Learning with MOOCs
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Learning with MOOCs
MOOCs are a new educational learning paradigm. Explore how to use MOOCs effectively and keep up with the latest MOOC news! - The University of Melbourne offer a range of MOOCs, check out out courses --> https://www.coursera.org/unimelb
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In Search of Quality: Using Quality Matters to Analyze the Quality of Massive, Open, Online Courses (MOOCs)

In Search of Quality: Using Quality Matters to Analyze the Quality of Massive, Open, Online Courses (MOOCs) | Learning with MOOCs | Scoop.it
The concept of the massive, open, online course (MOOC) is not new, but high-profile initiatives have moved MOOCs into the forefront of higher education news over the past few years. Members of institutions of higher education have mixed feelings about MOOCs, ranging from those who want to offer college credit for the successful completion of MOOCs to those who fear MOOCs are the end of the university as we know it. We set forth to investigate the quality of MOOCs by using the Quality Matters quality control framework. In this article, we present the results of our inquiry, with a specific focus on the implications the results have on day-to-day practice of designing online courses.
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elearning at eCampus ULg's curator insight, February 19, 2016 2:23 AM

Quality approach comes always with quality commitment in the instructional design (cf Margaryan, 2015 and Merril, 2002) :-)

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Instructional quality of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)

We present an analysis of instructional design quality of 76 randomly selected Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). The quality of MOOCs was determined from first principles of instruction, using a course survey instrument. Two types of MOOCs (xMOOCs and cMOOCs) were analysed and their instructional design quality was assessed and compared. We found that the majority of MOOCs scored poorly on most instructional design principles. However, most MOOCs scored highly on organisation and presentation of course material. The results indicate that although most MOOCs are well-packaged, their instructional design quality is low. We outline implications for practice and ideas for future research.

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MOOCs, MIT and Magic | Tony Bates - online learning and distance education resources

MOOCs, MIT and Magic | Tony Bates -  online learning and distance education resources | Learning with MOOCs | Scoop.it

Why is MIT ignoring 25 years of research into online learning and 100 years research into how students learn in its design of online courses?


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, June 27, 2013 7:14 AM

This blogpost is a detailed account by Tony Bates of why he thinks this is the case and what the implications of this observation are for educational research and instructional design. He first discusses four presentations that were given at MIT's recent LINC 2013 (Learning International Networks Consortium) conference. These presentations (by MIT's Sanjay Sarma, Sir John Daniel, edX's Anant Agarwal and Tony Bates) each cover a different point from which to view online learning, specifically MOOCs. Tony Bates then goes on to focus on how MIT in particular approaches online teaching with its edX platform. As indicated, he is rather disappointed with it, as MIT seem to ignore previous and often excellent past educational research. To single out two of his comments: For its MOOCs MIT uses lecture capturing as its main technology, this fits in with their behaviourist approach to teaching. 25 years of research at open universities, spearheaded by the Open University in the UK, has not only revealed the limited effectiveness of such an approach, it also has come up with a wealth of alternatives. In spite of what MIT seems to think, these can reenact the richness of informal communications that MIT claims their campus-based teaching (and the corridors and coffee corners in its buildings, I would add) offers. 

 

This observation of the state of affairs of educational research at MIT is all the more interesting as it is my impression (see my blogpost on this: http://tiny.cc/tj3bzw) that Harvard, MIT's founding partner institution in edX, takes a much more sophisticated approach to the role educational research could and should play. To them, edX is a means to carry out such research and they are aware of what insights educational research has already brought us. Nevertheless, the lack of impact of educational research could not be a matter of lack of knowledge, but a lack of status of instructional designers (as Tony Bates suggests may be the case at MIT) (@pbsloep)

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A MOOC by another name | Christina Hendricks - You're the Teacher

A MOOC by another name | Christina Hendricks - You're the Teacher | Learning with MOOCs | Scoop.it

Last October I posted some criticisms of moocs (massive, open, online courses) in humanities as too massive to really deal well with promoting critical skills in learners.  Recent experience has made me change my mind. … I have learned more in the last few weeks in etmooc than I ever did in any other professional development opportunity. … Must the interaction that is necessary to student success come from the instructor? Why not set up and foster a space in which interaction is encouraged amongst participants–indeed, where interaction and discussion are as much of (or more of) the focus as content delivery? … why couldn’t xMOOCs take some ideas from the successes of cMOOCs and incorporate more connectivist principles and practices alongside the traditional methods of learning they tend to use?


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 24, 2013 8:49 AM

This is the first installment of a two-piece blog post on why MOOCs in the humanities may work after all. So my remarks below should be seen in that light. Christina confesses to having had too monolithic a view of MOOCs, that cMOOCs such as etmooc provide valuable learning experiences. She also discusses why. 

 

An important thing to note here, however, is that Christina and I am sure many of her fellow learners, are experienced leaners. They know the ropes of self-directed learning, posses the metacognitive skills that independent learning takes. This is not the case for the adolescents who enter higher education, it is one of the important things they should learn and be taught: How to be critical, how to reflect, how to mistrust and trust authority at the same time, etc. It is telling that she describes her experience with etmooc (a cMOOC) as a 'professional development opportunity'. Indeed, but adolescent student are yet to become professionals. Therefore, the question of whether MOOCs are any good for humanities education still stands, as far as I am concerned. xMOOCs don't go beyond knowledge transfer, cMOOCs presuppose skills that only experienced knowledge workers possess. This is a dilemma that I believe can be tackled, but only with clever instructional design and some dedicated tools (about which I will write on another occasion). (@pbsloep)

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Design a World-Class Course on OpenLearning on openlearning.com

Design a World-Class Course on OpenLearning on openlearning.com | Learning with MOOCs | Scoop.it

In this course, learn how to create an effective MOOC using best practice instructional design and tools within the OpenLearning Platform.

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EdX Edge: Big MOOC’s Little Bro

EdX Edge: Big MOOC’s Little Bro | Learning with MOOCs | Scoop.it
So far in the very few months I’ve been at my new job, I’ve been introduced to several new tools. The second LMS of the year is now EdX Edge, the smaller sibling to EdX.org, meant for courses that aren’t quite at that massively open level. For OOCs, if you will. I’ve been very impressed.
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Instructional Content, MOOCs and Competition

Instructional Content, MOOCs and Competition | Learning with MOOCs | Scoop.it

"...greater attention to instructional content in MOOCS will generate more attention to the design of online courses. A more disciplined, team-based approach will improve the quality of learning..."

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Why Online Courses [Really] Need an Instructional Design Strategy

Why Online Courses [Really] Need an Instructional Design Strategy | Learning with MOOCs | Scoop.it
In this post I examine and define instructional design, and share why it’s essential to the development of online courses. "Design brings forth what would not come naturally"  Klaus Krippendorff De...
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