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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Revolutionary War Battles

Revolutionary War Battles | Geography Education | Scoop.it
America's war for indpendence began on April 19, 1775, when the first shots were fired at Lexington and Concord in Massachusetts.


Tags: USA, historicalmapping, National Geographic.

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The Invasion of America

The Invasion of America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations (above is a static image of the map; visit the map's page to play with its features).

Seth Dixon's insight:

In the past I've shared maps that show the historic expansion of the United States--a temporal and spatial visualization of Manifest Destiny.  The difference with this interactive is that the narrative focuses on the declining territory controlled by Native Americans instead of the growth of the United States.  That may seem a minor detail, but how history is told shapes our perception of events, identities and places.

 

Tags: USA, historicalmapping, visualization

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 9:25 AM

unit 1 Perception and bias of maps

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, June 24, 2:51 AM

This will likely resonate with 'first peoples' everywhere

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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The source of migrants today has changed the cultural composition of the United States from what is was 100 years ago.  Cultures are not static and migration is one of the key drivers of change. These maps produced by the Pew Research Center. Despite what media reports would have you believe, immigration into the United States is not on the rise, but maps such as these can be construed to imagine that there is a flow of immigrant coming from south of the border.  The reality is that migration from Mexico to the United States has steadily dropped since 1999.  


Tags: migration, historical, USA, mappingcensus, ethnicity.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 6:34 AM

unit 2

Jim Doyle's curator insight, June 23, 3:52 AM
From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century
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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED-ED lesson briefly summarizes the history of urban development and the technological advances that enable it.  Towards the end of the video they offer some suggestions that would make cities more sustainable as urban populations continue to grow.  What do you think of these suggestions?  


Tags: historical, urban, planning, TED

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steve smith's curator insight, June 7, 6:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 6:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 4:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

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The Geography of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED-ED lesson is a quick primer into the geographic context of linguistic change and variability that we find all around the world. 


Tags: language, TED, regions, folk cultures, toponyms, historical, culturediffusion.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, June 2, 4:45 PM

Not really primary geography but so interesting!

Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 3:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 6:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

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Love 'em or hate 'em - Britain's rocky relationship with the EU

Love 'em or hate 'em - Britain's rocky relationship with the EU | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The United Kingdom's relationship with the EU - or, in political parlance, 'Europe' - has long been one of the most divisive, emotive issues in British politics."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The beginnings of the European Union are rooted in the aftermath of WW II, with Europe exhausted from war many politicians wanted to unite European countries in a way that would make war with each other impossible.  The United Kingdom, though has had a complicated with the EU, sometimes (and for certain issues) wanting greater European integration to strengthen their regional position and at other times have resisted regional collaboration for fear of losing national autonomy.  This is very over-generalized, but this BBC article gives a nice historical perspective on the rocky relationship of between the two.  


Tags: Europe, supranationalism, currency, economichistorical, sovereignty, UK.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 2, 2:40 PM

Britain has always participated in its own events of politics and government. They have had a back and forth relationship with the European Union and have had its ups and downs throughout the years. The U.K. doesn't want to conform to the European money system and instead want to keep their own monetary system.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 7:00 AM

GB wants greater European intergration to strengthen their regional power,

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The Invention Of 'The Economy'

The Invention Of 'The Economy' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Until the Great Depression, nobody talked about 'the economy.' In a sense, it hadn't been invented yet."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This podcast is a great discussion on historical evolution of some standard economic measures; it is also a nice reminder that statistics such as GDP don't represent a tangible thing, but are a shaped by how we think about the world around us.  

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Darius Douglass's curator insight, March 3, 12:59 PM

A little history here, What we call the GDP is not really scientific #GDP #NationalIncome  #indicator #health

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, March 4, 10:54 AM

Seth Dixon has it right. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 26, 1:01 PM

The parameters of the measure of the economy are so broad that the numbers don't really mean anything. Each country counts different things. The GDP of the US cannot be compared to the GDP of other countries because the cost of living in each place is so wildly different. When compared to Japan our economies are close but compared to any country in Africa they are completely different. Measurement of the economy is not an overly useful number.

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Shifting post-colonial economic geographies

Shifting post-colonial economic geographies | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Changes in relationships can be hard to take. The economic bond between Latin America and Spain, its biggest former colonial power, is shifting as the region’s economies mature. Despite some ruffled feathers, the evolution is positive.  After two decades in which Spain amassed assets worth €145 billion ($200 billion) in Latin America, last year was the first in which Latin American companies spent more on acquiring their Spanish counterparts than the other way around."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I am hesitant to use the term post-colonial since there are theoretical constructs that use that term to embody cultural hegemonic power structures.  I'm simply using it to mean "after colonialism" because the power paradigm is shifting to the former colonies. 


