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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Hispanic Population in the USA

Hispanic Population in the USA | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau shows distribution of Hispanic or Latino population by specific origin. http://go.usa.gov/D7VH
Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: What geographic factors account for the differences in settlement patterns of those of Puerto Rican origin and those of Mexican origin?  How do these patterns shape the cultural patterns in the United States and affect particular places?


Tags: migration, USA, mappingcensus, ethnicity.


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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 22, 2013 6:27 AM

This source is interesting because it uses U.S. Census Bureau data to show where Puerto Ricans and Mexicans generally live in the United States.  This source shows that we cannot merely generalize about the entire Hispanic population.  We cannot just say, "Hispanics live in this particular region" because in reference to this source, that is false.  We notice that Puerto Ricans generally live in Florida and in the northeast, probably because the east coast of the United States falls along similar longitudinal lines as Puerto Rico itself.  Similarly, we notice that Mexicans tend to migrate to southern California and areas in Texas and Arizona since these places are along the U.S. border with Mexico, so it would make sense for Mexicans to live in these areas.  This is a great source.

Emma Boyle's curator insight, November 20, 2013 5:29 AM

Context matters!

Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:54 AM

1. What geographic factors account for the differences in settlement patterns of those of Puerto Rican origin and those of Mexican origin? 













2.How do these patterns shape the cultural patterns in the United States and affect particular places?


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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This short video on the street foods of German cities is a rich, tangible example to show cultural patterns and processes.  Culture is not static and this New York Times video can be used to teach the various concepts of culture; per the updated APHG outline, the initial concepts of culture are:  

  • Culture traits
  • Diffusion patterns
  • Acculturation, assimilation and multiculturalism
  • Culture region, vernacular region, cultural hearth
  • Globalization and the effects of technology on culture.


Question to Ponder: How are these 5 major elements of culture seen in this video?


Tags: food, migration, culturediffusion, globalization, consumption.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 1, 2013 10:13 AM

I found this video to be very interesting. The video talks about Berlin's signature dish the currywurst. Currywurst is one of most well known dishes in Berlin, and is a dish the natives say every tourist should try. What was interesting to find was that the dish had elements from a few different places. Currywurst is made of pork sausage which and fried and cut into pieces. Pork suasage is a very widely used and popular meat that have in germany. However on the curry worst dish they put ketchup, which is very american like. They also sprinkle it with curry, which comes by way of India from Great Britian. It is amazing ti me that a country's signature dish has ingredients from two other countries! You would think that a signature dish would be made entirely of ingredients from their homeland. However the country is becoming more and more like other country adding sushi bars, soup kitchens, fast food, and etc. It just goes to show how much things have changed. Before country's were trying to use their own products as much as possible. Now we have such good transportation systems that people are moving to new places and food is being transported all over the world. Now we are at a point where even a country's signature dish uses products from many different country's. We have almost completely eliminated folk culture. It is almost sad in a way. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:03 AM

All over Germany specially in Berlin you can find many varieties of foods and restaurants that were influenced by many countries all over the world. A very popular dish the currywurst is fried German sausage with American ketchup and India curry powder. This dish was influenced by two other countries and was opular during WWII. The dish is still very popular today because of its unique taste. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 7:44 AM

This is a stride of different cultures,  a little ancient and modern culture. When the Turkish immigrant came over to Germany because they needed workers (Germans stopped having so many kids) it help form the curry wurst. They also use American ketchup because Americans were over there for the war and they ate this too. The curry powder came way of United Kingdom. Basically the population learned from all these cultures and  created one huge hit. 

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Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."

Seth Dixon's insight:

While this is ostensibly a map that would be great for a cultural geography unit, I'm also thinking about the spatial patterns that created this map.  What current or historical migrations account for some of the patterns visible here?  What would a map like this look like it it were produced 50 years ago?  Why are Vermont and West Virginia the only states without a county with over 10% of the population that speak another language at home?  


