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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Using Scale in Elementary School

Using Scale in Elementary School | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Great idea to help early years learners understand their 'place'...


Via Maree Whiteley
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is would be a nice craft to help younger students understand the concept of scale.  This adapts some of the ideas from the classic picture book "Me on the Map" by Joan Sweeney.  


Tags: scale, K12, location.

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, March 16, 5:33 AM
AC Geography key concepts Place, Space, Environment and Interconnection...all in a set of form cups! Love it...
Hoolee Nan's curator insight, March 30, 2:17 PM

A great way for children to explore countries, areas, positions on maps and get a grasp of their surroundings! Also a fun and interactive idea for the classroom.

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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video shows the place matters; a Washington D.C. educator shows how food deserts and other spatial problems of poverty impact his students on a daily basis.  We usually look at life expectancy data at the national scale and that obscures some of the real issues of poverty in developed countries.  Above is a map that shows the Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was recently added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit).  Here are some maps and data from the World Bank that utilizes the Gini Index as well as an interactive Gapminder graph.  


Tags: industry, location, place, migration, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic.

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Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, October 12, 2013 10:46 AM

Just incredibly awesome, but so, so sadly true.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 12:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 4:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

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GPS Astray: Lost in Death Valley

GPS Astray: Lost in Death Valley | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Three women’s Death Valley day trip soured after their GPS led them to the edge of survival."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a extreme example, but this video serves as a cautionary tale.  The harsh and unforgiving physical geography of Death Valley does not tolerate a lack of preparation.  Here is part 2 of the video.  Garmin the GPS manufacturer's statement on these videos is quite telling "GPS's shouldn't be followed blindly...it is incumbent on users to obtain and update their GPS devices with the most recent map updates." 


Technology is designed to guide and assist our decision-making process--that does NOT mean we should turn over thinking functions to the device.  Spatial thinking is just like a muscle that will atrophy if it is never used.  So consult a map and think for yourself; newer technologies aren't always better or more reliable.   


Tagsmapping, GPS, geospatial, location, California.

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Mike Carney's curator insight, September 30, 2013 1:48 PM

GPS devices are very useful tools, but if you don't know how to use them properly they can be very frustrating and sometimes can get you into trouble. On the surface a GPS seems like a pretty fool-proof navigation device, but that's giving people way too much credit. A lot of (older) people can have a hard time following them. Take my mother-in-law for example, she once got lost for a half hour on the ten minute drive from my house to the highway. Somehow she missed the ONE turn and apparently didn't understand how to make a U-turn. People generally go astray if they fail to update their GPS, don't know how to configure their settings properly, or follow the GPS blindly. People often forget that they can just use the GPS as a map and figure out their own routes when the GPS is being wonky. Its also a good idea to keep real maps in your car so you don't have to rely soly on the GPS. The women from the video were dealing with a GPS that was following inaccurate and outdated information. At a time like this its a good idea to pull over and get out the map rather than drive in circles until you run out of gas.

 

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 12:43 PM

       Is not always the best idea to only rely on you GPS when traveling, best thing to do is to get and updated maps.  Is always good to get information on where you are going, how long are you going to be there? So you can get enough supplies like food, water, clothes etc.  Also are you making other stops along the road? Let someone know where you going therefore; if something happened to you they know where to look for you, once again don’t always trust on electronic. Prepared AHEAD!!

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:21 AM

Although I have grown up around technology, I've always been a little skeptical about its reliability. It is a good thing to have a GPS, but we should not rely solely upon it. Relying solely upon technolgy is not as good as it sounds. In some cases the GPS could be wrong and in instances such as these we need to be able to think for ourselves. Not having this ability is a dangerous situation. 

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The Local Global Mashup Show

Get the inside edge on the stories that connect Americans to the world -- in your ear every week.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video explains why geography teachers should be interested in Latitude News given it's desire to show how global stories have regional impacts.  They often have interesting perspectives on global stories that makes the geographic linkages explicit.  They are currently raising funds to expand their reach.   

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Where the Streets Have No Name

Where the Streets Have No Name | Geography Education | Scoop.it
West Virginia aims to put its residents on the map
Seth Dixon's insight:

While this article does occasionally play off of the country bumpkin stereotypes we've all heard about West Virginians, there are some important concepts lying under the surface in the article.  All places have a location (both absolute and relative), but not one that is easily discernible to an outsider unfamiliar with the area.  Many emergency responders rely on geocoded addresses and GPS systems to location those in need, and the state of West Virginia is trying to ensure that even the most rural of residents is on the grid.  Many location-based technologies lose their value as soon as you leave a named road, so these systematic campaign will strengthen the push for modernization and digital systems.  How will this change the cultural landscape?   