TagsLatin AmericaSouth America. economic, development, Spain, historical, colonialism.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 10:37 AM

Post- Coloonial Economical Gographies- It is important to remember that in the past Latin American companies spent less on acquiring the Spanish counterparts and last year for the first time they have shifted in which Latin America spent more acquriring their Spanish counterparts. After teo decades Spain's worth would be close to $200 billion in Latin America. Latin America in relation to Spain is very different because gears have shifted in order fot the net worth to compile to where it is today. The same goes for Spain in relation to Latin America.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 4:43 PM

This article describes the changing relationship between Latin America and its former colonial power, Spain. Latin America shares a cultural bond with Spain which is influencing how the Latin American economies develop. This cultural bond, along with the economies, are having an effect on migration.

As Latin American countries are becoming increasingly industrialized their economies have grown and Latin America is frequently looking at Spain for a place to invest due to their cultural similarities, like language. Latin America is investing in Spanish business while Spain, in an economic slump at home, is benefiting from Latin American markets and investments. Unsurprisingly, over the past several years trade between the Spain and Latin America has become more and more profitable for Latin America as their increasing industrial power can send manufactured products to a more deindustrialized Spain.

The economic slump in Spain is seeing Spaniards migrate away from their home country. Latin America, with its cultural similarity, is increasingly becoming a destination for these Spaniards in need of work due to the growing economies of Latin American countries. Some migrations may even be the result of Latin American investors owning a large portion of a Spanish worker's company in the first place.

This flip in economic power is unsurprisingly since it would be impossible for Spain to keep pace with its former colonies collectively. Though depleted by colonization, there are still significant resources available to Latin America, chief among them cheap agricultural labor and massive amounts of fertile land. Even with friction over their colonial past with Spain, Latin America is still investing in Spain and Spaniards still look to Latin America for work and investment opportunities.

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 7:35 PM

Unit IV

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The world's oldest living tree

The world's oldest living tree | Geography Education | Scoop.it
At 4,841 years old, this ancient bristlecone pine is the oldest known non-clonal organism on Earth. Located in the White Mountains of California, in Inyo National Forest, Methuselah's exact location is kept a close secret in order to protect it from the public. (An older specimen named Prometheus, which was about 4,900 years old, was cut down by a researcher in 1964 with the U.S. Forest Service's permission.) Today you can visit the grove where Methuselah hides, but you'll have to guess at which tree it is. Could this one be it?
Seth Dixon's insight:

I freely admit that I have a strange fascination with the twists and turns in a majestic tree; I find that they are great reminders of the wonders and beauty to be found on Earth. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, historical, California.

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Beatrice Do's curator insight, January 31, 12:40 PM

the exact location is kept a close secret O_O

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 5, 4:17 PM

After reading this article, I am pleased to know that the world oldest non-clonal organism is located in California. It is amazing that a tree could still stand after almost 5,000 years. Hopefully, people do not destroy this tree, as it is fascinating. 

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"Lost" New England Revealed

"Lost" New England Revealed | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"New England's woody hills and dales hide a secret—they weren't always forested. Instead, many were once covered with colonial roads and farmsteads."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I love living in New England and finding stone walls from old farmsteads; an archaeology professor at UConn is using geospatial technologies to map out the remants of that historical landscape.  This is a great example of using spatial thinking across the disciplines. 


Tags: remote sensing, geospatiallandscape, historical, environment modify.

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, January 8, 7:55 AM

Through the most recent technology, man has been able to discover that wooded areas of New England where once vibrant communities, homesteads and settled communities.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 26, 7:44 PM

Thanks to dedicated archeologists and the LiDAR, we can see the creations of a once small, abandoned community in New England. Even through the thick forest, the LiDAR can detect rocks walls and small dirt roads. Hopefully, we can find more of these ancient communities in other areas around the world.  

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 28, 9:48 AM

History is revealed with the use of high tech scanners known as  LiDAR's. With the use of these scanners, scholars learn that many areas of New England, including forested areas in Connecticut and Rhode Island, once were farming grounds. These "lost" pieces of history now lead scholars in new directions in dicovering the past, and details to its future.

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17th century London visualized

"Six students from De Montfort University have created a stellar 3D representation of 17th century London, as it existed before The Great Fire of 1666. The three-minute video provides a realistic animation of Tudor London, and particularly a section called Pudding Lane where the fire started. As Londonist notes, “Although most of the buildings are conjectural, the students used a realistic street pattern [taken from historical maps] and even included the hanging signs of genuine inns and businesses” mentioned in diaries from the period."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video original spotted in an Open Culture article is a real gem for any historical geographer with a love for London.


