Geography Education
Follow
Find tag "agriculture"
732.4K views | +29 today
Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 


Tagsfood production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

more...
HazelAnne Prescott's curator insight, July 31, 10:56 AM

Seems like a messed up system.  We do not have "taste"

Abigail Mack's curator insight, July 31, 11:27 AM

What would make Americans opt for the lower quality, imported fish?

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

China’s hungry cattle feasting on alfalfa grown on Utah farm

China’s hungry cattle feasting on alfalfa grown on Utah farm | Geography Education | Scoop.it
China has long depended on the U.S. breadbasket, importing up to $26 billion in U.S. agricultural products yearly. But increasingly, Chinese investors aren’t just buying from farms abroad. They’re buying the farms.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Globalization is often described as a homogenizing force, but is also pairs together odd bed fellows.  A small Utah town near the Colorado border, Jensen is now home to the largest Chinese-owned hay farm in the United States. Utah's climate is right for growing alfalfa, and China's growing cattle industry make this a natural global partnership.  Large container ships come to the United States from China, and return fairly empty, making the transportation price relatively affordable.  While this might make economic sense on a global scale, local water concerns in the west show that this isn't without it's problems.  Water resources are scarce and many see this as a depletion of local water exported to China.  Some states see this as a threat and are considering banning foreign ownership of farmland.  This article shows the merging of various geographic themes: the global and local, the industrial and the agricultural, the human and the physical.         


Tags: agriculture, agribusinesstransportation, globalizationwaterChinaindustry, economic, physical, Utah.

more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 7, 10:41 AM
strong>Seth Dixon's insight: China buying farm land
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

40 maps that explain food in America

40 maps that explain food in America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The future of the nations will depend on the manner of how they feed themselves, wrote the French epicurean Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1826. Almost 200 years later, how nations feed themselves has gotten a lot more complicated. That’s particularly true in the US, where food insecurity coexists with an obesity crisis, where fast food is everywhere and farmer’s markets are spreading, where foodies have never had more power and McDonald’s has never had more locations, and where the possibility of a barbecue-based civil war is always near. So here are 40 maps, charts, and graphs that show where our food comes from and how we eat it, with some drinking thrown in for good measure."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Occasionally these lists that say something like "40 maps that..." end up being an odd assortment of trivia that is interesting but not very instructive.  Not so with this list that has carefully curated these maps and graphs in a sequential order that will enrich students' understanding of food production and consumption in the United States.


Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, locavore, agribusiness, USA

more...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 9:41 PM

Nós somos aquilo que comemos ...

Stuart Shapiro's curator insight, June 25, 8:41 AM

With some drinking thrown in for good measure."

Treathyl Fox's curator insight, June 26, 12:26 PM

WOW!  Talk about contrast and compare.  So now is contrast, compare and ... uh? ... conquer??  From farming and enjoying the harvest - which could be interpreted as healthy eating back in the day - TO sugary sweet soda pops and fatty burgers - which some might be calling junk food, convenience food, fast food, comfort food you don't have to cook yourself, the cause of obesity, a politician's guide to a potential source of additional revenue from taxes, etc.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Alluvial Fans

Alluvial Fans | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When streams emerge from mountains, they often spread out and deposit sediment in a distinctive pattern known as an alluvial fan.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In dry areas of interior drainage (such as Central Asia and the Great Basin in the U.S.), the human settlements are often clustered along the foothills of the mountains near landforms called alluvial fans.  Take time to analyze this image (and this one as well); in alluvial fans and the agricultural patterns that people create on them, we can see some striking geometric and spatial configurations that show how human settlements are highly dependent of the physical environment.   


Tags: spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, Kazakhstan, Central Asialandscape.

more...
Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, May 13, 11:41 PM

Exercise 26 .Use Moodle plattform to send your answers.

 

1. Where is taken this picture?

2. Define alluvial

3. How are used the alluvial? What economical sector?

4. Look at the image and calculate ( use the scala ) the distance between apex and tracks

5. Write a summarize of the article

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 17, 7:08 AM

In dry areas of interior drainage the human settlements are often clustered along the foothills of the mountains near landforms called alluvial fans. 


Alluvial fans and the agricultural patterns that people create on them, show how human settlements are highly dependent of the physical environment.  

