Geography Education
1.5M views | +86 today
Follow
Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Spice Trade's Legacy

The Spice Trade's Legacy | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In its day, the spice trade was the world’s biggest industry. It established and destroyed empires and helped the Europeans (who were looking for alternate routes to the east) map the globe through their discovery of new continents. What was once tightly controlled by the Arabs for centuries was now available throughout Europe with the establishment of the Ocean Spice Trade route connecting Europe directly to South Asia (India) and South East Asia."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The spice trade changed how we eat forever but it did so much more.  The fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Empire cut off Europe from the vital trade routes to the east and access to the most prized commodities of the day.  What drove European exploration to get around Africa and to cross the Atlantic?  It was to reshape their situation location relative to the economic networks that shaped the emerging global economy.  In essence, the spice trade reshaped the fortunes and trajectories of several major world regions.   

 

Tags: Southeast Asia, food productiondiffusionglobalization, agriculture, economicindustry, economic, historical, regions.

more...
Liz Caughlin's curator insight, November 21, 7:45 PM
Spice trade and connections with diffusion of Islam
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race

The Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Forced to choose between limiting population or trying to increase food production, we chose the latter and ended up with starvation, warfare, and tyranny. Hunter-gatherers practiced the most successful and longest-lasting life style in human history. In contrast, we're still struggling with the mess into which agriculture has tumbled us, and it's unclear whether we can solve it."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Jared Diamond wrote this highly controversial essay back in the 80's and it still can elicit strong reactions from anthropologists, geographers, historians, and other scholars.  This is a good reading to give students during an agricultural unit.  This can get students to question many of the assumptions about humanity that they probably never knew they had (Diamond challenged the mainstream progressivist position).

 

Questions to Ponder: What is the progressivist view?  What were the negative impacts that early agriculture had on human health?  What social problems does Diamond attribute to agriculture?  What evidence would you present to argue against Diamond's position?

 

Tagsagriculturefolk culturestechnologyindigenous.

more...
Eben Lenderking's curator insight, October 12, 3:07 AM

Is it too late to reprogram ourselves?

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Cotton Candy Grapes?!?

Cotton Candy Grapes?!? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

After years of seeing fruit-flavored candy, we are now seeing candy-flavored fruit. The company Grapery is very careful to highlight that these patented fruit varieties are not GMOs, but the cotton candy flavored grapes are cross pollinated by hand (by fruit geneticists). You can watch this 4 minute CBS video about the agricultural production and marketing of this new product. Yes, I've experimented with these at a friend's house, and they really do taste like cotton candy (and no, I'm not planning on purchasing any).     

 

Questions to Ponder: Does this make you leery about eating this or totally excited to try it? How come?  Why is the company so adamant to state that these grapes are non-GMO? According to the video, what are the primary concerns of most grape producers and how does that contrast with this company?  

  

Tagsfood, food production, agribusiness, agriculture, GMOstechnology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Making Ethanol from Sugarcane

This segment highlights how sugarcane is processed into ethanol for fuel and other uses.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Sugarcane ethanol has proven to be one of the most environmentally safe alternative fuel sources. In addition to its green energy properties, sugarcane ethanol has fueled the Brazilian economy for over a decade. The Brazilian automotive industry have developed a complex, “Flex Fuel” engine that allows vehicles to run off of both gasoline and ethanol. Also, sugarcane ethanol has been one of their leading exports in the global economy. Due to recently discovered fuel deposits in Brazil and around the globe, there has been a decline in the need for sugarcane ethanol. This has negatively impacted the economy in addition to the Brazilian job market. But thanks to the engineering of cellulosic ethanol, Brazil is striving to become the green energy superpower yet again.

 

Questions to Ponder: Since cellulosic ethanol production is so expensive, do you think that will deter production and customers from purchasing it? Do you think that Brazil will ever become independent of fossil fuels as a result of their successful sugarcane ethanol production?

