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Tapping Into Tuition Benefits

Tapping Into Tuition Benefits | Learning | Scoop.it
Tuition assistance has benefits that go beyond development into recruitment and retention, but many companies don’t know just how helpful it can be.
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A Radical Way of Unleashing a Generation of Geniuses

A Radical Way of Unleashing a Generation of Geniuses | Learning | Scoop.it
Students in Matamoros, Mexico weren't getting much out of school -- until a radical new teaching method unlocked their potential. And then everything changed.
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Not Leadership Material? Good. The World Needs Followers.

Not Leadership Material? Good. The World Needs Followers. | Learning | Scoop.it
The glorification of leadership skills, especially in college admissions, has emptied leadership of its meaning.
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The Big, Big Problem with Current K 12 Investing (EdSurge News)

The Big, Big Problem with Current K 12 Investing (EdSurge News) | Learning | Scoop.it

If public K-12 invested 2% of its national spending on research and development (R&D), that would total $12 billion every year.
For perspective, Tesla, widely considered one of the world’s most innovative companies, raised approximately $200 million for the R&D required to put its first
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21 Top Presentation Tools for Teachers - More Than A Tech

21 Top Presentation Tools for Teachers - More Than A Tech | Learning | Scoop.it
Looking for the best presentation software for your classroom? Check out our list of 21 top presentation tools for teachers.

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13 Very Different Tools To Help Students Find Their Voice

13 Very Different Tools To Help Students Find Their Voice | Learning | Scoop.it
13 Very Different Tools To Help Students Find Their Voice

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The Ultimate Guide to Using iPads in the Classroom | Edudemic

The Ultimate Guide to Using iPads in the Classroom | Edudemic | Learning | Scoop.it
Although many teachers appreciate the advantages students gain from using iPads, they are very conscious of remembering that the devices are simply tools
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Why Does Physical Activity Improve Cognitive Flexibility?

Why Does Physical Activity Improve Cognitive Flexibility? | Learning | Scoop.it
People who are physically active tend be better at thinking outside the box. Why is this? New research from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign offers some valuable clues.
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Introducing Slides Q&A: A new way to talk with your audience—not at them

Introducing Google Slides Q&A feature allowing you to talk with—not at your audience. Learn more on the Google Docs blog: http://goo.gl/q9yMSw Get the app

Via Ariana Amorim
Nicole Copelands insight:
All I can say is Wow!
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5 Presentation Design Tips for Amazing Looking Slides

5 Presentation Design Tips for Amazing Looking Slides | Learning | Scoop.it
Discover 5 simple presentation design tips for creating the best looking PowerPoint slides. These PowerPoint tips and tricks will make your presentations

Via Ariana Amorim
Nicole Copelands insight:
People are more likely to remember your slides, if you have better slides.  Otherwise, don't use them.
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5 Movement Strategies That Get Students Thinking - TeachThought

5 Movement Strategies That Get Students Thinking - TeachThought | Learning | Scoop.it
Each day more research confirms the link between movement and learning. Brain researcher David Sousa claims that physical activity increases the amount of oxygen in our blood, and this oxygen is related to enhanced learning and memory. A recent Washington Post article suggests that many student behaviors we associate with ADHD may stem from an overall lack of physical movement  – both in and out of school. In addition, a phenomenally popular blog post by Alexis Wiggins recently touched upon how much sitting students actually do every day, and how all that sitting affects energy levels and learning.

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Regular exercise can help with memory loss, cognition | VailDaily.com

Regular exercise can help with memory loss, cognition | VailDaily.com | Learning | Scoop.it
There is little doubt that exercise has many benefits to the overall health of people at any age. However, with a global increase in the senior population, there is much research being done on physical activity and brain aging.

Age-related cognitive decline is a normal part of aging. As with any living organism, the brain has a life cycle. While most of the cells within our brains were formed during prenatal development, there is a part of the brain that is capable of producing new brain cells. Our hippocampus, the region of the brain involved in the formation and retrieval of memories, learning, and emotions, continues to create new cells as we age. This process is called neurogenesis.

Studies from the University of Edinburgh and UCLA’s School of Medicine have confirmed that exercise and increasing the oxygen levels of blood within the brain, aid greatly in promoting healthy brain tissue.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, two-and-a-half-hours of moderate cardio and two days of muscle strengthening every week can greatly assist in preventing memory loss. Walking, swimming, dancing and balance classes are all exercises that make you breathe faster, increase your heart rate, and can keep you feeling and looking your best.