 

Tags: rural, location, GPS.

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How Wal-Mart Used Payoffs to Get Its Way in Mexico

How Wal-Mart Used Payoffs to Get Its Way in Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Wal-Mart de Mexico was an aggressive and creative corrupter, offering large payoffs to get what the law otherwise prohibited, an examination by The New York Times found.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Wal-Mart officials worked hard to ensure that zoning regulations were changed so that they could bring a store to a coveted location.  They built a Wal-Mart in the shadows of arguably Mexico's most important world heritage site--the pyramids of Teotihuacán.  This investigative report uncovers the illegal steps that Wal-Mart took to force through their agenda. 


Questions to Ponder: Why would Wal-Mart be so keen on this particular location?  Why would some in Mexico oppose this project so fiercely?  Would Wal-Mart behave in such a manner in the United States?       


Tags: Mexico, industry, planning, culture, location, place.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 9:36 AM

Some reactions that I had about this article were that the corporate Walmart took steps in order to enforce their way into the new making of a Walmart store in Mexico. Some things I would ask would be are what regualtions would the Mexican people know to follow in realation to the fact that Walmart had broken rules in order to expand their monopoly.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 6, 12:33 PM

Wal-Mart is sometimes considered to be the embodiment of globalization.  Unfortunately, these things  come at the cost of not only the quality of life of many people, but also at the cost of these people's culture itself.  This is especially sad in Teotihuacon, where the tourism that is brought by the ruins helps support locals small businesses (their livelihood).  As the article states, and which has been seen wherever a Wal-mart pops up, these small, local business get shut-out quickly.  According to the evidence, it seems as though most of Wal-Mart de Mexico's stores were established through bribery.  With such a huge corporation showing such sure signs of corruption, what else in Mexico is made possible through bribery?

Maria Lopez's curator insight, February 8, 3:05 PM

WalMart is looking to build a new store to an important site in Mexico, the pyramids of Teotihuacán. I believe that WalMart is looking to build on this location because it is a great tourism spot and centered at a location where thousands of people would be likely to visit. Even though the permission was obtained illegally, Walmart was able to provide some powerful incentives to Mexico in exchange for doing so. In other words, they were able to bribe zoning commissioners in order to get their compliance. It is easy to understand why there are some in Mexico that would oppose this. The pyramids hold a lot of religious and cultural influence to Mexicans and they do not want to lose a part of their culture to the modern world. Money is not enough of a motivation for citizens to lose a party of their cultural identity.  If Walmart attempted such a move in the United States, I think there would a lot of opposition from groups bent on protecting US historical sites and monuments. I think Walmart would have faced a much tougher time obtaining permission to build their store in the US.

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Esri Story Map Treasure Hunt

Esri Story Map Treasure Hunt | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Although these were designed specifically for GIS day during Geography Awareness Week, these 2 excellent map-based treasure hunts from ESRI are great any time of year.  The answer to the question will only pop up in you are zoomed in the the right region (SHIFT + Make a box = Zoom to area).  These links will take you to the World Cities quiz and also to the Mountains quiz.

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Steven Flis's curator insight, September 10, 2013 7:28 AM

Fun quiz, pretty easy with basic worldly knowledge. Also if you just scroll in close enough then scroll across the page it would then show up to you, which is good for learning incase you had no clue what the answer is. 

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, September 10, 2013 8:53 AM

This is great! Thanks.

Ryan Amado's comment, September 11, 2013 11:19 AM
Challenging and fun. You can sometimes get carried away exploring
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What Is Geocaching?

Learn about the high-tech treasure hunting game being played around the world by adventure seekers! Learn more at http://www.geocaching.com Subscribe to this...


Geocaching is great way to get people outdoors, use geospatial technologies and have fun with the whole family. 


Tags: GPS, edtech, geospatial, technology, location.

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:56 AM

I have tried geocaching and it really does make you use geospatial tools. You have to know exactly where you are in reference to a map, you have to know directions in which you must travel, and you know you have to reach a certain place. While a fun activity, it is also a great geographic learning tool. 

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Latitude and Longitude of a Point

Latitude and Longitude of a Point | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Find the latitude and longitude of a point using Google Maps.