 

Tagsenergy, resourcespolitical ecologyagriculture, food production, land use, Brazil, South America.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Pros and Cons of Cotton Production in Uzbekistan

Pros and Cons of Cotton Production in Uzbekistan | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This case study considers the pros and cons of cotton production in Uzbekistan. Since the country's independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, revenues from cotton taxation have contributed substantially to developing the industrial sector, boosting the current account, achieving energy and food-grain self-sufficiency, and buffering domestic shocks in food and energy prices. Nonetheless, some argue that the state procurement system hampers the development of the agricultural sector. Often the payments for cotton hardly cover farmers' production costs, and the quasi mono-culture of cotton production has adversely affected environmental sustainability."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Uzbekistan is a top world producer and exporter of cotton. There are many sectors involved in managing the cotton commodity chain to partake in the production. Not only is it a source of income, but provides labor jobs and food consumption. However, the land where the cotton production takes place is suffering. This land faces many types of land degradation that has an impact on the cotton. In order to secure the land, there are possible solutions and policies to improve the agriculture and the cotton benefits. Once the world’s fourth largest lake, the Aral Sea, is located in Uzbekistan, and has had a major impact on the cotton industry. This production has given Uzbekistan a world-wide reputation in cotton production, but is also known for destroying one of the world’s largest lakes.  Just because it is your greatest economic competitive advantage, doesn't mean that it is environmentally sustainable.

 

Questions to Ponder: How much does the cotton production contribute to Uzbekistan economically? What are the solutions to address the demising Aral Sea? Who is impacted the most because of the land issues?

 

Tags:  agriculture, labor, Uzbekistan, physical, weather and climateland use, environmentAral Sea.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Robotics in Agriculture

Autonomous robots created at the University of Sydney can count fruit on trees, spray weeds, and even herd cows.
Seth Dixon's insight:

We all know that agriculture is becoming increasingly mechanized.  In addition to large, expensive machinery, this video showcases some robots that are automating work that was previously very labor intensive. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How will robotics impact agriculture and other industries in the future?  Will this impact the spatial dynamics of agricultural land? 

 

Tagsfood production, agriculture, foodeconomic, industry, scale, agribusiness, technology.       

 

 

more...
LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 20, 10:08 AM
Until robots understand holism and acquire a metaphysical connection with Nature, agriculture will probably continue down a path where soon they'll design artificial bees for pollination, and chemical-exuding worms to breakdown the nutrients predigested by bacteria ... if that works, which I doubt.
John Edwards's curator insight, June 2, 4:18 AM
I remember doing my GCSE French oral presentation on exactly this matter - "L'exode rural". Seems we're moving slower than I thought.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Closing the gap between men and women in agriculture

http://www.fao.org/sofa/gender "The world cannot eliminate hunger without closing the gap between men and women in agriculture. With equal access to productive resources and services, such as land, water and credit, women farmers can produce 20 to 30 percent more food, enough to lift 150 million people out of hunger."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Gender inequality, especially in rural, less developed part of the world, would lead to some of the fastest developmental improvements for the lives of women, men, children, and families.  Women are the backbone of the rural economy, and this single change would lead to countless benefits.   

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, developmentgender, agriculture, labor.

more...
Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 11, 1:35 AM
A great resource to show geography students! 
Linda White's curator insight, May 13, 10:40 PM
A reason why we need to review all the women that are incarcerated in our society.  The society is loosing so much.
Pascal Corbé's curator insight, May 26, 8:53 AM
While closing the gender gap is both righteous as economically advantageous, I find the claim that the world could not be fed without it totally unfounded and not true. Even the worst dictator could just redistribute the produce currently wasted and the issue would be solved with gender issues left touched. The intention of this message is great but I think from a communications point of view these kinds of exaggerated messages undermine the basis of campaigns and ultimately wear off the attention of your target groups.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Look Inside The Doomsday Vault That Protects Seeds Of The World

Scientists set up a vault in the Norwegian Arctic to keep as many varieties of seeds as possible in case of a catastrophe.
Seth Dixon's insight:

It's nice to know that if there is a cataclysmic disaster, that Norway has the world's back...you know, just in case.  I really hope that the asteroid of the future doesn't hit the island of Svalbard now.   

 

Tags: sustainabilitydisasters, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture. Norway.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

PBS Food: Potatoes

PBS Food: Potatoes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Follow America's favorite vegetable from field to factory — to see how potatoes grow and how they're turned into chips."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This 5 minute video is a good introduction to the potato, it's hearth, diffusion, population impacts, nutritional profile and industrial production.  The geography of food goes far beyond the kitchen and there are more episodes in the "How Does it Grow?" series to show that.