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, May 23, 11:29 PM

Inland water year 10 , River landscapes year 8 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

How the Potato Changed the World

How the Potato Changed the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Brought to Europe from the New World by Spanish explorers, the lowly potato gave rise to modern industrial agriculture
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Colombian Exchange is a term that describes the most dramatic biologic transfer in history.  European explorers brought animals and agricultural items from the Old World to the New and subsequently brought back items from the New World back to the Old.  This exchange profoundly reshaped many societies as agricultural diffusion of the potato lead to the changes across northern Europe. 


Tags: agriculture, food production, diffusionhistorical colonialism, Europe

more...
Loreto Vargas's curator insight, April 27, 5:10 PM

Potatoes changed the old world! 

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 1:38 PM

Potatoes were very important in the Colombian Exchange, which was the exchange of plants and animals to and from different lands where they are not native to.  Today, the potato is the fifth most important crop in the world.  Food is deeply routed in culture and this massive exchange changed societies.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 11:41 PM

Potatoes were brought to the New World through the Columbian Exchange. It does have a negative connotation but the trade route was used to diffuse cultures by trading food. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Spoof on Agricultural Standards

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is just for fun...but it is a way to start some conversations about  modern agricultural practices, especially the local and organic movements. 

more...
willdonovan's curator insight, March 4, 10:01 PM

Creative fun to spark a conversation. #GSJam

Josune Erkizia's curator insight, March 5, 2:49 AM

Very funny

Marie-Ann Roberts's curator insight, March 5, 3:51 AM

Good for sessions on Animal Welfare and Farm Assurance.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

How Vietnam became a coffee giant

How Vietnam became a coffee giant | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Think of coffee and you will probably think of Brazil, Colombia, or maybe Ethiopia. But the world's second largest exporter today is Vietnam. How did its market share jump from 0.1% to 20% in just 30 years, and how has this rapid change affected the country?"


Seth Dixon's insight:

Vietnam is a historically tea-drinking country, and when the French colonized, they brought coffee.  Culturally they still prefer tea, but in the 1980s, the government say this as a major export crop that they were climatically primed to produce.  This rapid growth has bolstered the economy, but has had some adverse environmental impacts as well.  The article is rich in geographic topics to bring into the classroom.

  

Tags: Vietnamagricultureglobalization, SouthEastAsia.

more...
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2:09 PM

This article pointed out that while Vietnam does not drink much coffee it has become a large exporter of the bean.  The article also talked about the ramifications of coffee farming on the economy as well as he geography of this country.  I also found it interesting that a country that no one ever trained to grow coffee has reached the heights it has with just farmers figuring out what needed to be done.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 11:05 AM

Coffee is in high demand. When any product is in high demand, countries want to rapidly be able to produce it before other countries. Vietnam has made its way to the top of the list of coffee producing/marketing countries. This has greatly affected the country in political/economic and financial ways.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 3:13 PM

This is a tough predicament, coffee growing is providing a stable income for many Vietnamese but land clearing is ruining the environment. Land mines are still in the soil in many places and could cause severe injury or loss of life. How long before the country cannot produce enough coffee and farmers start to suffer again?

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

In Florida, A Turf War Blooms Over Front-Yard Vegetable Gardening

In Florida, A Turf War Blooms Over Front-Yard Vegetable Gardening | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A woman in Miami Shores is suing after her town insisted she remove vegetables from her garden.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This podcast highlights the political governance issues surrounding urban agriculture. 

more...
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, December 18, 2013 7:38 AM

Not just Florida. Condos do not like use of landscape for gardening.

Purple Media Lady's curator insight, January 4, 7:38 AM

Science related

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 4:33 PM

Where you can and can not plant vegetables can become a major issue in communities that want to maintain their "reputations". While some gardeners plant crops where they can get the most sun and access to supplies, neighbors and neighborhoods, such as that in Miami Shores, do not always approve of planting in the front yard. This story focuses on a woman's need to garden for food and the shift into "turf-wars."

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map from a Geography in the News article shows that Quinoa has historically been grown almost exclusively in the highlands of the Andes Mountains.  This was a localized food source for generations but this new global demand has increased the economic possibilities for Quinoa growers.  At the same time, local consumers that have traditionally depended on cheap Quinoa to supplement their diet are now effectively priced out, as stated in this Al-Jazeera article


Questions to Ponder: What modern and traditional agricultural patterns can we see in the production of Quinoa?  How have global and local forces reshaped the system?


