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Mobile Learning in Higher Education
Strategies and tools for effective mLearning in Higher Ed.
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Curtin Teaching and Learning - eLearning: eLearning advisors

Curtin Teaching and Learning - eLearning: eLearning advisors | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The diverse team of eLearning advisors provide elearning workshops, send out periodic newsletter, provide customised consultation, support the eScholar program and more.

 

Use the 'Filter' pull-down menu above to search for topics by keywords.


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Craig Patterson's comment, June 13, 2013 1:52 AM
Is this link working?
Kim Flintoff's comment, June 13, 2013 2:12 AM
The website was redesigned and we disappeared ... This scoop is simply a flag about who's curating... We didn't expect anyone wold ever want to visit us.....
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Creating a Fluid Learning Environment (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu

Creating a Fluid Learning Environment (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Instead of mobile learning, I call this second-generation mobile learning fluid learning, which focuses on the flow of learning between mobile and non-mobile devices, such as a desktop computers. Fluid learning is enabled by a consideration of five attributes when designing content or instructional activities: neutrality, granularity, portability, interactivity, and ubiquity.

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Riding the wave of BYOD: developing a framework for creative pedagogies | Cochrane | Research in Learning Technology

Riding the wave of BYOD: developing a framework for creative pedagogies | Cochrane | Research in Learning Technology | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Riding the wave of BYOD: developing a framework for creative pedagogies

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thomcochrane's curator insight, September 24, 7:57 PM

Moving innovation in teaching and learning beyond isolated short-term projects is one of the holy grails of educational technology research, which is littered with the debris of a constant stream of comparative studies demonstrating no significant difference between innovative technologies and traditional pedagogical approaches. Meanwhile, the approaching giant wave of the bring your own device (BYOD) movement threatens to overwhelm education practitioners and researchers preoccupied with replicating current practice on mobile devices. A review of the literature indicates that there are yet few well-developed theoretical frameworks for supporting creative pedagogies via BYOD. In this paper, we overview the development of a framework for creative pedagogies that harness the unique affordances of BYOD. This framework has been used across multiple educational contexts and scale from short workshops through to full courses and international collaborative projects. Our key design principles for supporting creative pedagogies via BYOD include modelling collaborative practice via establishing teacher communities of practice to learn about the affordances of mobile devices in relation to new modes of student learning, collaborative curriculum redesign in response to shifts in conceptions of teaching and learning, and collaborating with ICT Services for infrastructure development across the campus. Keywords: Mobile Learning; augmented reality; creative pedagogies; communities of practice; social media (Published: 28 August 2014) Citation: Research in Learning Technology 2014, 22 : 24637 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/rlt.v22.24637

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What Teachers Need to Know about 1:1 Vs BYOD ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

What Teachers Need to Know about 1:1 Vs BYOD ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

BYOD and 1:1 are two popular trends in today's educational system. The common thing between these two trends is that they are both technology-induced, that is based on, applied to, and came about as a direct result of the wider uptake of digital technologies. Also both of these trends aim at a better integration and a wider access to technology within formal educational settings.

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Tablets fall out of favour in NSW classrooms

Tablets fall out of favour in NSW classrooms | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Once hailed as the poster child of digital interactive learning, tablets are falling increasingly out of favour in NSW schools.

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Peter Mellow's curator insight, August 20, 10:40 PM

I would really like to see 'how' they used the devices in the classroom. I can see this as another case of blame the technology (device) rather than the learning design for the activities.

 

I would have thought that a device with a range of scientific instruments included in it (gyroscope, accelerometer, two cameras), would be more useful for collecting and reporting on data/events than a keyboard with a screen. Sounds like a typewriter vs an educational swiss army knife to me.

 

Do we want our children to be able to ask the right questions with inquiry based learning or be able to type 40 words a minute?

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Tennessee College To Offer All Biology Course Materials Via Mobile Devices -- Campus Technology

Tennessee College To Offer All Biology Course Materials Via Mobile Devices -- Campus Technology | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
This semester, biology students at Walters State Community College will be able to access all course materials in digital form.
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The best note-taking app for iPhone

The best note-taking app for iPhone | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Sure, fine, you might still want to carry around a Moleskine and a lovely fountain pen because it just feels good. But that's hardly the most efficient way to take and store notes anymore...

