Lighting in history
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Lighting in history
History of street and public lighting
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Lighting began with wood fire...

Lighting began with wood fire... | Lighting in history | Scoop.it

followed by candles, gas, electricity, LEDs...

 

Ce sujet a été labellisé par le Comité Lumière 2015

 

http://www.lumiere2015.fr/ressources/lighting-lumiere-et-espaces-publics/

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this topic collects and curates old and new data on the history of public lighting.

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Faire l'histoire, abolir la nuit, un documentaire sur l'éclairage nocturne

Faire l'histoire, abolir la nuit, un documentaire sur l'éclairage nocturne | Lighting in history | Scoop.it
Faire l'histoire, documentaire de Patrick Boucheron sur Arte. Abolir la nuit parle éclairage nocturne avec Sophie Reculin, historienne des nuits urbaines.
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https://tel.archives-ouvertes.fr/tel-01915183

 

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An ode to HPS streetlights: up in sodium vapour

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Britannia-on-the-Bay - The Historical Society of Ottawa

Britannia-on-the-Bay - The Historical Society of Ottawa | Lighting in history | Scoop.it
24 May 1900 During the late nineteenth century, electricity was the big new invention that was transforming peoples’ lives. Within a short span of yea...
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The Unsung Inventor Who Chased the LED Rainbow

The Unsung Inventor Who Chased the LED Rainbow | Lighting in history | Scoop.it
LEDs came only in shades of red—until George Craford expanded the palette...
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Page de catalogue sur la lanterne d'éclairage public Eclatec Ocean (les lampes bleues en haut des poteaux). Années 70. : Giscardpunk

Page de catalogue sur la lanterne d'éclairage public Eclatec Ocean (les lampes bleues en haut des poteaux). Années 70. : Giscardpunk | Lighting in history | Scoop.it
4.3k abonné(e)s au sein de la communauté Giscardpunk. GiscardPunk. Et si Valéry Giscard d’Estaing avait été réélu en 1981 ? C’est le point de départ …
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S Y N C H R O N I C I T É - #histoire C’est un des berceaux de l’éclairage - LinkedIn

S Y N C H R O N I C I T É - #histoire C’est un des berceaux de l’éclairage - LinkedIn | Lighting in history | Scoop.it
S Y N C H R O N I C I T É - #histoire
C’est un des berceaux de l’éclairage public en France.
Un patrimoine d’exception sur une rivière la #Mauld
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Ouray Colorado –

