Biomimicry 3.8
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A crab-inspired artificial vision system for both terrestrial and aquatic environments

A crab-inspired artificial vision system for both terrestrial and aquatic environments | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
To efficiently navigate real-world environments, robots typically analyze images collected by imaging devices that are integrated within their body. To enhance the performance of robots, engineers have thus been trying to ...
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Researchers develop biomimetic-photo-coupled catalysis for H₂O₂ production

Researchers develop biomimetic-photo-coupled catalysis for H₂O₂ production | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
A research group led by Prof. Wan Yinhua from the Institute of Process Engineering of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has developed a catalyst with dual photocatalytic and biomimetic catalytic activity for the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2).
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Photosynthesis of green methanol from methane

Photosynthesis of green methanol from methane | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Getting around the high C-H bond dissociation energy in methane has been a challenge to making green methanol from natural gas — until now.
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Claude Grison, bio-inspired green chemist

Claude Grison, bio-inspired green chemist | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Meet chemist Claude Grison, whose stroke of genius has earned her the European Inventor Award 2022. Taking inspiration from the world of biology, this French researcher has developed plant-based methods to clean up polluted soils and water.
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A squid-inspired artificial skin that endures harsh environments

A squid-inspired artificial skin that endures harsh environments | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Countless hardware and software solutions created over the past decades draw inspiration from animals and natural phenomena. This includes electronic skins (e-skins), flexible and stretchable electronic circuits designed ...
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Electric Eels Inspire a New Kind of Power Source

Electric Eels Inspire a New Kind of Power Source | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it

"New power sources bear a shocking resemblance to the electricity-making organs inside electric eels. These artificial electric eel organs are made up of water-based polymer mixes called hydrogels. Such soft, flexible battery-like devices, described online October 13 in Nature, could power soft robots or next-gen wearable and implantable tech."


Via Miguel Prazeres
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Wind Dispersal of Natural and Biomimetic Maple Samaras

Wind Dispersal of Natural and Biomimetic Maple Samaras | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it

"Maple trees (genus Acer) accomplish the task of distributing objects to a wide area by producing seeds, known as samaras, which are carried by the wind as they autorotate and slowly descend to the ground. With the goal of supporting engineering applications, such as gathering environmental data over a broad area, we developed 3D-printed artificial samaras. [...] This study demonstrated a bioinspired design for the dispersed deployment of sensors and provides a better understanding of wind-dispersal of both natural and artificial samaras."


Via Miguel Prazeres
CoolRunnings's comment, October 25, 2022 12:19 AM
super
Benson Specialized Fitness's comment, December 15, 2023 6:18 AM
GOOD
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Dung beetles' coordinated cooperative transport

Dung beetles' coordinated cooperative transport | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Cooperative transport allows for the transportation of items too large for the capacity of a single individual. Beyond humans, it is regularly employed by ants and social spiders where two or more individuals, with more or less coordinated movements, transport food to a known destination. In contrast to this, pairs of male and female dung beetles successfully transport brood balls to a location unknown to either party at the start of their co mmon journey.
We found that, when forced to overcome a series of obstacles in their path, transport efficiency of pairs of beetles was higher than of solo males. To climb tall obstacles with their common ball of dung, the female assisted the leading male in lifting the ball by steadying and pushing it upwards in a ‘headstand’ position during the climb initiation. Finally, we show that pairs were faster than single beetles in climbing obstacles of different heights. Our results suggest that pairs of Sisyphus beetles cooperate in the transportation of brood balls with coordinated movements, where the male steers and the female primarily assists in lifting the ball. Taken together, this is to our knowledge, the first quantitative study of cooperative food transport without a known goal to aim for.

Via The Science & Education team
The Science & Education team's curator insight, January 22, 2:01 PM
“How does a beetle with a brain smaller than a grain of rice communicate? And how do they coordinate with each other in performing this task?” said Dr Claudia Tocco, who studies animal behaviour at Lund University in Sweden. “They don’t know where they are going.” https://www.theguardian.com/science/2024/jan/17/male-and-female-dung-beetles-coordinate-to-roll-balls-researchers-find
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Researchers fabricate miniaturized bionic ocean-battery

Researchers fabricate miniaturized bionic ocean-battery | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
The researchers from the Institute of Microbiology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a miniaturized bionic ocean-battery, a bio-solar cell that converts light into electricity, by mimicking the basic ecological structure of marine microbial ecosystems.
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Polar bear fur-inspired sweater is thinner than a down jacket — and just as warm

Polar bear fur-inspired sweater is thinner than a down jacket — and just as warm | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it

The synthetic fibre is an aerogel coated with polyurethane and is flexible, washable and wearable.

