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THE ONLY WAY OUT: China To Prioritize Environment Over Economy and Development In Revised Law

THE ONLY WAY OUT: China To Prioritize Environment Over Economy and Development In Revised Law | CSR | Scoop.it

                 - WITHOUT NATURE, HUMANS DO NOT EXIST-


Via pdjmoo
Ashley Bogar's insight:

Come April of 2015 China is ready to set a new law that gives Beijing more power against factories that are polluting the environment. This new law will allow them to punish business officials and place protected regions off-limits to industrial development. This new law states that the environment is a priority and will give the power to environmental enforcers to “veto” production in the industries until they have met their targets. They are also looking to eliminate the punishment of maximum fine as companies will pay this fine and still continue on with their same procedures.

I think that it is important for people to see a CSR program within their government and I feel that it is too strongly geared towards strictly corporations. We have seen in some cases such as the United States where ultimately the corporations run the show but the government needs to take responsibility as they have put themselves in the position to take care of the people and they need to live up to it.

I believe that getting rid of the fine penalty will be very beneficial for Beijing, you see too many cases where through a cost/benefit analysis companies will chose to take the risk of a maximum fine as they will still make more profit. An alternate solution such as a shutdown of the company whether it is permanent or temporary will be a greater threat and result in a greater desired outcome and better cooperation

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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, April 18, 2014 4:33 PM

While some details of the fourth draft are still under discussion, it has been agreed that the principle of prioritising the environment above the economy will be enshrined in law, according to scholars who have been involved in the process. The fourth draft is due to be completed within weeks.

"(Upholding) environmental protection as the fundamental principle is a huge change, and emphasises that the environment is a priority," said Cao Mingde, a law professor at the China University of Political Science and Law, who was involved in the drafting process.

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Rescooped by Ashley Bogar from Corporate Responsibility and Ethical Issues in Business
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The Dilemma of Ethical Eating

The Dilemma of Ethical Eating | CSR | Scoop.it
At first glance, it's not easy to be an ethical eater. We're told to cut back on meat to fight climate change and open up farmland for more nutrient-efficient grains.

Via Les Smith
Ashley Bogar's insight:

I really enjoyed this article. I have recently been watching a lot of documentaries such as Food Inc and Veugcated that talk about not only the brutality animals go through on factory farms but also the environmental and economic impacts. This article states that according to the United Nations our planet is currently producing enough food to provide every single person with  2,700 calorie in meals every day which is plenty enough to survive on.

One would never that think that eating meat would have an environmental impact but it actually produces more global warming than vehicles. I think that supporting neighbourhood farms and buying locally can have a very good impact on a society and if by making small changes that would help someone in poverty and also have a positive impact on your health why wouldn’t one do it?

It is understandable that people don’t like change but they also need to understand that the way we are currently living is shortening the life of the earth every single day. We also need global equality, no one deserves to live their life in poverty especially with it known that we have the resources to prevent this and I think many people who have everything they need at the tips of their fingers and more tend to take it for granted. I can admit for myself that I have taken many things for granted and that I am very lucky but I can also say that along with many people I have been uneducated about the circumstances but with my new knowledge I would like to take steps such as eating out less, and buying locally.I encourage people to do the same as small steps by many can have a great impact.

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Les Smith's curator insight, January 15, 2014 2:50 PM

What can you do right now?

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Knowing right from wrong | CIM magazine - The Marketer

Knowing right from wrong | CIM magazine - The Marketer | CSR | Scoop.it
Knowing right from wrong - ethical marketing http://t.co/jVmAyl6JEA http://t.co/H9RuCVIK5K

Via Alexa Purves
Ashley Bogar's insight:

This articles talks about ethics in marketing and how it can be difficult as all claims will be studied and if you fall short you may be faced with legal action. The example they used to explain this was when Volvo brought out a car that ran on bio fuels and said it was better for the environment, a decade later a journalist wrote an article about now that’s not true and that bio fuels are actually worse to burn than fossil fuels. You can only imagine the scrutiny that put Volvo under?

The articles also talks about how the biggest thing that can go wrong in ethical marketing is not being as good as you claim. If a company is going to claim that their product is organic for example it must be made on the full lifecycle of that product which is something Howies’ clothing” learned the hard way as this claim of theirs was found not to be entirely true.

