Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes
3.1K views | +0 today
Follow
Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes
"People seem to have begun to sense that they are dealing with something new, as far as their linguistic intuitions are concerned. They are realizing that their established knowledge, which has enabled them to survive and succeed in spoken and written linguistic encounters hitherto, is no longer enough to guarantee survival and success on the Internet. Perhaps they have encountered the 'painful and awkward lessons' in social interaction (...). Perhaps they have been misunderstood, misperceived, or attacked (flamed) because they have failed to notice the differences between this new medium of communication and the old. (David Crystal)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Writing Online: A Guide to Effective Digital Communication at Work

Providing a clear, convincing and approachable discussion, this book addresses arenas of online writing: virtual teamwork, instant messaging, emails, corporate communication channels, and social media. Instead of offering do and don’t lists, however, it teaches the reader to develop a practice that is observant, reflective, and grounded in the understanding of the basic principles of language and communication. Through real-life examples and case studies, it helps the reader to notice previously unnoticed small details, question previously unchallenged assumptions and practices, and become a competent digital communicator in a wide range of professional contexts.

Lingua Digitalis's insight:

 

This book is not intended solely for readers interested in language. It is for anyone who has had a message misread or misinterpreted and anyone who has wondered about the appropriate level of formality to use when writing a digital message. It is for anyone who has hesitated before adding a smiley at the end of a work e-mail or been surprised to see one in a message he or she has received. This book is primarily intended for professionals who communicate using digitally mediated communicative channels: 

Managers, virtual team leaders, and negotiators who use digital writing for professional interpersonal interactions; 

Communicators and customer service and PR specialists who use digital media to communicate with external stakeholders, 

Marketing and branding specialists as well as copywriters who create texts to be read online by a range of audiences. 

 

The book is also intended for communication trainers or teachers of business and professional communication. The theory and language-centered approach offers an effective way to appreciate and learn about the complexities of human interaction. The comprehensive review of scholarship offers an insight into a wide range of studies to explore further; and the wealth of examples, case studies, and reflections could also serve as starting points for developing teaching and training materials.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

MULTIMODALITY IN SOCIAL MEDIA. BAAL Language and New Media SIG

Anybody wants to catch up on the "Multimodality in Social Media and Digital Environments" event, organised under the auspices of the BAAL Language and New Media Special Interest Group, at Queen Mary University -- here's is a Storify of the tweets of the day.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Do you cringe when you see "there children" or "coffee's & tea's? Study finds that your grammar police reactions have to do with your personality

Do you cringe when you see "there children" or "coffee's & tea's? Study finds that your grammar police reactions have to do with your personality | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
The increasing prevalence of social media means that we often encounter written language characterized by both stylistic variation and outright errors. How does the personality of the reader modulate reactions to non-standard text? Experimental participants read ‘email responses’ to an ad for a housemate that either contained no errors or had been altered to include either typos (e.g., teh ) or homophonous grammar errors (grammos, e.g., to/too , it’s/its ). Participants completed a 10-item evaluation scale for each message, which measured their impressions of the writer. In addition participants completed a Big Five personality assessment and answered demographic and language attitude questions. Both typos and grammos had a negative impact on the evaluation scale. This negative impact was not modulated by age, education, electronic communication frequency, or pleasure reading time. In contrast, personality traits did modulate assessments, and did so in distinct ways for grammos and typos.
Lingua Digitalis's insight:
This morning I received an email with a curious signature sentence: "Please excuse any typos as sent from my iPhone". I found it curious because it was the first time I saw such message but I understood the motivation behind it really well: we have long known that grammatical errors and typos lead to negative judgement when it comes to the writer of the message. Whether resulting from high typing speed, technological issues, lack of concern or lack of knowledge,  the prevalent - and often aggressive - assessments of linguistic, grammatical or spelling faux pas clearly show how deeply we are concerned with errors in digital communication.
In a recent study researchers wanted to find out who do people react to different types of errors, and more importantly, what are the individual differences that affect the impact of errors. 
The authors make a distinction between typos, which are typically attributed to clumsy, hurried typing, and grammo, a mistake that could result form the writer's ignorance and limited knowledge. Out of the two, grammos are the dangerous type: they affect social as well as academic assessment. 
But there was a very interesting angle to the study: namely the personality of the reader as a factor affecting the judgement. More extraverted people were likely to overlook written errors that would cause introverted people to judge the person who makes such errors more negatively. Less agreeable people were more sensitive to grammos, while more conscientious and less open people were sensitive to typos.