Tags: agriculture, food production, foodglobalization, South America, folk cultures, culture, Bolivia.

more...
Pranav Pradeep's curator insight, February 27, 11:23 AM

Its crazy how something grown so far away can become such a dominant aspect in the food consupmtion of people in such distant place.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 2:01 PM

Quinoa is the new food to lose weight with. People all over the world have discovered its health benefits and can't get enough of it. However, quinoa only grows in certain climates and places. Since its supply is in high demand, finding places for it to grow would be beneficial to those trying to market and sell the grain. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 6:55 PM

Quinoa has been a staple crop in the Andes mountains for many years. It has only been recently that people in other parts of the world have recognized its health benefits. Since it is grown in only a tiny part of the world, the supply may easily fall behind the demand. Finding a similar geographic area to grow crops in may be what is needed in order to increase the supply.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming?

Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In the long run, a successful farmer needs to find a balance between economic and environmental sustainability.  Some big farms are working towards that so the 'big-equals-bad' narrative about agriculture may be easy, but it doesn't tell the whole story about modern agriculture. 


Tags: GMOssustainability, agriculture, agribusiness

more...
Pranav Pradeep's curator insight, February 27, 11:24 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 11:33 AM

The large-scale agricultural practices of modern America tend to lend to the bad image of commercial farming. However, the practices are actually helping feed more people in the US, but they also use genetically modified crops and other highly debated techniques.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 11:45 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms

Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Feedlots, a new series of images crafted by British artist Mishka Henner, uses publicly available satellite imagery to show the origins of mass-produced meat products."


Tags: Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.  

Seth Dixon's insight:

Beautiful imagery at one scale tells an unsavory story at another.

more...
Molly Diallo's curator insight, September 30, 2013 6:00 PM

Does this motivate you to become #vegetarian? 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:19 AM

Some wild photgraphs about the devastation of mass aggriculture to the enviroment. Also their is a nice little bit about the laws behind why most people havent seen farming conditions till recent, such as some states preventing people to take pictures of their farms or factories without consent. If you are intreged by this article i suggest you watch FOOD Inc. This movie goes into great detail about how our food is made. But caution this may be one instance where igroance is Bliss because once you know exactly how your food is made you may never be able to eat some meats again. This movie can also be found on Netflix.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:35 AM

British artist Mishka Henner took photographs and enhanced the colors of feedlots to reveal the agribusiness of meat production. Photographs of feedlots are considered illegal and the legal repercussions of Mishka Henner are not clear at the moment, but the photographs are shocking and reveal again how little Americans know about their food production. 

Americans have changed the places and utilized them to build agribusiness empires and have introduced new problems to the landscape of feedlot and farming towns.

 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger

Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The supercheap and palatable noodles help low-wage workers around the world get by, anthropologists argue in a new book. And rather than lament the ascendance of this highly processed food, they argue we should try to make it more nutritious.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Ramen is the most successful industrial food ever (100 billion serving yearly).  This NPR article acts as a book review for The Noodle Narratives which explores the global impacts of this massively important food source.  In developed countries, most food experts bemoan ramen's lack of nutritional value and see it as a symptom/cause of larger issues of unhealthy diets and obesity.  At the global scale however, some anthropologists are seeing ramen as the 'proletariat hunger killer' as it becomes a staple of the undernourished in megacities and less developed countries, and the poor in . 


Questions to Ponder: If the United States is only the 6th highest consumer of ramen, what does that say about the geogaphy of ramen?  Why and how did a post-World War II Japanese food come to be so crucial to the diets of those in Papua New Guinea and Nigeria?


Tags: food, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, agribusiness.

more...
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:10 PM

Its pretty crazy to think something as simple as ramen noodles can help feed billions of people. in the western world iramen is the butt currently for running jokes about poor college kids, i never thought it would have this impact. I can now say that ramen is a nessicty in some areas. Who cares about the slight health affects because if some of this people didnt have ramen they would already be dead from starvation. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:32 PM

I think everyone has had ramen noodles at some point in there life. I do enjoy ramen noodles here and there but couldn't eat it daily. I have found in some of my cookbooks they use ramen noodles in their recipes. It is mostly the quick and easy recipes.  if we are the 6th highest country that purchases ramen noodles I am convinced everyone eats it. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 26, 3:12 PM

I am sure almost every person in this country has eaten instant noodles at one point in their life. Due to the fact they are very cheap and enjoyable. Today, many impoverished people all over the world eat these instant noodles, as they are economical. Although they are not a nutritious, they can temporarily relieve people’s hunger.