Tags: language, North America, mapping, regions, census, migration, populationhistoricalfolk cultures, USA.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 5, 2013 11:34 AM

The presence of large numbers of people that speak languages other than English at home occurs on the east and west coasts of the U.S., but largely in the south and western areas of the U.S..  In high school we used to have discussions about how there were many immigrants coming into the U.S. from or through Mexico.  With migration comes cultural diffusion, as the people coming into the United States bring their language and many other cultural elements of their country of origin with them.  I know there are certain neighborhoods in cities in Rhode Island where most people that I see on the street are speaking Spanish.  I have a relative that has married an immigrant from Guatemala, and she learned that the North East coast of the U.S. Is where many people from Central America move to- often in groups that settle as communities to help each other.  I can understand that it is essential to live near people that speak your language, and it makes sense that their strength and comfort in numbers is also a way of having a "home away from home."  Being the area of the world on the southern land border of the U.S., and that Central America consists mainly of Spanish speakers, it fills in the Southern areas of the U.S. with people that speak a language other than English.  The coasts overall can be explained as being populated by people that speak languages other than English at home because they contain ports of travel and trade, and are points where many flights from other countries would land and drop off travelers and migrants.  That and beautiful ocean views make the coasts a great place for foreigners to settle and live.  These pull factors are likely influential reasons for people to relocate to the areas on the map.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 8:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

Maria Lopez's curator insight, February 6, 9:29 AM

This map is a great visual showing how multicultural the United States has become. This change is visible however is more states than others. For example, Most of the West Coast and Texas is made up of bilinguals that can speak both English and Spanish. I believe because they are so close to Mexico and that California sees a large influx of immigrants this would make sense. In addition, Florida is also another state that sees immigrants entering from overseas and has a large Cuban population because of this that Florida would be bilingual as well. It is interesting to see that in both Hawaii and Arizona, indigenous Native American languages are still spoken. Finally, the Dakota's have a large population of German speakers which I would have never associated together in the past. It is very interesting to see if these languages expand any further in the next ten years.

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | Geography Education | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

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Why these Somali refugees do not want to leave Kenya

Why these Somali refugees do not want to leave Kenya | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"For millions of refugees across Africa life is a daily struggle.  Many dream of one day returning to their homeland while others have spent decades building a new life.  On World Refugee Day, BBC Focus on Africa's Anne Soy visits a Somali family in Nairobi, Kenya, who cannot imagine returning to their roots."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In addition to this video, see this photo gallery of refugees around the world for some additional context of 'regular life' for refugees. 


Questions to Ponder: Is it the duty of a refugee to return to their home country as soon as it is safe?  If you were a refugee, what geographic factors (economic, cultural, political, environmental) would shape you decisions to stay or return?


Tags: refugees, migration, Somalia, Africa,

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:19 PM

I do not feel that Is the duty of refuge to return to their home if they don’t want to, even if is safe. If I were a refuge I would learn about the present situation of my home, if is safe or not or I would take in consideration, where would my family and I have a better future; like school, work and if I can practice my beliefs without any fear of being arrested or worst kill.   

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:44 AM

I don't believe its a refugee's duty to return to their country. I think after some time people start their lives over, for a reason. Most refugees leave their country because it is so bad. This family in the video went to another country and he was there for almost twenty years, that is a long time.  when your in a place for that long going back would mean starting over again. 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2:04 PM

No matter where you grow up, you form roots to your native land. Times are tough across the globe, especially for those living in Africa. While families plant their roots and look for ways to make things better, sometimes the best way is to leave. What makes people stay when their hometown roots are at rock bottom?

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The changing origins of U.S. immigrants

The changing origins of U.S. immigrants | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Back in 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they tend to come from Asia and Africa.
Seth Dixon's insight:

These statistics only include documented migrants although the number of undocumented migration (mostly from Latin America and the Caribbean) has declined since 2007. 


Tagsmigration.

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Jodi Esaili's curator insight, June 6, 2013 9:57 AM

add your insight...

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:17 PM

From these statistics i dont think the biggest change is the latin american immigrant population but the european population. The european went from 13% to 8 % of the total make up of immigrant population. Thats a 60% decline, and that tells me that the attraction of living in America has diwendled while the EU market is on the rise. I think this is from the growing economies of the EU market and also the fact that the US has been improving in many of the leading statistics such as education, child care, and quality of life. 

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Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style

Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In April, the Associated Press decided the word 'illegal' should only be used to describe actions, not people. It's one of several major news outlets that have been reconsidering how to refer to people who are in this country illegally."  