I think it is very interesting and useful viewpoint to take into consideration when thinking about language processing. But in a possible follow-up study we might also find out the it's not only our personality traits that affect our judgement, but the time of the day we receive a message, how tired we are and whether we had our morning coffee yet or not. 

For me the biggest lesson is, again, the negativity-effect:  namely the  likely negative evaluative weight assigned to random aspects of writing, whether is has to do with an error, an ill-placed smiley or an accidental CC-ig of a colleague. The study also highlighted the range of social meanings assigned to how language is used online, for example trustworthiness.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

OMG! The Hyperbole of Internet-Speak

OMG! The Hyperbole of Internet-Speak | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
On death by Internet and the linguistic arms race to out-hyperbole each other with phrases like “Omg literally dying,” “I can’t even” and “yassssss.”
Lingua Digitalis's insight:
The question of markedness is an interesting one in digital communication: because we are unable to convey emotional messages via audio-visual channels we tend to inscribe them via any possible means - even if those emotions are only representing phatic communion or signal involvement, they can come across as highly exaggerated.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Not Even Twitter Understands Twitter

Not Even Twitter Understands Twitter | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
One of the problems we have always had with Twitter is that Twitter itself doesn't know what it is, or what it is doing. We saw the latest example of this earlier this week, when they change the 'favorite' icon with a heart.
Lingua Digitalis's insight:

Excellent deliberation over the communicative functions of the star and heart!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Tissue review took an unexpected turn

Tissue review took an unexpected turn | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
This used to be a good Christian home. But it's not about moral judgment anymore. I'm way beyond that. I'm in survival mode. If I don't supply absorbent paper products, I'm going to find my dish towels hidden in the basement, stiff as aluminum. The other day, I almost cut my hand on a sock. I am sorry to speak so frankly, but with three teenage boys, a woman has got to be practical
Lingua Digitalis's insight:

Just to remind you that an online review is a genre that's much more than it seems for the first sight.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

No one says ‘brb’ anymore because we never sign offline

No one says ‘brb’ anymore because we never sign offline | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
Use of the slang term 'brb' has plummeted since 2010. Smartphone sales have more than quadrupled since then.
Lingua Digitalis's insight:

A refreshingly clever article on the decline of the use of indicators of physical presence like "brb" ---> because we have constant connectivity and no need to signal a break. There is also a mention of the rang of techniques people have developed to ensure online conversations are smooth, like discourse markers or the use of ....

For those interested to read more about the (effects of) constant connectivity, I recommend Maier, C.T. & Deluliis, D. (2015): Recovering the Human in the Network: Exploring Communicology as a Research Methodology in Digital Business Discourse. in. E. Darics (ed.) Digital Business Discourse. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Call for proposals: Microanalysis of Online Data

Call for proposals: Microanalysis of Online Data | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it

INVITATION TO CONTRIBUTE TO A SPECIAL ISSUE on MICROANALYSIS OF ONLINE DATA to be submitted to JOURNAL OF PRAGMATICS


Goals of the special issue: Although computer-mediated communication (CMC) has been studied extensively for the last three decades, few researchers have explicitly addressed the methodological issues in this field, particularly at the level of microanalysis; that is, the intensive study of language use typically found in traditions such as conversation analysis. Partly this is due to the plethora of online data types, from discussion forums to social media to multimodal platforms. The uncritical application of traditional analytic methods to online data is not without its problems (Giles, Stommel, Paulus, Lester & Reed, 2015). In this special issue, we focus on the methodological opportunities and challenges inherent to the microanalysis of CMC. We welcome empirical studies as well as methodological and theoretical discussions of these issues. More specifically, we seek paper  proposals that will move forward the development of methodologies in these contexts. Topics may include:

Empirical applications of microanalysis to the study of online interaction in a variety of data types (e.g. text-centered media like web-based chat and e-mail, multimodal environments; social media; discussion threads; comment fields)Methodological challenges related to microanalysis of online dataTheoretical issues raised by digital conversation analysis and other types of microanalysis

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

How a subtle change to Facebook icons could make huge difference for gender equality

How a subtle change to Facebook icons could make huge difference for gender equality | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
Facebook just made a subtle design change to its icons that probably won't be noticed by the vast majority of its users but that could profoundly influence perceptions of women.

