Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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onto Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
November 18, 2014 5:15 AM
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Making designer mutants in all kinds of model organisms

Making designer mutants in all kinds of model organisms | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Recent advances in the targeted modification of complex eukaryotic genomes have unlocked a new era of genome engineering. From the pioneering work using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), to the advent of the versatile and specific TALEN systems, and most recently the highly accessible CRISPR/Cas9 systems, we now possess an unprecedented ability to analyze developmental processes using sophisticated designer genetic tools. Excitingly, these robust and simple genomic engineering tools also promise to revolutionize developmental studies using less well established experimental organisms.


Modern developmental biology was born out of the fruitful marriage between traditional embryology and genetics. Genetic tools, together with advanced microscopy techniques, serve as the most fundamental means for developmental biologists to elucidate the logistics and the molecular control of growth, differentiation and morphogenesis. For this reason, model organisms with sophisticated and comprehensive genetic tools have been highly favored for developmental studies. Advances made in developmental biology using these genetically amenable models have been well recognized. The Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded in 1995 to Edward B. Lewis, Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard and Eric F. Wieschaus for their discoveries on the ‘Genetic control of early structural development’ usingDrosophila melanogaster, and again in 2002 to John Sulston, Robert Horvitz and Sydney Brenner for their discoveries of ‘Genetic regulation of development and programmed cell death’ using the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. These fly and worm systems remain powerful and popular models for invertebrate development studies, while zebrafish (Danio rerio), the dual frog species Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis, rat (Rattus norvegicus), and particularly mouse (Mus musculus) represent the most commonly used vertebrate model systems. To date, random or semi-random mutagenesis (‘forward genetic’) approaches have been extraordinarily successful at advancing the use of these model organisms in developmental studies. With the advent of reference genomic data, however, sequence-specific genomic engineering tools (‘reverse genetics’) enable targeted manipulation of the genome and thus allow previously untestable hypotheses of gene function to be addressed.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Scooped by Mary Williams
October 10, 2018 8:38 AM
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Visit to CAAS, the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences

Visit to CAAS, the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

The best part of plant science is the plant scientists. I had an amazing visit today to CAAS, full of young and energetic PIs and students. Special thanks to Fan and Xiangxiang my tour guides! @ASPB @ThePlantCell

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June 2, 2017 2:29 AM
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What We’re Reading: June 2nd

What We’re Reading: June 2nd | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

What We're Reading: Aphids, ABP1, FRO2, PO4, yuvalamide A, pinenes, ancestral alliances and other delights

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April 11, 2017 4:15 PM
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What We’re Reading: April 7

What We’re Reading: April 7 | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
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March 31, 2017 6:14 AM
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What We’re Reading: March 31

What We’re Reading: March 31 | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

What We're Reading: Today we cover spandrels & speciation, thermophilous species & tradeoffs, the Kok effect & more

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March 24, 2017 7:13 AM
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CRISPR, microbes and more are joining the war against crop killers

CRISPR, microbes and more are joining the war against crop killers | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Agricultural scientists look beyond synthetic chemistry to battle pesticide resistance.
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March 10, 2017 6:02 AM
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What We’re Reading: March 10

What We’re Reading: March 10 | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Stomatal immunity, banana breeding, synthetic botany, RACiR, AGO10 and SPY (oh my) and more!

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March 2, 2017 10:04 AM
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Activity and Videos: Do plants need soil to grow?

Activity and Videos: Do plants need soil to grow? | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
This resource provides a set of videos and a practical investigation aimed at supporting working scientifically in the classroom and relating science to real world experiences.

 

In the first video Professor Brian Cox joins a teacher to find out how to set up and run an investigation to find out if plants need soil to grow. Children try to germinate and grow plants from a seed using a variety of different materials instead of soil.

 

Further videos show Brian Cox visiting an Industrial farm to find out about how they grow vegetables in a building and meeting a researcher looking at soil health.

 

A written resource, provided by Science and Plants at Schools, (SAPS), guides teachers in running the investigation in class. This resource has been provided by the Royal Society.

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February 25, 2017 1:58 AM
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Poverty Plus A Poisonous Plant Blamed For Paralysis In Rural Africa (Cassava)

Poverty Plus A Poisonous Plant Blamed For Paralysis In Rural Africa (Cassava) | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Some African countries have long witnessed mysterious outbreaks of paralysis. Affected regions are poor and conflict-ridden, where people's main food is a bitter, poisonous variety of cassava.
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February 20, 2017 6:34 AM
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What We’re Reading: February 17

What We’re Reading: February 17 | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Morphometrics and mycorrhizas,

hydathodes and isoprenes,

Tansley Medal finalists and more!

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February 3, 2017 2:38 AM
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What We’re Reading: February 3rd

What We’re Reading: February 3rd | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Reviews on P, Se, and FR/R. Haploid induction, chlorophagy, ethnobotany and more!

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January 31, 2017 8:52 AM
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ASPB | Jobs at ASPB. Ecucation Coordinator

ASPB | Jobs at ASPB. Ecucation Coordinator | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Excellent opportunity for someone excited by plant science research! Located near Washington DC at Society headquarters (Rockville, Maryland).