Seth Dixon's insight:

There is power in the words we choose, especially for those those that are in the media that influence the way we frame any topic.  If a reporter in a news article, for example, were to describe a group as freedom fighters instead of insurgent rebels it impacts our perception of the news. See also this gallery of images on the U.S.-Mexico border


Tagsmigrationethnicity, race, population, podcast.

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Al Picozzi's comment, July 21, 2013 9:53 AM
It all goes along with the old saying, the victors write the history books. If the US lost the American Revolution it wouodl probably been called the American Insurrection. Also look at the Civil War as we mostly call it today. Many places, especially in the Southern states call this the War for Southern Independence or the War of Norther Aggression.
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 4:19 PM

I thought that NPR broadcast  was perpetuating the problem we face today in news media.  They spent there time talking about certain individuals and how they used their words instead of addressing and informing us about the issue of immigration. Labeling is an easy way of separating a human being from the situation, Illegal immigrant is easier to portray negatively in the news.  An illegal sounds better then a disadvantaged Mexican refuge in search of the same American dream our founding fathers were trying to create when the agenda is to close the boarders

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Border Walls

Border Walls | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Geographer Reece Jones discusses his recent book Border Walls, examining the history of how and why societies have chosen to literally wall themselves apart.  He gives a brief history of political maps, how international lines reshape landscapes, and how the trend towards increased border wall construction contrasts with the view of a “borderless” world under globalization."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This 30-minute audio podcast is a great preview of Reece Jones' book Border Walls; and discusses many concepts important to political geography.  The physical construction of barriers is an old practice (Great Wall of China, Hadrian's Wall), but those borders were the exceptions.  The recent proliferatrion of walls to separate countries is dramatically reshaping our borders and impacting economics, politics, migration and other geographic patterns (How recent? Over half of the borders with walls and fences we see today have been constructed since 2000). Although walls are often justified as a means to prevent terrorism, most of the world's walls can best be explained as dividing wealthy and relatively poorer countries to prevent migration (download podcast episode here).  You can also read his New York Times article on the same topic.   


Tags: book reviews, podcast, borders, political, landscape, states, territoriality, sovereignty.

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Darius Kidd's comment, August 27, 2013 7:37 AM
Wow....
Darius Kidd's comment, August 27, 2013 7:37 AM
Wow... your comment is really long Chris.........
Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 6:00 AM
listening to some of the podcast you can get an in-depth synopsis of this. the walls that divide our countries and even towns over time have all the criteria and/or reasoning. Great Wall of China to keep invaders from starting war, Berlin Wall to divide german supporters of war, America/Mexican boarder is to keep illegal immigrants from coming, fence in your moms backyard is to keep neighbors/animals out of yard. Walls all have the same concept of avoiding war, trespassers and privacy. this is seen in not only everyday living but in military use as well.
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International Migration

Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a good introduction to basic concepts of migration;  the video is especially noteworthy because it is rich in vocabulary terms (explaining them and using global examples) necessary to teach a population geography unit. 


Tags: migration, population, statistics, unit 2 population.

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Alvin Ang's curator insight, October 15, 2013 6:50 PM

This resource is a good introduction into the issue of migration in a humanities topic in History or even Geography. It is a good initial segway into a topic that is current within the discourse of Australia's migration.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:25 AM

Migration is extremely important in every country, because it does help build the economy, and for all the other positive reasons mentioned in the video. But one can also see why they put up fences and boaarders to block the entrance to the country. Growing up as a kid in RI, I would always hear whether at home or at school, about immigrants coming over and taking all of "our" jobs, and etc. Everyone was always bashing immigrants, but it's not the immigrants fault that employers want to higher them instead because of the lower salary. But still, people would say, that if they stayed in their country, then employers would have no choice but to higher the people who are from here and pay them the amount they desired. But they fail to realized, that we technically are all immigrants because even though we were born here, our grand parents or great grandparents migrated here as well. Unless you're native America, then you're not a native no matter what nationality you are. People are so asbent minded and ignorant to see that. But nonetheless, migration can be good or bad, it all depends on the reason/intentions of migrating and the results.

