Educational Psych...
Follow
Find
8.3K views | +0 today
Educational Psychology & Technology
This current collection includes news, resources, research, and strategies to support engaged learning. For educator resources on the new standards, visit http://bit.ly/new_standards and for resources to support Safe Schools and Communities, and Social Emotional Learning, check out: http://bit.ly/safe_schools_resources and http://bit.ly/SEL_Resources. For articles on privatization issues and high-stakes testing, http://bit.ly/chart_look and http://bit.ly/testing_testing.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us // Dan Pink, RSA Animate

"This lively RSAnimate, adapted from Dan Pink's talk at the RSA, illustrates the hidden truths behind what really motivates us at home and in the workplace."

more...
Mark Venters's comment, November 24, 2012 7:58 AM
A true paradigm shift in motivating people.
Sonia Thomas's curator insight, March 29, 12:30 PM

Reducing control over employee work can lead to better outcomes

Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Top 20 Principles from Psychology for PreK-12 Teaching and Learning // Coalition for Psychology in Schools and Education

Main page at: 

http://www.apa.org/ed/schools/cpse/top-twenty-principles.aspx

 

"Psychological science has much to contribute to enhancing teaching and learning in the everyday classroom by providing key insights on:

 

* Effective instruction

* Classroom environments that promote learning

* Appropriate use of assessment — including data, tests, measurement and research methods that inform practice.


We present here the most important principles from psychology — the Top 20 — that would be of greatest use in the context of pre-K to 12 classroom teaching and learning. We encourage consideration and practice of the Top 20 throughout all teacher preparation programs to ensure a solid foundation of psychological knowledge in pre-K to 12 instruction."

 

Download the full report (PDF 453KB) to find supporting research and learn why each principle is relevant in the classroom.  Click on title above or here: http://www.apa.org/ed/schools/cpse/top-twenty-principles.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD from Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

How Smart is it to Allow Students to Use Mobile Phones at School?

How Smart is it to Allow Students to Use Mobile Phones at School? | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it
Researchers have found that allowing use of mobile phones in schools harms low-achieving and low-income students the most.

 

 

https://theconversation.com/how-smart-is-it-to-allow-students-to-use-mobile-phones-at-school-40621


Via Mel Riddile
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Neurotech to Become Pervasive Within and Beyond the Medical Domain // SharpBrains via Reuters

Neurotech to Become Pervasive Within and Beyond the Medical Domain // SharpBrains via Reuters | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

“From ways to eaves­drop on brains and learn what adver­tise­ments excite con­sumers, to devices that alle­vi­ate depres­sion, the num­ber of U.S. patents awarded for “neu­rotech­nol­ogy” has soared since 2010, accord­ing to an analy­sis released on Wednesday.

 

That expan­sion into non-medical uses, said Sharp­Brains Chief Exec­u­tive Alvaro Fer­nan­dez, who pre­sented the results at the Neu­roGam­ing con­fer­ence in San Fran­cisco, shows we are at the dawn of “the per­va­sive neu­rotech­nol­ogy age,” in which every­day tech­nolo­gies will be con­nected to brains.

 

“Neu­rotech has gone well beyond med­i­cine, with non-medical cor­po­ra­tions, often under the radar, devel­op­ing neu­rotech­nolo­gies to enhance work and life,” he said.

 

Patents for neu­rotech­nol­ogy bumped along at 300 to 400 a year in the 2000s, then soared to 800 in 2010 and 1,600 last year, Sharp­Brains reported.”

 

For full post: http://sharpbrains.com/blog/2015/05/07/neurotech-to-become-pervasive-within-and-beyond-the-medical-domain/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

With Tech Tools, How Should Teachers Tackle Multitasking In Class?

With Tech Tools, How Should Teachers Tackle Multitasking In Class? | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it
Educators, students, and parents have noticed how schoolwork suffers when attention is split between homework and a buzzing smartphone. Read how teachers are responding.

 

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/05/15/with-tech-tools-how-should-teachers-tackle-multitasking-in-class/

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD from Resources for Social & Emotional Learning
Scoop.it!

