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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Economies of South America

World Economic Outlook, April 2019 - http://bit.ly/2vAxtak
Seth Dixon's insight:
There are many stories in this video in the nearly 40 years of economic history of South America since 1990.The two most important stories portrayed (or at least the most dramatic) in the animated chart are decline of Venezuela’s economy and the rise of Chile’s. This video can act as a primer to get students to consider the regional context of economic growth as well as the differing historical, political, and geographic context that leads to distinct results in any given country. See with links at: https://wp.me/p2dv5Z-2Qa


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Around world, more support taking in refugees than immigrants

Around world, more support taking in refugees than immigrants | Geography Education | Scoop.it
On balance, people around the world are more accepting of refugees fleeing violence and war than they are of immigrants moving to their country, according to a new analysis of public opinion data from 18 nations surveyed by Pew Research Center in spring 2018.
Seth Dixon's insight:
We know that there are diverse perspectives on migration in our own country, but it is important to remember that our country’s conversation is also a part of a global conversation. As many developed countries are trying to limit some of the permeability of their borders, and as economic migrants seek to improve their economic opportunities, the immigration debates become more central to Since there has been As the Pew Research data shows, in North America, the immigration discussion and the refugee discussion have converged, where in countries such as Greece they are very much different conversations.
Questions to Ponder:
Why might the immigration and refugee assistance questions elicit a greater distinction in European countries (such as Germany, Italy, and Greece) then it did in North American countries (such as the U.S. and Canada)?
What are some impacts of the convergence of the political conversations surrounding immigration and refugee assistance for the United States and its policies?

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Hawaiian Shirts: Articles of Interest #4

Hawaiian Shirts: Articles of Interest #4 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
“There are a few ways to tell if you’re looking at an authentic, high-quality aloha shirt. If the pockets match the pattern, that’s a good sign, but it’s not everything. Much of understanding an aloha shirt is about paying attention to what is on the shirt itself. It’s about looking at the pattern to see the story it tells.”  https://geographyeducation.org/2019/10/10/hawaiian-shirts/
Seth Dixon's insight:
An article of clothing is a product of the culture that made it and the place that it is from. If a place has a complex cultural history, with series of migrations that have shaped the place, then the cultural artifact might have a rich product as well. Such is the case with the Aloha shirt from Hawaii.
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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, October 10, 9:54 AM
This is an interesting exploration of clothing products and looking deeper than the first glance.
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The Case for Embracing Linguistic Diversity

The Case for Embracing Linguistic Diversity | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"For all our current interest in identity politics, there’s no corresponding sense of identity linguistics. You are what you speak—the words that run throughout your mind are at least as fundamental to your selfhood as is your ethnicity or your gender. And sometimes it’s healthy to consider human characteristics that are not inborn, rigid, and outwardly defined. After all, you can always learn another language and change who you are. And the more languages you know, the more you appreciate how hard it is to label another person, because each mind contains its own unique collection of words. An individual who wrestles with a difficult language can learn to be more sympathetic to outsiders and open to different experiences of the world. This learning process—the embarrassments, the frustrations, the gradual sense of understanding and connection—is invariably transformative."
Seth Dixon's insight:
In pop culture and the media, race and gender are usually touted as the most important part of a cultural identity, but in the APHG CED, language, religion, and ethnicity are the ones explicitly mentioned. This article calls for a more nuanced understanding of how language opens up the world and is a part of identity. It uses a few examples to show how language shapes our world as well as our perceptions of the world: 1-the politics of monolingual presidents and 2-Chinese men selling lingerie in Egypt (trust me, the examples actually work).
To read this with additional links and tags, visit: https://geographyeducation.org/2019/09/28/the-case-for-embracing-linguistic-diversity/ ;
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The perfect French baguette

The perfect French baguette | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"While there are few symbols as quintessentially French as the baguette, its status – and quality – have been uncertain in recent years. Beginning in the 1950s, bakers began looking for shortcuts to make baguettes more quickly: relying on frozen, pre-made dough. ‘Those bakers at that time were happy,’ said Bouattour, as he led me past the fresh loaves at his Arlette & Colette in Paris’ 17th arrondissement. ‘But it killed our profession.’ In an attempt to save traditional French baguettes from widespread industrialisation, France passed Le Décret Pain (‘The Bread Decree’) in 1993, establishing that, by law, an authentic baguette de tradition must be made by hand, sold in the same place it’s baked and only made with water, wheat flour, yeast and salt.”
Seth Dixon's insight:
Technological advancements and economic practices would have altered French baking practices, but to halt the change cultural purists took political steps to preserve the old cultural traditions. The running of bakeries, and the winners of the prize for the best Parisian baguette have been bakers who come from immigrant families. Bakers with Middle Eastern, North African, and West African backgrounds are now key participants of shaping the most French of cultural goods.

