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Why brand marketing is mostly useless for startups

Why brand marketing is mostly useless for startups | Economy | Scoop.it
Brand marketing is mostly useless for consumer startups. Startups build a great brand by being successful, finding product market fit and scaling traction, etc. But it’s not a real lever. Let’s not mix up correlation with causation! If this seems contrarian to you, it’s because there’s a vast ecosystem of consultants, agencies, and other middlemen …

Via Guillaume Decugis
Ndou Ibrahim's insight:

This is a mist read for entrepreneurs 

Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, June 21, 2018 3:17 PM

Right on. I've been on TechCrunch and we had decent coverage for Scoop.it. Did it help our user acquisition? Not really. 

 

For Scoop.it and my previous startup (a b2c mobile platform), I've thought a lot about how to build a brand. And while I respect there might be some exceptions, I very much second what Andrew Chen writes here: building a brand is mostly the consequence - not the cause

 

It doesn't mean there's just nothing to do other than growing to build a brand. The story your company tells, the values your product expresses, how it's design, how you communicate and many other things will shape your brand a certain way. But whether it's big or small - or said more bluntly whether you have a brand or not - remains tightly coupled with how much you grow. 

 

So, as a startup founder, unless you're an exceptional marketing genius, your best bet is probably to focus on product market fit and finding the right acquisition channels while paying attention to the story you tell. The brand will follow. 

 

PS: in his post, Andrew focuses on consumer startups but I would say that it's probably also true for most B2B startups. Even though they have more targeted PR / influencer marketing channels they can leverage for brand building purposes, I would consider them from a pure ROI standpoint as customer acquisition channels. And consider any resulting brand awareness impact a bonus. 

VetBiz Resources's curator insight, November 4, 2023 5:38 AM
Right on. I've been on TechCrunch and we had decent coverage for Scoop.it. Did it help our user acquisition? Not really.    For Scoop.it and my previous startup (a b2c mobile platform), I've thought a lot about how to build a brand. And while I respect there might be some exceptions, I very much second what Andrew Chen writes here: building a brand is mostly the consequence - not the cause.    It doesn't mean there's just nothing to do other than growing to build a brand. The story your company tells, the values your product expresses, how it's design, how you communicate and many other things will shape your brand a certain way. But whether it's big or small - or said more bluntly whether you have a brand or not - remains tightly coupled with how much you grow.    So, as a startup founder, unless you're an exceptional marketing genius, your best bet is probably to focus on product market fit and finding the right acquisition channels while paying attention to the story you tell. The brand will follow.    PS: in his post, Andrew focuses on consumer startups but I would say that it's probably also true for most B2B startups. Even though they have more targeted PR / influencer marketing channels they can leverage for brand building purposes, I would consider them from a pure ROI standpoint as customer acquisition channels. And consider any resulting brand awareness impact a bonus.
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Rescooped by Ndou Ibrahim from Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
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22 Powerful Tools to Create and Edit your Own Instructional Videos | LearnWorlds Blog

22 Powerful Tools to Create and Edit your Own Instructional Videos | LearnWorlds Blog | Economy | Scoop.it

Achieving a fantastic online course is more or less equivalent to creating one or more great videos for your students. Luckily, nowadays video production is not just a privilege of the professionals. Impressive techniques that are popular amongst the experienced moviemakers have become available to beginners too. Affordable software and easy-to-use apps empower you as a course maker and unleash your creativity resulting in impressive instructional videos.

When it comes to video editing, you may be wondering what’s the best tool to use. The plethora of available software makes it even harder to choose. We did the hard work and the testing and curated the best software for you. So, let us guide you through the most popular and consumer-friendly video editing tools on the market.

Here are the top 21 tools we selected and tested for you. Let’s see what suits your needs...please visit my blog for the full story Europe-Africa Institute of Study & Research


Via Jeff Domansky
Ndou Ibrahim's insight:

  1. Europe-Africa Institute of Study & Research

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Rescooped by Ndou Ibrahim from HOW LONG THIS GAS CRISIS WILL LAST IN GUINEA
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Ibrahim Bah Booster Programme gratuite : envie de créer une entreprise ? Une premiere en Guinee

Ibrahim Bah Booster Programme gratuite : envie de créer une entreprise ? Une premiere en Guinee | Economy | Scoop.it

Découvrez Ibrahim Bah Entrepreneur Booster Programme, une nouvelle formation en partenariat avec Europe Africa Institute pour vous aidez à monter votre propre entreprise.

Ndou Ibrahim's curator insight, June 22, 2022 4:02 PM

En 2022, pas moins de un million de nouvelles entreprises ont vu le jour rien qu’en France. Cette belle courbe de croissance a donné des idées à Mr Ibrahim Bah.

 

Europe Africa Institute est en effet désireux de tendre la main aux entrepreneuses et entrepreneurs en Guinee et dans l’Hexagone via un nouveau concept de formation : Ibrahim Bah Entrepreneur Booster Programme.

40 MODULES POUR APPRENDRE L’ENTREPRENARIAT

Au menu ? 40 modules ouverts à toute personne intéressée par apprendre les ficelles de l’entreprenariat, de la forme juridique à la stratégie marketing, en passant par la création d’un business plan. Bref, maîtriser toutes les caractéristiques à la création d’une entreprise au travers d’une formation spécialisée.

 

L’Entrepreneur Booster Programme inclut aussi un suivi psychologique. De quoi s’agit-il ? Un accompagnement de 3 mois par des professionnels, à travers un service de coatching, des événements et des conférences, pour répondre à toutes vos questions sur l’entreprenariat.