I do believe that ethical marketing can be tricky because it puts organizations up on a platform where they are constantly being analyzed and all their moves are being watch. It is also a good thing because it allows the company to share their values with the world and the ethical marketing will also differentiate them for their competitors. I wouldn’t be surprised to see advertisements strictly about CSR programs that companies have developed because consumers are basing their purchases off of this more and more. I can honestly say myself that I have never in my life bought a sweater that costs $80 and now I have two from Ten Tree only because I was able to go online, enter my code and have ten trees planted from my purchase that is a key reason why that company is so successful and we are seeing it more and more.

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Alexa Purves's comment, March 27, 2015 2:45 PM
Attaching an ethical quality to your product is a great selling feature as 55% of people globally will pay extra to purchase from a sustainable company. A concern when using an ethical angle in marketing is that all of the claims made by the company must be 100% accurate. People will question the smallest detail the company has claimed if they feel it might not be accurate. For example, if a company claims that their product is organic this claim must be true from the products inception until the time it is purchased. If one step in the process is not organic than this can be brought to light by a customer. Now with social media these allegations are made public before even confirmed. When a strong stand is made by a company about an ethical claim, this tends to put them under a bigger microscope.
From a global standpoint it is very important to realize that a company's message may have a different meaning internationally. Different countries have different ethical beliefs therefore what we may feel strongly about here may not be a concern in another country. It is important that a company also doesn’t deliver different messages to different countries based on what that country’s ethical beliefs are. This will make the company look like they have double standards and they will not be believed on their claims.
Even if this is all taken into consideration and the company does everything right, customers may not care about the ethical message behind your product. On a good note, there are companies that have done it right and are successful because of their ethical marketing campaign.
The message I took away from this is that a marketing team must be absolutely sure that they have all their facts straight if they are going to make any kind of a claim, ethical or otherwise. These claims cannot be made public without an ample amount of research going into them to make sure their claims are accurate. However, if a company has a good marketing/research team the rewards are definitely worth the ethical claims.
Rescooped by Ashley Bogar from Sustain Our Earth
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Sustainability now key selling point for business schools attracting students

Sustainability now key selling point for business schools attracting students | CSR | Scoop.it
After years of neglect, students are now demanding business courses include sustainability on the syllabus

Via Gordon McGlone, Nuno Gaspar de Oliveira, SustainOurEarth
Ashley Bogar's insight:

This articles talks about how prominent the study of sustainability has become in business schools today. In the past it was very difficult to teach sustainability as it made students angry as they thought sustainability was irrelevant and that their time and money was being wasted. Times are changing and business schools are building sustainability courses and using it as a competitive advantage as today’s students can see that this is a key issue in society.

Sustainability became more necessary in the school systems as more pressure was put on them to show different sides of business, the profit side and CSR side. The article then proceeds to talk about how teaching students in college and universities is too late, they should start learning in primary school about the environment and out impacts on it.

I believe that is very important to teach sustainability to students and I also agree that we should begin at a young age in order to allow students to adopt sustainable habits as they grow that will stick with them throughout their lives. The students of today are the leaders of tomorrow and it is up us to save the environment for future generations. Our parents and grandparents didn’t have all the knowledge that we have today and with the current technology we are able to adapt our ways to meet the needs of the environment. It’s up to today’s students to find ways to make the earth infinite and to pass on the importance of doing so, we need to encourage and teach future generations to carry on in these foots steps and take we have accomplished to greater levels.

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Gordon McGlone's curator insight, February 10, 2015 1:35 AM

When I completed my MBA at University of Bath School of Management in 2003 sustainability had not been mentioned during the four years that I had studied. On Thursday I will deliver my second lecture of ten for the School on Strategies for Sustainability in their new Masters programme.


This is a small beginning for a massive subject of pressing global significance.  Sustainability is so important that it should be firmly embedded within and across all academic and teaching disciplines. Yet the academic literature is fragmented and there still seems to be little true integration between business, social and environment literatures other than a growing affection for the term ecology.  Separate disciplines continue to work largely in isolation.