Questions to Ponder: Why have bread-making practices become politicized in Paris? How have immigrants changed French cultural practices? How have French cultural practices changed immigrants? 

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United States of Alaska Map

United States of Alaska Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"If the title of this post is confusing, it’s because the map is completely unconventional (and I love it). True, it is not the title of the map, but it could have been. So often we see a map of the United States with the 48 contiguous states prominently displayed and Alaska and Hawaii scaled down, and stuck in a corner somewhere. Well, this map ingeniously inverts that paradigm."

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Immigrant share in U.S. nears record high but remains below that of many other countries

Immigrant share in U.S. nears record high but remains below that of many other countries | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This was the highest share of foreign-born people in the United States since 1910, when immigrants accounted for 14.7% of the American population. The record share was 14.8% in 1890, when 9.2 million immigrants lived in the United States.Nearly 14% of the U.S. population is foreign-born. That's the highest share of foreign-born people in the country since 1910, but it's far from the highest in the world."

Seth Dixon's insight:
The percentage of residents in the United States that are migrants (born in a country other than the United States) has been rising since the 1970. This is much higher than the global average of 3.4%, but not surprising given how economic pull factors are reshaping global demographic patterns. High-income countries attract more migrants; so the demographic impact on the global patterns of migrants is profound. High-income countries have 14.1% of their residents coming from other countries, where middle and low-income countries average between 1 and 2% for their percentage of migrants in their populations.

Questions to Ponder: What are some of the demographic, economic, cultural, and political impacts of these statistics? How might this impact certain regions?
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Indonesia picks area on Borneo for new capital, with relocation estimated to cost US$33 billion

Indonesia picks area on Borneo for new capital, with relocation estimated to cost US$33 billion | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"Indonesia will build a new capital city on the island of Borneo, home to some of the world’s biggest coal reserves and orangutan habitats, as President Joko Widodo seeks to ease pressure on congested and sinking Jakarta. The relocation of the capital, some 1,400km away from Jakarta, will help spread economic activity outside the nation’s most populous island of Java."


Seth Dixon's insight:
Jakarta is a megacity that will continue to grow, but it is a sinking city–in fact, the fastest sinking city in the world. The pressures of being the primate city are enormous–the rush hour traffic is considered one of the worst in the world and the continued centralization of government in Jakarta limits economic group in other regions of the country. This plan to create a forward capital to encourage growth in Borneo and attempt to limit growth in Jakarta will be fascinating to monitor. For more on forward capitals, here is a BBC article with 5 other examples of countries that have changed their capital cities. To see this with supplemental links: https://geographyeducation.org/2019/09/03/indonesia-chooses-a-new-capital/
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Best Case Study for Declining Populations? South Korea –

Best Case Study for Declining Populations? South Korea – | Geography Education | Scoop.it
South Korea is the world’s first country to have a total fertility rate below 1 (in 2019, it dropped to 0.98). It may not be the largest population of the 86 declining populations (114 countries have TFRs above replacement level), but it makes for an incredibly important case-study to explore emerging demographic patterns because in the coming years, it probably won’t be the only country with a TFR below 1.
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This is what MLB fandom looks like across the country

This is what MLB fandom looks like across the country | Geography Education | Scoop.it
While Pennsylvania only has two teams, the state's team allegiance is split across seven different teams.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There are some good geographic concepts that can be used by showing this map (based on SeatGeek purchases). In this related map of baseball fan regions (based on social media connections), we can see more clearly the value of the core-domain-sphere model.  This map uses the brightest color intensities to represent the core regions and the lightest hues to show waning strength, but to still signify that the area is a part of a team's sphere of influence.  Essentially, this map is begging you to explore the borderlands, the liminal "in-between" spaces that aren't as easy to explain. What patterns do you see?  Explanations? 

GeoEd Tags: regions, diffusion, sport.