 

Tags: foodeconomic, food production, agribusinessindustry, video, agriculture.

more...
Ari Galant's curator insight, August 25, 9:53 PM
Share your insight
Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 30, 2:56 PM
papa.
Sophie Wilson's curator insight, August 31, 10:33 AM
This video shows the process of potatoes moving from farm to factory in America and how they are turned into chips. It shows how the potatoes are planted, grown and turned into chips. 
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Danger Of GMOs: Is It All In Your Mind?

The Danger Of GMOs: Is It All In Your Mind? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Genetically modified foods are often regarded as "unnatural" and approached with distrust. Commentator Tania Lombrozo considers the psychology behind these reactions.

 

Why do so many people oppose genetically modified organisms, or GMOs? According to a new paper forthcoming in the journal Trends in Plant Science, it's because opposition to GMOs taps into deep cognitive biases. These biases conspire to make arguments against GMOs intuitive and compelling, whether or not they're backed by strong evidence.

The authors of the paper — a mix of philosophers and biologists — turn to research in the cognitive sciences to shed light on the mismatch between the public's perception of GMOs (which is fairly negative, especially in Europe) and the state of the evidence about their safety (which is fairly positive).

 

Tags: GMOstechnology, agriculture.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

How Meteorology Changed Agriculture Forever

How Meteorology Changed Agriculture Forever | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Early meteorology helped farmers predict yield, transforming the agricultural industry.

 

Complaining over the weather is not new, but the science of studying the weather, and its effects on business, is fairly recent. Around [1920], economists were also starting to use statistical methods to predict yield. Although cotton’s price, as shown on the New York Cotton Exchange, fluctuated daily, a “well-known American economist” discovered that he could make the most accurate total yield predictions—more accurate than those of the government crop reports—by analyzing the average weather conditions from May to August. It was now possible to predict when the crops would have a bumper year or a poor one.

 

Tags: physicalweather and climate, food production, agribusiness, agriculture.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

NESTVAL 2015: The Geography of Food

"My 2015 NESTVAL presentation in an APHG session on the geography of food."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this presentation (PPTx file here), I share some of my favorite resources for teaching the content as well as some pedagogical tips.  Some of these resources are found in an article I wrote for National Geographic or have been shared on this site earlier.  Here are some pedagogical tips to APHG students about food systems:  

  • Tip#1: Don’t demonize agribusiness or romanticize the family farm. 
  • Tip #2: Use data and maps.  Here is a map in ArcGIS online on rural land use activities with a handy dandy instruction guide, ready to go (many more APHG GeoInquiries from ESRI set to be released soon). 
  • Tip #3: Connect them personally into the web of food systems and show how it impacts them. 
  • Tip #4: Let this be one of those units that connects to all the themes of the course, especially population, culture, political, and the environment.  


Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, APHG.

more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:09 PM

Things to consider when teaching about food production from a geographical perspective - remember to link to Biomes.

asli telli's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:40 AM

#Food is #geographical and #mobile...

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables

Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Farm exports to the U.S. from Mexico have tripled to $7.6 billion in the last decade, enriching agribusinesses, distributors and retailers.
American consumers get all the salsa, squash and melons they can eat at affordable prices. And top U.S. brands — Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, Subway and Safeway, among many others — profit from produce they have come to depend on.These corporations say their Mexican suppliers have committed to decent treatment and living conditions for workers.  But a Los Angeles Times investigation found that for thousands of farm laborers south of the border, the export boom is a story of exploitation and extreme hardship."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 


This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    


Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalizationfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

more...
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:24 PM

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 

 

This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    

 

Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalization, food production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Factory farming practices are under scrutiny again in N.C. after disastrous hurricane floods

Factory farming practices are under scrutiny again in N.C. after disastrous hurricane floods | Geography Education | Scoop.it
As fecal waste and bacteria flow from hog lagoons into the water supply, North Carolina is revisiting a contentious battle between the pork industry, health experts and environmentalists.