Simple, straightforward and easy to use.  All you do is point and click on the map to get latitude and longitude in both decimal degrees and DMS (degrees, minutes and seconds).  You can also quickly enter coordinates in either format an have the location displayed on the map.


Tags: GPS, mapping, location.

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A Tip for Restaurant Investors: Study the Demographics

A Tip for Restaurant Investors: Study the Demographics | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The most successful investors in restaurants consider how a style fits an area and track who their customers are, said Hudson Riehle of the National Restaurant Association.

 

A successful business model for restaurants is about much more than quality food at an affordable price.  Ask your students: what geographic factors are important in starting a restaurant?  What variables might make an otherwise attractive location less appealing?  What would ensure a return on your investment? 

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 6, 2012 5:42 PM
It's always important to consider an investment, especially one as great as a restaurant. Like Mr. Ruban said "be prepared to lose the money". You can't possibly foresee all the problems that will occur, but one of the best ways to increase profit is to pay attention to your demographic. Cater to the audience you wish to bring in, and do so in the right area, that will greatly increase your chances of success.
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GIS demonstrates links between health and location

GIS demonstrates links between health and location | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The neighborhoods in which children and adolescents live and spend their time play a role in whether or not they eat a healthy diet, get enough exercise or become obese, concludes a collection of studies in a special theme issue of the American...

 

Spatial analysis shows that numerous disciplines can utilize the 'geographic advantage' to improve research. 

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10 Places You're Not Allowed to See on Google Maps

10 Places You're Not Allowed to See on Google Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Google maps brings the world to your desktop - well, most of it, anyway. Here are 10 locations that governments and other entities have blurred or removed from satellite photos.

 

A user of geospatial technologies is not free to explore all places of the Earth with equal levels of specificity. Why?  Where?  How come?

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 6, 2012 4:41 PM
I must say I'm fairly surprised there were not more then 10, unless that is just the number chosen for this article.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 18, 2013 7:58 AM

When I was working on my environmental classroom assignment I came across an area that I couldn't see from above, only the fence that wrapped around it. At first I thought that couldn't happen but it makes sense for government reasons.  a security reason. 

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 6:15 PM

although we like to think that we are able to go anywhere on the world wide web some locations are off limits. Google Earth allows us to see place we have never been. However, some place are not available for us to see due to security reasons. Google Earth has restricted the public to view certain images of locations.

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Google Earth Map Quiz w/ArcGIS

Google Earth Map Quiz w/ArcGIS | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is an incredible combination of geospatial technologies to create a masterful Geography Education resource.  This quiz has the advantages of being able to pan and zoom, while at the same maintains the benefits of a static presentation (the instructions, and question prompts stay in the same size and in the same location on the screen).  For a static version of the same quiz (if you don't have internet available where you are presenting) see: http://www.arcgis.com/home/webmap/presentation.html?webmap=f95d562571d740a6840254ee53ae3024 

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Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

In this map, all Zip codes with more than 500 people are ranked from 0 to 99 based on household income and education.  The 'Super Zips' rank 95 or higher. The map at the top shows the highest concentration of the nation’s 650 Super Zips. The typical household income in a Super Zip is $120,272, and 68 percent of adults hold college degrees. That compares with $53,962 and 27 percent in the other zips mapped.  Washington D.C. shows a powerful bifurcation: One-third of Zip codes in the D.C. area are considered ‘Super Zips’ for wealth and education and large swaths of the metropolitan area are considered food deserts.


This weekend I had the privilege of flying essentially from Boston to Washington DC at night and was mesmerized by the vast urban expanse beneath me.  It was the greatest concentration of wealth in the United States as well as the some of the most blighted regions of the country.  What explains the spatial patterns of highly concentrated wealth and poverty in the biggest cities?  Are cities a causal factor in wealth and poverty creation?  What does this zip code data tell us? What accounts for the spatial patterns in your region?    


Tags: Washington DC, urban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 6:59 AM

See where the wealth and poverty are in America using this great map.

Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 9, 7:44 PM

wonderful

 

Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 3:56 AM

This picture shows the cocentrations of poverty and affluence.  The areas hilighted in yellow show the areas which are wealthy and the dark blue showing the poor. This coincides with the amout of pay and the education levels in these countries. Areas such as Boston, New York and Washington show high cocentrations of affluence. These areas also have much higher education systems and more well -paid jobs. Countries which are highlighted in dark blue are countries with lesser education and lesser paid jobs. This shows the  extent at which poverty can affect a country.