The Benefits of Helping Preschoolers Understand and Discuss Their Emotions // MindShiftKQED

The Benefits of Helping Preschoolers Understand and Discuss Their Emotions // MindShiftKQED | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it
Emotional literacy at an early age can make a big difference in a person's life. Here are some steps for helping adults and young children understand a child's big emotions.

 

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/04/13/the-benefits-of-helping-preschoolers-understand-and-discuss-their-emotions/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Learning How to Read Needs to Be More Hands-On. No, Really.

Learning How to Read Needs to Be More Hands-On. No, Really. | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

By Antonia Malchik
"Two years ago, the Albermarle County school system in Charlottesville, Virginia, moved forward with a rather bold experiment: They abandoned traditional explicit instruction in all summer school classrooms, replacing classic lesson plans with student-directed summer making programs, run as part of Maker Ed's Maker Corps program—an educational subset of the “maker movement” (a widespread cultural push to teach both kids and adults more hands-on and do-it-yourself skills). 

 

“I have never believed that literacy is a matter of decoding alphabetic text,” says Ira Socol, Assistant Director for Educational Technology and Innovation for Albermale. And so far, he says, the summer making programs seem to be proving him right. “I was having this conversation with a child from rural poverty who was at summer school because he’d failed (badly) the state’s third-grade reading assessment,” Socol says. “He was building a suspension bridge from newspaper, and he said to me, ‘You have to understand, when you’re making a suspension bridge, the cables always have to be taut.’”...

 

For full post, click on title above or here:
http://magazine.good.is/articles/let-the-hands-do-the-talking

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Seeing is Believing: Promising Practices for How School Districts Promote Family Engagement // Harvard Family Research Project

Seeing is Believing: Promising Practices for How School Districts Promote Family Engagement // Harvard Family Research Project | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

"Harvard Family Research Project (HFRP) and the National Parent-Teacher Association (PTA) have teamed up to bring you this ground-breaking policy brief that examines the role of school districts in promoting family engagement.  

Seeing is Believing: Promising Practices for How School Districts Promote Family Engagement spotlights how six school districts across the country have used innovative strategies to create and sustain family engagement “systems at work.”  Our findings point to three core components of these successful systems: creating district-wide strategies, building school capacity, and reaching out to and engaging families.

Drawing from districts’ diverse approaches, we highlight promising practices to ensure quality, oversight, and impact from their family engagement efforts. We also propose a set of recommendations for how federal, state, and local policies can promote district-level family engagement efforts that support student learning."...


For full post, main link to Harvard Family Research Project, and to download report, click on title above or here: 

http://www.hfrp.org/family-involvement/publications-resources/seeing-is-believing-promising-practices-for-how-school-districts-promote-family-engagement


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

On Rigor, Grit, Productive Struggle, and What Our Word Choice Means

On Rigor, Grit, Productive Struggle, and What Our Word Choice Means | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it
As happened last year, many of the teachers, administrators and parents who left feedback on last month's English Language Arts test at testingtalk.org pointed to what they felt were questions that...

 

For full post, click on title above. 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

The High Cost of Neuromyths in Education // Judy Willis, MD via Edutopia

The High Cost of Neuromyths in Education // Judy Willis, MD via Edutopia | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

Instead of believing in the right/left brain, learning styles, and that we use only ten percent of our brains, we should focus on neuroscience research.

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 
http://www.edutopia.org/blog/high-costs-neuromyths-in-education-judy-willis

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

"This Will Revolutionize Education" // Verisatium

"Many technologies have promised to revolutionize education, but so far none has. With that in mind, what could revolutionize education?"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEmuEWjHr5c&feature=youtu.be

more...
Heidi Veikkolainen's curator insight, December 7, 2014 2:47 AM

Soustitré en français.

Dafnord 's curator insight, December 7, 2014 2:47 AM

Soustitré en français.

Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Let ‘Em Out! The Many Benefits of Outdoor Play In Kindergarten // KQEDMindshift

Let ‘Em Out! The Many Benefits of Outdoor Play In Kindergarten // KQEDMindshift | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

By Holly Korbey
"For the typical American kindergartner, unstructured free play during the school day consists of 20 to 30 minutes of recess, and perhaps some time at indoor “stations” — perhaps creating with building blocks, costumes, or musical instruments. But what if there was more? What if the answer to “what did you do in school today?” was, “I climbed a tree, played in the mud, built a fire”?
 

