a lactic acid buildup.

Starting With Heavy Weights

  • Many injuries happen because individuals start too heavy.
  • Challenging the body’s performance is part of the process but should be done in small steps.
  • Start with lighter weights and add more gradually.

Improper Posture and Form

  • A leading cause of back problems is poor posture and form.
  • Curving the back while lifting weights is the most error.
  • Overarching can also cause injury.
  • When performing push-ups or planks, avoid sinking the hips.

Hard Surfaces

  • For runners, hard surfaces like concrete or asphalt force the body and back to absorb most of the impact.
  • This compresses the vertebrae, which can irritate the sciatic nerve.
  • Rotate by using running trails or a treadmill.
  • Work on running with a shorter stride to reduce bounce and impact.
  • Incorporate cross-training.
  • Rotate upper body strength training to give the legs, gluteals, and back muscles a rest.

Chiropractic Rehabilitation

Chiropractic care, massage, and decompression therapy can relieve sciatica pain. Using spinal manipulation techniques and other therapies, chiropractors can alleviate the pressure on the nerve. Treatment involves:

 

  • X-rays are taken so that the chiropractor can understand the cause.
  • Massaging the muscles to relax and release them and increase circulation.
  • Stretching and applying controlled pressure to the joints.
  • Specific exercises and stretches will be recommended to do at home.
  • Health coaching and nutrition and wellness recommendations.

Personalized Sciatica Treatment

 

General Disclaimer *

The information herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and directly or indirectly support our clinical scope of practice.* Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

 

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, don't hesitate to get in touch with Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

 

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACPCCSTIFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

References

Bonasia DE, Rosso F, Cottino U, Rossi R. Exercise-induced leg pain. Asia Pac J Sports Med Arthrosc Rehabil Technol. 2015;2(3):73-84. doi:10.1016/j.asmart.2015.03.003

 

Cook CE, Taylor J, Wright A, Milosavljevic S, Goode A, Whitford M. Risk factors for first-time incidence sciatica: a systematic review. Physiother Res Int. 2014 Jun;18:65-78. doi:doi:10.1002/pri.1572

 

Koes BW, van Tulder MW, Peul WC. Diagnosis and treatment of sciatica. BMJ. 2007;334(7607):1313‐1317. doi:10.1136/bmj.39223.428495.BE

 

Lewis RA, Williams NH, Sutton AJ, et al. Comparative clinical effectiveness of management strategies for sciatica: a systematic review and network meta-analyses. (PDF). Spine J. 2015;15(6):1461-77. doi:10.1016/j.spinee.2013.08.049

 

Ropper AH, Zafonte RD. Sciatica. N Engl J Med. 2015;372(13):1240–8. doi:10.1056/NEJMra1410151

 

Salehi, Alireza, et al. “Chiropractic: Is it Efficient in Treatment of Diseases? Review of Systematic Reviews.” International Journal of community-based nursing and midwifery vol. 3,4 (2015): 244-54.

Dr. Alex Jimenez's insight:

Chiropractic care, massage, and decompression therapy can release and relax the muscles and restore function. For answers to any questions you may have, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 or 915-412-6677

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