The module that I am teaching is titled Strategies for Sustainability.  I have given it the alternate title of "What on Earth are we going to do".  Time is not on our side; business schools must anticipate and deliver the knowledge and competencies that all organisations are going to need.  


I am pleased to be back at Bath; this time I am asking the questions from the front of the lecture theatre.






Nuno Gaspar de Oliveira's curator insight, February 10, 2015 7:07 AM

the business of saving our lives by protecting Life

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Can you teach businessmen to be ethical?

Can you teach businessmen to be ethical? | CSR | Scoop.it
In an interesting twist, creative people cheat more than others, because they are better at finding self-serving justifications.

Via Les Smith, Alexa Purves
Ashley Bogar's insight:

This article talks about the lack of trust people have in corporations due to scandals such as Enron (2001) and the global financial crisis (2008). A survey shows a decrease in the years of 2002-2007 of belief that a company’s primary responsibility is to maximize their shareholder value. It then begins to discuss the idea that ethical behaviour cannot be taught through lectures in school as you need to make it automatic and habitual which comes with ones upbringing and should rather be taught by creating a culture of ethics.

People who make unethical decisions are not bad people as shown in the Milgram Experiment where ordinary men believed they were electrocuting a screaming a man and continued doing so because an authoritative figured told them too. I believe this kind of situation happens very often in the corporate world where people make excuses for their actions, even when they feel it is wrong because the person telling them do so is seen to be very powerful and knowledgeable.

Sometimes these situations get taken too far as seen clearly in the Enroncase, little acts of over stepping the boundaries keep getting pushed further and further with the more they get away with. There is a point at which a person needs to come to their senses, take a step back and look at the externalities of their decisions. I believe that ethical decision making is a habitual and automatic trait that some people are missing, this is when they stop making excuses for their actions and become greedy for money and power. I believe that schools are able to instill this in students but as I agree with an article this will not happen through lecture but rather through creating a culture. To make things clear I am not saying it is okay to be unethical but every kid has stolen that candy from the convenience store knowing it was wrong when their friends dared them, it is about the limit at which one takes their actions and that limit is reached once people and the environment are being effected at ones expense.

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Les Smith's curator insight, January 15, 2014 2:47 PM

Is cheating something we have to endulge or can we insist that the rules be followed without having to punish? Can people be taught to be honest? Can customers train managers using buying habits?

Oluseun Akinyode's curator insight, February 25, 2014 11:12 PM

To effectively teach ethical behavior in business schools, such that it is entrenched in our graduates, we may need to start with redefining the objective of a business. Contrary to traditional believe that the objective of a business is to make profit (satisfy shareholders), it should be to satisfy all stakeholders with no exceptions. The traditional perspective has been a driving force of the ‘very large elephant’ in the metaphor above. History has shown that top performing businesses could fail due to unethical practices and heavily impact a country’s economy.

We have to focus on taking out the parochial approach to defining business objectives to a more systematic -thinking approach. Teaching ethics and business separately will not do justice to this but defining business as a function of ethics will help in embedding in the subconscious of our graduates that business decisions and ethical behaviors are inseparable.

Alexa Purves's comment, March 27, 2015 2:37 PM
When I first started reading this article I disagreed when it was stated that ethics classes in school do not help future business people to be more ethical. Since taking a CRS course I feel that it does help make me more aware of how to conduct myself more ethically in business. However, as I continued to read I started to agree with what the author was saying. The author goes explains that one ethics class isn’t going to change how people conduct themselves five years down the road when dealing with a morally gray situation. Ethical values need to be put into place in all aspects of learning. In all classes there should be underlying ethical components that help to make business people fundamentally more ethical. According to the article, being ethical means being professional, honest, and honorable. These characteristics will become more ingrained in a person the more that ethics is part of the business school-learning environment.
Furthermore, the author stated that it is important that business ethics courses contain a large human psychology component in order that students understand what makes people behave ethical. For example, studies were done that found that subconscious things such as the type of lighting, or whether a person is being watched, can determine if they behave ethically or not!