Scoop.it Tags: regions, diffusion, sport

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2019 APHG Reading Professional Development Files

2019 APHG Reading Professional Development Files | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I was delighted to have Dr. Alexander (Alec) Murphy be our professional development night speaker. He was one the members of the very first test development committee that made the idea of AP Human Geography to become a reality. His talk spoke about that history of the early days launching APHG, and the all-important topic, GEOGRAPHY: WHY IT MATTERS. His passion for geography education was only matched by his incredible teaching style that had the audience enraptured (he kindly shared this PDF of his slides with us).
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The Documentary Podcast, Balkan Border Wars - Serbia and Kosovo

The Documentary Podcast, Balkan Border Wars - Serbia and Kosovo | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Old enemies Serbia and Kosovo discuss what for some is unthinkable - an ethnic land swap
Seth Dixon's insight:

Land swaps are about fixing problematic borders–and we know that the world is full of problematic, contentious, and disputed borders.  Yet land swap are incredibly rare because it upends the status quo.  A few years back Belgium and Netherlands swapped some land, but more often then not, calls to simply give land to another country just because the land appears to be controlled by the ‘wrong’ country usually go unanswered.  This proposed swap is especially intriguing because (to an objective outside observer) it could benefit both countries and lead to a mutual recognition of their shared border.  Some argue that working this type of border/land-swap is not to different from the ethnic cleansing of yesteryear and won't lead to greater peace and regional cooperation. This series of maps highlights the ethnic, political, and geographic ramifications. 

 

GeoEd Tags: borders, political, territoriality, unit 4 political, Serbia, Kosovo, Europe.

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Shopping in Pyongyang, and Other Adventures in North Korean Capitalism

Shopping in Pyongyang, and Other Adventures in North Korean Capitalism | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Far from the stereotype of total economic isolation, the black market has brought a surprising degree of modernity and consumerism — for some."

Seth Dixon's insight:

It is very difficult to get reliable data, journalism, or any other form of analysis out of North Korea.  For decades, North Korea has consistently been the country with the least freedom of the press in the world (as ranked by Reporters without Borders metrics).  In the 1990s, North Korea’s official, socialist-run economy failed to provide enough food for the population, and the informal, underground of markets (jangmadang) became increasingly prevalent.  This article is a rare glimpse into the shadow economy and the merchants that grease the economic wheels in one of the most authoritarian countries of the world.     

 

GeoEd Tags: North Korea, East Asia, economic, labor.

Scoop.it Tags: North KoreaEast Asia, economic, labor.

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Masters of Tradition: A Cultural Journey Across America

Masters of Tradition: A Cultural Journey Across America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"Explore the Masters of Tradition story map. Discover the rich diversity of cultures and artistic traditions that enliven our nation. Meet extraordinary artists from across the country who have been awarded the National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellowship, the nation’s highest honor for excellence in the folk and traditional arts. Together they represent a remarkable portrait of America’s diverse cultural heritage."
Seth Dixon's insight:
This is an excellent StoryMap that to see examples of local and indigenous cultures that are being practiced by some in the United States. The NEA Fellowship also shows how preserving local and indigenous cultural traits in the face of popular cultural influences is difficult and is seen as a national priority and part of a treasured cultural heritage. Also, read this article on how to plan a good storymap.  Read with additional links here: https://geographyeducation.org/2019/11/05/masters-of-tradition-a-culture-journey-across-america/
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Geopolitics interfering with business, and business interfering with geopolitics –

Geopolitics interfering with business, and business interfering with geopolitics – | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“After Daryl Morey, the Houston Rockets’ general manager, tweeted in support of protestors in Hong Kong, he found himself at the center of an NBA-wide controversy concerning everyone from Rockets owner Tilman Fertitta to the Chinese government. The tweet has been deleted, but the debates on China’s role in the NBA continue.” 

This has been an interesting last few weeks for NBA commentators, as the most important topic of conversation in basketball circles has been (surprisingly) about the Hong Kong protests and China’s response to them. The origin of the story is lengthy, but some NBA employees tweeted support for the Hong Kong protesters and the Chinese government, the Chinese Basketball Association, and Chinese media platforms did not like it one bit.

China is a massive market that the NBA has been nurturing since Yao Ming’s playing days, and it is almost too tantalizing a market to ignore. The NBA is now discovering that there is a price to pay to do business in China, and we are watching this tension between a league with a history of politically outspoken players, coaches, and general managers. Many are backpedaling (like LeBron James and Stephen Curry) as China keeps flexing.

In a similar vein, the new DreamWorks movie Abominable has a scene that shows the 9-dash line of the South China Sea. Vietnam and Malaysia have both pulled the movie from theaters in their countries. This is just another recent example of soft power being used to promote a political perspective through business connections.