That is exactly the kind of learning going on in the Swiss Waldkindergartens, or forest kindergartens, where children ages four to seven spend all of their school days playing outdoors, no matter the weather. With no explicit math or literacy taught until first grade, the Swiss have no set goals for kindergartners beyond a few measurements, like using scissors and writing one’s own name.

They instead have chosen to focus on the social interaction and emotional well-being found in free play. With many parents and educators overwhelmed by the amount of academics required for kindergartners — and the testing requirements at that age  — it’s no surprise that the forest kindergarten, and the passion for bringing more free play to young children during the school day, is catching on stateside. Free play and inquiry learning are the cornerstone of Canada’s new all-day kindergarten program; forest kindergartens are popping up in Washington state, Vermont, and even Brooklyn."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/07/let-em-out-the-many-benefits-of-outdoor-play-in-kindergarten/

 

For a link to the School Out documentary: http://www.schoolsoutfilm.com/

more...
Sonia Thomas's curator insight, March 29, 12:17 PM

Balance learning with outdoor experiences.

Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Playtime Isn’t Just for Preschoolers - Teenagers Need It, Too // Time.com

Playtime Isn’t Just for Preschoolers - Teenagers Need It, Too // Time.com | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

By Hilary G. Conklin, Ph.D.

[Hillary is a fellow with the OpEd Project and an associate professor in the College of Education at DePaul University in Chicago.]

"Helicopter parents and teachers, stand down. Kids of all ages need time to learn through play in school."
 

"In classrooms across the country, the countdown to summer vacation has begun. The winter doldrums have always taken a toll, but in the era of test-dominated schooling and the controversial Common Core, it seems increasingly that it’s not until summer that teenagers have any prospect for having fun any more.

 

One of the casualties of current education reform efforts has been the erosion of play, creativity, and joy from teenagers’ classrooms and lives, with devastating effects. Researchers have documented a rise in mental health problems—such as anxiety and depression—among young people that has paralleled a decline in children’s opportunities to play. And while play has gotten deserved press in recent months for its role in fostering crucial social-emotional and cognitive skills and cultivating creativity and imagination in the early childhood years, a critical group has been largely left out of these important conversations. Adolescents, too—not to mention adults, as shown through Google’s efforts — need time to play, and they need time to play in school.

 

Early childhood educators have known about and capitalized on the learning and developmental benefits of play for ages. My five-year-old daughter has daily opportunities to play dress-up in her preschool classroom, transforming into a stethoscope-wearing fairy princess and tending to the imaginary creatures in her care. Her work during “center time” has all the hallmarks of what experts like psychologists David Elkind and Peter Gray define as play: she has choice in her pursuits, she self-directs her learning and exploration, she engages in imaginative creation, and she does all these things in a non-stressed state of interest and joy."... 

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 
http://time.com/3726098/learning-through-play-teenagers-education/

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD from Health Education Resources
Scoop.it!

Exercise Builds Brawn… and Brain Power

Exercise Builds Brawn… and Brain Power | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it
Exercise tones the legs, builds bigger biceps and strengthens the heart. But of all the body parts that benefit from a good workout, the brain may be the big winner.

 

(Selected quote)
"Pre-adolescence:
In a new twist in the debate over physical education in schools, researchers are asking an intriguing question: What if exercise improves academic success?


Some research suggests it can. Hillman’s team at the University of Illinois’ Neurocognitive Kinesiology Laboratory found that children aged 7 through 9 who participated in a 60-minute after-school exercise programme had better focus, processed information more quickly and performed better on cognitive tests than children who didn’t exercise.
The researchers also found a dose effect: The more days the children attended the exercise programme, the greater the changes in their brain function or cognition, according to the nine-month randomised trial, published in the journal Pediatrics in 2014.


“We didn’t take low-fit kids and make them highly fit,” Hillman said. “We took low-fit kids and made them a little less low fit. These aren’t massive changes.”  The effects were seen only on tasks that required executive control, “which is related to attention, behaviour and obviously germane to success in school,” Hillman said.  “It’s our working memory and cognitive flexibility - often called multitasking - the ability to take information, put it on hold and go back and forth.”...