Suggested by Aulde de B
Scoop.it!

Jamaica Focuses on Farming

Jamaica Focuses on Farming | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The country has taken on a bold new strategy in the face of expensive food imports: make farming patriotic and ubiquitous."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Jamaica's historical agricultural products are cash crops that were connected to the plantation economy and in turn slavery.  Today, Jamaica is restructuring their agricultural production to address local food security issues rather than global market commodities.  This push will increase food security and to do so the government started a campaign with the slogan “grow what we eat, eat what we grow.” Grocery stores in Jamaica now identify local produce with large stickers and prominent displays as school children, backyard gardens and local businesses are all a part of the new agricultural initiative.  


Tags: agriculture, locavore, Jamaica, Middle America.

more...
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:34 PM

I have discussed Jamaica with some former classmates of mine, and they informed me that a lot of people are really poor there.  They said that the people there were very friendly, and hooked my friends up with some outstanding agricultural products at a really good price, but these people are very poor.  I think that because Jamaica was involved in the slave trade, and they didn't really as much of have slaves to do work like the US, but Jamaica was still involved in the slave trade, which ensured the presence of slaves.  While the US was building as a country, Jamaica was not thriving as much.  I think that the agriculture in Jamaica is (by what my friends say) fabulous as far as illegal crops go, but the agriculture FOR the Jamaicans (such as food) is lacking.  I read in the article that a European Development Agency sent money to Jamaica to help them be able to build chicken coops... So the chickens are enslaved too, and doomed to lay eggs or become a Sunday dinner.  That is kind of sad.  In all truth, I enjoy the taste of meat, but look forward to when meat and plants will be synthesized with no living tissue involved, because, after all, plants are alive too.  There are so many things that people have taken from the Earth, without giving anything back.  We are approaching the era where people should be more concerned with the environment, and what they can do for the Earth.  I think Jamaica should be given new technology that serves synthetic meat and synthetic vegetables, as a way to aid their agricultural and economic situation, rather than money for chicken coops from some pompous European cults.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 8, 1:53 PM

The article describes how Jamaica and a couple other Caribbean nations are beginning to focus more on food crops than cash crops. Being dependent on imports for food can be disastrous for these islands when a global food shortage makes prices skyrocket. Being food independent will likely allow Jamaica to increase its net agricultural gains so long as the production and demand for its cash crops of bananas and sugarcane remain high.

 

Jess Deady's curator insight, February 18, 12:56 PM

Understanding how other countries survive their everyday lives is an important part of being a civil human being. As shown in one of the clips, a boy is putting on a tie before school and is on his way to eat breakfast. Not only does he have to eat breakfast at home, but he also is eating a stew that he picked the crops for. I could never imagine picking my own food in order to survive life. This scoop is enlightening in many ways.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This story is one in a series on a crisis in America's Breadbasket –the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer and its effects on a region that hel...
Seth Dixon's insight:

This isn't new, but it is a new development that the media is covering the issue that has been going on for decades.  The Ogallala aquifer is the primary water source in an agricultural region  from Texas to Nebraska in dry, but agriculturally productive states.  The reason behind their agricultural success in the dry high plains is that more water is being extracted from the aquifer than is naturally being replenished.  This is the obvious result of a human-environmental interaction where the individual actors are incentivized to deplete a communal resource.      


Tags: agriculture, agribusinesswater, environment, resources

more...
Linda Denty's curator insight, July 24, 6:46 PM

Could this happen in Australia also?

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, July 25, 10:46 AM

Thanks to my good friend, Seth Dixon for the original scoop.  There had been quite a bit of news reporting on the drought in central California this year, but this midwestern region has been experiencing water stress for years with little national attention.  I plan to use this article in both an upcoming presentation as well as an example when I teach "Tragedy of the Commons" in my Environmental Dilemma class.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 10:32 PM

Good to compare to how we use water resources in Australia

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Sustaining Seven Billion People

Sustaining Seven Billion People | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food. How can Earth’s resources be managed best to support so many people? One key is tracking the sum of what is available, and perhaps nothing is better suited to that task than satellites."


