Geography Education
Follow
Find tag "visualization"
728.9K views | +197 today
Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

An Intriguingly Detailed Animation of How People Move Around a City

An Intriguingly Detailed Animation of How People Move Around a City | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Watch the commuting patterns of New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This CityLab article and the embedded maps show the rhythms and patterns that make city life so beautifully complex.  The Center for Advances Spatial Analysis has compiled numerous maps, time-lapse videos and other animations to show flows of urban life.  These are great resources to visualize the 'spaces of flows.'  


Tags: mobility, mapping, visualization, urban, planning, unit 7 cities, transportation.

more...
Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 2:49 AM

possibly useful for studying complexity

Linda Alexander's curator insight, July 13, 7:41 AM

You can actually plug-in income levels for these 3 cities and view daily commutes.  Fascinating CityLab data!

 

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, July 13, 3:28 PM

Another fabulous post for Year 7 from Seth Dixon. An aspect of liveability  in colour!

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges

12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Want to learn more about the issues surrounding poverty in the world today? We ve assembled a collection of some of the best data visualizations for just that.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This set of 12 graphics all show a particular facet on the topic of global poverty.  I've shared some of this before, but the compilation is definitely helpful.  In the graphic above, the connection between low female literacy rates and poverty is demonstrated quite powerfully.    


Tags: poverty, development, economic, visualization.

more...
Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 8, 1:42 PM

Datos Que ilustran la Pobreza en El Mundo.

Erica Senffner's curator insight, June 9, 8:01 AM

Unit 6

Helen Rowling's curator insight, June 10, 3:37 PM

STUDY OF RELIGION - COMPARISONS OF HAVE & HAVE NOTS.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Earthquakes in the Classroom

"An 8.2-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of northern Chile, generating a local tsunami.  The USGS reported the earthquake was centered 95 km (59 miles) northwest of Iquique at a depth of 20.1km (12.5 miles).  This video gives the context for this type of earthquake."  

Seth Dixon's insight:

I woke up this morning to news of a large earthquake in Chile (security camera video footage).  IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night.  


Tags: visualization, disasters, physical, Chile.

more...
dilaycock's curator insight, April 2, 11:02 PM

From Seth Dixon: 

 "IRIS(Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night."  

Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 10:37 AM

Hoe ontstond deze tsunami precies?

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 5, 7:52 AM

http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/resources

 

Lesson Plans from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Drain the Great Lakes

This represents less than 10% of the Terragen CGI created for "Drain the Great Lakes", a TV documentary made for MSP, National Geographic Channel & Discovery Canada by 422 South in Bristol, UK. I created all the Terragen landscape work over a period of 7 months in 2011."

Seth Dixon's insight:

What would the Great Lakes region look like if the lakes were drained?  This visualization is a tremendous exploration into hypothetical geographies. This video has been added to the the interactive map, Place-Based Geography Videos.  


Tags: physical, environment, water, visualization.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Global wind conditions

Global wind conditions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
an animated map of global wind conditions
Seth Dixon's insight:

Earlier I shared a dynamic map of near-live wind data for the United States and a static rendering of global wind patterns.  This combines the features of both of those resources to provide a mesmerizing digital globe.  Click on the 'earth' icon in the lower righthand corner to customize the display.  

more...
Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 6:40 PM

Wind...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 10:07 AM

This animated depiction of the earth and it's global wind conditions  shows that the northern and southern part of the world refelects the same type of wind conditioons where as the "middle" of the world depicts  different types of trade winds. For example, the trade winds and other prevailing winds change throught time in the world as the axis rotates the different wind patterns rotate with them.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The PRB World Population Data Sheet is a great resource; now you can access that same data through this interactive map

more...
Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 6:33 AM

The human popluation debate will always seem to be an issue. One can almost assume that the less developed countries are going to have the highest popluation but the most problems as well. A country that is classified as less developed are most definitely going to have low incomes due to the low number of jobs available, poor human development because there isn't enough people to be taking care of each other. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Mapping Rocky's Run

Mapping Rocky's Run | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"As a kid, I grew up watching the Rocky movies, shadow boxing with my brothers and doing push-ups during the workout montages.  One on my favorite scenes was in Rocky II when Rocky runs through the whole city of Philadelphia, thronged by adoring fans as he runs to the top of the stairs to the Philadelphia Museum of Art (and yes, of course I re-enacted that scene when I was there)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I was thrilled to read an article in the Philly Post by Dan McQuade entitled “How Far did Rocky Go is His Training run in Rocky II?“  This article identifies the locations in movie that were used to capture such a strong sense of place; earlier versions of this article did not have a map, and I wanted to see the images and a map together.  That was enough reason to make both an online map on arcgis.com and an interactive web mapping application with an ESRI storymap template. 


Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, urban, place.

more...
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 23, 2013 7:45 AM

My family and I have watched the Rocky series a handful of times, and a month or two ago, my grandmother called our house all frantically to let us know that "Rocky" was on TV, in case we wanted to watch it.  I used to be big into going for long walks across a few towns every night, and this article reminded me of some of the walks that I had been on, and have actually mapped out.  The expression "walking around in circles" does not fully apply to many places, because they have semi-straight roads and often have 90 degree intersections with other roads, which would make it walking in rectangular patterns.  I have walked well over 20 miles in a single night, and found myself exploring side roads and looking them up later on an online map of the area.  In this article, Rocky runs in a "circular" pattern, but from his house to the final steps that he runs up at a museum, rather than returning to his house.  In this map with the article, Rocky is shown as covering a large area on his run, without overlapping the same areas all that often.  "Rocky" is a series about achieving dreams and defying odds- actions that are different with different characters and different outcomes in every movie.  It makes sense that Rocky covers a little bit of the same ground twice, metaphorically in the movies, and literally on the map, but also that he achieves his destination after going the long and difficult distance rather than a bee-line to the destination, that would defeat the depth of the story.  Rocky's run is symbolic as a journey mentally, physically, and spiritually, and is enforced by the route that he was found to have run, as analyzed by this article and its links.  While I found myself walking 15 miles to a place, and back in the same night, I was merely part of a cycle.  Rocky is a hero because he went the distance.

Expert's comment, September 25, 2013 7:08 PM
Good http://www.skoyun.com
Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 5:14 PM

I too loved this movie growing up. Everytime Rocky was brought up you always remebered the part when Rocky ran up the stairs to the statue after his long training run. Just from his run you see the type of community they lived in. His town was very rundown, but you still got a sense of community by the way people yelled and cheered for Rocky as he ran by. They may not have had much as a community, but they supported each other and took pride in their city. You were able to get all of this just from the different landmarks you saw Rocky pass by on his run. You may not think about it at the time, but the location and scenary really paints a picture of the type of lifestlye and culture Rocky grew up in, and what makes him the man that he is. That is all just from simply paying attention to the landmarks that he runs by. Location really effects a person and you can see that in this movie. Rocky was a fighter who never gave up. His community was the same way. And looking at the map I don't think I was would ever want to run that far. It appeared a lot shorter in the movie than it actually is!

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Ethnic/Population Density Map

Ethnic/Population Density Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an incredibly gorgeous interactive map of population density in the United States.  It is very reminiscent of this North American Map with two major differences.  On the down side, Mexican and Canadian data are not displayed but on the bright side, the added color component is used to show ethnic categories as defined by the 2010 U.S. census.  Please explore this map at a variety of scales and in distinct locales.   


Questions to Ponder: Is this a map of ethnic diversity patterns or is it a map of racial segregation?  How come?  Is there additional information that you would need to decide?  This review of the map on Wired and Atlantic Cities described this map as a map depicting segregation: why would they say that? 


Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, population, density, ethnicity, race.

more...
ethanrobert's comment, September 16, 2013 1:24 PM
Robert wrote this comment btw.
Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 8:52 AM

This describes challenges to human migration because it shows certain areas that people have moved to opposed to areas that have less population because of climate, area, etc...

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:27 PM

This article shows the ethnic distribution across the US.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The 7,000 Streams That Feed the Mississippi River

The 7,000 Streams That Feed the Mississippi River | Geography Education | Scoop.it

" A new online tool released by the Department of the Interior this week allows users to select any major stream and trace it up to its sources or down to its watershed. The above map, exported from the tool, highlights all the major tributaries that feed into the Mississippi River, illustrating the river’s huge catchment area of approximately 1.15 million square miles, or 37 percent of the land area of the continental U.S. Use the tool to see where the streams around you are getting their water (and pollution)."


Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a fantastic teaching image, especially if you teach within the Mississippi River Basin.  However, my main purpose in showing this image is to demonstrate the potential of the National Atlas' new Streamer application.  Streamer is a new way to visualize and understand water flow across the United States. With Streamer you can explore major streams by tracing upstream to their source or downstream to where they empty.  A watershed is a critically important region and many have little idea about how they are connected to other places within a watershed; this tool ccan help alleviate some of those problems. 


more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 30, 2013 11:20 PM

INland water environments

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, September 4, 2013 6:40 PM

Land use is different around Mississippi River basin.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:28 AM

The Mississippi River flows down the east side of the United States. Since the river is so long it has many streams that expand off it it as well. As you can see in the picture the red parts are the sections where the water has branched off the Mississippi River. It takes up almost all of the middle section of the United States. 

Suggested by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM
Scoop.it!

This Guy's Never Met a Map He Didn't Want to Fix

This Guy's Never Met a Map He Didn't Want to Fix | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Just not always for the better: "I've deliberately designed maps that are deliberately horrible to look at, and succeeded."
Seth Dixon's insight:

All maps are compromises; the Mercator projection preserves shape but distorts size, and so on.  What about sacrificing locational accuracy to preserve the aesthetic design or readability?  Just some things to think about as you peruse these redesigned subway maps.  


Tags: visualization, transportation, mapping, NYC.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Don Brown Jr
Scoop.it!

Visualizing 3 Billion Tweets

Visualizing 3 Billion Tweets | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a look at 3 billion tweets - every geotagged tweet since September 2011, mapped, showing facets of Twitter's ecosystem and userbase in incredible new detail, revealing demographic, cultural, and social patterns down to city level detail, across the entire world.

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this this great social media dataset, patterns of population density are immediately evident, with areas with great population densities not surprisingly representing the greatest concentration of social media usage.  On closer inspection though, the major transportation arteries (or in this particular map map of NYC, tourism districts) become much more visible than a population density map would suggest.

UPDATE: See also twitter's newest visualization of this dataset where they used digital elevation tools to show "height" to represent the tweets

 

Tags: visualizationsocial media, transportation, globalization, mapping, NYC, tourism.

more...
MelissaRossman's curator insight, August 30, 2013 7:37 AM

nice one

MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 7:37 AM
nice one
trampolinecalf's comment, September 26, 2013 11:50 PM
well
Suggested by Kristen McDaniel
Scoop.it!

Gapminder

Gapminder | Geography Education | Scoop.it

" Unveiling the beauty of statistics for a fact based world view."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I know that many of you have seen Gapminder, but for those that haven't, this is one of the best ways to visualize global statistics.  The world is changing--see how. 


Tags: visualization, statistics.

more...
Bronwyn Desjardins's curator insight, June 23, 2013 3:51 AM

This is a great website for stats on all sorts of global information.

ratzelster's curator insight, June 25, 2013 8:38 AM

Looking for an effective visualization tool?  Gapminder might just help you get your point across with a picture.

JMSS_Geography Resources's curator insight, June 25, 2013 10:20 PM

A “fact tank” that promotes a fact based world view. Gapminder promotes sustainable global development and achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Global flight paths

Global flight paths | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Transportation planner plots pattern of airline travel across the globe.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This set of 9 images displays 58,000 flight paths from various perspectives.  What patterns do you see emerging from this data?  What does this tell you about the world today?


Tags: visualization, transportation, statistics, globalization, mapping.

more...
jwilliams's comment, May 29, 2013 4:42 AM
Here is a video created of how to use Google Earth and airtraffic visual in a geography class. http://youtu.be/BXva8a1krMo
L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 1:25 AM

Global networks

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Invasion of America

The Invasion of America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations (above is a static image of the map; visit the map's page to play with its features).

Seth Dixon's insight:

In the past I've shared maps that show the historic expansion of the United States--a temporal and spatial visualization of Manifest Destiny.  The difference with this interactive is that the narrative focuses on the declining territory controlled by Native Americans instead of the growth of the United States.  That may seem a minor detail, but how history is told shapes our perception of events, identities and places.