 

In regions where hog farm density is high, there is an overall poor sanitary quality of surface waters. The presence of mass-scale swine and poultry lots and processing plants in a sandy floodplain – a region once dotted by small tobacco farms – has long posed a difficult dilemma for a state where swine and poultry represent billions of dollars a year for the economy. [Past] hurricane’s environmental impact in North Carolina were so severe in part because of the large number of hog lagoon breaches. Following Hurricane Matthew, the department has counted 10 to 12 lagoons that were inundated, with floodwaters topping the berms and spreading diluted waste.

 

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture, agricultural environment, environment, environment modify, pollution

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Mekong Delta fights losing battle against salt water

Vietnam's rice region is facing the worst drought to date. Over half a million people have been affected, and the country could lose one million tons of its staple food.Leaders of six countries along the Mekong River met in China to discuss the relief measures.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Economic progress for some often entails job loss and environmental degradation for others.  As dams upstream are slowing the flow of the Mekong River, the low-lying delta that is a rich agricultural region is facing the ocean water that is moving further inland.  The once isolated and remote Mekong is experiencing some impacts of globalization. 

 

Tags: fluvial, waterVietnamagriculture, SouthEastAsia.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Why the US government wants Americans to eat more cheese

Why the US government wants Americans to eat more cheese | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The USDA said today that it will buy $20 million worth of cheese to donate to food banks and pantries in an effort to help America's struggling dairy producers.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Do politics, economics, and government policies help to shape agriculture patterns?  Absolutely.  This is an interesting, current example that shows how Chinese and Russian policies are impacting American dairy producers, and how the U.S. government is stepping in. 

 

Questions to Ponder:  Should the U.S. government protect businesses that are in dire straits?  What would happen if the government did not offer agricultural subsidies/bailouts?  What will happen (or not happen) because of these subsidies/bailouts?  Any way you slice it, 11 million tons is a lot of cheddar.     

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, economicfood, agribusiness,

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Stop opposing GMOs, Nobel laureates say

Stop opposing GMOs, Nobel laureates say | Geography Education | Scoop.it
It's the latest sign of a rift between the scientific establishment and anti-GMO activists.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Environmental activists are often frustrated when climate change skeptics do not listen to the scientific consensus that the Earth's climate has changed because of humanity's collective actions.  On the flip side, some environmental organizations, such as Greenpeace, ignore the overwhelming scientific consensus that GMOs are safe for human consumption.  Both have been highly politicized and tap into larger narratives that confirm particular world views.  Most of the opposition to GMOs is not because of the information that is out there, but the fear of the unknown that GMOs illicit.  

 

Tags: GMOs, technology, agriculture, agribusiness.  

more...
Marc Meynardi's curator insight, July 2, 3:42 AM
And then ? Should everyone blindly accept what scientists have discovered ? No opposition for nothing ? This is the end of the humanity if we do so Mr Nobel Laureate.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Where our food came from

Where our food came from | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Explore the geographic origins of our food crops – where they were initially domesticated and evolved over time – and discover how important these 'primary regions of diversity' are to our current diets and agricultural production areas."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an incredibly rich website with great interactive maps, dynamic charts, and text with rich citations.  This is one of those resources that an entire class could use as a starting point to create 30+ distinct project.  This is definitely one of the most important and best resources that I've shared recently, one that I'm going to use in my class.  Where did a particular crop originally come from?  Where is it produced today?   How do these historic and current agricultural geographies change local diets and economies around the world?  All these issues can be explored with this interactive that includes, but goes beyond the Columbian Exchange

 

Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, APHG, unit 5 agriculture, globalizationbiogeography, ecology, diffusion.

more...
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 16, 6:43 PM

Great interactive map to illustrate the source regions of the world and foods that originated there. Hover over each region and the foods of that area popup.


Rory McPherson's curator insight, July 3, 5:39 PM

Very informative! It's great to learn where our food comes from. The author is able to communicate this information through simple but effective maps and visualizations.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

India to 'divert rivers' to tackle drought

India to 'divert rivers' to tackle drought | Geography Education | Scoop.it
India is to divert water from major rivers like the Brahmaputra and the Ganges to deal with severe drought, a senior minister tells the BBC.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The drought has been bad enough that (coupled with rising debt to seed companies) many farmers are committing suicide to escape the financial pain of this drought.   The monsoon rains can be lethal, but critical for the rural livelihoods of farmers and the food supply.