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 6:57 PM

This video is an insight to what exactly migration is. It shows us that migration is what civilizations did in order to both survive and explore new territories. It also shows the prejudices that come along with migration. This occurs when one group of people migrate into an are where they are already people who have migrated there before them. it also shows the reason why it is necessary for migration to occur.

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My escape from North Korea

"As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was 'the best on the planet.' It wasn't until the famine of the 90s that she began to to wonder. She escaped the country at 14, to begin a life in hiding, as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Not all migration is voluntary and this woman's personal struggle to flee North Korea alternates between heartwarming and heartbreaking.  Her accent is thick, but it is worth it to her her story from her own mouth. 


Tags: North Koreamigration, political, East Asia, development, states, poverty.

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Emily Ross Cook's curator insight, March 27, 2013 6:48 AM

We've been studying North Korea and the conflict between North and South in our World Geography classes.  This is an interesting perspective and story - one that definitely helps to understand the plight of many North Koreans as they struggle to leave and subsequently create new lives elsewhere.

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 20, 2013 1:22 PM

A very powerful and informaitivie dipiction of life as you girl for Lee, and her stuggle to get a away. Her story is increadible, I cant even begin to imaigian all that she has been thouhg sence her escape. This story reminds me alot of life how life for jews was during and the hollocust, and how the need to escape your own country became a need to survive. The fact that Lee has remained safe and is able to come out and share her story is inspiring.

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After boom and bust, Sun Belt cities see glimmers again

After boom and bust, Sun Belt cities see glimmers again | Geography Education | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON -- With their economies and housing markets gaining strength, some of the nation's biggest boom-to-bust cities in the Sun Belt are starting to become magnets again, attracting a growing number of people primarily from the northern part...
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: economic, migration.

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Changing Ethnic patterns in London

Changing Ethnic patterns in London | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Of all the changes announced by the 2011 census, one of the most startling is the rapid change in the ethnic composition of London's population.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The fact the immigrants moving to the UK have flocked to London is not surprising (View a map of the census data).  Immigration isn't the only component to this situation.  White Britons are also leaving London in large number, prompting some to refer to this as "White Flight."  Today, white Britons are no longer the majority population within London (but still the largest ethnic group).  Some feel that this story has gone underreported and deserves more analysis.  What elements of human geography should an observer of this situation use in their analysis?  


Tags: ethnicity, London, migration, census, urban.

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Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 7:25 AM
The British-white percentage of the population in London is dropping. While this says a lot about the demographics of London it also says a lot about global migratory patterns. London is a international city, culturally and ethnically, it has many pull factors for many different kinds of people from all over the globe, with all different cultural backgrounds. These pull factors have translated into one big push factor for British-whites, however, as they move out of the city.
There are many different things that could explain these patterns. Racism, economic shifts or better opportunities else where, however one thing is for sure, the world is become more multi-cultural. With the movements of cultures comes displacement and resistance, tension doesn’t run short in these types of situations. As so many people move away from their homelands through out the world it will be interesting to see what begins to happen with geopolitical boundaries, will situations like Hungary be more common as people move away?
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 12:39 PM

The most surprising piece of information in this article is that white Britons are leaving London because of the minorities that are moving in. As of 2013 only 59.9% of London was white, meaning that the miniorities are taking over Ethnic part of London much faster then first anticipated.   

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 29, 2:43 PM

Since immigrants have flocked into London, it appears some of the White population has left the city because of it. The ethnic change is happening very quickly in London and White British population is no longer the majority. As large numbers of immigrants enter London, large numbers of White people leave the city. London is becoming a melting pot rather quickly. 

 
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Puerto Rico's Battered Economy: The Greece Of The Caribbean?

Puerto Rico's Battered Economy: The Greece Of The Caribbean? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
With the highest unemployment rate in the U.S. and a mountain of debt, the island is facing a declining population. But those who stay insist they're there for the long haul.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many Puerto Ricans have left the island as economic struggles continue to mount.  This podcast provides vivid examples of push and pull factors that lead to the individual choices of potential migrants (read the transcript or listen to the podcast).