NEWS 21 December 2023 Correction 21 December 2023 Polar bear fur-inspired sweater is thinner than a down jacket — and just as warm The synthetic fibre is an aerogel coated with polyurethane and is flexible, washable and wearable. By Gemma Conroy Twitter Facebook Email A polar bear appears to wave as it sits upright on a snowy landscape in Russia. Chinese scientists have created a sweater as snuggly as this bear, using synthetic fibres.Credit: Belfalah Soufian/500px via Getty A sweater knitted from a fibre that mimics polar bear fur offers as much warmth as a down jacket, despite being one-fifth as thick, according to a study published today in Science.

The fibre — made from a light, synthetic material known as an aerogel — maintains its heat-trapping properties even after being stretched, washed and dyed. The proof-of-concept fibre might one day be used for clothing that need to be lightweight and durable — such as sportswear, military uniforms and spacesuits — without the need for animal fur or down, says study co-author Weiwei Gao, a materials scientist at Zhejiang University in China. Studies have found that aerogels are among the best heat-locking materials around2, and they have been used as insulation in buildings3. But fibres made from aerogels are often too brittle and fragile to be weaved into wearable textiles, and they tend to lose their insulating properties after washing and in humid environments.


Via The Science & Education team
The Science & Education team's curator insight, December 30, 2023 5:47 PM
more inspiration from nature, biomimicry.
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Bio-inspired device captures images by mimicking human eye

Bio-inspired device captures images by mimicking human eye | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Drawing inspiration from nature, Penn State scientists have developed a new device that produces images by mimicking the red, green and blue photoreceptors and the neural network found in human eyes.
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3D-printed surfaces inspired by nature

3D-printed surfaces inspired by nature | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
To survive in extreme habitats, many animals and plants have developed brilliant abilities that we otherwise only know from superheroes in movies. In most cases, their abilities are based on the extraordinary properties of their surfaces. Mimicking these properties offers enormous potential in the engineering field for developing new products and solving technical problems. Research teams from Bochum and Kiel have succeeded in mimicking the structural color of the famous blue Morpho butterflies using a high-precision 3D printing technology referred to as two-photon polymerization (2PP). The researchers present their newest findings in a paper published in the Journal of Optical Microsystems on September 2, 2022.
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Bio-inspired localization system slashes power consumption

Bio-inspired localization system slashes power consumption | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Inspired by barn owls, researchers have developed an innovative localization system that combines state-of-the-art sensors with a neuromorphic computational map based on resistive random-access memory (RRAM).
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Biomimetics | Free Full-Text | Sound Reception in the Yangtze Finless Porpoise and Its Extension to A Biomimetic Receptor

Biomimetics | Free Full-Text | Sound Reception in the Yangtze Finless Porpoise and Its Extension to A Biomimetic Receptor | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Sound reception was investigated in the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis) at its most sensitive frequency. The computed tomography scanning, sound speed, and density results were used to develop a three-dimensional numerical model of the porpoise sound-reception...
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Drones | Free Full-Text | Ant Colony Optimization ACO Based Autonomous Secure Routing Protocol for Mobile Surveillance Systems

Drones | Free Full-Text | Ant Colony Optimization ACO Based Autonomous Secure Routing Protocol for Mobile Surveillance Systems | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Sensing plays a vital role in enabling smart cities. The mobile surveillance of different sectors, the retransmission of radio signals, and package delivery are the main applications conducted by unmanned vehicles in smart cities.
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How Is Regenerative Architecture Changing Sustainability Fundamentals We All Know?