Ouray Colorado – | Lighting in history | Scoop.it
Ouray History Ouray, Colorado is widely regarded as one of America’s most beautiful towns. Although the town was built by mining, it was the spectacular beauty of the area that gave Ouray long life as a tourist destination. After the silver crash of 1893, when many mining communities were destined to become ghost towns, C.L. Hall remarked “Ouray is Peerless. She will be famous as a mountain resort when many of the now famous watering places are abandoned and forgotten”. Early history of the Ouray area For centuries, the Tabeguache Utes camped seasonally in the area that is now known as Ouray. Undoubtedly these nomadic people appreciated the natural beauty of the canyons, mountains, and waterfalls that make this spot so popular with tourists today. The town of Ouray was named after Ute Chief Ouray, who worked for years to find peaceful resolution to the escalating conflicts that were occurring as more and more white people poured into the region in the 1860’s and 1870’s. Prospector’s first arrived in the Ouray area in 1861. After discovering placer gold, some stayed the winter of 1861-62 in the canyon that would later be the site of the town of Ouray. It would be well over a decade however before the district would develop and the town established. The isolation and ruggedness of the San Juan Mountains, combined with the ever-present danger of conflicts with the Ute tribes, resulted in the region being developed very slowly at first. In 1873, under pressure from an ever-increasing number of white prospectors, the Utes agreed to cede the San Juans to the whites, and they would retain their lands in the valleys and plains to the west and north. With the San Juans now officially open for business, prospectors poured in and infiltrated all parts of the difficult terrain. Settlement of the Ouray town site The first mines were discovered at the Ouray site in 1875, and an initial settlement and mining district named “Uncompahgre” were established. The box canyon at Ouray was deemed an ideal town site, being spectacularly beautiful, relatively flat, sheltered from the worst of the winter weather, and warmed by numerous hot springs. The initial settlement was small and only a few men stayed for the winter of 1875-76. Transportation routes were not established at this time and the poorly-equipped miners almost starved before supplies arrived during the spring of 1876. By early 1876, the town name was changed to Ouray and a permanent town started to take shape. Numerous businesses were started like hotels, stores, a blacksmith, and of course the center of every mining town - saloons. Many of these early businesses operated out of tents and log cabins and only lasted that first summer. Ouray was incorporated in October of 1876. In January of 1877, Ouray County was carved out of existing San Juan County, and Ouray became the county seat. Early in 1877 the population of Ouray was reported to be over 400 residents. The town contained over 200 structures including log cabins, two blacksmiths, a school, a post office, a bank, two hotels, and too many saloons to count. The first newspaper in town, the Ouray Times, was published in June of this year. The population of Ouray had doubled to around 800 by early 1878. The 1880 census reported a population of 864. At this time the town boasted a water works, street lights, plank sidewalks, and graded roads. Ouray in the 1880s By the early 1880s, Ouray had established itself as the second most prominent town in the San Juan region, behind Silverton. Ouray would become the supply, social, and cultural center of several rich mining districts at high-altitude and forbidding terrain above the town. Ouray’s position at the foot of the mountains made it much more suitable for habitation than the locations of most of the major mines. Rich silver discoveries at Red Mountain in 1882 would mark the first major rush to Ouray and the northern San Juans. The mines of the Red Mountain district were only out-produced by the spectacular Leadville mines during this decade. Ouray has many historic buildings remaining from the 1880s, largely due to early efforts to avoid catastrophic fires in the town. Fire resistant brick construction became prevalent during this decade and the first volunteer fire department was created in the early 1880s. Ouray was electrified in 1885, a very early year for electrification in the frontier West. The mines and towns of the San Juan region were early pioneers in implementing electrical infrastructure. The Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad reached Ouray in December of 1887, marking a new era of prosperity for the town. By 1890, Ouray had over 2,500 residents. Ouray and the silver crash of the 1890s Like many prosperous mining cities in Colorado, Ouray hit hard times after the repeal of the Sherman Silver Purchase Act in 1893. Prominent businesses closed after 1893, including the Bank of Ouray. Many men were out of work as many of the local silver mines halted production. Ouray would survive this crisis largely due to the discovery of rich gold mines northeast of town in an area that became known as the “Gold Belt”. Notable producers were the American Nettie, Bachelor, and Wedge mines. Ouray began to recover by 1895 based on activity at the Gold Belt mines, and the fact that many silver mines in nearby districts had some gold content, helping them operate profitably even when silver prices were low. It also helped that two of the richest mines in the West were nearby: the Revenue and Camp Bird. These mines employed hundreds of men each, and kept Ouray humming as a supply center and rail hub for the mountain operations. By 1900, Ouray’s population had been reduced to 2,196 residents. While this figure reflected some of the economic hard times related to the decline in the silver industry, the reduction in population was far less than seen in mining towns of other districts. Early newspaper articles capture notable events around Ouray Most descriptions of the history of Ouray describe a town that was the center of mining and society in an area of vast mineral wealth. It is easy to forget that the town was still part of the Wild West, and was sometimes subject to the same lawlessness that impacted many frontier towns. The following historic newspaper articles describe some of the criminal activity that went on in and around early Ouray. June 25, 1897 A MOST DARING ROBBERY Ora Jones and an unknown companion entered Chase’s saloon today and after drinking leveled the guns at the customers, picked up sacks containing five hundred dollars, and escaped on horses. October 3, 1899 - A STAGE STOPPED - ROBBERS OVERLOOKED A BOX FILLED WITH BULLION Two masked men stopped the Sneffels' stage one mile this side of the Camp Bird