Seth Dixon's insight:

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  Satellite imagery can help answer these questions. 


Tagsremote sensing, geospatial, images, sustainability, agriculture, food production, environment modify, unit 5 agriculture

more...
Russell Roberts's curator insight, July 6, 12:53 AM

Thanks to environmental reporter Wes Thomas and professor Seth Dixon for this incisive analysis of how to provide sustenance to a world population nearing the 7 billion mark.  Dixon says the key is tracking the "sum of what is available...and perhaps nothing is better suited to the task than satellites."  Ever since the launch of "Landsat" and resource imaging satellites, scientists have been collecting data on global resources such as water, land use, forests, and crop production.  Dixon and Thomas say it's time the data were  put into a plan to fight hunger and habitat destruction around the world.  Such a plan may work if we as humans can keep from killing ourselves over religion, politics, and territory.  A tall order , indeed.  Aloha de Russ.

Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, July 6, 12:09 PM

Such studies of the agriculture around the world are essential. The way we are doing agriculture to support seven billion people now, peaking at 9-10 billion in another 60 years, it is clear that we are putting severe strains on the environment.  But we have grown lazy, and we are doing it all wrong.

 

We CAN drastically reduce the amount of meat we consume, and thus quickly reduce the amount of arable land we need.  We CAN grow plants in ways that actually sequester more carbon and improve the soil it over time rather than erode and degrade.  And we CAN in fact grow all the food we need in the space we live in, thus enabling us to recycle all the water used as well, which is mostly just lost in evaporation. 

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 5:52 AM

Vital debate for the future

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico

NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"When the agreement between the United States, Mexico and Canada went into effect in 1994, it removed nearly all trade barriers between the countries. Among the industries affected was agriculture, forcing small Mexican farmers into direct competition with big American agribusiness. Cheap American corn – heavily subsidized, mechanized and genetically modified – soon flooded the Mexican market to the detriment of local farmers.  As U.S. farmers exported their subsidized corn to Mexico, local producer prices plummeted and small farmers could no longer earn enough to live on."

Seth Dixon's insight:

International trade agreements are usually discussed at the national level.  "NAFTA benefits Mexico" is a commonly heard saying because trade with the United States and Canada strengthens the manufacturing sector in Mexico.  Even if there is an overall benefit to a country, there are always winners and losers for different regions, economic sectors and many other demographic groups.   Farmers in southern Mexico were certainly a sector that struggled mightily under NAFTA.


Tags: Mexicosupranationalism, industry, place, agriculture, food production,

more...
Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 29, 11:44 AM

The American agricultural industry has been highly subsidized by the government to create interest in farming and food production. This causes problems for America's neighboring countries' resident farmers. The Mexican corn farmers are struggling mightily with the influx of cheap American corn into Mexico due to the open trade policies created by NAFTA. Some tariffs or new economic regulations must be created to protect Mexican corn farmers and regulate the amount of cheap American corn that is flooding Mexican markets. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Will American Pot Farmers Put the Cartels out of Business?

Will American Pot Farmers Put the Cartels out of Business? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
They've driven prices so low that Mexican growers are giving up.


For the first time ever, many of the farmers who supply Mexican drug cartels have stopped planting marijuana, reports the Washington Post. "It's not worth it anymore," said Rodrigo Silla, a lifelong cannabis farmer from central Mexico. "I wish the Americans would stop with this legalization."  Facing stiff competition from pot grown legally and illegally north of the border, the price for a kilogram of Mexican schwag has plummeted by 75 percent, from $100 to $25.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Events that we think of as local (Washington and Colorado legalizing marijuana use) have national and global implications, especially in a globalized economy.  This article is but one example of why geographers try to approach every issue at a variety of scales to more fully comprehend the ramifications and ripple effects of any given phenomenon. 


Tags: Mexiconarcoticsscale

more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, May 19, 12:36 PM

I wonder how true this story actually is??

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Feeding 9 Billion

Feeding 9 Billion | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When we think about threats to the environment, we tend to picture cars and smokestacks, not dinner. But the truth is, our need for food poses one of the biggest dangers to the planet.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  This one question brings up many more spatial, environmental, political and social questions--this interactive feature nicely addresses many of the pertinent issues in a very accessible manner.    


Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, environment modify, unit 5 agriculture

more...
dilaycock's curator insight, April 29, 6:00 PM

Excellent resource from National Geographic that offers a 5-step plan to deal with the issue of feeding the world's population.

Sally Egan's curator insight, April 30, 11:09 PM

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  This one question brings up many more spatial, environmental, political and social questions--this interactive feature nicely addresses many of the pertinent issues in a very accessible manner.   

 

This article relates well to the Population topic in Global Challenges and issues that arise from the present growth patterns.  

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 1:59 PM

As population continues to grow and agricultural lands dissappear, the issue of feeding the world is becoming a growing concern.

The environmental places of the world are becoming arid and the agrarian places are dwindling affecting the human/environment interaction by introducing agricultural issues.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

GMO-Free Europe

GMO-Free Europe | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Would you like to map out the GMO-free regions of Europe?  Looking for resources discussing the impacts of GMOs on society?  This is a partisan site with some nice resources for a student project. Additionally, in this NPR podcast they discuss how some American companies are trying to be GMO free in a GMO world.  

more...
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 2:47 PM

Parts of Europe know to be GMO free. When will we?

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 11:25 AM

The GMO debate is raging throughout the world. Many believe that these crops have many harmful effects on the human body due their their altered genetic state. Thankfully, many countries are adopting a non-GMO attitude, as illustrated in the above map, so as to prevent the many poor side-effects they have.

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 6:44 PM

This map is the epitome of agricultural geography and the beginning of a series of questions such as why did all of Europe choose to be GMO-free? Or, does the proximity of European countries have to do with the fact that they share similar values (such as being GMO-free)? What does the EU have to do with this pattern? Because the EU chooses to be GMO-free, European countries are making a statement and consequently refining agricultural markets by refusing to import certain genetically modified foods. Agricultural geography thus shares some patterns across space- with all of Europe sharing simile agricultural policies. 

Suggested by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
Scoop.it!

"Lost" New England Revealed

"Lost" New England Revealed | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"New England's woody hills and dales hide a secret—they weren't always forested. Instead, many were once covered with colonial roads and farmsteads."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I love living in New England and finding stone walls from old farmsteads; an archaeology professor at UConn is using geospatial technologies to map out the remants of that historical landscape.  This is a great example of using spatial thinking across the disciplines. 


Tags: remote sensing, geospatiallandscape, historical, environment modify.

more...
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, January 8, 10:55 AM

Through the most recent technology, man has been able to discover that wooded areas of New England where once vibrant communities, homesteads and settled communities.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 26, 10:44 PM

Thanks to dedicated archeologists and the LiDAR, we can see the creations of a once small, abandoned community in New England. Even through the thick forest, the LiDAR can detect rocks walls and small dirt roads. Hopefully, we can find more of these ancient communities in other areas around the world.  

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 28, 12:48 PM

History is revealed with the use of high tech scanners known as  LiDAR's. With the use of these scanners, scholars learn that many areas of New England, including forested areas in Connecticut and Rhode Island, once were farming grounds. These "lost" pieces of history now lead scholars in new directions in dicovering the past, and details to its future.

Suggested by Thomas Schmeling
Scoop.it!

Gaming to Help Farmers

Gaming to Help Farmers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A computer game wants you to map the world's cropland so farmers can get more out of each harvest.
Seth Dixon's insight:

NPR has recently highlighted Crop Capture; Crop Capture is a game that uses Google Earth imagery to crowd-source agricultural data.  From a pedagogical standpoint, this is a great way to visually introduce students the variety of agricultural landscapes that can be found around the world.  This is an example of what many refer to as citizen science games which provides an alternative rationale for playing the game.