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Ben Seaman's curator insight, October 23, 6:30 PM
In the 2018 Nba Season, 300 million people watched a portion of an NBA game in China. Recently, protestors in Hong Kong have led demonstrations fighting for basic human rights that in America we are used to as the normal. Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey shared his support via twitter for the Hong Kong citizens fighting for human rights. Following the tweet, the Chinese Government cut all deals with the NBA, censored opening night games from being viewed in China, and also demanded that the Morey be fired immediately. 
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Persuasive Maps

Persuasive Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This is a collection of “persuasive” cartography: ​more than 800 ​ maps intended primarily to influence opinions or beliefs - to send a message - rather than to communicate geographic information. The collection reflects a variety of persuasive tools ​, including​ allegorical, satirical and pictorial mapping; selective inclusion; unusual use of projections, color, graphics and text; and intentional deception. Maps in the collection address a wide range of messages: religious, political, military, commercial, moral and social.
Seth Dixon's insight:
This is a fantastic collection of historical maps. I especially enjoy the rhetorical and overtly persuasive quality of the maps in this collection. Too often, we assume that maps convey data and information from a strictly neutral position. Just like every news article, how the information in a map is arranged, selected, and framed is helpful in evaluating the usefulness, important, and accuracy of the information that is being presented. See with tags and links on: https://geographyeducation.org/2019/10/08/persuasive-maps-2/
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Indonesia 'discards' its capital Jakarta for a new one, but we can't just dispose of cities

Indonesia 'discards' its capital Jakarta for a new one, but we can't just dispose of cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
“Indonesia’s government is advancing plans to relocate the country’s capital more than 1,000 kilometres away, from Jakarta on densely populated Java island to Borneo. At a time when modern consumer societies are awash in disposable products, the relocation plan seems to exemplify global society’s tendency to throw things away once they can no longer be used. In other words, Jakarta is a ‘disposable city.’ The situation with Jakarta is only the latest case of a country shifting its capital from an unmanageable urban context.”
Seth Dixon's insight:
This article, while on the surface is about forward capitals, and Jakarta’s plan to change it’s capital city, is truly about unsustainable urban land use practices. Relocating a capital is a part a a fix to alleviate the pressures on the government, but it does not solve the ecological problems of the city itself. This article is a plea to push for more sustainable urban initiatives.

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The Displaced: When 40,000 desperate Venezuelans hit a tiny island


Seth Dixon's insight:
The country of Trinidad and Tobago is only 7 miles away from Venezuela, which is currently in the midst of a political, agricultural, and economic collapse. As 10% of Venezuelans have left their country, an estimated 40,000 have fled to the small, neighboring island nation of Trinidad and Tobago. The Trinidadian government and people have done much to aid Venezuelans, but can only do so much and are feeling stretched beyond their capacity to assist the Venezuelans who can be called refugees or economic migrants, depending on how you see this situation.
I believe that this is the first in the BBC’s new series, The Displaced and look forward to seeing more. Not surprisingly, when reading the Youtube comments on this, many from Trinidad feel that this reporting did not convey an accurate portrayal of the situation, that most of the Trinidadians that are welcoming to migrants and not xenophobic. I believe, to some extent, that the BBC is judging the Trinidadian government much as it would a large, developed country with a far greater capacity to accommodate an quick demographic influx. 
To read this with additional links and tags, visit: https://geographyeducation.org/2019/09/18/the-displaced-venezuela/
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How to Read a Topo Map

How to Read a Topo Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A topographic map is designed to show the physical features and terrain of an area. They’re different from other maps because they show the three-dimensional landscape: its contours, elevations, topographic features, bodies of water, and vegetation. Find your way the old-school way by mastering the map."

Seth Dixon's insight:
This article gives a nice introduction to topographic maps, explains how to read them, and why they are useful. While I love digital maps and the features that are offered through GIS, old school paper maps still play a vital role in helping us navigate this world of ours.  See with links on: https://geographyeducation.org/2019/09/12/how-to-read-a-topo-map/
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Hong Kong protests: 9 questions you were too embarrassed to ask

Hong Kong protests: 9 questions you were too embarrassed to ask | Geography Education | Scoop.it
“What began as a targeted protest against a controversial extradition bill in June has transformed into what feels like a battle for the future of Hong Kong. Protesters are not just fighting their local government. They’re challenging one of the most powerful countries on earth: China.”