While exercise is a helpful in slowing memory loss, there are many other factors that contribute. One of the most frequent things affecting memory I see is medications. Although medications provide many benefits, they can also have unwelcome side effects. Too often I see that prescription drugs cause my clients issues with cognitive impairment.

When medications are taken improperly and/or skipped, many unfavorable outcomes may occur. Memory concerns are just one such possibility. Common medications including antidepressants, antihistamines, anti-anxiety medications, muscle relaxers, tranquilizers, sleeping pills and pain medications often affect people’s cognitive capacities. If you take any of these, you should not dismiss the potential for memory and cognitive impairment as a side effect.

For people who may suffer from dementia or Alzheimer’s, forgetting to take their medications is not uncommon. And often the opposite is true: They often forget whether they took their medication and thus they may take doses again. Having family or a caregiver remind them of the appropriate times to take their medication can be very helpful. Using a pill organizer or a computerized pill dispenser is another tool that can aid clients in taking their meds.

Many commonly prescribed medications often place older adults at higher risk of not only memory loss but also delirium, falls, fractures and motor skill functions. I find medications such as Ativan, Klonopin, Xanax, Ambien and Diazepam are some of the most prevalent contributors to cognitive side effects. While not appropriate for all people, you may want to consult your doctor about the possibility of trying alternatives such as melatonin, doxylamine, valerian and chamomile.

Studies suggest that S-Adenosyl methionine may help treat depression. SAMe plays a role in the immune system, maintains cell membranes and helps produce and break down brain chemicals, such as serotonin, melatonin and dopamine. Studies at the University of Maryland Medical Center and other research facilities, have shown that SAMe may also help relieving the pain of osteoarthritis and may help treat depression.

It’s important to consult a doctor if you notice the onset of sudden memory complications or unusual mood swings. Asking your doctor if there are side effects to medications they prescribe is always a good start.

There are no guarantees when it comes to preventing memory loss and dementia. However, exercise is increasingly proving to assist in brain atrophy and gray matter volume. The same practices that contribute to healthy living and physical vitality also contribute to a healthy memory.

The brain a muscle that requires nutrition, rest and exercise. Use it or lose it!

Judson Haims is the owner of Visiting Angels Home Care in Eagle County. Contact him at www.visitingangels.com/comtns or 970-328-5526.

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Emotional Advertising: How Brands Use Feelings to Get People to Buy

Emotional Advertising: How Brands Use Feelings to Get People to Buy | Learning | Scoop.it
Learn how brands use the four core human emotions in advertising to influence buying behavior.

Via Marylene Delbourg-Delphis, BSN
Nicole Copelands insight:
Isn't it the same for learning? Don't we "buy in" when we feel that emotional or personal connection to the information? We may want to take a lesson from the best marketers who somehow know exactly how to get us to buy what they are selling.
rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, April 12, 2016 11:41 AM
We have all heard of Propaganda Techniques, advertising is all about touching emotions in a big way! Brands use feelings and emotions to get people to buy products even when they don't need them! Brand loyalty depends to a great deal on emotive attachments. Baby products for one thing exploit maternal feelings to a great deal, whether it is diapers, or clothes!
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Tapping Into Tuition Benefits

Tapping Into Tuition Benefits | Learning | Scoop.it
Tuition assistance has benefits that go beyond development into recruitment and retention, but many companies don’t know just how helpful it can be.
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Teaching Mindfulness to Kids: Mindful Listening - Left Brain Buddha

Teaching Mindfulness to Kids: Mindful Listening - Left Brain Buddha | Learning | Scoop.it
Mindful listening is a great way to introduce young children to the practice of mindfulness. Discover several fun ways to teach this concept to kids -- with lots of helpful resources!

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10 Excellent Web Tools for Creating Digital Quizzes

10 Excellent Web Tools for Creating Digital Quizzes | Learning | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

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Learning in an Uber Economy

Learning in an Uber Economy | Learning | Scoop.it
Learning has shifted to an Uber app-like functionality that lets employees know what skills are in demand and helps develop them.
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Why Constant Learners All Embrace the 5-Hour Rule

Why Constant Learners All Embrace the 5-Hour Rule | Learning | Scoop.it

At the age of 10, Benjamin Franklin left formal schooling to become an apprentice to his father. As a teenager, he showed no particular talent or aptitude aside from his love of books.

 

When he died a little over half a century later, he was America's most respected statesman, its most famous inventor, a prolific author, and a successful entrepreneur.