Tags: agriculture, food production, mapping, geospatial, edtech.

more...
PIRatE Lab's curator insight, December 4, 2013 7:30 PM

These types of approaches to crowd sourcing are becoming bigger and bigger by the day it seems.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:34 PM

This is cool, there are many agricultural types and you can see It here. different land areas have different soil and chemicals in it which certain types of crops can benefit from. It is important to know these things. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Geography in the News: Pumpkins

Geography in the News: Pumpkins | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Halloween and Thanksgiving are just around the corner and pumpkins are already showing up at roadside stands. Jack o’lanterns, decorative displays and pumpkin pies are the main destinies of most pumpkins in the United States. Elsewhere in the world, however, the pumpkin is nearly exclusively considered a food crop or animal feed."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Maybe you have never thought about where all the flowers are grown  every year just in time for Valentine's Day, the spatial extent of Christmas tree farms or how egg nog's season production changes the diary industry.  If you have considered these issues, you are thinking about the geographic impact of seasonal activities.  Many of these traditions are rooted in a particular climatic/agricultural region that started from folk cultural traditions connected to that region.  As traditions have diffused, the use of pumpkins, Douglas Fir pine trees or other seasonal items have have moved beyond their ecological origins and jumped scales to become a larger global phenomenon.  In this Geography in the News article, Neal Lineback and Many Lineback Gritzner discuss the geographic impact and context of our pumpkin traditions.  


Tags: seasonal, food production, agriculture.

more...
Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:02 AM

Every year it is expected around halloween that my family and friends will carve pumpkins. Then around chrstmas time it is expected that we will get our christmas tree to decorate. This is something lots of people do around this time. However what I never really linked together was that I was thinking about the geography of things by doing this. I know it is part of our culture and most people do it because it was a tradition. However what I never really thought about was where these pumpkins or christmas trees actually came from. There is a process that farmers have to go through to produce pumkins and pine trees, a process we probably don't even think about because we are so used to having these things around the holidays. When we think of pumpkins we thing of Jack-o-laters and pumkin pies, but to some people pumpkins are considered a crop and food source. We may not see it that way because our culture uses them around Halloween and for processed canned pumpkin for cooking. However not all cultures are like that, which is interesting to think about. Something that is considered seasonal in our culture might be an everyday crop for another culture. It is interesting to see how different places in the wolrd use such things as pumpkin so much different that we do in our culture.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:25 PM

I have been a long-time fan of pumpkin coffee, and tomorrow I will probably have some with my cousins and family... Some areas of Asia allow consumption of dogs, other areas of the US allow consumption of roadkill, and that is different from what most people in RI are used to... So I guess, it's not really my business what other people and countries do with their pumpkin crops, as long as it doesn't negatively affect other people.  My neighbor has won some prizes, I think 3rd place in RI for largest pumpkin contests, which is pretty cool, because for several months, you can see their pumpkin garden from my backyard.  Those pumpkins are enormous, and made me wonder if there was anything being done to make the modified pumpkins more usable in food.  I know GMOs are a touchy issue, but to feed the starving people around the world, you have to wonder if one pumpkin at 2000 lbs could feed a village of people.  Lots of people that don't like GMOs probably do unhealthy things in other ways, so their huge activism movements really boggle me.  Labeling GMOs is one thing, but stopping genetic modifications seems as controversial as starting them, especially when some people can benefit from them.  Whatever, I guess pumpkins are cool for whatever people want to do with them, including smashing them... this week on RIC's campus I saw a smashed pumpkin.  The only thing that really popped into my head was not "what a waste," or "oh, those delinquents," but rather "that seems fun."  I did assume though, that no one was hurt by the smashing of the pumpkin...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 5:14 PM

Although you wouldn't think it there are many different countries and specific regions that demonstrate the perfect cropping land and fertilization process to grow pumpkins. Out of the US power house pumpkin growing Illinois is named number 1. Along side California, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvainnia, Mississippi. But lets travel abroad to Africa, now me personally I wouldnt think that there are alot of pumpkin patches in Africa but there are many different places in Africa that pumpkins are grown. SOme of these places are Egypt with (690,000) and then there is South Africa with (378,776). I found these numbers quite interesting because one wouldn't think that there are pumpkin patches in Africa.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Harvest 2013

Harvest 2013 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
From grains to grapes to cabbage and many other crops the harvest season has been in full swing in the Northern Hemisphere.
Seth Dixon's insight:


So few of my students have actual experience working on a farm and being part of the food producing process.  This gallery of 38 photos around the world is a great visual to reinforce how important the harvest is for sustaining life on this planet.  The picture above shows the a Hmong hill tribe woman harvesting a rice terrace field at Mu Cang Chai district, northern Vietnamese province of Yen Bai. The World Bank on Oct. 7 lowered its 2013 growth forecast for East Asian developing countries to 7.1 percent and warned that a prolonged US fiscal crisis could be damaging to the region.