Tags: Puerto Rico, economic, migration, podcast.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 21, 2013 6:48 PM

The economic stuggles of the Puerto Rican population are driving many of them to head to the states. Puerto Rico currently has the highest unemployment rate in the US at 14 percent and endless debt. There are however those that are there to stay for the long haul. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 8, 11:17 AM

Puerto Rico, is suffering from economic problems. With few exports, lots of imports, the highest unemployment rate in the US, and many market stalls not paying sales tax, Puerto Rico is getting buried in debt. For many Puerto Ricans, particularly educated ones having trouble finding jobs, starting over in the United States has become an increasingly attractive option. For some, coming to the US would make them feel like outsiders and leaving Puerto Rican culture behind feels slightly treasonous.

 

I cannot blame anyone for feeling that way, home is home. But for anyone who has to think about the welfare of their children or family, being able to provide for them is too much to ignore. It is unfortunate that many of these Caribbean islands seem to be having economic problems due to their reliance on imports and cash crops as a result of colonization.

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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video shows the place matters; a Washington D.C. educator shows how food deserts and other spatial problems of poverty impact his students on a daily basis.  We usually look at life expectancy data at the national scale and that obscures some of the real issues of poverty in developed countries.  Above is a map that shows the Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was recently added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit).  Here are some maps and data from the World Bank that utilizes the Gini Index as well as an interactive Gapminder graph.  


Tags: industry, location, place, migration, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic.

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Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, October 12, 2013 10:46 AM

Just incredibly awesome, but so, so sadly true.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 12:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 4:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I’ve posted earlier about the end of cheap China; the rising cost of doing business in China coupled with the higher transportation costs to get goods to North American and European markets have made manufacturing in Mexican much more competitive on the global market.  Many investors are turning to Mexico as an emerging land of opportunity and Mexico is now a destination for migrants.  This is still a new pattern:  only 1 percent of the country is foreign-born compared to the 13 percent that you would see in the United States.  Mexican migration to the United States has stabilized; about as many Mexicans have moved to the U.S. (2005-2010) as those that have moved south of the border.


Tags: Mexico, industry, location, place, migration.

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, September 29, 2013 10:39 AM

Mexico could be on the rise to become one of the world's manufacturing powers.  The workforce is already there, now it's up to companies and people to build jobs for the citizens and immigrants moving in.  Amazingly, a country which had so much migration away from the country is now moving back, and with they're not doing it alone but with people from around the world.  "Build it and they will come".  That being said, Mexico not only has appealing labor rates compared to China and other areas of the world, but the proximity to the United States makes opportunity very appealing.  Being next to the U.S., a country which imports so much of its supplies, can be a gold mine for Mexico.  In the future it is possible for the tables to turn.  Where there was once Mexicans crossing the border for work, it could be Americans crossing the border into Mexico for work.  An extreme statement, but anything can happen in this day and age.

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:43 AM

The wealth of a nation can come from many differnet aspects, jobs land, ecnomy, resoucres, and labor force. In many contries like china and indina they have lots of factorys and factory workers. However what ahppens when the cost of living and transporations go up, should we give workers a pay raise? NO. The answer is to find people who are able to work for cheeper. This lead to the mass influx of mexican factorites and the mass influx of forign workers fleeing to mexico for the jobs and simple life.

It was very interesting to see how even workers form the US were going to mexico in search of jobs becuse ten years ago it was the exact oppisit.

Paige Therien's curator insight, March 1, 12:44 PM

As domestic problems increase in countries where the United States have been previously "setting up shop", institutions are rethinking where they outsource manufacturing to.  It is becoming increasingly more expensive to ship goods from China or Europe.  People of all sorts are turning to Mexico, where the United States already has a good manufacturing foundation, to find new opportunities in many different increasingly competitive (globally) sectors.  This is allowing Mexico to be culturally, economically, and socially closer than ever before to many countries around the world.  This large influx of people from all around the world is definitely welcomed, but is being monitored and managed with great care and strategy in order to ensure that this shift benefits everyone.  Mexico is currently very flexible since it is transitioning into a more first-world country; this gives entrepreneurs a great place to start experimenting and migrants a chance to shape Mexico.