The changes were made to the tiny icons that appear in the upper right-hand corner of the social networking site. For years, the company had used a "friends" icon with a man and woman, with the woman positioned behind the man. And because the company literally used a cutout of the female from the friends, the generic female avatar looked like her shoulder had been lopped off.
Lingua Digitalis's insight:

I welcome this change - not only because it draws attention to the importance of the multimodality of communication, but also to the subconscious ways our gender biases are learned and formed. Well done Facebook.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

The Internet Talks Like a Woman

The Internet Talks Like a Woman | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
Women tended to use more emoticons, exclamation points, and lexical features like homophones, complex capitalization, phonetic spellings, repetition, and extra letters. These quirks — known (sometimes derisively) as Netspeak —emerged as users of text and instant messages began to demand from writing the nimbleness of speech, even though old-fashioned writing lacked the paralinguistic elements, like tone and body language, that shaped the meaning of our spoken words.
Lingua Digitalis's insight:

A couple of really interesting insight in this one (and kudos to the author for quoting REAL research for a change), although I am really not sure if the main points are gender-related, or they just refer to good vs. bad communicators!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Special issue on Social collaboration and Professional communication

Special issue on Social collaboration and Professional communication | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
With increasing adoption of enterprise social networking platforms and other social collaboration tools, many new forms and approaches to communication are occurring within companies and between businesses. This special issue will publish articles about these new forms of internal and business-to-business (B2B) communication.
Lingua Digitalis's insight:

The International Journal of Business Communication published a CFP for a special issue on social media in professional communication. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Is data from Twitter pointing towards a last-minute swing in the UK 2015 elections?

Is data from Twitter pointing towards a last-minute swing in the UK 2015 elections? | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it

Our approach is based on using data from Twitter to make faster and more accurate predictions of the vote share – also allows us to paint a more detailed picture of the election than the national polls imply. It allows us to spot changes in the public mood early on, as well as the more subtle fluctuations that averaged national polls might paper over. Ultimately, we hope that properly understanding these shifts will help us to make better predictions – particularly if they occur just before polling day when much opinion polling will have stopped.

Lingua Digitalis's insight:

Can social media listening and sentiment analysis be used to predict the results of the elections? Only 2 days to go to find out!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

The Semiotics of Emoji: The Rise of Visual Language in the Age of the Internet (Bloomsbury Advances in Semiotics): Amazon.co.uk: Marcel Danesi: 9781474281980: Books

The Semiotics of Emoji: The Rise of Visual Language in the Age of the Internet (Bloomsbury Advances in Semiotics): Amazon.co.uk: Marcel Danesi: 9781474281980: Books | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it

Emoji have gone from being virtually unknown to being a central topic in internet communication. What is behind the rise and rise of these winky faces, clinking glasses and smiling poos? Given the sheer variety of verbal communication on the internet and English's still-controversial role as lingua mundi for the web, these icons have emerged as a compensatory universal language. The Semiotics of Emoji looks at what is officially the world's fastest growing form of communication. Emoji, the colourful symbols and glyphs that represent everything from frowning disapproval to red-faced shame, are fast becoming embedded into digital communication. Controlled by a centralized body and regulated across the web, emoji seems to be a language : but is it? The rapid adoption of emoji in such a short span of time makes it a rich study in exploring the functions of language. Professor Marcel Danesi, an internationally-known expert in semiotics, branding and communication, answers the pertinent questions. Are emojis making us dumber? Can they ultimately replace language? Will people grow up emoji literate as well as digitally native? Can there be such a thing as a Universal Visual Language? Read this book for the answers.

Lingua Digitalis's insight:
A book that finally reveals the universal truth about emojis? We shall see
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Investigating the Potential for Miscommunication Using Emoji

Investigating the Potential for Miscommunication Using Emoji | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
To your smartphone, an emoji is just like any other character (e.g., lower-case ‘a’, upper-case ‘B’) and needs to be rendered with a font. Since each smartphone platform (e.g., Apple, Google) has its own emoji font, the same emoji character can look quite different on different smartphone platforms. This is why when a Google Nexus owner sends  to a friend with an iPhone, the iPhone owner will actually see .
Lingua Digitalis's insight:
The socio-pragmatic meanings of emoticons are complex as they are, and now this...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

How 'Textual Chemistry' Is Changing Dating

How 'Textual Chemistry' Is Changing Dating | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
I’d heard similar complaints from friends: potential dates who texted too much, too little; used too many emojis, didn’t seem to understand emojis at all; were too serious, used to many “lols” when they clearly were not laughing out loud. Each text was carefully analyzed for hidden meaning. It’s no wonder, then, that text message miscommunications were a daily source of stress and anxiety. It was yet another box to check as we sought a significant other: textual chemistry.
Lingua Digitalis's insight:

What we perceive as best practice or conventions in texting might not be the same as how others perceive it... But, as I always say, the secret lies in our innate drive to search for meaning - wherever. IN time lapses, length, the presence of lack of presence of emoticons, capital letters, punctuation, words used - or not used. And if we find someone who is able to encode meaning the way that we can decode as intended - can that be textual chemistry? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Review of "The Discourse of Online Consumer Reviews"