 

What happened between these two points to cause such a meteoric rise? Underlying the answer to this question is a success strategy for life that we can all use, and increasingly must use.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, July 14, 2016 5:58 PM

Benjamin Franklin did this 1 hour a day, 5 hours a week. Why you should do it too.

Brilliant Breakthroughs, Inc.'s curator insight, July 15, 2016 3:30 PM
Succinct article about the power of consistent learning. Great examples of role models and their approach.
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Having a PLN

Having a PLN | Learning | Scoop.it
In case you missed it, Sylvia Duckworth released another of her wonderful Sketchnotes last week. This time, it deals with reasons why you should have a PLN. It's well worth sharing for those who aren't connected well with other educators or organizations.  I strongly agree with all of the 10 points in the Sketchnote. Once…
Lucía Naranjo's curator insight, July 31, 2016 12:55 AM
Hola  todos, comparto el segundo contenido de mi töpico!
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9 Ways to Become More Creative in the Next 10 Minutes

9 Ways to Become More Creative in the Next 10 Minutes | Learning | Scoop.it
Creativity is developed, not a birthright.
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All You Need to Know About the ‘Learning Styles’ Myth, in Two Minutes

All You Need to Know About the ‘Learning Styles’ Myth, in Two Minutes | Learning | Scoop.it
The myth of preferred learning styles states that people learn better when they are taught in a way that matches their preferred style. Yet there is little evidence to support this claim, and plenty of reason to doubt it.
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Walking increases creative thinking

Walking increases creative thinking | Learning | Scoop.it

(NaturalNews) People perform more creatively when walking, according to a study conducted by researchers from Stanford University and published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition.

The findings -- which found as much as a 60 percent increase in ability to perform creative tasks while walking -- support anecdotal comments from many creative people who claim that they get their best ideas while walking. Some corporate executives have even been known to hold meetings while walking, including Steve Jobs (the late co-founder of Apple) and Mark Zuckerberg (co-founder of Facebook).

"This study is another justification for integrating bouts of physical activity into the day, whether it's recess at school or turning a meeting at work into a walking one," researcher Dr. Marily Oppezzo said. "We'd be healthier, and maybe more innovative for it."

Measuring creativity

The researchers had 176 adults complete a number of tasks designed to measure creativity in one of four conditions: walking indoors, walking outdoors, sitting indoors or sitting outdoors. The walking indoors condition consisted of a treadmill facing a wall, while the sitting outdoors condition consisted of being pushed in a wheelchair along the same path that the walkers took. This was designed to control for any effect on creativity from changing scenery.


Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/045033_walking_creative_thinking_exercise.html#ixzz318GZDLTx


Via Charles Tiayon
Charles Tiayon's curator insight, May 8, 2014 8:56 AM

(NaturalNews) People perform more creatively when walking, according to a study conducted by researchers from Stanford University and published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition.

The findings -- which found as much as a 60 percent increase in ability to perform creative tasks while walking -- support anecdotal comments from many creative people who claim that they get their best ideas while walking. Some corporate executives have even been known to hold meetings while walking, including Steve Jobs (the late co-founder of Apple) and Mark Zuckerberg (co-founder of Facebook).

"This study is another justification for integrating bouts of physical activity into the day, whether it's recess at school or turning a meeting at work into a walking one," researcher Dr. Marily Oppezzo said. "We'd be healthier, and maybe more innovative for it."

Measuring creativity

The researchers had 176 adults complete a number of tasks designed to measure creativity in one of four conditions: walking indoors, walking outdoors, sitting indoors or sitting outdoors. The walking indoors condition consisted of a treadmill facing a wall, while the sitting outdoors condition consisted of being pushed in a wheelchair along the same path that the walkers took. This was designed to control for any effect on creativity from changing scenery.


Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/045033_walking_creative_thinking_exercise.html#ixzz318GZDLTx

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How Exercise Can Boost Young Brains

How Exercise Can Boost Young Brains | Learning | Scoop.it

Encourage young boys and girls to run, jump, squeal, hop and chase after each other or after erratically kicked balls, and you substantially improve their ability to think, according to the most ambitious study ever conducted of physical activity and cognitive performance in children. The results underscore, yet again, the importance of physical activity for children’s brain health and development, especially in terms of the particular thinking skills that most affect academic performance.

The news that children think better if they move is hardly new. Recent studies have shown that children’s scores on math and reading tests rise if they go for a walk beforehand, even if the children are overweight and unfit. Other studies have found correlations between children’s aerobic fitness and their brain structure, with areas of the brain devoted to thinking and learning being generally larger among youngsters who are more fit.

