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How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks

How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It's something you can see on every block in most major cities. You probably see one every day and never give give it a second thought. But in Yangon, Myanmar in 2013, an ATM was a small miracle. For decades, Myanmar was cut off from the rest of the world. There were international sanctions, and no one from the U.S. or Europe did business there."

Seth Dixon's insight:

We often assume that one form of technology, a system, institute should work equally well where ever it is.  But the nuances of cultural geography mediate how societies interact with technological innovations, and as demonstrated in this Planet Money podcast, "People in Myanmar (Burma) were reluctant to use ATMs because they didn't trust the banks. They weren't sure that the machines would actually give them their money."  

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, poverty, development, economicpodcast.

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Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia

Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The purpose-built city of Naypyidaw – unveiled a decade ago this year – boasts 20-lane highways, golf courses, fast Wi-Fi and reliable electricity. The only thing it doesn’t seem to have is people, report Matt Kennard and Claire Provost


Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, urban, urbanism.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Visitors to Naypyidaw are routinely shocked to see how empty this city is and often refer to it as a ghost town.  The capital of Burma moved to Naypyidaw in 2005, away from the busy streets of Rangoon.  However, building the city, does not automatically bring the people, jobs, and economic networks that make a bustling city bustle. 


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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 27, 2015 8:53 AM

If you build it, they may not come. Burma's government t must be both shocked and dismayed at the development of their grand new capital. They probably should not be that surprised at this development. All cites take time to grow. Outside of china, mega cities are not developed over the course of a night. Up until the Civil War, Washington D.C. was a swampy outpost in the middle of no were.  Eventually their capital will develop, it may just take longer than the government of Burma had hoped for.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:02 PM

this just goes to prove that there needs to be an economic reason for people to move. if you build it, they will not come. they will stay where the money is, and ignore the 'honor' of living in the new capital city.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 4:46 PM

I strange but not historically unprecedented situation. This kind of reminds me of all the cities China built in compensation for population growth. Historically the only way cities like this succeed is either by enticing immigration with tax cuts, free house etc or it has been forcefully with entire populations being moved (the latter being what the ancients largely did creating cities like Alexandria). Another example of capital moving is Iran however how they got a population in theirs I am not aware.Burma committed to neither and as a result the city is a failure. The cities layout also seems a bit extreme given it was made to suppress rather than entice. What is really bad however is the loss of agricultural land and ancestral villages in the area being destroyed all clearly for nothing. At the very least the country may be slowly moving away from dictatorship but only time will tell. Hopefully this failure will force further concessions making it a more tolerable place to live. Only then true solutions will likely be found to their poverty since the dictatorship has been seemingly incompetent in its actions.

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Coca-Cola Returning To Myanmar; Now It Sells In All But 2 Nations

Coca-Cola Returning To Myanmar; Now It Sells In All But 2 Nations | Geography Education | Scoop.it
With the country also known as Burma taking steps toward democracy and respect for human rights, Coke is returning after a 60-year absence. What are the two nations where it still won't be doing business?

 

Globalization has made many companies and products ubiquitious throughout the world.  We take their presence as a matter of course, a sign that the largest brands are in essentially every country in the world--but not all.  Until recently Coca Cola was not in three markets, all for political reasons.  Now that Burma is becoming more democratic, Coca-Cola will bring their product to all countries of South East Asia.  Any guesses on the 2 countries that still don't have Coke?

 

UPDATED CORRECTION: Thanks to the great people at About.com 's geography page, I was informed that there are more than just the initially listed two countries (North Korea and Cuba) not within the Coke universe (such as Somalia and East Timor to name a few).  For more on this see: http://geography.about.com/b/2012/06/15/coca-cola-in-every-country-but-three-no.htm

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:03 AM

Coke is another product that is a worldwide phenomenon. People love their soda (even if its terrible for you). People that migrate from country to country bring with them unique items such as Coke, that the foreigners don't know about. This is how different countries come to pick up on other countries foods and customs.

Cyrena & Chloe's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:43 PM

GEOGRAPHY: North Korea, although one of the smallest nations in the world, is still arguably the most defiant. They're completely cut-off from the outside world, and they've displayed this once again by not selling Coke in their borders. Being a classic American drink, Coca-Cola is likely viewed as an enemy to North Korea, judging by their hatred of America and its citizens. They're one of only two countries in the world not to sell Coke, and this just goes to show that even though they're physically connected to us, they are isolated from the world.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 7:06 AM

Coca Colas return to Myanmar signals a change in the history of that country. The recent democratic reforms in the nation have made it a nation that can be attractive to major international cooperation's.  Coke will likely be the first of many international cooperation's that seeks to return to this market. Often, democratic reforms are initiated  in the hope that it will make the nation attractive to outside businesses.

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A Keyhole into Burma

A Keyhole into Burma | Geography Education | Scoop.it
On my last afternoon in Bagan, I went in search of a meal that would serve as both lunch and dinner, before boarding my flight...

 

As a notoriously closed society, glimpses into Burma become all the more important as Burma shows signs of (possibly) opening up politically for the first time in decades.

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Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 2014 12:23 PM

Yet another collection of pictures I'm scooping, but this time there's over 100 of them! Getting a western view into the insulated society of Burma is a rare opportunity, this shows some interesting pastimes such as Water buffalo surfing, but also things of major cultural significance, such as the importance of Buddhism.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 4:41 PM

This article depicts the differences and the little things that we in the USA take for granted for instance in this case it is a cd that is known as the "Western" type of misc and mass media culture that has been transported in this Burmese society.  It truly is the little things such as the Robbie Williams CD that is being depicted as not only the Western musical society but also being grouped with Bob Marley songs that would depict from the Burmese translation the Western society. And even though the people in this society don't know what the lyrics mean they can still be moved by the melody.  