 

TagsIndia, agriculture, labor, agriculture, South Asia, physical, weather and climate.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

How Orange Juice Is Made

The process of making orange juice on a humongous scale. The Americans drink so much of the stuff I'm surprised they still have any left for export.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you image that your orange juice comes from farmers on ladders picking, then hand-squeezing oranges into orange juice, then you need to see just how mechanized this agribusiness is.  The machinery alone means that a small-scale farmer simply can't compete on the open market.  

 

Questions to Ponder: Why is OJ concentrate cheaper in the store if they have to work hard to extract the water out of the juice?  How would OJ concentrate be an example of either a bulk-gaining product or a bulk-reducing product?  

 

Tagsfood production, agriculture, foodeconomic, industry, economic, scale, agribusiness.

more...
Antonio Andrade's curator insight, May 4, 5:47 PM
Excelente conocer todo el proceso!

Character Minutes's curator insight, July 1, 7:07 PM
Great resource for FACS teachers.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats

This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We know how to harvest potatoes and apples. There are other fruits and vegetables, however, which have natural habitats we can barely imagine. We see these items in the grocery store every day, but often we have no idea how they got there.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This set of teaching images hammers home how natural items become commodities that are removed from their original context.  The fact that these foods are somewhat difficult to recognize shows just how most consumers have been removed from the full geographies of their food.  

 

Tagsfood production, images, agriculture, foodeconomic.

more...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger

How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger | Geography Education | Scoop.it
About a third of the planet’s food goes to waste, often because of its looks. That’s enough to feed two billion people.
Seth Dixon's insight:

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

more...
Katerina Stojanovski's curator insight, March 10, 6:10 AM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

NADINE BURCHI SCORP's curator insight, March 10, 1:24 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 11, 9:29 PM
Share your insight
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Women expand their home on the range

Women expand their home on the range | Geography Education | Scoop.it
According to the U.S. Agriculture Department, the number of women-operated farms increased from 5 percent to 14 percent between 1978 and 2007. Today, counting principal operators and secondary operators, women account for 30 percent of all farmers in the United States, or just under 1 million.Some women regard themselves less as entrepreneurs and more as gentle stewards of the land, or bulwarks against corporations overtaking family farms and developers sweeping in with seductive offers. Others are drawn to the farm-to-fork movement, where locally grown produce and meat hold much greater appeal. Also, more women are inheriting farms and ranches.
Seth Dixon's insight:

When we discusss gender in an agricultural context, it is usually to point out that around the world, women are approximately half of the agricultural workforce, and in less developed countries they often comprise the majority of the the agricultural sector.  U.S. students find this shocking, given that traditional cultural norms often perceive farm work as a very masculine domain.  However, that has slowing been changing in the last 30 years as more women in the U.S. are owning and operating farms.  There isn't one simple reason to explain this shift, but it is indicative of broader social changes.

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, cultural norms, gender, agriculture, labor.

more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, February 4, 10:04 AM

unit 5

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 14, 8:49 AM
Share your insight
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Dear Subway, I really wish you would have talked to a farmer.

Dear Subway, I really wish you would have talked to a farmer. | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Dear Subway, I really wish you would have talked to a farmer. I really wish you would have done so before your big announcement saying you would, as of 2016, be sourcing all of your turkey and chicken as being raised without antibiotics."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is not a typical source, but it captures an important perspective on our food production systems.  Some policies (like this one from Subway) are designed to increase customer confidence in the quality of the product, but they don't reflect some of the practical issues that farmers have to face on the farm.  


Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness.

more...
Vicki Bedingfield's curator insight, November 15, 2015 4:58 PM

Food production

Cade Johns's curator insight, January 7, 6:47 PM

Why are they not using antibiotics?Is it to be healthier or for flavor.Either one should attract different crowds.The healthier alternative brings healthier people in there.C.J.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 11, 9:29 PM
Share your insight
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Overpackaged Foods

Tagsfoodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture,


more...
No comment yet.