mills, eight miles from Ouray this afternoon. They were after the daily shipment of gold bullion from the Camp Bird mine, and unloaded the mail and baggage looking for it. However, they overlooked the box containing $12,000 worth of gold, representing two days' production of the mine. The mails were left untouched and the passengers were not molested. Sheriff Edgar was notified, and, with a posse, overtook the holdups near Yankee Boy basin. After a brisk exchange of shots the officers retired to secure reinforcements. Several other parties are in pursuit. July 30, 1910 - FINANCIER WITH REVOLVER ROUTS STAGE ROBBERS An attempt to hold up a stage coach of eight easterners was frustrated last night by the coolness and nerve of Samuel McCurdy of Pittsburg, a retired financier, who opened fire with an automatic pistol. The party was returning from an outing in the mountains in an old-fashioned stage coach driven by A.L. Stewart, a veteran stage driver, when two bandits stepped into the road and ordered Stewart to stop. February 27, 1921 - ANGRY MINERS TRY TO LYNCH MURDERER A mob of more than 200 miners smashed down the door to the Ouray county jail at Ouray, Coloroado, last night and Invaded the jail in an attempt to lynch Billy Nagle, a miner, who had confessed, according to the sheriff, that he had killed Fred Jacobs, superintendent of the White Cloud mine at Ironton and Hindmarch Hill. Nogle had been removed from the jail by Sheriff Roy Laird a short time before, smuggled through a coal chute, and brought to Montrose in an automobile. Ouray in the new century Ouray entered the 1900’s slightly diminished from its peak in the early 1890s, but still a thriving mining camp. The town had also made a name for itself as a tourist center with its hot springs and spectacular mountain setting. The Camp Bird and Revenue mines continued to be major contributors to Ouray’s economy. The road from Ouray to these mines was packed daily with more than a hundred of wagons and pack trains hauling ore concentrates down the mountain, and provisions and equipment up to the mines. These mines became world famous, and each summer thousands of tourists walked or rode up the steep mountain road to witness the fantastic operations first hand. Thomas Walsh, owner of the Camp Bird mine and one of the West’s wealthiest and most respected businessmen, lived in Ouray for several years. Walsh was a generous contributor to the community and in 1901-02 he donated over $30,000 for the construction of the new City Hall and Library building. Ultimately falling metal prices and worked out mines finally began to catch up with the city of Ouray. The population in 1920 had fallen to 1,165 residents, down more than half from the town’s peak years. The Million Dollar Highway The “Million Dollar Highway” is the name commonly used for the stretch of Highway 550 from Ouray to Silverton. The highway originated as the Otto Mears toll road that was built in 1883 to link Ouray with the Red Mountain Mining District. The route of Mears’ road was originally thought to be impassible, and initial construction in 1883 was a marvel of guts and ingenuity. The road was precarious, narrow, and carved out of steep cliffs of solid rock with drops of hundreds of feet often just inches from the wheels of the crude wagons and stagecoaches that traveled the route. Despite the obvious dangers, Mears’ toll road was popular with adventurous tourists all the way back to the 1880s. Numerous photos were taken from the period of wagons perched on the edge of a high cliff or navigating steep switchbacks. Many of these photos have been preserved and provide a glimpse into the stunning landscapes of the original road. The 1916 passage of the “Good Roads Bill” provided funds that were used to improve roads throughout America. Starting in 1921, these funds were used to upgrade Mears’ toll road to a highway that could accommodate automobiles. Although the origin of the name “Million Dollar Highway” is not known, it is believed to be related to the high cost of construction of the road in the 1920s. With upgraded roads, Ouray became a popular destination for auto tourists who came to enjoy the hot springs and scenic beauty the town had to offer, and to drive America’s most spectacular road. Transition to a tourist economy Ouray already had a steady tourist economy throughout its history, but the downturn in mining by 1920 necessitated additional diversification of the local economy if the town was going to survive. Starting in 1923, citizens of Ouray began contributing funds for the construction of a large municipal pool, part of an effort to turn the town into a tourist resort. Construction of the 150 by 280 foot pool was completed a couple years later, but difficulties were encountered finding a source for the million gallons of hot water needed to fill the pool. After construction of a mile-long pipeline from the hot springs in Box Canyon, the pool was finally opened late in 1927. The hot spring-fed pool was very popular and helped Ouray survive through the Depression years. The city advertised the pool as the “most radioactive in America”, for at the time it was thought that radioactivity was beneficial to health. The claim was exaggerated, which was probably a good thing as a radioactive bath would not have been the experience that most tourists were hoping for. World War II would bring mining back to the districts around Ouray, with the Revenue, Camp Bird, and Idarado being big producers during this time. The Idarado operated into the late 1970s, and the Camp Bird into the early 1990s. The closure of these mines spelled the end of Ouray’s mining economy, but fortunately tourism had become a major industry that continued to support the town into the 2000s. Today, Ouray is known as “The Switzerland of America” and is one Colorado’s most popular tourist destinations. For those interested in history, mining relics and ruins can be found throughout the region. The Alpine Loop is America’s most popular backcountry 4x4 area and is one of the best places in the country to tour historic mining districts. Many of Ouray’s remaining historic buildings were built during the 1880s and 1890s, including the Beaumont Hotel, Wright’s Opera House, the County Courthouse, the Western Hotel, and the St. Elmo Hotel. Ouray is one of the West’s best preserved mining towns from the late 1800s. It also happens to be one of the most spectacularly beautiful destinations anywhere in America. Hundreds of thousands of tourists visit “The Switzerland of America” each year. A Tour of Colorado Mining Towns Check out many more Colorado mining towns at A tour of Colorado Mining Towns.
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A la lanterne ! - Histoire analysée en images et œuvres d’art | https://histoire-image.org/