Review of "The Discourse of Online Consumer Reviews" | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it

“Game-changer” is how Argenti and Barnes (2009) described the effects of social media in their book Digital Strategies for Powerful Corporate Communications. This term aptly encapsulates the dramatic change in how organizations now communicate with external stakeholders: the previously strategically planned, command-and-control communication models now gave way to interactive, free-flowing interactions between customers, consumers and the representatives of a company.
 Besides drawing attention to the new media landscapes and the resulting new practices, the word “game-changer” also implies a shift in behavior and attitude: a shift that enables professionals to get ahead of the game and win the game—to remain with the gaming metaphor. This means that organizations have now a pressing need to understand these new communication practices, and use digital media channels to communicate effectively—and recruit the people who have the skills to do so. Consequently, institutions who train students to cope with the new demands of business and working life should acknowledge and flexibly respond to these emerging needs, and train their students to be able to effectively communicate in these new contexts. 

Lingua Digitalis's insight:

My praise of Camilla Vasquez's book on online consumer reviews. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Study confirms that ending your texts with a period is terrible

Study confirms that ending your texts with a period is terrible | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
These messages are read as being less sincere.
Lingua Digitalis's insight:

I'm not surprised by the results of this study, but would quietly issue a warning about categorical statements related the the "functions" of non-verbal signs in CMC. For more on this here is an article of mine https://theconversation.com/watch-where-you-put-that-emoticon-and-keep-your-voice-down-22512

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

E-seminar of the Language and New Media Special Interest Group

E-seminar of the Language and New Media Special Interest Group | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it

The BAAL Language and New Media Special Interest Group will host their first e-seminar discussing Camilla Vásquez’s recent paper:

‘Right now versus back then: Recency and remoteness as discursive resources in online reviews‘

(available online 9 June 2015, doi:10.1016/j.dcm.2015.05.010)

 

Schedule

23/11 – 8/12 The paper is made freely available by Discourse, Context and Media

23/11 – 8/12 Discussion takes place via http://baallangnewmedia.proboards.com

8/12 The author, Camilla Vásquez reflects on the group discussion in an interview with Dr Ruth Page

(Special Interest Group Convenor). The podcast will be made public.

Lingua Digitalis's insight:

http://baallangnewmedia.proboards.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Here's why memes are so much more than just funny internet photos

Here's why memes are so much more than just funny internet photos | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it

The word existed before the Web. – An explanation  straight from the man who coined the term

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Hi ... hey ... hello ... Dear reader, how do you start an email?

Hi ... hey ... hello ... Dear reader, how do you start an email? | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
‘Hello there’ is too Bertie Wooster. ‘Hey there’ is too Hank from Larry Sanders. Email salutations are a minefield
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

3 year funded PhD in Digital Discourse

3 year funded PhD in Digital Discourse | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it

University of Bern, Switzerland

Preferred start date 01 October 2015

Salary/stipend

CHF47,000 (€45,000/ US$50,000)

Professor Crispin Thurlow is interested receiving applicants interested in pursuing a PhD (2015 to 2018) while working on a research project titled Cultural Discourses and Social Meanings

of Mobile Communication. Funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF), this project will form part of an interdisciplinary research programme about WhatsApp conducted by a network of linguists/sociolinguists at University of Bern, Zurich University, University of Neuchâtel and Leipzig University (Germany). While fulfilling the aims of the project (see below), there would be ample opportunity for you to pursue your own areas of interest within the field of digital discourse studies. Given the nature of the project (see below), preference will be given to candidates who have a good grasp of German, French and/or Italian as well as English.

If you are interested in finding out more about the project, doctoral studies at Bern, or the application process, please send an email to crispin.thurlow@ens.unibe.ch. For more information about Professor Thurlow and his research agenda, please visit:

www.crispinthurlow.net.

 

CONDITIONS: To be eligible, you would need an MA or equivalent in a field like sociolinguistics, discourse studies, communication studies, linguistic anthropology, or cultural studies. You

would need also to demonstrate (a) a track record of successful academic study and (b) a commitment to the investigation of digital discourse and new media language. To be eligible for

15‐Jul‐15 2 this fellowship, you must meet the University of Bern’s basic admission criteria for doctoral study.1 The University of Bern is an equal opportunity employer: female candidates are particularly encouraged to apply.