 

Tags: USA, historicalmapping, visualization

more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 9:25 AM

unit 1 Perception and bias of maps

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, June 24, 2:51 AM

This will likely resonate with 'first peoples' everywhere

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Science behind Google Earth

The Science behind Google Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Google is using a new technology to automatically generate  3D buildings from 45-degree angle aerial photography made by overlapping passes of aircraft.  The aerial photos are combined to create 3D models."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some of the nuts and bolts behind Google Earth might be difficult to replicate in the computer lab, but it is critical to conceptually understand how geospatial data is used today.  This series of images shows how important remote sensing is for our modern digital mapping platforms.  


Tags: cartography, visualization, mappingremote sensing, google.

more...
Annenkov's curator insight, April 15, 9:46 PM

This technology of visualization I would name "3D landscape"

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, April 16, 5:40 PM

Tecnología para generar imágenes en 3D con Google Earth

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:06 AM

Google Earth has made the Earth easier to decipher and examine in a geographical sense of location and place by being able to see multiple layers. This article goes into the 3D designs and usage of aerial photography to create 3D images.

Suggested by PIRatE Lab
Scoop.it!

Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe

Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe | Geography Education | Scoop.it

  This chart shows the lexical distance — that is, the degree of overall vocabulary divergence — among the major languages of Europe. The size of each circle represents the number of speakers ...

 

And yes, English has its deepest roots in German...the French aspects were tacked on after the Norman Conquest.

more...
ethanrobert's curator insight, March 19, 7:20 AM

This is a wonderful map that truly shows language families and their roots. In Europe, I was rather surprised when I seen that the Romance branch was much larger than that of the Germanic. All of the ancient Germanic groups such as the Jutes, Angols, and the Saxons were well versed in combat. Considering they conquered much of Western Europe, how is it that the Romance group is bigger than the Germanic? Also, in Eastern Europe, the Albanian language has no reason to exist. In a region dominated by the Slavic group with no environmental barriers, the Albanian language should not exist.~Ethan.

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 7:33 PM

Unit II

Ness Crouch's curator insight, March 28, 5:43 PM

This isn't my normal area of interest but I found this fascinating!

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Population by Latitude and Longitude

Population by Latitude and Longitude | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin
Seth Dixon's insight:

I was recently reminded of the graph and thought is was worth sharing again.  This is an excellent spatial graph that helps to explain the distribution of the human population.  Why do we live where we live?   The longitude map is still fascinating, but has less explanatory power.  What would be brilliant is a graph that charted population by latitude (as this does) AND charts the amount of land at each given latitude.  Click here for Frank Jacobs analysis on the "Strange Maps" blog.   

more...
Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 6:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 5:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 3:53 PM

We can see that the majority of the world's population is clustered in the mid latitudes in particularly Asia. Showing population in terms of latitude shows how people live based on environmental factors while longitude remains the same throughout, thus showing countries/continents and their rates of population simply based off of that country's growth rate or demographic momentum aside from just looking at climatic preference. For instance, Asia is the most populated area and this is evident because of the current growth rates. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

17th century London visualized

"Six students from De Montfort University have created a stellar 3D representation of 17th century London, as it existed before The Great Fire of 1666. The three-minute video provides a realistic animation of Tudor London, and particularly a section called Pudding Lane where the fire started. As Londonist notes, “Although most of the buildings are conjectural, the students used a realistic street pattern [taken from historical maps] and even included the hanging signs of genuine inns and businesses” mentioned in diaries from the period."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video original spotted in an Open Culture article is a real gem for any historical geographer with a love for London.


Tags:  virtual tours, EnglishLondon, urban, historical, visualization.

more...
harish magan's comment, November 6, 2013 10:02 AM
Great Source for studies.
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 7, 2013 11:53 PM

London in the 1700's was a chacterised by buildings that were very tighly packed together with obviously little fire code. There buildings are similiar to other communities thrughout Europe and areas in Switzerland. This remake of the past gives the student an animated journey into an  England that once was before the fire. It appears preindustrial revolution and shows how the economy was run by individual businesses and markets, its always interesting to look into the past and see the way the same cities exist today. Most importantly we learn and have the best fire codes possible