A la lanterne ! - Histoire analysée en images et œuvres d’art | https://histoire-image.org/ | Lighting in history | Scoop.it
Découvrez A la lanterne ! analysée par Luce-Marie ALBIGÈS au travers d’œuvres et d’images d’archive.
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Campaign for Newcastle | Homepage

Campaign for Newcastle | Homepage | Lighting in history | Scoop.it
Join us in making a difference to our future students, future research and a future of positive change in our city and around the world.
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A Brief History of Globes | Whipple Museum

People have used globes to model the world around them since ancient times, although the earliest surviving globe dates from 1492. This article surveys globe manufacture and use from the 16th through to the 20th century.
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DCCCXXXVIII : Les stations de métro du 4e : Cité une station dont les quais sont à 20m de profondeur

DCCCXXXVIII : Les stations de métro du 4e : Cité une station dont les quais sont à 20m de profondeur | Lighting in history | Scoop.it
La station "Cité" sur la ligne 4 du métro a un aspect très particulier pour deux raisons : d'une part les lampadaires circulaires sont uniques, d'autre part la station est située à 20m de profondeur car le tunnel d
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A Moment in Yarmouth's History - First Street Lights

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Full article: Margaret Farrington: Sociability and Sanity in Georgian England

Full article: Margaret Farrington: Sociability and Sanity in Georgian England | Lighting in history | Scoop.it
Margaret Farrington was a single woman declared to be a lunatic in 1765 and moved with legal authority from a fashionable London residence to lodgings in her home town, Newcastle upon Tyne. Analysi...
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Urban improvements throughout the eighteenth century, including street lighting, pavements, and public transport in the form of sedan chairs and hackney carriages, made living in British towns much more attractive for young women and widows.36

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History Adventuring podcast #162 - 1920, when the street lights were in the middle of the road

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Acetylene Gas Generating Station in Herndon, Virginia

Acetylene Gas Generating Station in Herndon, Virginia | Lighting in history | Scoop.it
Discover Acetylene Gas Generating Station in Herndon, Virginia: The birthplace of the Herndon Gas Company.
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Gas street lighting around the world

Gas street lighting around the world | Lighting in history | Scoop.it
World Heritage Site: arguments in favourExpert reportGas street lighting around the worldBerlin Light » World heritage site » World Heritage Site: arguments in favour » Gas street lighting around the worldGas street lighting around the world Not only in Berlin but also all around the world one can still find large numbers of fully functioning gas street lamps. These gas street lamps still exist because, as in Berlin right now, people fight or have fought for their preservation. Gas street lightining in Germany City Number of Gas street lampsAugsburg23Backnang 137Baden-Baden1.480Bad Homburg65Berlin44.000Bonn121Bückeburg10Chemnitz500Dortmund10Dresden1.600Düsseldorf16.900Frankfurt am Main5.700Friedrichroda30Greiz9Heidelberg60Jena11Leipzig5Lübeck355Mainz120Mannheim440Minden9Münster 26Nettetal35Neuss34Neustadt/Weinstraße5Nördlingen33Rathenow22Rostock7Soest180Werl80Westerland/Sylt5Willich251Worms1.000Würzburg184Zwickau160 Moreover, the following cities are known to contain small numbers of gas street lamps or gaslight chandeliers: ... Vienna, Venice. Outside of Europe gas street lamps are known to exist in the following cities: ... (all US), ... (all US)... Gas street lightning in EuropeCity Number of Gas street lamps ... Prague ... Warsaw ... Zurich Moreover, the following cities are known to contain small numbers of gas street lamps or gaslight chandeliers: ... Vienna, Venice. Outside of Europe gas street lamps are known to exist in the following cities: ... (all US), ... (all US)... Gaslight preservation around the world South Orange, New Jersey, is home to the largest gas lit area in the US. The local gas street lighting has become the city's unofficial landmark. With a relatively small population of about 17,000 inhabitants, South Orange is lit by approx. 1,400 gas street lamps. Find out more here and here. (LINKS siehe dt. Seite) For some time now, South Orange has been attempting to implement a kind of timer for the gas lamps in order to save operational costs. For more information click here. (LINK siehe dt. Seite) Read an article about the local lamplighter Ray Kienzle here. (LINK siehe dt. Seite) Additionally, approx. 1,200 gas street lamps are spread throughout Cincinnati (Ohio). They were declared a historic monument in 1978. Moreover, gas lamps stand in Riverside (Illinois), Park Slope (New York) and along Manhattan Beach (California). In Disneyland (Florida) one can find a monument to America's first gas street light. This site features historic lanterns from Baltimore. While America's first gas street lamp was put in operation in 1816 in Baltimore, New York did not install gas lamps until 1825. According to a historic report, the city was aware of the availability of gas street lighting in 1816. However, New York at first sought to avoid the associated high installation costs. Nine years later, New York conceded and began installation, one year ahead of Berlin.
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#Shorts || India's 1st Street Light || VANSHIKA JARWAL || V Know history ||