But these studies were short-term or associational, meaning that they could not tease out whether fitness had actually changed the children’s’ brains or if children with well-developed brains just liked exercise.

So for the new study, which was published in September in Pediatrics, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign approached school administrators at public elementary schools in the surrounding communities and asked if they could recruit the school’s 8- and 9-year-old students for an after-school exercise program.

This group was of particular interest to the researchers because previous studies had determined that at that age, children typically experience a leap in their brain’s so-called executive functioning, which is the ability to impose order on your thinking. Executive functions help to control mental multitasking, maintain concentration, and inhibit inappropriate responses to mental stimuli.

Children whose executive functions are stunted tend to have academic problems in school, while children with well-developed executive functions usually do well.

The researchers wondered whether regular exercise would improve children’s executive-function skills, providing a boost to their normal mental development.

They received commitments from 220 local youngsters and brought all of them to the university for a series of tests to measure their aerobic fitness and current executive functioning.

The researchers then divided the group in half, with 110 of the children joining a wait list for the after-school program, meaning that they would continue with their normal lives and serve as a control group.

The other 110 boys and girls began being bused every afternoon to the university campus, where they participated in organized, structured bouts of what amounted to wild, childish fun.

“We wanted them to play,” said Charles Hillman, a professor of kinesiology and community health at the University of Illinois who led the study.

Wearing heart rate monitors and pedometers for monitoring purposes, the children were guided through exercise that doubled as romping. The activities, which changed frequently, consisted of games like tag, as well as instruction in technique skills, such as how to dribble a soccer ball. The exercise curriculum was designed to improve both aerobic endurance and basic motor skills, Dr. Hillman said.

Each two-hour session also included downtime, since children naturally career about and then collapse, before repeating the process. In total, the boys and girls generally moved at a moderate or vigorous intensity for about 70 minutes and covered more than two miles per session, according to their pedometers.

The program lasted for a full school year, with sessions available every day after school for nine months, although not every child attended every session.

At the end of the program, both groups returned to the university to repeat the physical and cognitive tests.

As would have been expected, the children in the exercise group were now more physically fit than they had been before, while children in the control group were not. The active children also had lost body fat, although changes in weight and body composition were not the focus of this study.

More important, the children in the exercise group also displayed substantial improvements in their scores on each of the computer-based tests of executive function. They were better at “attentional inhibition,” which is the ability to block out irrelevant information and concentrate on the task at hand, than they had been at the start of the program, and had heightened abilities to toggle between cognitive tasks.

Tellingly, the children who had attended the most exercise sessions showed the greatest improvements in their cognitive scores.

Meanwhile, the children in the control group also raised their test scores, but to a much smaller extent. In effect, both groups’ brains were developing, but the process was more rapid and expansive in the children who ran and played.

“The message is, get kids to be physically active” for the sake of their brains, as well as their health, Dr. Hillman said. After-school programs like the one he and his colleagues developed require little additional equipment or expense for most schools, he said, although a qualified physical education instructor should be involved, he added.

Extended physical education classes during school hours could also ensure that children engage in sufficient physical activity for brain health, of course. But school districts nationwide are shortening or eliminating P.E. programs for budgetary and other reasons, a practice that is likely “short-sighted,” Dr. Hillman said. If you want young students to do well in reading and math, make sure that they also move.




Via Technical Doctor
Vajda, J.'s curator insight, March 16, 2017 1:25 AM


Did you know: that the children in this exercise group (experiment) also displayed substantial improvements in their scores on each of the computer-based tests of executive function. They were better at “attentional inhibition,” which is the ability to block out irrelevant information and concentrate on the task at hand, than they had been at the start of the program, and had heightened abilities to toggle between cognitive tasks.

 

Nic Gibson's curator insight, May 29, 2017 9:37 PM
A great insight to how fitness relates to young brains and their mental health.
Kelsie Borg's curator insight, May 31, 2017 1:34 AM
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Feedback Q & A

Feedback Q & A | Learning | Scoop.it
Students love rich useful feedback. But, what exactly do they want and need from the instructor? Here are a few questions I have been asked by students, and ways to respond. Feedback Q & A

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Free Technology for Teachers: Six Tools for Creating Videos on Chromebooks

Free Technology for Teachers: Six Tools for Creating Videos on Chromebooks | Learning | Scoop.it
Here are some of my go-to video creation tools to use on Chromebooks.

Via Ariana Amorim
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