The Education Coordinator is responsible for implementing the Society’s education and outreach activities, as well as for administrative support and coordination of correspondence, communication activities, and development of education-related projects. 

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January 25, 2017 11:01 AM
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Plant biologists welcome their robot overlords

Plant biologists welcome their robot overlords | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
Old-school areas of plant biology are getting tech upgrades that herald more detailed, faster data collection.
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January 23, 2017 11:33 AM
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Edward Buckler

Edward Buckler | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Edward S. Buckler, Research Geneticist, USDA-ARS and Adjunct Professor, Plant Breeding and Genetics at the Institute for Genomic Diversity, Cornell University, will receive the 2017 NAS Prize in Food and Agriculture Sciences, the first time this prize is being awarded.

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October 9, 2018 8:35 AM
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Meting with students at Tsinghua University, Beijing

Meting with students at Tsinghua University, Beijing | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

I spent a wonderful day visiting with the plant scientists at Tsinghua University, Beijing. Lunch with some graduate students was a highlight! Thanks for hosting me!

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April 28, 2017 2:43 AM
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What We’re Reading: April 28

What We’re Reading: April 28 | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

We're reading about photosynthesis (several), perennialization, Polycomb Repressive complexes, plastid origins, pollination by birds, hypoxia, hybrid vigor, heat stress (and more!). Enjoy and have a nice weekend!

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March 31, 2017 6:16 AM
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Are GMOs Good or Bad? Genetic Engineering & Our Food

A well-presented look at the controversies around GMOs, from the popular video seriesKurzgesagt – In a Nutshell.

 

Frankie Gnekow's curator insight, April 3, 2017 6:10 PM
Most people are confused about what GMOs are and how they are beneficial to people. People think that GMOs are deadly, but science has proven that they are no more dangerous than no GMOs. Most criticizes against GMOs that are actually valid are actually criticisms of the agriculture and pesticides industries, not the science of genetically modified organisms. Without GMOs, many people would not be able to produce crops and they would not be able to feed families. Examples would be in Hawaii, where the papaya industry was almost wiped out by a disease, but GMOs that were resistant to the disease were created and now the industry prospers. 
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March 24, 2017 7:15 AM
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What We’re Reading: March 24

What We’re Reading: March 24 | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

A plethora of papers featuring auxin (5), guard cells (2), evolution (3), & flower/ing (3) +more

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March 17, 2017 3:40 AM
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What We’re Reading: March 17

What We’re Reading: March 17 | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Some big ideas this week, from sex determination to the fate of the world's plants (&much more)

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March 3, 2017 2:51 AM
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What We’re Reading: March 3

What We’re Reading: March 3 | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Cool chemistry: Structural metabolomics for community ecology, MS imaging of Kranz anatomy, Real-time phloem unloading, Metabolic gene clustering, Pollen chemistry as a driver of host shifts in bees .... and more!

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February 25, 2017 2:30 AM
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Quinoa—quest to feed the world | KAUST Discovery

Quinoa—quest to feed the world | KAUST Discovery | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it
The sequencing of a high-quality quinoa genome by a KAUST-led team supports global food security and the production of crops to feed millions of people
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February 21, 2017 5:28 AM
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People Behind the Science Podcast. Dr. Mike Blatt: Keeping a Close Eye On Channels and Vesicle Trafficking in Plant Cell Membranes

People Behind the Science Podcast. Dr. Mike Blatt: Keeping a Close Eye On Channels and Vesicle Trafficking in Plant Cell Membranes | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Editor-in-chief of Plant Physiology interview

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February 10, 2017 2:32 AM
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What We’re Reading: February 10

What We’re Reading: February 10 | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

What We’re Reading: February 10

Weekly roundup of new and interesting plant science. Shade avoidance syndrome, hypoxia in development, C-stores in coastal wetlands and more!

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February 2, 2017 6:04 AM
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“Genomic resources and databases”, special issue from Current Plant Biology

“Genomic resources and databases”, special issue from Current Plant Biology | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

The November-December 2016 special issue of Current Plant Biology is out now and available free of charge. With this issue, focused on “Genomic resources and databases”, Current Plant Biology celebrates the successful completion of its third year.

Call for papers: Upcoming special issue on plant development
This special issue will focus on the mechanisms that govern plant development including the differentiation of the plant cells, tissues and organ. The articles may include reviews, research articles, resources/databases and perspectives.

Deadline for submission: March 30th, 2017

Please contact Sushma Naithani for more information.

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January 27, 2017 2:43 AM
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What We’re Reading: January 27th

What We’re Reading: January 27th | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

Flower origins and pollinator interactions, dark responses, peptide hormones and pathogen responses, we've got it all!

A great place to find your weekend plant science reading.

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January 23, 2017 11:36 AM
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What We’re Reading: January 20th

What We’re Reading: January 20th | Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education) | Scoop.it

What We’re Reading: January 20th: drought, pathogens, membranes and databases, oh my! Fe, Cl and mitochondria too!

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