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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I’ve posted earlier about the end of cheap China; the rising cost of doing business in China coupled with the higher transportation costs to get goods to North American and European markets have made manufacturing in Mexican much more competitive on the global market.  Many investors are turning to Mexico as an emerging land of opportunity and Mexico is now a destination for migrants.  This is still a new pattern:  only 1 percent of the country is foreign-born compared to the 13 percent that you would see in the United States.  Mexican migration to the United States has stabilized; about as many Mexicans have moved to the U.S. (2005-2010) as those that have moved south of the border.


Tags: Mexico, industry, location, place, migration.

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:43 AM

The wealth of a nation can come from many differnet aspects, jobs land, ecnomy, resoucres, and labor force. In many contries like china and indina they have lots of factorys and factory workers. However what ahppens when the cost of living and transporations go up, should we give workers a pay raise? NO. The answer is to find people who are able to work for cheeper. This lead to the mass influx of mexican factorites and the mass influx of forign workers fleeing to mexico for the jobs and simple life.

It was very interesting to see how even workers form the US were going to mexico in search of jobs becuse ten years ago it was the exact oppisit.

Paige Therien's curator insight, March 1, 12:44 PM

As domestic problems increase in countries where the United States have been previously "setting up shop", institutions are rethinking where they outsource manufacturing to.  It is becoming increasingly more expensive to ship goods from China or Europe.  People of all sorts are turning to Mexico, where the United States already has a good manufacturing foundation, to find new opportunities in many different increasingly competitive (globally) sectors.  This is allowing Mexico to be culturally, economically, and socially closer than ever before to many countries around the world.  This large influx of people from all around the world is definitely welcomed, but is being monitored and managed with great care and strategy in order to ensure that this shift benefits everyone.  Mexico is currently very flexible since it is transitioning into a more first-world country; this gives entrepreneurs a great place to start experimenting and migrants a chance to shape Mexico.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 7:39 AM

Foreigners on work visas is a huge and broadening event that is happening throughout the world. Most of the people on work visas have migrated from the U.S. and more now than ever, Europe. With dwelling economies, people are being forced to migrate towards the U.S. and Mexico.

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The Longitude Problem

The Longitude Problem | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Today we take it for granted that through GPS technology we can instantaneously determine our latitude and longitude.  This video documents how for centuries it was fairly easy to determine latitude at sea by measuring the height of the sun in the sky, but longitude (determined by the difference in time between local noon and the noon of a fixed point) could only be estimated.  The British Empire saw solving the "longitude problem" as the key to solidifying their economic dominance at sea and they established the Board of Longitude in this 18th century "race to the moon." Today the University of Cambridge has digitized the Board of Longitude's archives with a series of five shorter video clips.  


Tagsmapping, GPS, historical, cartography, geospatial, location.

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Romain ARMAND's comment, August 21, 2013 2:17 AM
Thank you for the video and fo the link to the Board of Longitude! Already know this story, but still amazing and well documented.
Richard Miles's curator insight, September 5, 2013 4:30 PM

Great video on how the problem of longitude was solved.

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Successful Implosion of South Bay Power Plant on Saturday morning

Successful Implosion of South Bay Power Plant on Saturday morning | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The South Bay Power Plant was imploded Saturday Feb 2, 2013
to clear the way for development along Chula Vista's bayfront.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This powerplant was demolished primarily because of location (watch the cool videos of the implosion).  The electrical powerplant provided energy for the region, but it's location right on the San Diego Bay doesn't line up with current land uses.  When the area's economy was focused more on manufacturing, this was seen an ideal way to use the wetlands on the bay.  Today our city planning priorites has shifted.  First, how we view wetlands has changed and we no longer see them as "wasted" space.  Second, an attractive waterfront that can be used to generate tourism is seen as a greater economic priority today than it was 50 years ago.  

 

Tags: location, planning, economic, space, industry, California


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 12:59 PM

 


It seems that getting rid of this power plant was a great step for the city of San Diego. This plant was doing no good for them because it was taking space that could have been used to attract people from all over the world they could have added a many stores and other cool things that would create hundreds of jobs for local people who are struggling to make ends meet. The explosions were cool it was amazing how they feel in a line back to back. The explosion was a success for the city of San Diego. With all this new space available more people are going to invest in the city in which it will become much more popular than what it is now. 

