Biomimicry 3.8
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Frontiers | Editorial: Controlled self-assembly and functionalization

and organic building blocks. Many examples from nature have demonstrated the power of hierarchical 14 self-assembly in designing structurally complex and functional architectures for various applications, 15 in which multiple components are brought together through a stepwise process driven by...
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What Is Biomimetics? And what can it mean for fresh water? – IISD Experimental Lakes Area

What Is Biomimetics? And what can it mean for fresh water? – IISD Experimental Lakes Area | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Commentary | Jul 20, 2022 | By Matthew Pries , Sumeep Bath, Editorial & Communications Manager What Is Biomimetics? And what can it mean for fresh water? Matthew Pries (MP), when he is not spending summers working in our chemistry laboratory, spends his time exploring the fascinating world of biomimetics. During a week when Matthew was temporarily holed up at home away from the world’s freshwater laboratory, our editorial and communications manager, Sumeep Bath (SB), took the opportunity to sit down with him to discover more about biomimetics and what the process could mean for freshwater protection. In 500 words or fewer, of course… SB: You’ve got 100 words (or fewer) to explain what biomimetics is. Go! MP: Biomimetics basically means looking to nature for design ideas and solutions to our problems. From looking at the ways different organisms or ecosystems have solved problems or arranged themselves, we can extrapolate to systems built and designed by humans. A classic example is making fibers based on spider silk to replicate its incredible physical properties. Importantly—in addition to inspiring specific solutions—biomimetics also offers a way to evaluate the suitability of our designs by judging them against ecological standards. Do our solutions share the features that characterize robust natural ones? Are they resilient, mutually beneficial, and efficient? SB: 98 words. Great job! So, how can biomimetics be applied to how we deal with freshwater systems? MP: One of the biggest challenges for good water management is ensuring access to clean water. A biological strategy that addresses this is aquaporin proteins. Present in the cells of organisms from all kingdoms of life, these proteins form channels that allow water to pass easily through the cellular membrane while preventing the passage of most solutes (substances dissolved in the water). The structure of the protein is such that the water is filtered using far less energy than would be required to pump it through traditional filters. Numerous research groups have come up with ways this strategy can be scaled up and applied in the way we deal with our freshwater supplies. SB: Over the last few decades, here at IISD we have been advancing natural infrastructure systems—like floating treatment wetlands—to respond to threats to fresh water. Do you consider those a form of biomimetic innovation? MP: Definitely! With an understanding of the functioning of natural systems we can design complex technologies to emulate certain biological mechanisms, or we can simply give a leg up to the organisms/communities already doing what we want. I think some of the most elegant biomimetic solutions are the ones that focus human intervention on creating or restoring good habitats for the organisms that solved the problem millions (or billions!) of years ago. Natural infrastructure projects like floating treatment wetlands do just that and, depending on the scale, can also become biodiversity hotspots, providing myriad other benefits. SB: You’ve been working in our chemistry laboratory for a few months now. Have you had a chance to apply any of your work on biomimetics to your work at the world’s freshwater laboratory? MP: What I think is exciting about the work in the chemistry lab, and indeed all the work happening at IISD-ELA, is that it’s uncovering the workings of many different biological systems in varied circumstances. Our ability to envision, design, and implement effective biomimetic designs hinges on a deep understanding of the way natural systems operate, in all their complexity. The analysis we do in the chemistry lab enables research that continues building that understanding, adding to the library of what we can learn from nature. So, while I’m up to my elbows in the sink making a dent in the interminable pile of dishes we generate in the lab, I remind myself that all the work is part of something greater. SB: Now you’re back in the city for a couple of weeks as we try to limit access to the site. Are you eager to get back to the site? MP: Absolutely. To be working shoulder-to-shoulder with such an incredible team of people who bring so many different abilities and perspectives together is an inspiring experience. Not only that but being out at the site surrounded by the wonders of the forest makes for the perfect chance to learn from nature. While many biomimetic inquiries require in-depth research and specific skills and equipment to learn how to do what nature does, all it takes is sitting amongst the trees to learn from nature how to be.
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Neural Networks. Neural networks mimic human brain… | by Çağatay Tüylü | Çağatay Tüylü | Sep, 2022

Neural Networks. Neural networks mimic human brain… | by Çağatay Tüylü | Çağatay Tüylü | Sep, 2022 | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Neural networks mimic human brain behavior, allowing computer programs to recognize patterns and solve common problems in AI, machine learning, and deep learning.Neural networks, also known as…...
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fello'fly - Biomimicy - Airbus

fello'fly - Biomimicy - Airbus | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Airbus fello’fly is demonstrating the viability of two aircraft flying together. Discover how this collaborative activity drives environmental performance.
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Squid skin inspires material that keeps stuff hot (or cool)

Squid skin inspires material that keeps stuff hot (or cool) | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
In the future, you may have a squid to thank for your coffee staying hot. Squid skin has inspired a new material for insulating cups, packaging, and more.
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Taking inspiration from nature for a new generation of quiet aerofoils

Taking inspiration from nature for a new generation of quiet aerofoils | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Constant exposure to noise is an increasing problem in developed countries, with impacts not only on industry but also our health. Key culprits often accused of creating noise include airports and wind farms.
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Why Are Scientists Trying To Make Fake Shark Skin? | Innovation

Faux marine animal skin could make swimmers faster, keep bathrooms clean and cloak underwater robots
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Let’s Use Biomimicry to Take on Climate Change