Tags:  virtual tours, EnglishLondon, urban, historical, visualization.

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harish magan's comment, November 6, 2013 10:02 AM
Great Source for studies.
Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 7, 2013 11:53 PM

London in the 1700's was a chacterised by buildings that were very tighly packed together with obviously little fire code. There buildings are similiar to other communities thrughout Europe and areas in Switzerland. This remake of the past gives the student an animated journey into an  England that once was before the fire. It appears preindustrial revolution and shows how the economy was run by individual businesses and markets, its always interesting to look into the past and see the way the same cities exist today. Most importantly we learn and have the best fire codes possible

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 8:24 AM

For someone who loves history as much as i do this was a real treat. It honest makes you feel as if you could hop on a plane and travel there right now. Also as someone who has walked the streets of london you can see glimpses of these times within the architechture and the city planning. Great video really makes me nostalgic for a time in which was way before myself.

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Podcast: Columbus's Voyage

Podcast: Columbus's Voyage | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This Geography News Network Article podcast is an historical description of Christopher Columbus's role in discovering the Americas."

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An Insider's View Of 19th-Century Paris

An Insider's View Of 19th-Century Paris | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Charles Marville photographed Paris' transition from medieval hodgepodge to modern metropolis.  Marville made more than 425 photographs of the narrow streets and crumbling buildings of premodern Paris, including this view from the top of Rue Champlain in 1877-1878."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This NPR podcast adds some great insight into Charles Marville's 19th century photography currently on display at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C.  The urban transformations designed by Haussmann made Paris the global capital of modernity and the many cities around the world copied the principles of Haussmannization.  A photographic glimpse into Paris before and during these changes that brought about social upheaval is a marvelous tool for an historical geographic analysis of urbanization.  

   

Tags: urban, historical, Paris, placeFrancepodcastimages.

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Kevin Barker's comment, October 6, 2013 8:38 AM
Little blurb at the top of the link for the gallery :) "Notice: During the federal government shutdown, the offices and all premises of the National Gallery of Art and its Sculpture Garden are closed to the public, and all public programs are canceled. Employees will not have access to their e-mail or voicemail accounts during the shutdown."
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This 19th Century Map Could Have Transformed the West

This 19th Century Map Could Have Transformed the West | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Today's drought-riven west would look very different if Congress had listened to John Wesley Powell
Seth Dixon's insight:

Author of Mapping the Nation, Susan Schulten explains how western expansion failed to recognize the basic physical geographic reality of the United States--that the west is much drier than the east.  Given that much of the west, especially California, is in the midst of a severe drought, this article serves as a reminder to recognize that localized understandings of human and environmental actions are necessary.  Do you know what watershed you live in?  How does and should that impact us?   


Tags: physical, historical, California, water, environment.

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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, July 1, 5:11 AM

We are very proud in France thinking we created the watershed approach with the 1964' water law, present basis for EU's water framework directive. Now, I would say that John W Powell is the true creator of watershed management. It's a blow to French pride...

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The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split

The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The division between Islam's Shiite minority and the Sunni majority is deepening across the Middle East. The split occurred soon after the death of the Prophet Muhammad, nearly 1,400 years ago.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The ghosts of religious wars past are rattling in Iraq; The geography of the Sunni-Shiite division is incredibly important for a good understanding of world regional geography as well as modern geopolitics. This NPR podcast examines the  historical and religious aspects of this split to then analyze the political and cultural implications in the Middle East today.  Additionally this Pew Research article highlights the 5 countries where the the majority of Muslims are Shiite, with some good demographic data to add to the analysis. 


Tags: MiddleEast, Islamreligionhistorical, culturepodcast.

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The Silk Road: Connecting the ancient world through trade

"With modern technology, a global exchange of goods and ideas can happen at the click of a button. But what about 2,000 years ago? Shannon Harris Castelo unfolds the history of the 5,000-mile Silk Road, a network of multiple routes that used the common language of commerce to connect the world's major settlements, thread by thread."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED-ED lesson was produced in part by an AP Human Geography teacher and the strands of geographic thought in this video are evident.  More geographers should make their own TED ED lessons; thanks for blazing the trail Shannon! 


Tags: TED, worldwide, transportation, globalization, diffusion, historical, and video.

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GIS in the History Classroom

GIS in the History Classroom | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I have had a number of requests for copies of GIS in the History Classroom in a format other than iBooks. I have just completed an internet version of the book that works on Safari, Firefox, Chrome, and Internet Explorer."