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Place and Flash Mobs

The idea of flash mobs has spread quickly, diffusing at a time when online video sharing can immortalize the moment in time and social media can amplify the audience beyond just one place.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I LOVE this particular flashmob (as a bonus, 'read' the cultural landscape to try to identify where this took place).  While there are many types of successful flash mobs, all share one characteristic: place matters.  The place where a flash mob performs is not simply a stage; place is a crucial part of the meaning of the flash mob.  An incredibly prominent place with open spaces and many sight lines is a prime location for a flash mob.  Beyond these tangible characteristics, if a site has some importance cultural significance, those qualities can be meshed with the meanings of the flash mob.  For more of my musings on flashmobs (and extra clips) you can continue reading here.


Tags: place, space, diffusion, popular culture, music.

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Justin Cardoso's curator insight, September 10, 2013 7:51 AM

we saw this flash mob in my first geography class and i just thought that it was amazing how many people gathered around to listen to the street performers.  i also love how it escalated so quickly from a single performer into a complete orcastra in a matter of a couple minutes. #georic

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 15, 2013 2:02 PM

I love the consept of a flash mob. How a planed performace can start in the steet and instantly people are attracted and engaged. They are done all over the world, but where the mob takes place is the important part. The location of the mob is more likeley to be in a popular city, or near a highly populated area (park, beach, ect..).  Its important to realize how something like this would serve no signicinace if it was done say at a shopping center in a surban town. Its also interesting to see what the message of the mob is, this video was more of just entertainment while some mobs have clear messages that there trying to comminucate to socioty.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 7:38 AM

The people who were apart of this flashmob picked a very good place to do it. They decided to do it rightin the center of a town or market area where many people would notice them. They wanted everyone to focus their attention on them even if it was just for a few minutes. If they were to pick an are that was not in a city or town area not that many people would be gathered around and watching them. 

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Inside an Amazon Warehouse

Seth Dixon's insight:

During the holiday season, online sales shoot up as distant relatives seek to ship gifts in time for Christmas.  Some have noted that online shoppers can stay at home and completely render the tradition physical storefront redundant.  Online shoppers, whether they think about it or not, hoping that the physical logistics behind the scenes will work efficiently and quickly.  This collection of images is a reminder that while it might appear that geography and location are eliminated with online communications, these virtual interactions in cyberspace are dependent on actual physical locations.


Tags: location, economic, space, industry, technology

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noah taylor's comment, September 12, 2013 5:30 PM
to see something this lsarge and relavent to the world be built by human beings
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 1:07 PM


It is amazing how big this warehouse is. This warehouse must be a couple of acres because amazon is a big company that mostly everyone in the world buys from. it is also amazing how organized they are with all the inventory they get. Amazon is a great company that is helping people gets jobs to help improve there lives and also the economy in which is struggling to get back on it knees. I wonder were amazon has found this warehouse because there are not so many that have this much space. The workers must have golf carts to get around from one spot to the other. Amazon keep up the good work.

 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 7:45 AM

Online shopping is a great way to get your holiday gifts or just to regularly shop. By online shopping we do not have to go to the mall and walk around in all these different stores. What most people do not realize is when we online shop our orders are being processed somewhere and it is usually in big warehouse buildings. These buildings require a lot of space to hold all of a stores merchandise. 

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A Sense of Place

A Sense of Place | Geography Education | Scoop.it
THERE WAS SOMETHING odd about the black car at the junction of Sutter and Hyde Streets. It was an ordinary saloon. Its windows were clear, and it looked in good...


Technologies today have allowed us to be digitally connected from anywhere.  This impacts geographic patterns from outsourcing to local businesses that rely on interpersonal communications to connect potential demand with resources.  Some may see this as geography becoming less of a barrier, and consequently, less relevant.  This article in the Economist argues that as these technologies have rendered location more important than ever since they rely on geospatial technologies.  "The reports of the death of distance have been much exaggerated." 


Tags: technology, globalization, location, place.

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Our Place in the World

Our Place in the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Tags: scale, K12, location

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 7:21 AM

As I am almost finished with my teacher degree I always look for great ideas that will help the students I will teach some day. This will be great for kids to get the concept of location and scale.  Scale is critical to know where something is, This is a great frame of reference.  

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What is GIS?

This is a brief introduction to what geographic information systems are.  This is not a tutorial on how to use it, but a conceptual overview on the potential uses and applications for GIS.  


Tags: GIS, video, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples, geospatial, mapping and location.

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Who's using mobile maps and check-ins

Who's using mobile maps and check-ins | Geography Education | Scoop.it
According to a new survey from the Pew Internet and American Life Project, three-quarters of U.S.