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 8:24 AM

For someone who loves history as much as i do this was a real treat. It honest makes you feel as if you could hop on a plane and travel there right now. Also as someone who has walked the streets of london you can see glimpses of these times within the architechture and the city planning. Great video really makes me nostalgic for a time in which was way before myself.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Fertility Rates in Gapminder

Fertility Rates in Gapminder | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"CATHOLIC Argentina, Mexico & Phillippines have more babies born per woman than MUSLIM Indonesia, Iran & Turkey."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Gapminder is a tremendous resource that I've shared in the past and total fertility rates is an ideal metric to see in this data visualization tool.  As Hans Rosling said in one of his TED talks using Gapminder, religion and total fertility rates are not as connected as previously thought.  In this particular mode, you can see how three predominantly Catholic countries (Philippines, Argentina and Mexico) compare in Total Fertility Rates to three predominantly Muslim countries (Indonesia, Turkey and Iran).  


Questions to Ponder: Historically many have assumed that Catholic and Muslim populations would have higher birth rates; why is this changing?  How important a factor is religion in changing fertility rates?  What are other factors impact a society's fertility rate?


Tags: population, demographicsvisualization, religion.

more...
Mathijs Booden's comment, September 28, 2013 12:03 PM
Any mention of Gapminder gets an upvote from me. One of the best resources in and outside of the classroom, period.
jon inge's curator insight, October 11, 2013 2:20 PM

awesome site for development economics

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 3:15 PM

When watching the video it was apparetnt that for Iran during the 1950-early1970's there was an increase in fertility and then decreased to almost 1.32% in 2010. These facts were very interseting to see and the way that we as historians/ georgraphers can predict the future with the past facts.

Suggested by Sylvain Rotillon
Scoop.it!

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | Geography Education | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The 'spyglass' feature gives thesse gorgeous vintage maps a modern facelift. The cities that are in this set of interactive maps are: 



Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, urban, historical.

more...
Tom cockburn's comment, September 20, 2013 2:09 PM
Absolutely agree,Marian!
Amy Marques's curator insight, February 6, 2:09 PM

These maps are a great way to see what North American cities used to look like in comparison to what they are now. Some great transformations are Chicago and NYC.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 8:56 AM

The Smithsonian Magazine overlayed maps of American cities for the past centuries with modern satellite images to show differences in the development and planning and the growth of the cities.

The growth and change of the cities changed over the years on how it was achieved and how far it could be expanded due to new technology and movement of people to urban areas. The technology helped achieved a certain hold over the environment to build more urban spaces. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

When Google Earth Goes Awry

When Google Earth Goes Awry | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"These jarring moments expose how Google Earth works, focusing our attention on the software. They reveal a new model of representation: not through indexical photographs but through automated data collection from a myriad of different sources constantly updated and endlessly combined to create a seamless illusion; Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation. These uncanny images focus our attention on that process itself, and the network of algorithms, computers, storage systems, automated cameras, maps, pilots, engineers, photographers, surveyors and map-makers that generate them.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

The quote above from Clement Valla shows some of the problems with trusting too completely in a form of technology if you are not sure how it works or what its limitations are.  What does he mean when he says "Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation?"  What does this have to do with the term metadata?   


Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, art, google.

more...
Mary Rack's curator insight, August 26, 2013 7:10 AM

This post represents a "sub-issue" which underlies many of today's  decisions: How much "information" is really a composite of items that may or may not be related? And how many of our decisions are based on those constructs? As a result, are we liviing in a "house of cards", a fantasy world that is sure to collapse around us one day? It's a scary thought. 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 12, 2013 6:55 AM

I understand that this article mostly depicts the inherent limitations with our current technology within GIS systems but I mostly just found these images to be eerily and awkwardly beautiful. Art made accidentely. Thank-you flawed technology.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Population Density

Population Density | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."

Seth Dixon's insight:

At NCGE this week, I was pleased to hear a presentation from Alexander Murphy, a giant in the academic world.  He shared this interactive map from Derek Watkins, which is the best map I've ever seen to teach global population distribution patterns.  It is removed all extraneous information and allows the user to focus on the areas of heavy settlement and limited population.  The map can show regions that are settled at densities from 15 to 500 people per square mile; the changes at various densities are visually staggering and powerfully telling. I've shared some other maps that would work very nicely together with this in a lesson on global population settlement patterns.   