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Every 10 years the centroid (the center of U.S. population) is calculated using the latest census data.  As the map above shows, the centroid has continued moved west throughout history, but in the last 60 years has moved to the south and west.  The recent shift to the south coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors) which opened up the Sun Belt.  In this article in Orion Magazine, Jeremy Miller discusses the historical shifts in the spatial patterns of the U.S. population and the history of the centroid.  you can listen to podcast versions of this article as well, one by NPR and a much more detailed one by Orion Magazine.


Questions to Ponder:  Would the centroids of other countries be as mobile or predictable?  Why or why not?  What does the centroid tell us?


Tags: statistics, census, mappingmigration, populationhistoricalUSA.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, August 4, 2013 10:45 AM

Awesome way to show how the settlement of the US continues to move west with the population growing on the West Coast at a faster rate.  If you look at the biggest jump between 1850 and 1860 it shows the mass immigration into the US and the further migration to the western part of the US especailly with the gold rush starting in 1849.  Great littel piece of information.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 30, 2013 11:23 PM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 7:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US

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Out of nowhere: U football player comes from dusty California outpost

Out of nowhere: U football player comes from dusty California outpost | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Cedric Thompson retraced some of the steps that led him from L.A. to a dusty California outpost to, finally, the Gophers football team.

Seth Dixon's insight:

A young man for the tough streets of South Central Los Angeles found refuge from from gang troubles out in the desert in a community on the Salton Sea.  His family believes this unconventional move was key to him becoming a successful football player at the University of Minnesota.  His personal geographies follows uncommon migrational patterns, but it demonstrates that personal geographies can show some of the great diversity that is a part of the human mosaic.      


Tags: Los Angeles, sport, migration.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 19, 2013 2:20 PM

It is amazing how much the location of where you live can influence your life. Thompson traveled all over the place and each place had a huge impact on his life. His whole life could have been different if he had lived elsewhere. For example if he stayed in L.A who knows if he would have ended up getting involved in gangs or even been killed like some of his family members. Then again if he hadn't lived in Bombay would he ever have found that motivation to work hard. He didn't think so. His area even had an impact on him being recruited, because not many people thought to recruit a kid from Bombay. The area you live in really can have a huge role in who you become. Fortunately Thompson was able to use his experience to change his life and even his families future for the better. Such an amazing story and it is all due to where a person lived. 

Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 26, 2013 6:13 AM

This is such an inspiring story, and it's crazy to think that everything he has become is due to where he grew up. If this man had not gone to Bombay Beach his life would be very different. He probably would have gotten involved with gangs and never seen his full potential. Attending high school in such a remote area encouraged him to better his life so he could get out of there. Being bored all the time, he became a workout fiend and his father made him become a better student. Being from such a remote area also intrigued the Minnesota college scout. The choices Cedric made in his life as to where he would live, whether in Bombay Beach or the Minnesota college campus have drastically changed his life forever. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:20 PM
Cedric wanted more for himself and his life. He commuted hours away from home in order to stay away from the gangs and violence that surrounded him back home. So he endured the long travel inorder to better his life. He also was an exceptional football player. He felt he had no choice and it pushed him even harder because he wanted an out from that life he had at home. He wanted better for him and his family.
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The Health Toll of Immigration

The Health Toll of Immigration | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A growing body of mortality research on immigrants has shown that the longer they live in the United States, the worse their rates of heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article highlights a fascinating cultural shift that impacts the migrants that come to the United States.  The second generation might have more money but they tend to live shorter lives than their parents.  As the next generation becomes integrated into American pop culture, unhealthy habits follow (smoking, drinking, high-calorie diets and sedentary lifestyles). 


Tags: migrationpopular culture, population, food, culture.

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Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map

Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"An earlier GeoCurrents post on Chechnya mentioned that the Chechens were deported from their homeland in the North Caucasus to Central Asia in February 1944.  However, the Chechen nation was not the only one to suffer such a fate under Stalin’s regime."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a painful page in world history, but it needs retelling.  The Soviet era profoundly reshaped the cultural, political and economic geographies of the region.  

 

Tags: Russia, migration, Central Asiahistorical, war, ethnicity, political, gerrymandering.