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 10:51 PM

I found the fact that the government of Burma banned certain music, it seems like an odd thing to refuse the people of the country, but we forget that it is the small things that we take for granted in the US, that are seen as luxuries in other parts of the world and that is an interesting idea to wrap your mind around.

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On the trail of Myanmar's Rohingya migrants

On the trail of Myanmar's Rohingya migrants | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Jonah Fisher has been to Rakhine state in Myanmar to meet Rohingya migrants who are being forced to return home - but at a cost.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Rohingya that are in the news lately are refugees on boats that everyone agrees that SOMEONE should help, but that no country in Southeast Asia wants to bring in. 


Tags: migration, political, refugeesBurma, Southeast Asia.

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In Burma (Myanmar), China's Scramble for Energy Threatens Livelihoods of Villagers

In Burma (Myanmar), China's Scramble for Energy Threatens Livelihoods of Villagers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In western Myanmar a Chinese-backed energy and trading hub is taking shape on a remote island.


Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, energy.

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Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 14, 2015 1:16 PM

While reading this article I found it quite shocking to see that Myanmar is scrambling for energy, such as selling oil, this money is used in lanterns as a cheaper alternative to kerosene. People will do anything just to receive money and use it to help out their families. Money is not something easily  accessible and neither is energy.Yet, even though Myanmar is struggling right now, places such as Beijing still see Myanmar and Ramree Island as the main way to have safe and fast trade. 

The article also states that there are promising signs to China, and Southeast Asia to come back into the picture such as they are likely to have development that will focus on manufacturing in textiles and construction materials to help the country to gain power and energy back. 

The photographs in this article give for a good example of how China is striving for energy such as the women holding up the teapot that is considered to be a lamp with the use of oil. People in China are working hard and using different resources to serve as energy. Shouldn't people even out of China use up what they have and not be wasteful? 

Places in Southeast Asia can think of ways to gain energy, power and comfort because their whole motto on life is different than that of the United States of America.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 9:05 PM

this is where china grows at the expense of others. How are these people going to fight back? China is forced to do this because it wants to be the strongest nation in the world and as long as they are importing oil it relies on someone that can cut them off. And as long as they now are allowing the birth of two children the population growth in china is forcing china to expand and will do whatever means necessary to do so.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 19, 2015 4:28 AM

An interesting article that highlights important geographic disparities. The problem for Burma is that it has lagged behind in the world from its isolation. As a result when globalization such as the proposed trade zone in the article come about there is disastrous consequences. Unlike the west they are catching up and didn't have an adjusting period. Furthermore in China's race to keep its economy superior and out due America they have been going on wild spending sprees such as this deal to give them a global edge. Unfortunately this will leave many of the poor in Burma worse off than before. Plus their government will not likely help them because of their oppressive nature. Maybe all of this will create of revolution to give the Burmese freedom so that they can make these decisions for themselves as they enter the global community(also so they are not exploited as companies everywhere will likely be looking at its cheap labor and resources).

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Tsunami of Change Hitting Burma!

Sometimes the news can be good news! The historic April 1st election in Burma that saw Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy win 43/45 parliamentary seats is being hailed as the first free and fair elections for 50 years!

 

This is a current perspective on the many changes transforming Myanmar back into Burma.  For more by John Boyer, see: http://www.plaidavenger.com/ ;

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James Hobson's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:36 PM

(Southeast Asia topic 2)

The oppressive government of Myanmar (aka Burma) may finally be realizing that they are in a sense their own enemy. Since free elections seem to have taken place (and apparently were not 'faked' like other reforming nations have done), it seems as if the government of the time is admitting a type of defeat by showing that more citizens are against it than for it. This also implies that despite giving up political power, those previously in charge of the government see potentially better lives for themselves by not being the only ones in control. If this holds true, then it can serve as a powerful example to oppressive governments that in order to fulfill your own best interests, you have to let others vie for their own. This can also serve as an argument for pro-Democratic activists.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:19 PM

Burma is an area where the identity of the people has been muddled. This is an election that signals the people of Burma acting to clarify their needs through free and fair elections. Democracy is a powerful tool in regards to expressing the voices of the people. Aung San Suu Kyi is now the face of that voice.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:37 PM

This video explains that today the nation of Burma is at the cusp of change. This nation long oppressed by its government now stands to usher in a system of democracy and bring with it a hope of improving the lives of it's citizens. Sadly uplifting events are far and few between today but also long as people such as this aspire to bring change and better things for themselves and their families change can happen. Hopefully the people actually are able to achieve this level of freedom they seek and won't simply end up with a new brand of oppression.  

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A Burmese spring?

A Burmese spring? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"THE recent news from Myanmar, that beautiful, blighted land formerly known as Burma, has offered an all-too-rare cause for optimism." 

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:10 PM

This is interesting and hopefully turns out to be a good thing for Myanmar.  After being under so much oppression from not only its own government but from other countries as well.  Having this improved more relaxed government that works more for the people is a definite improvement for Myanmar.  Standing up to China about closing the dam because the people that live in Myanmar aren't benefiting from it and are still poor.  Stepping up and listening to the people that live in the country and standing up to others that are taking advantage of the country is a huge step in the right direction on improving the lives of those in the country.