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Bad practices in mobile learning

Bad practices in mobile learning | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
something doesn't seem quite right with this particular implementation ... The World Bank's EduTech blog explores issues related to the use of information and communication technologies (computers, laptops, tablets, the Internet, ...) to benefit education in middle and low income countries around the world. While I tend to view, with a fair degree of skepticism, many of the statistics which purport to document just how many people have visited a particular web site, it seems that the EduTech blog was recently visited by its one millionth reader. When viewing the mass of blog posts in their entirety, together with our visitor logs and other relevant data, it is quite clear that BY FAR the single most popular post remains one I did over four years ago on 'worst practice in ICT use in education'. What was relevant back in 2010 appears still to be quite relevant today. (This isn't always the case: If memory serves, I quickly drafted and published that particular blog post because I was having trouble completing one 'Exploring the Use of Second Life in Education' -- I'm guessing that the half-life for *that* one, had it even been finalized and published, would have been pretty short!) Recent news articles -- whether reporting that the one tablet per child project in Thailand 'has been scrapped' or the decision of the school district in Hoboken, New Jersey (USA) to 'throw away all its laptops' -- suggest that debris continues to pile up on the landscape of 'failed' attempts to use new technologies effectively in education in various ways. The Franco-Czech writer Milan Kundera has a short story called "Let the Old Dead Make Room for the Young Dead". Sometimes I feel like this title could be adapted for use in an introductory essay to a book documenting many of the unfortunate 'educational technology deployments' that have been irresistable fodder for politicians and headline writers alike (and clickbait for folks on Twitter) over the past decade. And yet .... just because because we continue to hear variations on a sadly familiar theme, I don't know that the best response is to admit defeat, throw up our hands, throw everything away and go back to the 'good old days'. Learners would not be terribly well served if educational planners in 2014 simply decided to emulate the impulses and actions of Silesian weavers back in 1844 and smash all the machines in reaction to the spread of new technologies. Attempting to stuff this particular genie back in the bottle isn't only impractical: I would hazard a guess that it is well nigh impossible. The recent article on the Hoboken experience labels it a 'failed experiment'. Personally, I am not sure that this label fits in this particular case. In an experiment, it seems to me that you are usually trying to learn something. This rather large purchase of technology seems to me like yet another solution in search of a problem that no one bothered to actually tried to define in any meaningful way. I suspect that, at a fundamental level, the problem wasn't (really) with the technology. In other words: It seems more like human failure to me.
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In China, Mobile Becomes Number One Way of Going Online

In China, Mobile Becomes Number One Way of Going Online | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
China has been going through an explosive internet adoption period, with mobile playing a key role in getting people online. And now, the latest report published by state-affiliated research organization China Internet Network Information... Keep reading →
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Report: Smartphone Surge Continues as PC Decline Slows -- Campus Technology

Report: Smartphone Surge Continues as PC Decline Slows -- Campus Technology | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Worldwide device shipments, including mobile phones, PCs, tablets and unltramobiles, are on pace to increase 4.2 percent this year over last to reach 2.4 billion units, according to the latest forecast from market research firm Gartner.
Kim Flintoff's insight:

More to suggest that if you're a global p[layer and not targeting mobile you may be missing a huge cohort of users.  Increasingly learners are abandoning larger computing devices for portable and mobile options - mobile phones are by far the closest thing to ubiquitous technology.

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Exploring Students' Mobile Learning Practices in Higher Education (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu

Exploring Students' Mobile Learning Practices in Higher Education (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Key TakeawaysA university-wide survey on students' mobile learning practices showed that ownership of mobile devices is high among students and that tablets are the most popular devices for academic purposes.The survey also found that mobile learning typically occurs outside the classroom, with only limited guidance from instructors.To improve mobile learning effectiveness, students and instructors need help adopting more effective learning and teaching practices across content areas.
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Daniel Tan's curator insight, June 13, 3:48 AM

Universities should go beyond ICT Plans to SMICT (Social Mobile Information Communication Technologies) strategies. And even the, this would just be the tip of the ice-berg. While synergized, it will change and create new business models for campus teaching, learning, living, wellness, performance/assessment modes and measurements, learning space designs,

 

Really, you ain't see anything yet!

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 20, 8:26 PM

The key issues section is important. Many factors exist that have not been fully explored. They might never be with the pace of change. That is not bad if we have a plan to try make sense of what happens in classrooms, how teaching and learning are impacted in local situations.