 

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 

 

http://www.gulf-times.com/opinion/189/details/439577/exercise-builds-brawn%26hellip-and-brain-power

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

New Understanding of Sensory Overload in Autism // Autism Daily

New Understanding of Sensory Overload in Autism // Autism Daily | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it
New research shows that people with autism have enhanced movement integration that can make them better or worse at seeing motion, depending on what they are asked to do. This challenges previous research showing that people with autism generally see visual motion poorly. This increased ability to pool motion information, in combination with fewer restraints …

 

For full post, click on title above or here: http://www.autismdailynewscast.com/press-release-new-understanding-sensory-overload-autism/26767/pressrelease/

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD from Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

Avoiding "Learned Helplessness"

Avoiding "Learned Helplessness" | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it
Take responsibility for empowering students, and avoid the schooling habits that train them to seek a single right answer instead of exploring the learning process.

 

 

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/avoiding-learned-helplessness-andrew-miller


Via Mel Riddile
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

4 Fundamental Problems With Everything You Hear About The Future Of Education

4 Fundamental Problems With Everything You Hear About The Future Of Education | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jordanshapiro/2015/04/30/4-fundamental-problems-with-everything-you-hear-about-the-future-of-education/

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD from Purposeful Pedagogy
Scoop.it!

Resources Toolkit for New Teachers // Edutopia

Resources Toolkit for New Teachers // Edutopia | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

From classroom management to working with parents, lesson planning to learning environments, this compilation of blogs, videos, and other resources provides an array of tips and advice for teachers just starting out.


Via Dean J. Fusto
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Facing The Screen Dilemma: Young Children, Technology, & Early Education // Alliance For Childhood, CCFC, & TRUCE

Co-authored by the Alliance for Childhood, Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, and Teachers Resisting Unhealthy Children’s Entertainment
 

"This guide is designed to help educators and parents make informed decisions about whether, why, how, and when to use screen technologies with young children. Just because products are marketed as “educational” doesn’t mean they are. How do we best support children’s growth, development, and learning in a world radically changed by technology? 

Download your free copy here.

 

Now available: Spanish translation of Facing the Screen Dilemma


Visit Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood report announcement here: http://commercialfreechildhood.org/screendilemma 

 

Visit main page of Alliance For Childhood here: http://www.allianceforchildhood.org 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD from Awesomeness
Scoop.it!

Superhero with Autism Featured in New Comic Book // NBCNews via AutismAtFaceValue

Superhero with Autism Featured in New Comic Book // NBCNews via AutismAtFaceValue | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

"Extraordinary superpowers, high-flying villains and fearless, world-saving heroes are the stuff of countless comic books. But the newest star to hit the comic circuit is different than most.
 

Michael is a comic book character with autism - a hero with a mathematical mind, artistic gift and an abundance of compassion. Face Value Comics says he is the first"...

 

For full post and video, click on title above or here: http://www.nbcnews.com/feature/making-a-difference/comic-book-stars-worlds-first-hero-autism-n190321

 

For more, check out Autism At Face Value: http://autismatfacevalue.com  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

The Homestretch // Independent Lens (Preview)

http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/homestretch/ Premiering April 13, 2015. Check local listings: http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/broadcast.html Three home...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Graphing Linear Equations (Full Body Style) // TeachingChannel

"Rebecca Davis sets up a coordinate plane on the floor of her classroom. Groups of 3 or 4 students are assigned equations in slope-intercept form and graph them using their bodies on the giant coordinate plane. As extensions, Ms. Davis changes the slope or y-intercept of the original equation and makes the activity into a race."

https://youtu.be/UVavAC3Tclk

 

For other lessons and ideas, visit the Teaching Channel at: 
http://www.teachinchannel.org  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Listen Current: Lesson Plans for Science, Social Studies, and ELA

Listen Current: Lesson Plans for Science, Social Studies, and ELA | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it
Free lesson plans with great audio stories for your Science, Social Studies, or ELA classroom. We curate the best of public radio to keep teaching connected to the real world and build student listening skills at the same time.

