Remotely Piloted Systems
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Remotely Piloted Systems
This is a media curation page for the PIRatE Lab's AARR Program.  We are developing practical, low cost programs to monitor resources in our coastal zone (the land near the ocean and the ocean near the land) with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs aka "drones") overhead and subtidal Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) .  Enjoy!!  
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19 Projects To Do Outdoors While You Need The Distraction - MAKE

19 Projects To Do Outdoors While You Need The Distraction - MAKE | Remotely Piloted Systems | Scoop.it
With extra time at home, we’re seeing an incredible amount of gardens and yard projects popping up all over social media. The weather is right, and surely we can all use something give us even a momentary distraction from Covid-19. Why not get out in the sun, feel the dirt on your hands, and make or grow something?

Via John Evans
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Do You Have a Makerspace or a Fakerspace?

Do You Have a Makerspace or a Fakerspace? | Remotely Piloted Systems | Scoop.it
When the makerspace movement in education began, teachers’ intentions were in the right place, but they didn’t always have the resources and expertise to make the most of these incredible spaces. Though schools might invest in the best makerspace materials for their classrooms, if they are simply instructing students to build crafting projects the entire point of making working machinery and systems through STEM concepts is lost.

Within a true makerspace, students are supposed to create working items that serve a purpose or solve a problem. When students use simple materials to create tools that offer great solutions, they are able to see the process from the earliest planning, through building, into testing a prototype, identifying weak areas, fixing problems, and celebrating the success of a fully functioning piece of equipment.

Via John Evans
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Maker Projects: The Awesome Cardboard Maker Cave

Maker Projects: The Awesome Cardboard Maker Cave | Remotely Piloted Systems | Scoop.it
Last spring, I gave my after-school Makers Club a challenge – create a unique, interactive project that guests can interact with at our 2016 Maker Fair.  We had held the Cardboard Challenge earlier in the school year, giving my students lots of ideas on how to use cardboard as a medium.  So it was no surprise to me when a group of students enthusiastically told me that they would be creating a cardboard Maker Cave for our MakerFair.

Via John Evans
maralma's curator insight, July 30, 2016 10:09 AM
EDUCATING CREATIVITY! GREAT IDEAS!
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Libraries: The physical + digital = new space for learning

Libraries: The physical + digital = new space for learning | Remotely Piloted Systems | Scoop.it

Most evenings I ride my bike home from work past the public library here in Cambridge, Mass. Often I see parents with their children, enjoying themselves on the playground in front of the library. I also see people quietly reading inside the building, as the evening lights around them turn on.

 

In the same way that playgrounds are public spaces for play, I think of libraries as public spaces for learning. I have been interested in another type of public space, the concept of a digital commons, for a long time. And today I am fascinated by the connection between these public spheres, between the physical space of the library, and the digital virtual space of information and communication. Leveraging their strengths, and tinkering with ways that they can complement each other, is one way to reimagine what the library of the future could look like.

In the past, when access to information and experts was scarce and books were unaffordable, libraries acted as archives of shared human knowledge. Today content knowledge is accessible easily via the Internet. But content knowledge is only a small part of learning. We learn best when we work on projects that ignite our passion, in collaboration with peers, and in a playful environment that encourages risk taking. At the Media Lab we call those the four Ps of Creative Learning and we apply them everyday.

Bringing together the things that are great about the Internet with the affordances of a physical venue that the library can offer, let’s imagine a few interesting scenarios.

The maker culture is a relatively recent phenomenon that has already managed to newly inspire people to think of themselves as creators rather than consumers. In the same way that books used to be scarce, many tools and machines, such as 3-D printers or laser cutters, are not affordable and could easily be shared between a number of users. Some libraries are already starting to host maker spaces and host communities of tinkerers and creators. But more could be done to network the libraries and connect their local communities.


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
PIRatE Labs insight:

This is clearly the new trend in libraries.

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Making Culture Report - Drexel University 

Making Culture Report - Drexel University  | Remotely Piloted Systems | Scoop.it

"Making Culture is the product of a year-long investigation visiting 30 K-12 education makerspaces across 12 metropolitan regions map conducted through in-depth interviews with students, instructors, and leadership alongside observation and study of each space and its programs.

Among the ExCITe Center's recommendations made as a result of the report are:

*The culture of a makerspace has a direct impact on student learning. Rather than choosing equipment or specific projects, designers of new makerspaces should first consider the kind of learning culture they seek to create for their students.

 

*Makerspace participation can positively impact a broad range of students, including English Language Learners. But school leaders must be mindful to recruit inclusively, for both for instructors and students.

 

*Within school makerspaces, hosting unstructured open hours (outside of class time) encourages greater exploration, positive risk-taking, and collaboration for a wider range of students.

 

*Students frequently use skills learned in makerspaces to improve other aspects of the school and local community, such as student government activities, classroom maintenance, and sports facilities.  

The full report includes specific recommendations for those considering or planning an education makerspace and how to create a supportive culture from the outset."


Via John Evans
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A New Research Center for the Study of Failure - The Atlantic

A New Research Center for the Study of Failure - The Atlantic | Remotely Piloted Systems | Scoop.it

"Every kid has that moment when she realizes that the adults she admires aren’t perfect. Few children ever learn, however, that the same is true for the inventors and intellectual giants whose distinguished portraits permeate their history textbooks.   

As it turns out, recognizing that visionaries such as Albert Einstein experienced failure can actually help students perform better in school. In 2016, the cognitive-studies researcher Xiaodong Lin-Siegler of Columbia University’s Teachers College published a study that found that high-school students’ science grades improved after they learned about the personal and intellectual struggles of scientists including Einstein and Marie Curie. Students who only learned about the scientists’ achievements saw their grades decline."


Via John Evans
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In Curiosity Hacked, children learn to make, not buy

In Curiosity Hacked, children learn to make, not buy | Remotely Piloted Systems | Scoop.it
With her right hand, my 8-year-old daughter, Kalian, presses the red-hot soldering iron against the circuit board. With her left hand, she guides a thin, tin wire until it's pressing against both the circuit board and the tip of the iron.
PIRatE Labs insight:

The notion of maker spaces and actually building things can be a powerful motivator for STEM and other subjects as kids are in their formative stages.

 

Building drones is but one aspect of this movement.

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