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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:43 AM

Stalin probably did not have the outlook of his country's geography in mind when he deported all of these people.  It goes to show that ruthless dictatorships are never the way to go, as impulsive decisions and tyranny can have consequences for the long term.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 10:09 PM

This article details the ethnic deportation of peoples during the Soviet era. Many peoples were relocated under the guise of creating an ethnically unified Soviet Union but the truth was while some of the deportations were to simply move workers places of planned industry, many were to exile those deemed enemies of the state. The article estimates over 40% of those relocated died of diseases, malnutrition, or mistreatment. These forced migrations changed the demographics of Eastern Europe and Asia while causing major conflicts between various ethnic groups and Russia.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 6:22 AM

This article describes the practice of Lenin and Stalin of Russifacation.  This policy led to many ethnic minorities with in the Soviet Union being deported from their home soil to the interior of Russia.  The aim was to place ethnic Russian in boarder areas and to bring the ‘undesirable’ ethnicity into the interior to become Russian or sent to the gulags to die.  The effects of this mass relocation of ethnicity is still being felt today.  The rising conflict in Ukraine is a direct result from these policies as the country is split between ethnic Ukraine and the decedents of the ethnic Russians move there to secure the ports to the Black Sea.

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Rising Anti-Immigration Sentiment in the EU

Stratfor Europe Analyst Adriano Bosoni discusses the political implications of the increasing number of migrants from the European Union's periphery to its c...
Seth Dixon's insight:

The economic crisis has contributed to rising anti-immigration sentiment and policies in Europe.  Immigrants from Eastern Europe continue to enter the core, but now more from the struggling southern periphery of Europe are also on the move.   


One of the free response questions in the 2012 AP Human Geography test focused on increasing Muslim population in many European countries.  This video some background context for that particular Free Response Question (as would this article from Al Jazeera titled Europe's failure to integrate Muslims). 

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 9, 2013 9:26 AM

This looks just like the arguments in the US about the immigration issue here.  These seem to be be more of legal immigration, as well as illegal to some extent,  as to illegal immigration in the US.  The governments of some of the EU nations need this population in order to fill the workers shortage that has been fuled by low birth rates.  In the US its a little deffernt form of immigration.  Here many illegal immigrants are taking the much lower wage jobs and working in cash with no taxes, ie mirgrant farmers.  Well we want cheap food, that is the way the farm owners are doing it.  In Europe it seems that they are taking some jobs, but I assune since it is legal immigration they are paying some sort of tax on their wages.  These immigrants are from other EU countries for the most part.  Under the EU treaty it is legal for them to live and work in any member nation.  This shows the problem with supranational organizations, a country will lose some of its autonomy in these types of organizations.  For example, can the UK limit the number of people allowed into its country, or even limit access to their health care system under EU law?  If they do, what can the EU do to the UK?  Looks like a fight is about to start!

Ashley Raposo's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:53 PM

Like America, Western Europe is facing the troubles of immigration for jobs. COuntries in Europe, such as Eastern countries of Bulgaria and the P.I.G.S. are moving to core countries in search of work that the cannot find in their own land. The problem becomes a matter of the core country citizens not having jobs for themselves as their economy joins other in slowing down. Racial tensions are rising because of this. Ironically, the video generalizes the anti-immigration as just anti-immigrants but as images in the video would suggest, much of the sentiments are towards Muslim immigrants.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 8:12 AM

This video describes the increase in immigration into EU countries from other EU countries.  The EU agreements on free movement are being challenged in countries that feel rightly or wrongly that the immigrants coming in are a drain on their economies during this difficult economic time.  It is interesting to see how Europe deals with this immigration issue compared to how America deals with its immigration issues.

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Syrian refugees update 2013

Syrian refugees update 2013 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Another refugee camp opened today in Mrajeeb al-Fhood, Jordan, to accommodate the reported 1,500 to 2,000 Syrians fleeing to Jordan daily.  Just over a year ago the Big Picture posted an entry of the growing number of people displaced due to the conflict that now has lasted over two years. The United Nations recently said a total of around 7,000 to 8,000 Syrians are leaving their country daily; there are 1.3 million Syrian refugees and almost 4 million more have been displaced inside Syria since the start of the conflict. Posted here is another glimpse of daily life for those displaced since the beginning of this year." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

These 37 images are excellent, but I chose to share this particular one, because the combination of poverty and happiness embody the purpose behind refugee camps.  While the living conditions are grim and far from ideal, they are better than the alternative for these refugees and the assistance that they are receiving from the international community can be a ray of hope for the future of these children.  In this picture, Syrian refugee children play in Sidon, located in southern Lebanon. 