 

http://listencurrent.com/lessons

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Virtually Addicted: Why General Practice Must Now Confront Screen Dependency // British Journal of General Practice

ABSTRACT

"Discretionary screen time (ST) is now the main waking activity of children: a lifestyle factor as relevant to health as nutrition and physical activity. High ST is increasingly considered an independent risk factor, often exhibiting a dose–response relationship with cardiometabolic disease, unfavourable child development outcomes, and adult morbidity and mortality, ultimately placing greater pressure on primary care services.1 The US Department of Health has issued ‘recommended limits for screen time’ as one of its national ‘health improvement priorities’ and a key ‘disease prevention objective’.2 Public Health England recently reported their concern over: ‘Increased screen time … evidence suggests a “dose-response” relationship, where each additional hour of viewing increases the likelihood of experiencing socio-emotional problems’.3

 

As concern grows over the amount of ST, the term ‘addiction’ is increasingly used by physicians to describe the rising number of children engaging in a variety of screen activities in a dependent, problematic manner. The diagnostic vernacular is still evolving: internet addiction disorder (IAD), at-risk/problematic internet use (ARPIU), pathological video game use, video game addiction, pathological technology use, online game addiction, and more. Although the current medical focus is on ‘video gaming’, other forms of screen use, from excessive messaging and social networking to ‘porn addiction’, can also become highly problematic. While there is a lack of consensus as to whether such screen use constitutes a formal psychiatric disorder, the NHS doesn’t consider it a passing phase, stating ‘as computer use has increased, so too has computer addiction’.4
 

Involving primary care in this emerging problem should not be construed as medicalising a popular pastime, the thin end of the wedge leading GPs to meddle in patient lifestyles. ST is a health issue and the GP’s surgery is the entrance hall through which patients seek authoritative guidance, referral, and where education can take place. Raising parental awareness of both excessive ST and problematic, dependent screen use is vital. As the guardians of family health, GPs’ views on child health hold currency.

Unfortunately, families are courted and bedazzled, child development research is funded, and governments are lobbied by a well-heeled, highly influential technology industry. It is, therefore, incumbent on GPs to confront the iridescent elephant(s) in the room.

Irrespective of the formal status of screen ‘addictions’, those in primary care must step back and simply consider the extent to which excessive, seemingly dependent, non-work-related ST affects the health and wellbeing of patients, and ST’s impact on functioning including work, study, relationships and finances. In this rapidly developing field, a better understanding of the subject will enable physicians to make clinical and policy decisions."...

 

For full article, click on title above or here: 
http://bjgp.org/content/64/629/610

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

The Disturbing Transformation of Kindergarten // W. Lecker, Hearst Media Group

By Wendy Lecker (Hearst Media Group)

"One of the most distressing characteristics of education reformers is that they are hyper-focused on how students perform, but they ignore how students learn. Nowhere is this misplaced emphasis more apparent, and more damaging, than in kindergarten.

 

A new University of Virginia study found that kindergarten changed in disturbing ways from 1999-2006. There was a marked decline in exposure to social studies, science, music, art and physical education and an increased emphasis on reading instruction. Teachers reported spending as much time on reading as all other subjects combined.

 

The time spent in child-selected activity dropped by more than one-third. Direct instruction and testing increased. Moreover, more teachers reported holding all children to the same standard.

How can teachers hold all children to the same standards when they are not all the same? They learn differently, mature at different stages – they just are not all the same especially at the age of 4-6."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 
https://truthabouteducation.wordpress.com/2014/03/06/the-disturbing-transformation-of-kindergarten/

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD from Digital Presentations in Education
Scoop.it!

Expin.me // Create interactive stories

Expin.me // Create interactive stories | Educational Psychology & Technology | Scoop.it

Via Kathleen Cercone, Baiba Svenca
more...
Christopher Howell's curator insight, March 9, 12:08 PM

Allows you to share thoughts and feelings.

Mazin Ali's curator insight, March 12, 8:53 AM

I believe this Web 2.0 tool is great for introducing yourself and telling others about your past experiences.

Nedko Aldev's curator insight, March 16, 9:09 AM

 

292