THE RESEARCH PROJECT

The Cultural Discourses and Social Meanings of Mobile Communication project will take a cultural approach to the language of mobile communication by asking: “How is mobile communication talked about in public contexts?” and “How do mobile communicators describe their own linguistic and communicative practices?” In other words, the focus here is on language about mobile communication as a way to illuminate broader media ideologies and language ideologies. Organized around a unique international media archive and an ethnographic survey of local users, the project will also ask: How are people’s preferences and

practices shifting? What are their interpersonal, affective and practical motivations for using one mobile technology over another? To what extent are these on‐the‐ground preferences and practices reflected in wider public discussions about mobile/online communication? 

The other projects in the wider WhatsApp programme will be examining (a) linguistic issues of grammar and syntax, (b) spelling and other language‐design related graphical properties, and (c) individual‐centered variationist analysis of language‐in‐use. To complement these other projects, the Cultural Discourses and Social Meanings of Mobile Communication project will follow the tradition of critical discourse studies by taking a decidedly metalinguistic or language ideological approach to the language use of WhatsApp. Where the other subprojects prioritize the linguistic and graphical form and communicative/identificational

functions of WhatsApp messages, this project examines the social meanings of WhatsApp. The project will be organized around two complementary strands of research activity and one applied objective with a wider, public audience:

Strand I entails the archiving and analysis of a substantial dataset of national, regional and also international newspaper reports about new media language with specific reference to WhatsApp and mobile messaging.

Strand II comprises an up‐to‐date ethnographic survey of local Swiss users of WhatsApp and other mobile/online communication technologies, intended to deepen the broadly demographic questionnaire already used.  A concrete or applied objective of the archival work in Strand I will be the creation of a unique, open‐access repository (the Digital Discourse Database) for scholars and students engaged in the study of new media language.

It is expected that a distinctive feature of this project will be the archiving of visual representations of mobile communication and other new media. This data will support a collaborative engagement between the doctoral researcher and a post‐doctoral researcher

in the WhatsApp programme at Zurich University; it is expected that the post‐doc will, for example, be lead author on a paper with the doctoral student. The post‐doc and doctoral candidates will also work together to organize a conference provisionally titled “Visualizing (in the) New Media: Ideologies and Practices”. It is important to note there is leeway for the appointed doctoral researcher to inflect the project with her/his own research priorities.

The building of the Digital Discourse Database will also be supported by a professional web developer and an undergraduate student assistant.


 

APPLICATION: To apply for this fellowship, please submit the following materials as a

 

single PDF:

 

 a cover letter (addressed to Professor Thurlow)

 

 a Curriculum Vitae (aka résumé) with citizenship details

 

 the names and email addresses of two academic referees (no letters needed now)

 

 a short research proposal (no more than six pages)

 

 a representative writing sample (e.g. a chapter from your MA thesis or a standalone

 

paper/essay)

 

In your cover letter, please explain what your writing sample is and why you have chosen to submit it. Please also explain who your referees are and why you have chosen to ask them for a possible recommendation. Professor Thurlow will start reviewing applications immediately and until 31st August 2015.


Lingua Digitalis's insight:

3 year funded PhD 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Gmail finally adds an official 'Undo Send' button to let you recall accidental emails

Gmail finally adds an official 'Undo Send' button to let you recall accidental emails | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
Google is finally bringing the life-saving “Undo Send” option to the main settings on the Web version of Gmail.
Lingua Digitalis's insight:

This is a welcome development. Not that I won't find a typo in an important email  5 seconds AFTER the dispatch time....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Why Men Are Retweeted More Than Women

Why Men Are Retweeted More Than Women | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
The gender disparity of influence on Twitter
Lingua Digitalis's insight:
Same old gender stereotypes confirmed: women use expressive, emotional language...even in hashtags. #hmmm
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lingua Digitalis
Scoop.it!

Exploring digital communication

Exploring digital communication | Lingua Digitalis ...or how to do things with *keystrokes | Scoop.it
One common misconception related to language, and of particular relevance to a book on digital communications, is that of language decline. Oddly, we tend to see society as getting worse - educational standards are falling, the streets aren't as safe as they used to be, children get less exercise, communities are breaking down, and young people don't speak properly. With all of these issues, we tend to posit a Golden Age, which usually corresponds to our childhoods. Of course, in actual fact (and as we all know) in many ways our societies today are safer and our children better educated than they ever were; things go up and down but there's little evidence to suggest a decline. The same is true of language. People have been bemoaning the state of the English language for centuries. For example, in 1712, writer Jonathan Swift criticised the language used at the time and he placed the Golden Age of English at the start of the reign of Queen Elizabeth (1550s).
Lingua Digitalis's insight:

My friend -  author of the month at Routledge! - is talking about her book on digital communication.

more...
No comment yet.