Seth Dixon's insight:
They have been protesting for months in Hong Kong, at first about the extradition bill, but now about so much more as well. The government has backed down, and withdrawn the hated extradition bill, and now it’s remains to be seen if the protestors will continue with their demands or will be appeased with this compromise. China doesn’t back down very often with their citizens so this still a potentially volatile situation.  To read with additional links, see: https://geographyeducation.org/2019/09/04/hong-kong-protests/
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Istanbul's Proposed Canal: Big Business and Sweeping Consequences

Istanbul's Proposed Canal: Big Business and Sweeping Consequences | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The ambitious Canal Istanbul project could displace thousands of people, imperil the city’s tenuous water supply, and impact ocean life, critics say.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Istanbul’s location on the Bosporus has been vital to the Byzantine and Ottoman Empire as well as the modern state of Turkey.  This is one of those crucial chokepoints of global commerce like the Straits of Malacca, and the demands on both of these natural waterways will soon exceed their capacity.  Thailand is working on the Thai canal to relieve the pressures on the Straits of Malacca (and enrich themselves in the process); Nicaragua is also seeking to create an alternative to the Panama Canal which is in the process of expanding their locks to accommodate the massive container ships.

 

Istanbul is likewise looking to find other ways the keep their locational advantage as the gateway to the Black Sea region and beyond.  Projects on this grand of a scale have tremendous real estate, trading, transportation and even tourism impacts. They can also bring negative impacts to the local water supply, wildlife, other environmental concerns.  The bigger the project, the bigger the environmental risks and the greater the economic rewards.

 

GeoEd Tags: transportation, globalization, industry, economic, environment, political ecology, Turkey.

Scoop.it Tags: transportation, globalization, industry, economic, environment, political ecology, Turkey.

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Anne Endres's curator insight, August 29, 12:18 PM
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2019 AP Human Geography Exam Results

2019 AP Human Geography Exam Results | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The 2019 reading was great place for professional development, networking, and great time to meet passionate educators. The Chief Reader report will be added here soon (forthcoming) but in the meantime, here are the slides of my presentation at the AP Annual Conference on July 20th, 2019.
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Using the Streamer App

Tutorial on how to use the National Atlas Streamer interactive mapping tool. This map allows you to explore the rivers, streams, and brooks of the United States. Trace these bodies of water upstream to their sources or downstream to their emptying points, and view a detailed report on the traces path.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Streamer is the online mapping application that lets anyone explore downstream and upstream along America’s rivers and streams. Streamer can be used to follow the paths of rivers up to their headwaters and down to the sea, to view location-related information such as weather radar and near real-time streamflow data, and to discover hydrologic connections between distant places.

GeoEd TAGS: water, mapping, physical, fluvial, regions.

Scoop.it Tags: water, mapping, physical, fluvial, regions.

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Chart of the World Economy

Chart of the World Economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Latest estimates put the world economy at about $80 trillion in nominal GDP. Here is how each individual country stacks up in terms of size."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This chart is reminiscent of another chart depicting the global economy.  Like so many things floating out there on the interwebs, it's  good but not perfect.  Part of what we need to do as educators is to help them assess the validity of online resources.   

Questions to Ponder: What data was used to create this chart?  Any limitation to that data/data source?  Do you agree with the regional divisions in the color scheme and where the countries were slotted? What other information would help contextualize this information? 

 

GeoEd Tags: globalization, industry, economic, visualization.

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The Xinjiang Conflict: Uyghur Identity, Language Policy, and Political Discourse

The Xinjiang Conflict: Uyghur Identity, Language Policy, and Political Discourse | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This study explores Chinese language policy and language use in Inner Asia, as well as the relation of language policy to the politics of Uyghur identity. Language is central to ethnic identity, and official language policies are often overlooked as critical factors in conflict over ethnic nationalism.
Seth Dixon's insight:

A while back I wrote this blogpost for the National Geographic Education Blog about the Uyghur people of Eastern Turkestan.  The cultural policies of assimilation that are working to erase Eastern Turkestan and more fully make it Xinjiang are politically powerful, but the situation is more pressing that most people today realize. This academic article, The Xinjiang Conflict: Uyghur Identity, Language Policy, and Political Discourse, is an excellent primer to the cultural and political complexities of this place with two names where East Asia and Central Asia meet. 

 

GeoEd Tags: political, conflict, governance, China, East Asia, religion, culture, Islam, landscape.

Scoop.it Tags: political, conflictgovernance, China, East Asia, religion, culture, Islam, landscape.

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