This was an interesting article and I am going to hope that ethics are not lacking in the business world. I would like to believe that ethics is an important part of most business behaviour and that people strive to be ethically minded. I do believe that ethics classes are good and should be taught more frequently though, as I am sure there will be many times in the business world where decisions will need to be made and it may be tempting to take a less ethical path to obtain the end result.
Rescooped by Ashley Bogar from Corporate Responsibility and Ethical Issues in Business
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Crane and Matten blog: Top 10 corporate responsibility stories of 2013

Crane and Matten blog: Top 10 corporate responsibility stories of 2013 | CSR | Scoop.it

Via Les Smith
Ashley Bogar's insight:

I found this article very interesting, it shows how shallow corporations can be and the lengths they will go to in order to make or save money. The two stories I found the most intriguing were the first about the Rana Plaza building collapse and the second was Apple’s tax avoidance. The collapsing of the Rana Plaza took the lives of 1100 people. This could have easily been prevented through maintenance of the building and several people lost their lives due to the negligence the multi-million dollar corporations who occupied the floors of this building. I have previously done some research on this and found that Walmart was one of the large corporations that had products produced here. Prior to the building collapsing a petition was brought around to the companies, including Walmart in order to create regulations to maintain the building and they refused it. How ever much money it would have cost these companies to make this a safe work environment would never be of greater value then the 1100 lives lost.

I found the Apple tax avoidance very surprising. This company spent their time looking for loopholes in international tax treaties and funneling its European profits through a shell company in Ireland, as a result they avoided paying billions of dollars in taxes. This is very upsetting because so many people support Apple through buying their products and by them fulfilling their obligation of paying taxes they would have been rightfully giving back to the community. This is gives them a very cheap and negative impression as large corporations like Apple have a big impact on the economy and their surrounding communities. It will be interesting to see the impact this has on their sales.

The majority of these stories are good examples of the need for CSR in today’s society and it shows the negligence of corporations, lack of respect and need for greed. 

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CSR spending: Private firms unlikely to meet 2% target - Livemint

CSR spending: Private firms unlikely to meet 2% target - Livemint | CSR | Scoop.it
As the deadline looms for reporting CSR spends, govt-run firms seem to have an edge over private companies
Ashley Bogar's insight:

Currently India has adopted a new legislation stating that private corporations must contribute 2% of their profits to CSR, government-run businesses have been under this obligation since 2010.  It also requires that the organizations have a CSR board committee and institute a CSR policy. I think this is a positive step in the right direction for sustainability and more countries should incorporate programs like this in order to obligate all corporations to support present and future issues. It is also nice to see that governments are beginning to take their countries into the right direction as this should not only be up to organizations.

The articles talks about how the corporations are not going to meet the 2% demand in the first year as the new legislation is not easy to follow or setup and will take some time for companies to become accustomed to the new procedures. It compares the new CSR program to previous DPE guidelines outlining the close of loopholes and positive effects it will have such as trust throughout the communities and also allows for more flexibility as the previous DPE guidelines were closely tied to the ministries agenda

I don’t think this is unreasonable in any way that the corporations won’t make the 2% in the first year because the new legislation has several rules. I also believe that the company should take the first year to ensure the CSR programs they adopt meets the needs of their organization and clearly outlines their values.

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People, Brands and Trust: Turning Consumer Confidence into Advocacy

People, Brands and Trust: Turning Consumer Confidence into Advocacy | CSR | Scoop.it

Though consumers will show no remorse when it comes to holding companies responsible for unethical or distasteful behavior, they will also proudly advocate and defend the brands that are doing their jobs well. For the past fourteen years, theEdelman Trust Barometer has benchmarked consumer confidence in businesses, media and the government through an annual, global survey of more than 30,000. Respondents are asked to rank brands on how much they trust each institution to do what is right.

 

Recently, Edelman launched an additionalbrandshare™ survey that seeks to understand the evolving relationship between buyers and brands.

 

Examining the natural intersection of both studies reveals an important opportunity for businesses to build trust by improving engagement and integrity. But what is trust? Wincko defines trust by the equation “Trust = Reliability + Delight/Self-Interest” as a reminder of the principle’s core components, which are strongly aligned to the findings of the 2014 Edelman Trust Barometer...


Via Jeff Domansky
Ashley Bogar's insight:

This article discuss how trust is a priority between brands and their stakeholders and how consumers will show no remorse when it comes to holding a company responsible for unethical behaviours but will also defend and advocate for the brands that are doing their jobs well.