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Game-Based mLearning: Develop Learning in Hours, not Weeks | Game On! Learning

Game-Based mLearning: Develop Learning in Hours, not Weeks | Game On! Learning | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Moving in the direction of mobile learning?  Working to enable your traditional eLearning courses to run on tablets and smartphones?  Consider another direction.  Unless your eLearning offerings draw rave reviews from your workforce, moving them to a mobile device only makes it more convenient for your employees to access marginally effective training.

Raise the bar on your online training as you go mobile.  Produce more effective, more engaging mLearning in a fraction of the time required to develop unengaging eLearning.  How fast?  How about 8 hours to produce training with 10 distinct learning activities?  With built-in addictive learning games, extensive leaderboard capabilities, and the most extensive analytics on the market.

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Smartphones: The Silent Killer Of The Web As You Know It

Smartphones: The Silent Killer Of The Web As You Know It | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The PC is dying, long live the PC! These headlines have been thrown around for years, as sales of laptops and desktops have continually dwindled downward.
Kim Flintoff's insight:

The implications for learning engagement are significant.  Recent data suggests that mobile engagement can potentially target 93% of the world's population.  Learning design must shift to accommodate these growing patterns for engagement - instructional design and knowledge of more dynamic mobile platforms will need to become more common.  Universities are still a decade or more behind current trends.  What will blended and elearning look like in another few years if anyone takes notice of this?

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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, May 5, 2:32 AM
The implications for learning engagement are significant. Recent data suggests that mobile engagement can potentially target 93% of the world's population. Learning design must shift to accommodate these growing patterns for engagement - instructional design and knowledge of more dynamic mobile platforms will need to become more common. Universities are still a decade or more behind current trends. What will blended and elearning look like in another few years if anyone takes notice of this?
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7 Tips to Effectively Use Google Scholar ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

7 Tips to Effectively Use Google Scholar ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

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WEAC's curator insight, October 12, 12:25 PM

Google Scholar provides a simple way to broadly search for scholarly literature. 

Ruby Day's curator insight, October 12, 11:01 PM

Great resource to share with students

 

Stephan Hughes's curator insight, October 21, 9:29 AM

Could be useful for student teachers who have to prepare academic articles as part of their research methodology subject. 

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Creating a Fluid Learning Environment (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu

Creating a Fluid Learning Environment (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Instead of mobile learning, I call this second-generation mobile learning fluid learning, which focuses on the flow of learning between mobile and non-mobile devices, such as a desktop computers. Fluid learning is enabled by a consideration of five attributes when designing content or instructional activities: neutrality, granularity, portability, interactivity, and ubiquity.
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Social Sciences | Free Full-Text | Implementing a Mobile Social Media Framework for Designing Creative Pedagogies

Social Sciences | Free Full-Text | Implementing a Mobile Social Media Framework for Designing Creative Pedagogies | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The rise of mobile social media provides unique opportunities for new and creative pedagogies. Pedagogical change requires a catalyst, and we argue that mobile social media can be utilized as such a catalyst. However, the mobile learning literature is dominated by case studies that retrofit traditional pedagogical strategies and pre-existing course activities onto mobile devices and social media. From our experiences of designing and implementing a series of mobile social media projects, the authors have developed a mobile social media framework for creative pedagogies. We illustrate the implementation of our mobile social media framework within the development of a new media minor (an elective set of four courses) that explicitly integrates the unique technical and pedagogical affordances of mobile social media, with a focus upon student-generated content and student-determined learning (heutagogy). We argue that our mobile social media framework is potentially transferable to a range of educational contexts, providing a simple design framework for new pedagogies.

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52% of student prospects view educator websites on mobile devices

52% of student prospects view educator websites on mobile devices | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

These days, we can’t seem to stress enough the importance of having a mobile strategy in place for student, prospect, and alumni engagement.

This ICEF Monitor article provides several statistics from 2 reports on the mobile tendencies of American schools and students, and includes charts and an infographic.


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Access to Technology for Immigrant Students

Access to Technology for Immigrant Students | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
How a ninth-grade teacher handles BYOD issues with a largely immigrant classroom.
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Student use of mobile devices in university lectures | Roberts | Australasian Journal of Educational Technology

Student use of mobile devices in university lectures
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Keeping students on track with a mobile nudge

Keeping students on track with a mobile nudge | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

UW Tacoma's mobile student support system.

