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'I was 14 when I was sold'

'I was 14 when I was sold' | Young Professor | Scoop.it
Laxmi's story of being kidnapped and trafficked in Nepal is not an isolated case but, as this graphical account shows, things are not always what they seem.
Chris Costa's insight:

It's heartbreaking to see the plight children living in other parts of the globe, making me all the more appreciative of my uneventful upbringing in the US. Child labor is a practice that many Americans associate with the 19th century, but it continues to be widespread in many parts of the world, as is the case in Nepal. Educational opportunities are few and far in between for many Nepalese, who's short-term financial struggles rob their children of long-term opportunities for success. Many are kidnapped from their homes, or sold by their families to pay off debt with skyrocketing interest rates. The same also holds true for young female sex workers, who suffer an enormous amount of physical and psychological harm at the hands of their kidnappers and their clients. Economic pitfalls and a lack of access to education helps to perpetuate this cycle of abuse, as people are unaware of their rights in addition to lacking the education to advance economically in their societies. The Nepalese national government and several international rights groups are hard at work to combat these harmful practices, but they are fighting an uphill battle against an illicit institution that has ingrained itself in Nepalese society and culture. Great strides are being made, but much still has to be done for the youth of Nepal.

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Ssekyewa Charles's curator insight, April 24, 2013 9:03 AM

Where is Human Rights Watch? Human trafficing is a crime to humanity!!

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:14 PM

It is sad to see the many different ways the poverty stricken and uneducated regions of the world are exploited, especially the children. Nepal is so poor that most of the recruiters for the predatory foreign networks are often locals who either take their relatives or abductees sent back to find a replacement. The animation helps add clarity and approachability to a bleak and difficult topic.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:22 AM

Teaching about human trafficking and child slavery can be very disconcerting and uncomfortable.  How much of the details regarding these horrific situations is age-appropriate and suitable for the classroom?  The BBC is reporting on events with sensitive stories to both give a human face to the story, while protecting the identity of under-aged victims (to read about the production of this comic, read Drawing the News.)  I encourage you to use your own discretion, but I find this comicbook format an accessible, informative and tasteful way to teach about human trafficking in South Asia to minors.  It is a powerful way to teach about some hard (but important) aspects of globalization and economics. 


As geographer Shaunna Barnhart says concerning this comic, "It moves from trafficking to child labor to pressures for migration for wage labor and the resulting injustices that occur. There's differential access to education, gender inequality, land, jobs, and monetary resources that leads to inter- and intra-country trafficking of the vulnerable. In the search for improved quality of life, individuals become part of a global flow of indentured servitude which serves to exploit their vulnerabilities and exacerbate inequalities and injustice. Nepali children 'paid' in food and cell phones that play Hindi music in 'exchange' for work in textile factories - cell phones that are themselves a nexus of global resource chains and textiles which in turn enter a global market - colliding at the site of child labor which remains largely hidden and ignored by those in the Global North who may benefit from such labor."


Tags: Nepal, labor, industry, economic, poverty, globalization, India.


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Kiribati and Climate Change

You might not be feeling the effects of climate change, but Kiribati, a small country in the Pacific, is actually drowning because of rising sea levels. Check out how the government there is trying to run a country that might not exist in a few years.
Chris Costa's insight:

I did a project on Kiribati last year in my first geography course, and it's sad to see that the situation is only growing increasingly worse. Looking at time-lapsed photos of the tiny island nation is alarming; I'm not speaking on a scale of centuries, or even a few decades, but within a couple of years, the erosion of the island's coast line is clearly evident. There are conspicuous changes in the size of the island from 2012 compared to today, suggesting that it could disappear entirely before 2050 should water levels continue to rise at their current rates. I have talked a great deal recently about the effects of man-made climate change on the world we call home, but I have mainly referenced the ecological damage, and the damage to other species that our actions have. However, we are also at great risk to the ever rising tides, as we continue to warm the planet and pump up coastal waters. Kiribati is just the tip of the iceberg; nearly 70% of the world's population lives within 50 miles of the coast, suggesting that any further increases in water levels could leave to irreparable damage done to human lives, infrastructure, and business. While it may be easy to let this tiny island slip beneath the waves, human lives are at stake- Kiribati in the short term, and the rest of the world in the long-term. Something needs to change.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:15 PM

this is an example of a small, innocent nation being hit harder by something caused by large nations which are having no negative impact on them. these large nations will not take responsibility until they must face the same results as Kiribati.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:07 PM

The video explains how the volcanic island will eventually disappear. The reason that the island will disappear is because of erosion and the sea is eating away at it. What makes them so easy to erode is the fact that the volcanoes are no longer active. Soon, coral reefs that are created will be the only thing holding the island together. Most of the island will be destroyed eventually and what is left behind will be in the shape of a caldera. 

Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, April 25, 2018 8:51 PM
(Oceania) This short video explores Kiribati, a small group of islands between Australia and Hawaii. At the highest point, the land is 10 feet above the water, posing a major problem with raising sea levels. Due to climate change, half the population was already forced to migrate. Many islands face the same problem, and in the next few decades much more land will probably be underwater.
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The Great Barrier Reef

"Australia urged the UN's World Heritage Committee to keep the Great Barrier Reef off the 'in danger' list to protect their tourism industry. But that doesn't mean the ecological treasure is not in danger."

 

Tags: biogeography, environment, ecology, Australia, Oceania.

Chris Costa's insight:

I have enjoyed the emphasis on the human aspect of geography in this course, and how geography impacts us. However, as much as the world influences us, we do have a substantial amount of influence on the composition of the planet, oftentimes for the worse. The Great Barrier Reef is one of the greatest wonders of the world, home to some of the most spectacular sights one can see; as someone who has been scuba diving a handful of times, I can only imagine what it must be like to explore such a world below the surface, seeing all the life that surrounds me. I would love to be able to at some point in my life, but there is a great probability that I might never get the opportunity, as the reef is dying- fast. 50% of the reef has been lost over the past 3 decades, and while Australia has pledged to reserve over a billion dollars to fund conservation efforts, it might be a case of too little, too late. Man-made climate change as a whole is taking a toll on one of nature's greatest treasures, and it might be out of the hands of the Australian damage to reverse the damage that has already been done. I would love to have the opportunity to see this one day, and I hope I get to, but I don't know if I ever will if current rates of reef loss continue. Here's to hoping humanity gets it act together and tries to save the geography we often take for granted; we won't like the ugly landscapes that will follow if we don't.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:29 PM

Great article for the GBR as an ecosystem at risk.

Matt Manish's curator insight, May 3, 2018 1:03 AM
The Great Barrier Reef in Australia is certainly considered to be a natural wonder. But according to this video, 50% of the reef has been lost within the last three decades. This is very discouraging news, not only is the Great Barrier Reef the largest living organism on Earth, but it is also home to many other species as well. So in result to much of the reef dying, it also takes a heavy toll on the ecosystem as a whole, since much of it depends on the reef for survival. Hopefully there will be a positive impact on this Australian treasure with the 1.5 billion dollars the Australian government plans to spend to conserve the reef over the next few years and the consequences of pollution can be reversed.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 2018 10:42 PM
The Great Barrier Reef is in danger. Even though it is not listed this way, nearly half of the reef has died, and the rest is in serious trouble if conservation is not underway. According to the video, Australia has invested over 1 billion dollars to saving its beloved coral reef. What was once filled with beautiful colors has been blanched. The loss of the reef would be devastating and could greatly impact the sea life as well as Australian tourism.
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Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S.

Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S. | Young Professor | Scoop.it

"If you think the United States is every immigrant's dream, reconsider. Sure, in absolute numbers, the U.S. is home to the most foreign-born people — 45.7 million in 2013. But relatively, it's upper-mid-pack as an immigrant nation. It ranks 65th worldwide in terms of percentage of population that is foreign-born, according to the U.N. report 'Trends in International Migrant Stock.'  Whether tax havens and worker-hungry Gulf states, refugee sanctuaries or diverse, thriving economies, a host of nations are more immigrant-dense than the famed American melting pot.  Immigrants make up more than a fourth (27.7 percent) of the land Down Under; two other settler nations, New Zealand and Canada, weigh in with 25.1 and 20.7 percent foreign-born, respectively. That's compared to 14.3 percent in the United States." 

 

Tags: migration, population, USA, Australia, Oceania.

Chris Costa's insight:

The son of an immigrant, I am always taken aback at the intensity of the hatred that is held by certain Americans towards foreign born individuals, as if being born in a different country is the greatest affront to all that we as Americans are supposed to hold dear to us. There is a lot of rhetoric in the current political climate concerning the rate of immigration to the US, with most conservatives unanimously declaring that there are too many foreign born peoples in the US; that our economy, ways of life, and culture are doomed to collapse under the weight of huge waves of uneducated, impoverished immigrants. While immigration is a controversial topic in this country that does deserve a portion of the attention that it receives, it was interesting to learn that immigration is so largely blown out of proportion here in the US, especially compared to other countries. 14.3% of Americans are foreign born; this number seems relatively large, until you learn that 1 in 4 New Zealanders were not born in New Zealand, and yet the immigration debate isn't anywhere near as fierce in New Zealand as it is here in the states. Perhaps we should borrow from the New Zealand model, and show a little more tolerance towards those who were born elsewhere, but call our country home. We pride ourselves on being the "melting pot" of the globe, and it's time that we actually start acting like it, instead of giving into ignorance, fear, and internal fighting.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:16 PM

the us is not the choice nation of nations. it is not the most sought nation for migrants. that means we must be doing something right or wrong.

David Stiger's curator insight, December 5, 2018 11:25 AM
Facts put major cultural issues into perspective. The facts found in this NPR article indicate that much of the world - and not just the United States - is grappling with immigration issues. Although the U.S. has the largest foreign-born population in raw numbers, it does not make up as large a percentage as the overall population as some other nations. Compared to the U.S.'s immigrant population of 14.3%, Australia's foreign-born subgroup makes up 27.7% while New Zealand's hit 25.1%. That is over one-fourth of the entire population in each country. 