How Is Regenerative Architecture Changing Sustainability Fundamentals We All Know? | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Regenerative Architecture considers ways to develop buildings and supplies to reduce their ecological outcome and increase ecological wellness. It's the next stage in sustainability and perhaps the future of construction.
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Biomechanics and mechanobiology of the bone matrix | Bone Research

Biomechanics and mechanobiology of the bone matrix | Bone Research | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
The bone matrix plays an indispensable role in the human body, and its unique biomechanical and mechanobiological properties have received much attention. The bone matrix has unique mechanical anisotropy and exhibits both strong toughness and high strength.
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Intelligent membranes with memories for next-generation smart filters

Intelligent membranes with memories for next-generation smart filters | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
Researchers from the National Graphene Institute (NGI) have created "intelligent" membranes whose "memory" can be used in areas like smart separation technology, wound management, drug delivery, sensors and memory devices.
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The Simple Algorithm That Ants Use to Build Bridges

The Simple Algorithm That Ants Use to Build Bridges | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it

"Army ants form colonies of millions yet have no permanent home. They march through the jungle each night in search of new foraging ground. Along the way they perform logistical feats that would make a four-star general proud, including building bridges with their own bodies. Much like the swarms of cheap, dumb robots that I explored in my recent article, army ants manage this coordination with no leader and with minimal cognitive resources."


Via Miguel Prazeres
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The total mass, number, and distribution of immune cells in the human body

The total mass, number, and distribution of immune cells in the human body | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
We characterized the human body’s immune cells distribution and provided its total weight. Our findings show that an average individual’s immune system consists of approximately 1.8 trillion cells, weighing around 1.2 kg. Lymphocytes make up 40% of the total number of immune cells and 15% of their mass. Similarly, neutrophils account for comparable proportions. Notably, macrophages constitute 10% of immune cells but contribute nearly 50% of the total cellular mass due to their large size. This knowledge gives an integrative quantitative view of the immune system and facilitates the development of models.
The immune system is a complex network of cells with critical functions in health and disease. However, a comprehensive census of the cells comprising the immune system is lacking. Here, we estimated the abundance of the primary immune cell types throughout all tissues in the human body. We conducted a literature survey and integrated data from multiplexed imaging and methylome-based deconvolution. We also considered cellular mass to determine the distribution of immune cells in terms of both number and total mass. Our results indicate that the immune system of a reference 73 kg man consists of 1.8 × 1012 cells (95% CI 1.5–2.3 × 1012), weighing 1.2 kg (95% CI 0.8–1.9). Lymphocytes constitute 40% of the total number of immune cells and 15% of the mass and are mainly located in the lymph nodes and spleen. Neutrophils account for similar proportions of both the number and total mass of immune cells, with most neutrophils residing in the bone marrow. Macrophages, present in most tissues, account for 10% of immune cells but contribute nearly 50% of the total cellular mass due to their large size. The quantification of immune cells within the human body presented here can serve to understand the immune function better and facilitate quantitative modeling of this vital system.

Via The Science & Education team
The Science & Education team's curator insight, October 27, 2023 9:45 PM
More fun counting (stamp collecting)
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Sustainable energy: New energy innovations to make the future brighter - Compilation

1. An Australian company has been working on a system that uses underwater buoys to convert sea waves into zero-emission energy and desalinated water.


2. Scientists in China are producing solar panels that can produce energy from the last source you’d expect — rainwater.


3. A Japanese engineer has designed a new type of wind turbine that he believes would be able to harness power from typhoons.


4. Researchers at Binghamton University have come up with an interesting way to harness energy, using a resource we have far too much of — bacteria.


5. US scientists have developed a bionic leaf that can convert solar energy into liquid fuel.


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MAHLE introduces new bio-inspired cooling plate for batteries; 10% more cooling capacity, 20% less pressure loss, better temperature distribution

MAHLE engineers have developed a bio-inspired structure for cooling channels in a battery cooling plate that significantly improves the thermodynamic performance and structural-mechanical properties of the cooling plate.
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A low-tech way to create high-tech materials

A low-tech way to create high-tech materials | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
AMOLF researcher Christiaan Van Campenhout has found a new, simple method to create a material with a regular pattern of crystalline bands. The pattern formed by the crystals is not a coincidence.
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Dirt-cheap solar evaporation could solve the world's soil pollution problem

Dirt-cheap solar evaporation could solve the world's soil pollution problem | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
A team led by University of South Australia researchers has pioneered a new soil remediation technique that is significantly faster, simpler, safer, and more cost-effective than currently available methods.
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Microbial Miners to Colonize the Moon and Mars: Biomimetic Mining | TechieTonics

Microbial Miners to Colonize the Moon and Mars: Biomimetic Mining | TechieTonics | Biomimicry 3.8 | Scoop.it
The phenomenon of how cyanobacteria obtain nutrients for its survival from rocks inspired scientists to consider them as tools to develop colonies on moon and Mars
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