Seth Dixon's insight:

GIS is not just for geography classes; spatial thinking and spatial data management can help students learn a variety of subjects including history.  This free ebook will help history teachers to see how to unlock the power of Geographic Information Systems. 


Tagsmappinghistorical, GIS, geospatial, edtech.

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Catalina Elena Oyarzún Albarracín's comment, June 9, 11:38 AM
Great,than you!!!!
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How the Potato Changed the World

How the Potato Changed the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Brought to Europe from the New World by Spanish explorers, the lowly potato gave rise to modern industrial agriculture
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Colombian Exchange is a term that describes the most dramatic biologic transfer in history.  European explorers brought animals and agricultural items from the Old World to the New and subsequently brought back items from the New World back to the Old.  This exchange profoundly reshaped many societies as agricultural diffusion of the potato lead to the changes across northern Europe. 


Tags: agriculture, food production, diffusionhistorical colonialism, Europe

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Loreto Vargas's curator insight, April 27, 2:10 PM

Potatoes changed the old world! 

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 10:38 AM

Potatoes were very important in the Colombian Exchange, which was the exchange of plants and animals to and from different lands where they are not native to.  Today, the potato is the fifth most important crop in the world.  Food is deeply routed in culture and this massive exchange changed societies.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 8:41 PM

Potatoes were brought to the New World through the Columbian Exchange. It does have a negative connotation but the trade route was used to diffuse cultures by trading food. 

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19th Century Ship Routes

19th Century Ship Routes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Ben Schmidt, assistant professor of history at Northeastern University, has visualized the routes of 19th Century ships using publicly available data set from NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). The resulting image is a hauntingly beautiful image that outlines the continents and highlights the trade winds. It shows major ports, and even makes a strong visual case for the need for the Panama and Suez Canals."

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, March 10, 1:29 PM

Beautiful data visualisation of 19th century ships using publicly available data set from NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration).

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 10, 3:21 PM

Lessons in GIS and Medical GIS - Examples of applications. Various Resources at hand.

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150 Years Ago, Sochi Was the Site of a Horrific Ethnic Cleansing

150 Years Ago, Sochi Was the Site of a Horrific Ethnic Cleansing | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Czar Alexander II may have freed the serfs, but his war against the stateless people of the Caucasus cannot be ignored


The czar’s approval of this rapid expulsion of hundreds of thousands of Circassians to the Ottoman Empire resulted in an ethnic cleansing through disease and drowning as overcrowded ferries crossed the Black Sea. The Ottomans were unprepared for the influx of refugees, and the absence of adequate shelter caused even more deaths from exposure. Those Circassians who attempted to remain in the Russian Empire and fight for their land were massacred. Sochi’s “Red Hill,” where the skiing and snowboarding events will take place during these Olympic Games, was the site of the Circassian last stand, where the Imperial Russian armies celebrated their “victory” over the local defenders.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I mentioned this before, but it is worth repeating.  As the international spotlight in on Sochi, our students interest in the region is also heightened.  This makes it the perfect time to shine a light on parts of history that many have conveniently tried to brush aside. 


Tags: Russia. historical, colonialism.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 10:56 AM

Czar Alexander II was a horrific leader who " ethnicially cleansed" the people of Sochi and cleansed them through disease and drowning as over populated ferries crossed the Black Sea. This act of innaliation of the war against the stateless people is just outrageous and unforgiving. In Sochi the "red hill" where the skiiers and snowboarders are set to take off is the site at which one of the massacres happened, it makes you wonder if the rest of the world knows this or are they ignorant to the fact that the Olympics at Sochi is glorified as having the two veritile terrains in which you can swim and ski in the a couple miles form eachother. I wonder what people who thnk if they knew the truth about Sochi.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 6:13 AM

It is interesting to learn the history of a place that most American’s didn’t know existed until the Olympics.  It is always helpful to have things placed in a historic perspective.  The historic background makes understanding modern day events easier

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 5:33 PM

This is basically like a mini Holocaust. When do people think its okay to do something like this? It boggles my mind how things like this can actually go on in the world still with todays technologies and armed forces. 

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The Real Pirates of the Caribbean

The Real Pirates of the Caribbean | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Explore the travels and exploits of five real pirates of the Caribbean. Click through the tabs to track the adventures of each pirate overlaid on Spanish ports and pirate strongholds in the area. Zoom into the map to see additional detail.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive StoryMap is great way to show the historical and geographic context of colonial-era piracy in the Caribbean.

 

Tags: Middle America, ESRI, mapping, historical.