Tags: Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

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MAANDO_PROTOTYPE's curator insight, March 13, 3:19 PM

http://syria-freedom-2014.tumblr.com/
FREEDOM GRAFFiTi WEEK Syria ... MAANDO...PROTOTYPE
#Syria #MAANDO #PROTOTYPE #SYRIAN

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 12:13 PM

Conflicts in Syria have led almost 4 million refugees to displace to Jordan. Refugee camps have been set up to aid these families the best ways possible. although conditions are still tough, they are much safer than in Syria. These photos embrace the combinations of struggle and joy. Children cry and children play. Families create homes within the tents and make due with what they have.

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From Pets To Plates: Why More People Are Eating Guinea Pigs

From Pets To Plates: Why More People Are Eating Guinea Pigs | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Guinea pigs are popular pets in the U.S., but in parts of South America, they're a delicacy. Some environmental and humanitarian groups are making a real push to encourage guinea pig farming as an eco-friendly alternative to beef.
Seth Dixon's insight:

First off, my apologies if you find the image distressing (I have two guinea pigs in my house and I will not be showing this picture to my children). However, the fact that many readers might find this image disturbing but wouldn't think twice about the sight of chicken grilling on the barbeque highlights the cultural taboos surrounding what we consider appropriate food sources.  The tradition has diffused to the United States as more South American immigrants have come to the United States.  While the meat is more environmentally sustainable (less resources are required to raise one pound of guinea pig meat than one pound of beef), many potential costumers are leery to eat something that they consider a pet.


Tags: food, diffusion, sustainability.

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 6:21 PM

I can  see both sides of this, I would never eat a guinea pig because I grew up viewing them as pets. I think people are brought up a certain way and even when they move they take their customs with them.  I have a friend from china and lived there until he was 14 yrs old, he  had told me the city he was from they ate dog and cats. they view it as meat were we think of them as pets. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 7:26 PM

This article is interesting because it is taking into consideration the ecological benefits of eating what we consider unorthodox meats. Raising guinea pigs for food would apparently leave a substantially smaller carbon footprint over a large, high waste producing animal like cows. Culturally, in South America guinea pigs are considered a delicacy, but I can't see culture changing in the United States to the point where we would give up hamburgers for grilled guinea pig.

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Turning A Boom Town Into A Real Town

Turning A Boom Town Into A Real Town | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Thousands of workers have flooded into the town. But they're reluctant to call it home.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This oil boom is visible from space; it has created a real estate market where a one-bedroom apartment goes for $2100 a month (census map showing population increase -slide 4).  Still, the overwhelmingly male population that works here is not willing to move their families with them and truly put down some roots.  Some fear a potential "bust" on this economic prosperity and others don't see the amenities that encourage lasting settlement growth (schools, parks, cultural events, etc.).  The city of Williston, North Dakota "feels like a frontier town" and will build a huge recreational center and other things to entice these temporary workers to become permanent residents.  More than just jobs are needed to made a city attractive to potential migrants.  

 

Tags: migration, podcast, urban.

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If Economists Controlled The Borders

If Economists Controlled The Borders | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What would the perfect immigration system look like? We asked three economists to dream big.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an intriguing podcast focused on how to best manage national borders if the only goal were to strengthen the economy (they center the conversatri on the United States).  These economists envision plans with more incentives to attract a labor force that is more highly-skilled is crucial to having a rational migration policy.  How how you manage the borders if you were in charge?  How would your plan strengthen the country?  

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People Movin'

People Movin' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A visualization of migration flows"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great way to visualize global migration patterns.  Where are people migrating to Brazil coming from?  What countries are Brazilians migrating to?  Here are the answers to these types of questions for every country.  


Tags: migration, population, statistics, visualization, unit 2 population.

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Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 8, 2013 1:14 AM

Es un grafic molt atractiu. Interessant per muntar treballs de grup, investigants païssos concrets

Peter Farárik's comment, February 8, 2013 6:20 AM
Perfect!