Tags: density, populationvisualization, mapping.

more...
Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 3:22 PM
I really liked this map, because it showed me how spread out we are. I actually didnt realize the world was THIS populated!
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 2:23 PM

This interactive map shows the varying intensities of population density, and the first thing that I thought of was how low the population density is in my hometown, compared to some of the bigger cities or areas around the world.  I am from a rural area of Rhode Island, and there are plenty of farms near my home, as well as woods and ponds.  It really is a beautiful area, which made me think that if population densities were so high- the maximum density on the interactive map was over 500 people per square kilometer- that there would  be less room for the beauty of the natural world in those densely populated areas.  I grew up playing in my woods, and I am always shocked by city-dwellers that live in places where their yards have one or two trees (and are considered to live in 'woodsy' areas of their towns), or have no yards at all.  My town has a low population density, and much of the land is occupied by the reservoir, farms, and woodland areas that are not permissible for development.  Although my hometown is not a city, it serves the more populated areas- such as Providence- by providing water to their city.  It seems the more populated areas drain the surrounding areas of their natural beauty and resources.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:31 AM

Mindblowing interractive map dealing with the population desinty of the world.  From tinkering around with this ive seen some scary things. As we all know the North East metropolis area is compact with people from rhode island to delaware and everything in between. but when you take the map to 100 people per square to kilomete it almost disapears. This in itself wouldnt be that bad but when you move the image to 500 per kilometer almost the entireity of India is still there. This is a perfect compaitive example of how jam packed south eastern asia is and its actually pretty scary.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Weather Graphs and Maps

Weather Graphs and Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
WeatherSpark: beautiful weather graphs and maps making in-depth weather information easily accessible.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Weather Spark is a platform with interactive maps, weather forecasting and climatological history for the last five years for many different weather stations.  This is the data for the TF Green airport, and is an incredible set of information to teach physical geography.    


Tags: physical, weather and climate, statistics, visualization.

more...
Jose Sepulveda's comment, July 4, 2013 9:07 AM
Nice class material
Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 7, 2013 3:44 AM

Thiis s some great information on weather stats and tracking storms statistics and seasonal trends of general weather events.Thanks

David Madrid's curator insight, July 25, 2013 5:33 PM

Graficos y clima juntos

Suggested by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
Scoop.it!

Map iPhone Users In a City, And You Know Where The Rich Live

Map iPhone Users In a City, And You Know Where The Rich Live | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Our stuff often says a lot about us, whether we own a hybrid car or a station wagon, a MacBook Pro or an ancient desktop.  Among other things, cell phone brands say something about socio-economics – it takes a lot of money to buy a new iPhone 5 (and even more money to keep up with the latest models that come out faster than plan upgrades do). Consider, then, this map of Washington, D.C., which uses geolocated tweets, and the cell phone metadata attached to them, to illustrate who in town is using iPhones (red dots) and who's using Androids (green dots)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: visualizationsocial media, Washington DC, mapping.

more...
Mary Everhart's comment, June 26, 2013 7:59 PM
I keep wondering what impact commuting has on the patterns shown on the maps.
Timothy Roth's curator insight, July 8, 2013 1:38 PM

This just amazes me! The information that geography relates to us will never cease to amaze me.

Fleur Farah's curator insight, May 27, 4:06 AM

Would Sydney show these trends?

Suggested by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
Scoop.it!

Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized

Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a small subset of 16 great maps created by Twitter, Inc. displaying the billions of geotagged tweets sent since 2009.  In this this great social media dataset, patterns of population density are immediately evident, with areas with great population densities not surprisingly representing the greatest concentration of social media usage.  On closer inspection though, the major transportation arteries become much more visible than a population density map would suggest.  

 

Question to Ponder: What does this map say about transportation networks and those that use them? 


Tags: visualizationsocial media, transportation, globalization, mapping.

more...
fabio sousa's comment, June 3, 2013 6:00 AM
que lindo
oyndrila's curator insight, June 3, 2013 10:35 AM

Useful and interesting visuals. They help us to understand significant aspects like varying population density, variable intensity of use of social media, digital divide etc.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 10, 2013 5:12 AM

Communication and social media.