The article references the 2014 Edelman Trust Barometer whose studies revealed important opportunities for businesses to build trust by improving engagement and integrity. This study showed that 84% of respondents believe that business can pursue its self-interest while doing good work for the society but if executed poorly, corporate giving can be seen as a distraction from their unethical business practices.

Here are the three ways the articles suggests a company can turn trust into brand advocacy:

  Rational Needs – addressed in the form of responding quickly to concerns and complaints

  Emotional Needs – fulfilled through transparency about the brand and product development process

  Societal Needs – satisfied by confidence that a brand cares about things other than itself, is committed to its community, and belief in a brands core purpose and mission.

I believe that these will all work hand in hand if properly executed and they all need to be part of business procedures in order to turn trust into advocacy. It is very rare to see consumers advocate for brands in most cases they move on to a new one. I believe that if consumers feel that they are part of the brand in some way through the rational, emotional, and societal needs they will feel connected and represented by it.
In the article they state “people don’t just buy products anymore, they buy the companies that make products, the values they represent and what they stand for.” I couldn’t agree with this more. There have been too many instances where companies are doing things that just aren’t right and consumers can’t help but feel responsible because they contributed to that through their purchases.

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, January 4, 2015 2:26 AM

Useful look at how brands can build trust and stimulate advocacy from supporters.

Alexa Purves's comment, March 27, 2015 2:45 PM
This article is stating that when customers have trust in a brand they will become advocates for the company, resulting in increased sales. The author points out that people have no problem spreading negative comments about a product but they will also support businesses that do as they say.
When people are purchasing a product they are also purchasing what the company stands for. The customer trusts that the company is trustworthy and behaving in an ethical manner. The author has conducted research and has found many ways a company can build trust with the customer. He also says that a company doing good for society has become more important to consumers over the years. Consumers believe that companies can be socially responsible without hurting their bottom line. The author says that when a company is defining their social objective, the company has to think about what they stand for. Then they will look at why the consumer will purchase their product, and what is it about our product that has made the company accepted in the marketplace. The article continues with three needs that must be met in order for customers to feel a sense of loyalty to a product. If a business can satisfy these needs of the customer it is likely that the customer will be loyal to the brand and advocate for the brand.
My take away from this article is that once a company has decided their CSR approach all the actions that they take must follow this philosophy. Customers are aware and pay attention to whether a company is living up to their claims. When customers are happy with a company they will promote it and even defend it. To me that mean the customer becomes another form of advertising through word of mouth. This can only increase the company’s bottom line. It is important that a company is aware of how to build trust with their customers and a company needs to take a proactive approach to develop this trust. Once trust is developed, a company wants to be sure to maintain this trust by always staying true to what they claim. I feel this is important because I know personally that I prefer to buy from a company that is socially responsible. I trust that the company is truthful in their claims.
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CSR Programs Are Not The Answer - Forbes

CSR Programs Are Not The Answer - Forbes | CSR | Scoop.it
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs are becoming increasingly popular in corporate America. There is no doubt that most make positive contributions to society and in some cases, make the sponsoring corporations more profitable.
Ashley Bogar's insight:

This article made several key points, it talks how business are designed to make a profit and due to the current business models and methods it is very difficult for them to sustain a profitable company while also incorporating social and environmental friendly “add ins.” The author talks about a quadruple bottom line, this is where business methods are evaluated and changed in order to sustain a company financially, socially, environmentally, and impact their employees positively.

The world of business is rapidly changing as society is becoming concerned with social and environmental issues. We now see companies such as Ten Tree and TOMS becoming successful as it allows people to give back to the community through purchasing a sweater to plant ten trees or buying a pair of shoes to donate another to someone who needs them, but these business are designed to operate this way where as other large corporations making necessities for humanities habits are resulting in negative externalities such as pollution and poverty. The earth and equality throughout the world are needs that are currently not being met and it is about time the business model was analyzed and brought up to date with today’s needs and issues in order to adequately meet them.