Tags: agriculture, food production, landscape, images.

more...
Scott Langston's curator insight, October 28, 2013 7:48 PM

An image our Grad 11 students can at least have some empthy with....

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:47 PM

Well see as how my page is called World Photography, i figurd this would be a good article/gallery to put up. Along with so georgous photos one can really see the imporance of farming on a culture and farming world wide. The gallery of photos is increadible, and with a caption to match each photo you are able to see geographilycly and cultulary where certan foods and plants are produced. This makes me feel  that cultures are all some what connected, the tobbco from your cigretts comes from mexico, and the nice wine that you drink when your out to dinner is from a vineyard in germany. Its a small idea but food is very cultualy influncing 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:09 PM

After reading this article it became apparent the back breaking work that these people have to endure just to stay alive and feed their family. Which is insane when you think about our society today, I dont know about you but I do not farm and do this type of work after I'm done with my school work everyday. In some places in the United States like out west they are used to some of this work but most of us do not make all of our meals and kill them in the same spot. It became apparent how much of a lifestyle this type of work is and the true dedication that people go through for themselves, family, land and economy.

Rescooped by Seth Dixon from World Regional Geography with Dr Jensen
Scoop.it!

Vegan food truck makes rounds in 'food deserts'

Vegan food truck makes rounds in 'food deserts' | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Baruch Ben-Yehudah is tackling Prince George’s County’s "food desert" problem. His vegan food truck delivers nourishment to neighborhoods lacking fresh groceries.

Via Natalie K Jensen
Seth Dixon's insight:

What are food deserts?  Why do they form?  What does this Washington Post video suggest about the demographic composition of food deserts?


TagsWashington DC, agriculture, food, urban, povertyplace, socioeconomic.

more...
nicole Musset's curator insight, September 14, 2013 1:55 PM

la terre peut offrir de la nourriture à tous ses habitants;mais les interets personnels,la recherche de profits et l'absence de plus en plus grande de conscience "écolologique"....une personne comme Baruch Ben Yehuda est tres importante pour ceux qui souffrent du manque de ressources.

Patricia Stitson's curator insight, September 20, 2013 10:38 PM

After having just driven across country this year I am very in touch with the fact that this model needs to be replicated across the US.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:03 PM

This food truck is bringing healthy, vegan food, to food deserts. A food desert is a place where healthy food is not accesable to the population, which is always impoverished. These people typically rely on unhealthy/cheap foods that are high in fats, preservatives, and sugars. This leads to tremendous health issues for these populations. Sure, this food truck is making a profit but it is also providing a wonderful service to the community, exposure to healthy foods and an alternative to the norm.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Rethinking Agriculture

"Growing Power is a national nonprofit organization and land trust supporting people from diverse backgrounds, and the environments in which they live, by helping to provide equal access to healthy, high-quality, safe and affordable food for people in all communities."

Seth Dixon's insight:

There has been a revitalization in urban gardening as many city dwellers feel disconnected from their food systems; urban gardening is a way for people to actively control what they are ingesting into their systems many fear some of the modern agricultural methods.  Based in Milwaukee, WI, Growing Power has created an interesting combination of vegetable gardening and aquaponics for the urban environment. 


Tags: food, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture.

more...
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:56 AM

with the increasing numbers of urban citizens in years to come the key to success in the city will be its ability to adapted to its growing enviroment. It would be nearly impossible for cities to exsit in the future with the current ways of agriculuture, there needs to be a change in the way things are done. Thats why this next gen way of agriculuture is going to take off in urban areas. with the ability to have full farms on rooftops the city will be able to self sustain itself more properly than it does in current times.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:40 PM

For the past three years I have had the luxury of having a garden in my backyard, it is a lot of work but there is nothing better than knowing where my food is coming from. I enjoy going in my backyard and being able to grab vegetables whenever I need them. I also go to farmers markets for vegetables that I don't grow in my own garden.  I would defeniately support local people to get good quality food. 

Lauren Shigemasa's curator insight, January 23, 1:28 AM

a powerful way to increase access to healthy foods! this organization called Growing Power is using urban gardening not only to create a sustainable food source for its neighbors, but also provides a system so we can donate and send a week's worth of fresh fruit/vegetables to any surrounding community in need. so amazing!