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125 years of CIBSE: back to the future –

125 years of CIBSE: back to the future – | Lighting in history | Scoop.it
To the public, the science of heating is almost unknown, and ventilation exists largely in the imagination.’ These words, written 125 years ago, reflect issues facing the early pioneers of building services engineering as they rallied support for a new professional organisation to tackle this lack of technical and scientific knowledge. Pointing to the success of their contemporaries in North America in influencing public opinion and raising standards of efficiency, the call came in the original prospectus of the new Institution of Heating and Ventilating Engineers (IHVE), formed in 1897, which would evolve into CIBSE. ‘Every person engaged in the profession is, like any other scientist, necessarily a student,’ it declared presciently. The organisation was established to create a forum for open discussion and debate, exploring issues by sharing professional knowledge through publications and lectures. The aim was ‘improving the comfort of mankind’. While much has changed over 125 years, the aims of these Victorian founding fathers still resonate in the 21st century. The impetus for the creation of the IHVE was recognition within the growing and increasingly sophisticated Victorian building engineering sector of the deficiency in knowledge surrounding heating and ventilation. Notably, the idea emerged from the Institute of Sanitary Engineers in 1896, with secretary Jesse Kemsley proposing that a society be formed to foster the heating and ventilating trades. Edmund William Mayner – a member of the ISE council – was largely responsible for setting up the IHVE, and became chairman of an executive committee, while John Grundy was its first President. It was the first serious attempt to organise the heating and ventilation profession, and the organisation’s stated objectives were ‘to promote the intellectual welfare of its members by periodical meetings, to read, consider and discuss papers or problems on heating, ventilating or other kindred subjects, and to take such measures to extend, develop or safeguard the interests of these important trades’. Around the same time, the lighting industry was also undergoing change, with increasing electrification. In 1909, the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) was founded by a group of lighting, electrical and gas engineers, and architects. Fast-forward to 1976, and the Chartered Institution of Building Services (CIBS) was formally established (‘Engineers’ was added in 1985) with the grant of a Royal Charter, which enabled the IHVE to amalgamate with the IES. Since then, a number of specialist divisions and societies have been established under the auspices of CIBSE. CIBSE Societies In 1980, CIBSE Patrons was established as a group of ‘corporate supporters’, comprising businesses that collaborate to give financial, technical and moral backing to a range of Institution initiatives. In 2000, the Lighting Division, which continued the lighting work of the IES became the Society of Light and Lighting with its own governance, membership classes and post-nominals and a world renowned collection of professional guidance. This was followed, in 2003, by the Society of Public Health Engineers, which replaced the Public Heath Engineering Group of CIBSE. In 2004, the Society of Façade Engineering was formed as a joint initiative of CIBSE, IStructE and the RIBA, bringing together individuals from all sectors who have an involvement in façade engineering. In 2011, the Institute of Local Exhaust Ventilation Engineers (ILEVE) was launched by CIBSE, supported by the Health and Safety Executive, to recognise and assess competence in the practical application of LEV. Most recently, the Society of Digital Engineering was formed, in 2017, for those involved in digitising the built environment. Our timeline plots CIBSE’s evolution, from its origins to a global organisation that covers every facet of building services. References: CIBSE Heritage Group for the images and former chair Brian Roberts for giving permission to reproduce sections from Quest for comfort, which he wrote to mark the centenary of CIBSE. The CIBSE Heritage Group has its 50-year anniversary in 2023.
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Shining a light on true carbon transparency

Shining a light on true carbon transparency | Lighting in history | Scoop.it
The policeman is the friendly kind and helps him look, but when nothing shows up he asks him if he is sure this is where he dropped them.‘No’, says the...
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