 

Smartphones have built-in location features with a host of apps that can be added.  However, 1  in 4 smartphone users do not use these features at all.  Age, ethnicity, education and gender (or more simply, demographic factors) play a major role.  Which groups would you imagine use geo-location features more or less?  Why? 

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 1:30 PM

 I would imagine that the group that would use less geo-location features could be the older crowd, probably because they might not know to use it; for example my mother’ we recently bought her a new iPhone. she only know the basic call, text and taking picture , I been trying to get her to use her phone as a GPS but she won’t budge in. when I asked her how do she feel about  letting other people know where she is (check in Facebook) she thinks is crazy because she like her privacy.

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Venice sinking five times faster than thought?

Venice sinking five times faster than thought? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Venice, by virtue of its geographic situation will always be sinking as a course of nature.  A research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the UCSD has recently concluded that Venice is sinking 2 millimeters per year...not catastrophic on a single year basis, but threatens the long-term viability and sustainability of the location. 

 

Urban ecology: what economic forces created the rationale for building Venice?  What environmental factors are currently threatening it?  Will economic or environmental forces win out? Location: do the economic advantages of a location outweigh the environmental liabilities of the location?  How do these competing factors influence the development of a city?  For additional information on this story see: http://www.physorg.com/news/2012-03-venice-hasnt.html

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 30, 2013 5:47 PM

The famous city in Italy is sinking, and quickly.  It seems that the transient opportunities of a transient town are like that of other areas exposed to natural inclemence- such as New Orleans, and earthquake zones.  Sooner or later, places that are exposed to disaster will become inhabitable, and possibly abandoned.  When I hear of this city sinking, it makes me think of the Titanic, and how people should likely jump ship out of this situation, before the whole city 'goes under.'  I also think of marshy areas that would not be well-suited for development and inhabitance, and it seems that there is a history in the town that united people to live there in spite of the abundance of water.  Some of my ancestors were from Italy, and I wouldn't want harm to come to their homeland, but it really makes me wonder why they chose such a place to live...  It seems likely to me that the mere fact that it was sinking was not really considered much back then;  they were not as realistically concerned about the longevity of the city in the long run, than they were about the 'now' and the time at hand.  This reflects many facets of humanity and the hedonistic lifestyles that accompany many humans.  Humans that live for today and forget about tomorrow are doomed to live a life of sorry.  Humans that live for tomorrow and not today are out of touch and fail to seize the day.  Humans that live for today but remember tomorrow are the masons that build stairways to new lands for their descendents, and along with that, myriad new possibilities for positive opportunities.  I think some of the wisdom of Italy was put into its architecture and structural design, so that we might remember- we are dying in this life, just as Venice sinks, but we should live life as best as we can, and pave the way for future generations.  Like so, the dumping of wastes into the ocean seems tiny at first, but accumulates over many generations and will leave many ocean species dead, and harm the overall functionality of the Earth as a whole.  Let Venice be a reminder.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 6, 2013 6:27 PM

So not only is Mexico City sinking, but Venice is as well, and five times faster than we thought at that. If the heart of an urban, sprawling city becomes completely destroyed what changes will be made to the outlying areas? Will they break up into multiple, smaller districts each with a central area? Where will the rich who used to reside in the heart move to?

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:36 PM

Day to day, even looking into next year the rate of 2 millimeters per year may not seem drastic.  To a city that has been around for hundreds of years, it's assumed the city plans to stay standing for hundreds more.  Considering the age of the city, say in a couple hundred more years, some buildings could begin to take in water.  It is also possible that certain parts of the city could be sinking faster than others.  There is a similar situation in Mexico City where it was built on a lake and each year that source diminishes due to the demand of water by its residents.  Certain parts of the city are sinking and some buildings are slanted due to the results.  These cities are beautiful  but reality shows that as time passes, it will probably only get worse.  Hopefully preventions can be taken to at least reduce the speed of sinking so that people after us can appreciate the architecture and atmosphere the city has provided all these years.

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Location always matters!

Location always matters! | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Even the three little pigs need to know the basic tenets of geography.

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 7:57 AM

This image has a lot to do with geograpy because of where the pig placed his new home. Location is key when deciding where to place a building or home. If a new mall is being built they want to make sure they put it in a popular area where people are like in a city.  In this example the pig placed his home right next to  a sausage factory where this factory could use him to make sausage. He probably should have built his home in an area away from the factory like in a neighborhood.