Consumers are beginning to make their purchases based on a company’s CSR but as mentioned before CSR is currently an added in aspect for companies and it takes away from other necessary areas which will eventually have negative results and push companies away from incorporating CSR into their businesses. I believe that yes this would be a challenging task but not one that can’t be accomplished and is required in order to sustain our ways of living and improve others who deserve better.

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Why CSR Is Essential To Your Company's Growth

Why CSR Is Essential To Your Company's Growth | CSR | Scoop.it
It's no longer enough for businesses to simply buy and sell their products and services without considering the world in which they operate.

Via Jessica Redpath
Ashley Bogar's insight:

CSR is becoming a part of organizations as they must conduct business in an economically, socially, environmentally responsible manner in order to be sustainable. CSR programs will look different for each company in order to adequately meet all their needs as they are built into the business’s strategy.

The articles talks about all the benefits implementing a CSR program will have such as encouraging executives to look into their long-term business strategies, drive sales by positioning your company as a leader that affects change, builds your brand reputations.

They mentioned in the articles about showcasing your CSR program through PR which I think is a really good idea. It allows consumer to see what your company is doing to make a difference in today’s world and will also show your methods which other companies may adopt and upgrade to also have a positive impact. I think it will make one big team of CSR coordinators which will make the program that much better with so many ideas being presented.

I believe that it is important for consumers to understand a company’s values because that gives them a method to support those values and ensure that they are not contributing to something that they feel is unethical.

The articles talks about TOMS shoes “one for one” and how the company is built on philanthropy, we know that not all companies can be built strictly on this concept but industries should look for a way to incorporate this.

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THE ONLY WAY OUT: China To Prioritize Environment Over Economy and Development In Revised Law

THE ONLY WAY OUT: China To Prioritize Environment Over Economy and Development In Revised Law | CSR | Scoop.it

                 - WITHOUT NATURE, HUMANS DO NOT EXIST-


Via pdjmoo
Ashley Bogar's insight:

Come April of 2015 China is ready to set a new law that gives Beijing more power against factories that are polluting the environment. This new law will allow them to punish business officials and place protected regions off-limits to industrial development. This new law states that the environment is a priority and will give the power to environmental enforcers to “veto” production in the industries until they have met their targets. They are also looking to eliminate the punishment of maximum fine as companies will pay this fine and still continue on with their same procedures.

I think that it is important for people to see a CSR program within their government and I feel that it is too strongly geared towards strictly corporations. We have seen in some cases such as the United States where ultimately the corporations run the show but the government needs to take responsibility as they have put themselves in the position to take care of the people and they need to live up to it.

I believe that getting rid of the fine penalty will be very beneficial for Beijing, you see too many cases where through a cost/benefit analysis companies will chose to take the risk of a maximum fine as they will still make more profit. An alternate solution such as a shutdown of the company whether it is permanent or temporary will be a greater threat and result in a greater desired outcome and better cooperation

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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, April 18, 2014 4:33 PM

While some details of the fourth draft are still under discussion, it has been agreed that the principle of prioritising the environment above the economy will be enshrined in law, according to scholars who have been involved in the process. The fourth draft is due to be completed within weeks.

"(Upholding) environmental protection as the fundamental principle is a huge change, and emphasises that the environment is a priority," said Cao Mingde, a law professor at the China University of Political Science and Law, who was involved in the drafting process.

pdjmoo's curator insight, November 23, 2014 1:05 PM

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▶  OUR OCEANS NEED US http://www.scoop.it/t/our-oceans-need-us

▶  OUR FOOD, OUR HEALTH http://www.scoop.it/t/agriculture-gmos-pesticides

pdjmoo's curator insight, February 23, 2015 8:54 PM

                                         YOU ARE INVITED

                      TO FOLLOW MY NEWS AGGREGATES

 ▶ CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY http://www.scoop.it/t/environmental-and-human-health

▶  CLIMATE CHANGE WILL IMPACT US ALL http://www.scoop.it/t/changingplanet

▶  BIODIVERSITY IS LIFE http://www.scoop.it/t/biodiversity-is-life

▶  OUR OCEANS NEED US http://www.scoop.it/t/our-oceans-need-us

▶  OUR FOOD, OUR HEALTH http://www.scoop.it/t/agriculture-gmos-pesticides