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Ness Crouch's curator insight, February 8, 12:41 PM

Excellent site... though we don;t study pirates I'm sure I'd have some kids that would love to be extended by looking at this!

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 10:54 AM

Pirates were real in this specific time period. But lets just say they were no the type we think of today that Blockbusters glorify. These types of pirates would have beeen working to discover treasures from the Tierra Firme trade line. The point of origin for the South American 'Tierra Firme' Treasure Fleets, ran from Portobelo (Panama) to the Orinoco Delta.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 7:27 AM

This is a fun exercise than can be used in many classrooms. I like being able to scroll through and zoom into what maps what I want to look at. Also, children love pirates (or most of them anyway) and this would be a great map to bring into their worlds.

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Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States

Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond has created an enhanced version of the Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States, which was published in 1932. The atlas, which took dozens of researchers to assemble, used maps to illustrate a variety of political, demographic and economic concepts."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm sure many of you have already seen it but this is a gem. This is something that you must explore on your own, but I will say that there should be something for everyone in this digital treasure trove.  Read a New York Times review on the digital atlas here.  

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Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, January 17, 6:37 AM

Muy buen material!

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, January 21, 8:24 AM

Atlas de la geografíia histórica de Estados Unidos.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 10:33 AM

Okay, this is actually pretty cool. The atlas is huge and has tons of information within it. No wonder there were tons of helping hands who created this map(s) of insightful looks at demographic and political debate.

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A. R. Wallace: The Other Guy to Discover Natural Selection

This paper-puppet animation celebrates the life of Alfred Russel Wallace, who is co-credited with Charles Darwin for the theory of natural selection.  Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1fhBbGw

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some of the greatest discoveries in biology began as spatial discoveries.  Alfred Russel Wallace made some amazing advances in biogeography and discovered the appropriately named Wallace Line


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, historical.

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Kelsey McCartney's curator insight, December 10, 2013 6:40 PM

A sweet animation of the wonderful Alfred Russel Wallace, the oft unaknowledged simualtaneous discoverer of evolutionary mechanisms.

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Salem Witch Trials Podcast

Salem Witch Trials Podcast | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

With Halloween right around the corner, the Salem Witch trials loom large in the collective American psyche.  While many emphasize the supernatural and the scandalous, this Maps 101 podcast (based on the article written by Julie Dixon and yours truly) gives the geographic and historic context to understand the tragedy of the 1692 witch trials.


Tags: seasonal, historical, colonialism.

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Mohamed Maktoub's curator insight, October 21, 2013 3:20 AM

لوحة  عظيمة  مثل صاحبها 

Justin McCullough's curator insight, October 21, 2013 10:37 AM

The outbreak of the Salem Witch Trials really are really something that produces many questions. Perhaps the most obvious question is why did these trials happen all of a sudden? A community largely based off of agriculture produces an atmosphere of superstition. This can be seen in the events that led up to the Salem witch trials. With the land barely producing enough to sustain the town, people look for a scapegoat to blame. Neighbors turned on neighbors in order to obtain more land claiming that each other were witches. It is interesting to see that in a time of crisis one can a helping hand is not always the popular choice; as seen in the Salem Witch Trials the opposite extreme is taken place. 

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How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines

How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Few know "boondocks" is a relic of U.S. military occupation in the Philippines.


Seth Dixon's insight:

I imaged that the term 'the boondocks' was of Asian origin, but I was surprised to learn how this U.S. military lingo was able to become a mainstream term.  The Tagalog word bundok means mountain and given the guerrilla warfare tactics, U.S. soldiers thought of their enemies as hiding 'in the boondocks.' This term spread throughout the military to mean an isolated region, but today the term has morphed from its military-based meaning of mountainous jungles to one that can also describe a sparsely populated rural America.  This is a fascinating article from NPR's Code Switch team that focuses on issues of culture, identity and race. 


Tags: language, toponyms, historical, conflict, culturediffusion.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:06 AM

We have all heard the phrase living in the "Boonies" The boondocks was a word that was taken from a philipino word called Bundok, that meant the guerilla warfare they were experiencing from phillipino insurgents during the Spanish American War with the America. In this war which Teddy Roosevelt helped lead we gained US Puerto Rico and Guam as new Territories from the Treaty of Paris. The war was fought against Emilio Aguinaldo who was a master at guerilla tactics against American soldiers. This was a desperate war involving coloniazation or exerting our power as a country against other countries that ammassed a huge death toll. Now that we know the word boondok, is not an all American word that was popularized in the 1950's but it was actually taken from the Phillipino language during a time of fighting in the Jungle or the Sticks. But boondocks also refers to a people living around mouintainous regions. Just some food for thought.