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How medical professionals can use Evernote and mobile devices to improve productivity and learning - iMedicalApps

How medical professionals can use Evernote and mobile devices to improve productivity and learning - iMedicalApps | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Readers of the iMedicalApps forums will have seen that Evernote was rated particularly highly by a number of commenters when asked ‘How do you use mobile technology to help with your studies’. As  a result of this, I was encouraged to try Evernote out for an extended period and see what impact it could make upon …

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How Educators Around The World Are Implementing Mobile Learning (And What You Can Learn From Them) - InformED

How Educators Around The World Are Implementing Mobile Learning (And What You Can Learn From Them) - InformED | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

"In less than a decade, mobile technology has spread to the furthest corners of the planet. Of the estimated 7 billion people on Earth, 6 billion now have access to a working mobile phone. Africa, which had a mobile penetration rate of just 5% in the 1990s, is now the second largest and fastest growing mobile phone market in the world, with a penetration rate of over 60% and climbing."

Cited From: http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/features/how-educators-are-practicing-mobile-learning/#ixzz38DAMUBd0"


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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, July 25, 2:54 PM

How Educators Around The World Are Implementing Mobile Learning

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Keeping Students on Track With a Mobile "Nudge" -- Campus Technology

Keeping Students on Track With a Mobile "Nudge" -- Campus Technology | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The University of Washington Tacoma is hoping to improve retention with a daily support message sent to each student's mobile device.

 

Retention and student success have long been among the biggest issues facing institutions of higher education, but a new generation of students is complicating matters. "There has been a change in who goes to college," according to Colleen Carmean, assistant chancellor for academic technologies at the University of Washington Tacoma. "We think of the traditional student as the person right out of high school; but now the demographic is across the board. What in the past was a small percentage of students returning to college is now the majority. We are a nation going to college, as people realize they need a college degree in order to have a more successful life."

Kim Flintoff's insight:

Personalisation through targeted scaffolding of effective behaviours.

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How green is my ebook? | CILIP

How green is my ebook? | CILIP | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

The rapid rise of ebooks and e-readers has been phenomenal. Ebook sales have risen from 10 million in 2008, to 457 million in 2012, and despite slower growth in 2013, account for 20 per cent of all book sales. CILIP estimated that academic ebooks will account for 18 per cent of the global textbook market by 2013, up from 3.4 per cent in 2011. - See more at: http://www.cilip.org.uk/cilip/news/how-green-my-ebook#sthash.Q4xKNx4D.a5waSy2n.dpuf

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App Smashing: Combining Google Drive, iTunes U, And Apps In The Classroom - Edudemic

App Smashing: Combining Google Drive, iTunes U, And Apps In The Classroom - Edudemic | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Many schools that have adopted one-one tablet technology struggle with the pre-requisite skills associated with moving files from app to app. This process is now called App Smashing, and when you learn how to use it to your advantage, it really does make things nice and simple.

Workflow is king and the easier it is to distribute content, create solutions, and then store that information for feedback, the more success you will have in the digital classroom.


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, May 13, 11:01 AM

The phrase that jumped out at me is "Workflow is king..." . The classroom is all about flow.  


The use of tablets can be daunting when it comes to getting your documents to go where you want them to go. So, flow seems a good topic to investigate.


Slide on into this article. It will help!

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50 Apps That Clarify 50 New Ways To Learn - te@chthought

50 Apps That Clarify 50 New Ways To Learn - te@chthought | Mobile Learning in Higher Education | Scoop.it

"Below we’ve gathered a diverse list of learning apps across iOS and Android from giants like Google, Apple, Microsoft, as well as upstarts like Brainfeed, The Sandbox, and Knowji. None of the apps are perfect, but each app does something special, and in that talent represents what’s possible as we careen towards 2020 and beyond.

 

Learning through play. Self-directed learning. Flipped learning. Mobile learning. Collaborative learning. Social learning. It’s all here. Alone, none offer the turn-key approach to education that textbooks have traditionally turned to. But this is a strength. As education technology grows, we can adapt to new learning models that take advantage of the fragmented but enormous potential of self-directed, creative, collaborative, and almost entirely mobile learning."

 


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Wilko Dijkhuis's curator insight, April 26, 6:01 AM

a nice list

Ali Anani's curator insight, April 27, 12:20 AM

Fifty learning tools in one

God Is.'s curator insight, April 27, 5:26 PM

Always learn something new everyday...