 

Vous cherchez de plus amples informations sur le monde de l’entreprenariat et sur l’Entrepreneur Booster Programme ? Tout le programme est expliqué ici. Vous vous sentez prêt à vous lancez en tant qu’entrepreneur ? Vous pouvez contacter Rama Bah sur 620780000.

 
 
 
Rescooped by Ndou Ibrahim from Ideas for entrepreneurs
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Why brand marketing is mostly useless for startups

Why brand marketing is mostly useless for startups | Economy | Scoop.it
Brand marketing is mostly useless for consumer startups. Startups build a great brand by being successful, finding product market fit and scaling traction, etc. But it’s not a real lever. Let’s not mix up correlation with causation! If this seems contrarian to you, it’s because there’s a vast ecosystem of consultants, agencies, and other middlemen …

Via Guillaume Decugis
Ndou Ibrahim's insight:

This is a mist read for entrepreneurs 

Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, June 21, 2018 3:17 PM

Right on. I've been on TechCrunch and we had decent coverage for Scoop.it. Did it help our user acquisition? Not really. 

 

For Scoop.it and my previous startup (a b2c mobile platform), I've thought a lot about how to build a brand. And while I respect there might be some exceptions, I very much second what Andrew Chen writes here: building a brand is mostly the consequence - not the cause

 

It doesn't mean there's just nothing to do other than growing to build a brand. The story your company tells, the values your product expresses, how it's design, how you communicate and many other things will shape your brand a certain way. But whether it's big or small - or said more bluntly whether you have a brand or not - remains tightly coupled with how much you grow. 

 

So, as a startup founder, unless you're an exceptional marketing genius, your best bet is probably to focus on product market fit and finding the right acquisition channels while paying attention to the story you tell. The brand will follow. 

 

PS: in his post, Andrew focuses on consumer startups but I would say that it's probably also true for most B2B startups. Even though they have more targeted PR / influencer marketing channels they can leverage for brand building purposes, I would consider them from a pure ROI standpoint as customer acquisition channels. And consider any resulting brand awareness impact a bonus. 

VetBiz Resources's curator insight, November 4, 2023 5:38 AM
Right on. I've been on TechCrunch and we had decent coverage for Scoop.it. Did it help our user acquisition? Not really.    For Scoop.it and my previous startup (a b2c mobile platform), I've thought a lot about how to build a brand. And while I respect there might be some exceptions, I very much second what Andrew Chen writes here: building a brand is mostly the consequence - not the cause.    It doesn't mean there's just nothing to do other than growing to build a brand. The story your company tells, the values your product expresses, how it's design, how you communicate and many other things will shape your brand a certain way. But whether it's big or small - or said more bluntly whether you have a brand or not - remains tightly coupled with how much you grow.    So, as a startup founder, unless you're an exceptional marketing genius, your best bet is probably to focus on product market fit and finding the right acquisition channels while paying attention to the story you tell. The brand will follow.    PS: in his post, Andrew focuses on consumer startups but I would say that it's probably also true for most B2B startups. Even though they have more targeted PR / influencer marketing channels they can leverage for brand building purposes, I would consider them from a pure ROI standpoint as customer acquisition channels. And consider any resulting brand awareness impact a bonus.
Rescooped by Ndou Ibrahim from LEAP EntrepreneurshiԀPassion - lasting enterprise action practices
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L'ENTREPRENEURIAT EN FRANCE EST DEVENU IMPOSSIBLE

L'ENTREPRENEURIAT EN FRANCE EST DEVENU IMPOSSIBLE | Economy | Scoop.it

Intrapreneurs say unrealistic expectations and a low tolerance for failure harm progress in French corporate innovation and intrapreneurship.

 

Le grand boom de l'intrapreneuriat en France - où les employés deviennent des entrepreneurs au sein de leur entreprise - a commencé à peu près en 2015. Alors que l'écosystème naissant des startups du pays commençait également à décoller, les entreprises y voyaient un moyen d'attirer les talents et de fidéliser les employés. Et les travailleurs adoraient avoir la chance d'innover dans la sécurité d'une grande entreprise. Cela a conduit à la création de la société de logiciels de sécurité Heropolis au sein de la multinationale Thales. Chez le géant de l'alimentation Danone, Les 2 Vaches ont défendu les produits laitiers biologiques à une époque où le bio n'était pas courant. Mais depuis lors, de nombreuses entreprises - dont Danone et Pernod-Ricard - ont fermé leurs programmes.

 

Les entrepreneurs blâment les attentes irréalistes, la mauvaise conception et le manque de tolérance à l'échec. "Nous sommes à un point où beaucoup de grandes entreprises ont expérimenté [l'entrepreneuriat d'entreprise] mais ce n'est pas facile de le promouvoir et de ne pas l'avoir conçu pour exploiter [le travailleur] mais l'explorer est une tâche difficile", a déclaré Véronique Bouchard, professeure. de la stratégie et de l'entrepreneuriat à l'EM Lyon. "Beaucoup de ces programmes ont été interrompus après quelques années, ou ils ont été réduits ou concentrés davantage sur des projets plus importants, ou moins d'idées." Alors, est-ce bien sombre pour l'intrapreneuriat en France ? Des attentes irréalistes signifient un échec dès le départ Environ 37% des entreprises françaises ont déjà testé l'intrapreneuriat, selon We Are Intrapreneurs, un groupe qui aide les organisations à mettre en place de tels programmes.

 

Mais le problème est, selon Bouchard, que les entreprises qui ont échoué avaient des attentes irréalistes dès le départ. Parce qu'ils veulent impliquer autant de personnes que possible et le rendre ouvert à tous, ils se retrouvent avec des programmes qui doivent passer par des centaines d'idées, épuisant les ressources.


Via Oliver Durrer swissleap.com
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