Let’s Use Biomimicry to Take on Climate Change | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
By Gamelihle Sibanda Certified Biomimicry Professional Gamelihle Sibanda with a termite mound The climate change issue has become so big, so complex, and so difficult to solve that many people have given up on even thinking about it.
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Nature‐Inspired Circular‐Economy Recycling for Proteins: Proof of Concept - Giaveri - 2021 - Advanced Materials

Nature‐Inspired Circular‐Economy Recycling for Proteins: Proof of Concept - Giaveri - 2021 - Advanced Materials | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Abstract The billion tons of synthetic-polymer-based materials (i.e. plastics) produced yearly are a great challenge for humanity. Nature produces even more natural polymers, yet they are sustainab...
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Bio-inspired hydrogel can rapidly switch to rigid plastic

Bio-inspired hydrogel can rapidly switch to rigid plastic | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Bio-inspired hydrogel can rapidly switch to rigid plastic.A new material that stiffens 1,800-fold when exposed to heat could protect motorcyclists and racecar drivers during accidents.Hokkaido University...
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Airbus and its partners demonstrate how sharing the skies can save airlines fuel and reduce CO2 emissions

Airbus and its partners demonstrate how sharing the skies can save airlines fuel and reduce CO2 emissions | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Airbus has performed the first long-haul demonstration of formation flight in general air traffic (GAT) regulated transatlantic airspace with two A350 aircraft flying at three kilometers apart from Toulouse, France to Montreal, Canada.
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A Brief History of Neural Networks

A Brief History of Neural Networks | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
In the last few decades, neural networks have evolved from an academic curiosity into a vast “deep learning” industry. Deep learning uses neural networks, a data structure design loosely inspired by the layout of biological neurons.
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Advances in Biomimetic Nanoparticles for Targeted Cancer Therapy and Diagnosis

Advances in Biomimetic Nanoparticles for Targeted Cancer Therapy and Diagnosis | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Biomimetic nanoparticles have recently emerged as a novel drug delivery platform to improve drug biocompatibility and specificity at the desired disease site, especially the tumour microenvironment. Conventional nanoparticles often encounter rapid clearance ...
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Carnivorous plants inspire smart slippery surfaces and bionic robots

Carnivorous plants inspire smart slippery surfaces and bionic robots | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
A new publication from Opto-Electronic Advances; DOI 10.29026/oea.2023.210163  discusses how carnivorous plants inspire smart slippery surfaces and bionic robots.Credit: OEA A new publication from Opto-Electronic Advances; DOI 10.29026/oea.2023.210163  discusses how carnivorous plants inspire smart...
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Biomimicry - Nature Solving Human Problems

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Nature’s path to sustainability

Nature’s path to sustainability | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
For centuries, designers, and engineers have tried to harness the power of nature. Now, they are trying to learn from it....
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Why Shark Scales Might Be Key to Helping Stop Bacterial Spread

Why Shark Scales Might Be Key to Helping Stop Bacterial Spread | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
A shark's skin is made up of thousands of armor-like scales, known as denticles. Now, humans are copying that pattern to fight the spread of bacteria.
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Lotus Leaf-Inspired Self-Cleaning Bioplastic Created | Technology Networks

Lotus Leaf-Inspired Self-Cleaning Bioplastic Created | Technology Networks | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Inspired by the always immaculate lotus leaf, researchers have developed a self-cleaning bioplastic that is sturdy, sustainable and compostable.
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A Biomimetic Patch Could Soon Change the Way We Do Heart Valve Repairs | Columbia Surgery

A Biomimetic Patch Could Soon Change the Way We Do Heart Valve Repairs | Columbia Surgery | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
David Kalfa, MD, is a pediatric heart surgeon with a PhD in tissue engineering. As Surgical Director of the Initiative for Pediatric Cardiac Innovation, his passions align in the thoughtful development of creative solutions to clinical problems.  We spoke to Dr. Kalfa about a recent breakthrough in the Cardiothoracic Research Lab, the first synthetic patch for heart valve repair that actually mimics the natural valve’s complex structure and function.  
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Algorithm Solves Complex Learning Tasks With Extreme Energy Efficiency

Algorithm Solves Complex Learning Tasks With Extreme Energy Efficiency | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
An interdisciplinary research team has made major progress in developing a machine that can process information as efficiently as the human brain, which has long been sought in the field of artificial intelligence. The team at Heidelberg University in Germany and the University of Bern in Switzerland was led by Dr. Mihai Petrovici. The research […]
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Biomimetic | Foundation

Biomimetic | Foundation | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Scott Pagano x Trifonic

A universe of life, beauty, and struggle compactly existing in an inverse tide pool of unusual origin.2048x2048 / 24 fps / 33 seconds…...
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Electrically assisted 3D printing of nacre-inspired structures with self-sensing capability

Electrically assisted 3D printing of nacre-inspired structures with self-sensing capability | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Lightweight and strong structural materials attract much attention due to their strategic applications in sports, transportation, aerospace, and biomedical industries. Nacre exhibits high strength ...
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Bite-size Biomimicry: Sensitive Plant | by Lily Urmann | Nov, 2021

Bite-size Biomimicry: Sensitive Plant | by Lily Urmann | Nov, 2021 | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
What can we learn from the sensitive plant about how to modify shape and protect from biotic or abiotic factors?Mimosa pudica has the ability to move its leaves in response to insects, herbivory…...
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Triodos Bank office building – Inspired by nature - - WindoorExpert.eu

Triodos Bank office building – Inspired by nature - - WindoorExpert.eu | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
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Biomimicry Ecotone. Episode 12. 7 minutes.14 October 2021.

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