Australia and New Zealand are ideal as they are both relatively safe, stable, progressive, and economically developed nations that have room to grow. 

The issue, especially for Australia, is taking in high numbers of unskilled workers who can be difficult to integrate into the economy. The U.S., mainly from the right, has also complained about this trend. Many migrant workers, however, are filling low-wage, unskilled jobs that non-immigrant workers shun and have no desire for. Considering that immigrants who fill these jobs earn their keep, pay taxes, and stimulate the economy by spending their money outweighs the potential economic burden. The truth of the matter is that natives in Australia and the United States are more fearful of the cultural, social, ethnic, religious, and linguistic changes that often take place when outside groups settle within a new country. This diversity can surely enrich a society. It can also stress out traditionalists, fearful of change, and cause social unrest and animosity. The important thing for Americans to understand is that we are not the only country wrestling with a globalized world in which people transcend boundaries, diversity is on the rise, and change happens. Just look to Oceania. 
Matt Danielson's curator insight, December 12, 2018 4:34 PM
With some countries having as many as 25% of people being foreighn born I wonder how much of this diversity could cause social upheaval. As we learned in class sometimes cultural differences can cause major issues in a country, and often times without a major culture tying every one together the country will inevitably split up or have civil strife similar to what we see in parts of Europe from mass migration.  I wonder what effect migration will have in places like Australia 5-10 years from now. Especially if the cultures these immigrants come from are drastically different then Australian culture. 
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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | Young Professor | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "

Chris Costa's insight:

If this isn't an example of geography shaping human settlements and civilization, then I don't know what is. The area encompassed in yellow represents an enormous area of land, largely desert and unsuitable for the establishment of large settlements. In order for people to settle in an area, you need access to water and arable land, and the area shown in yellow lacks both; as a result, a meager 2% of Australians call this area home. That means an astounding 98% of the country's population lives in less 25% of the country's total landmass, making for an interesting statistic and an excellent example of how geography impacts human development, despite all our technological advances. We may be able to communicate with one another effortlessly across the globe, or travel up into space, but we are still limited in our ability to settle and live in new areas by our basic needs for food and water. Those who doubt that need only look at the map above to see my point.

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Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 2, 2018 4:13 PM
This distribution of Australia's population should come to no surprise to people who have a vague idea of the continent's geography. The coastal areas are by far preferable to the desert areas of the continent's interior. A good example of how geography impacts population density and where people decide to live.
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 10:20 PM
The population of Australia is highly concentrated at the coast. Only about two percent of the population lives in the yellow shaded area on the image present in the article. The reason for the middle of Australia being so lightly populated is because the harsh climates. Where most people do not live the climate resembles the Sahara desert, which is very dry, and lacks rainfall. While the coastal areas where most of the population is concentrated resembles climates like Brazil, California, and India. These climates that most people live are not as harsh on the human and better for agriculture, cattle and port cities are known to be economically more powerful and populated. Since they access to the sea is so imperative these days.
Matt Danielson's curator insight, December 12, 2018 4:38 PM
The area often referred to as the "Outback" of Australia is one of the most sparsely populated areas on the planet. Due to the harsh environment and lack of resources not many people live their at all with the exceptions being some scientist, anthropologist, and native aboriginal tribes. This environment to many   seems like a horrible, desolate place. Hence why it was a great setting for Mad Max to help Illustrate the gravity and desperateness of the situation. To people that know the land better there is a lot there and a vast array of species only found in the Outback. 
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Burka Avenger is the Muslim Female Superhero We've All Been Waiting For

Burka Avenger is the Muslim Female Superhero We've All Been Waiting For | Young Professor | Scoop.it

"The Muslim world doesn't have the best reputation when it comes to female empowerment. With a lack of of strong, independent female role models, young women in the region have few places to look in popular culture for guidance. Until now.

Meet Burka Avenger, the game-changing Pakistani cartoon that, for the first time, has flipped the status quo on its head with its female superhero protagonist, who fights crime in her magical burka."

 

Tags: Pakistan,  gender, popular culture, SouthAsia, globalization, culture, Islam.

Chris Costa's insight:

This is an awesome, heartwarming story, and I highly recommend people to watch the trailer for the show offered on the website- it seems very cool, and like something kids will actually want to watch (unlike a great deal of educational television). For a nation that is plagued by such a great deal of bigotry and gender inequality- with female infant mortality rates contributing to a gender distribution of 108 men to 100 women- it is so good to see a program such as this being released from Pakistan. Young Muslim women are so deprived of positive and powerful female role models, allowing for the continued systematic abuse and mistreatment of women in many parts of the Middle East, including Pakistan. This show looks promising, from both a critical and humanitarian perspective, although I fear for the lives of its creators and that its showing will be suppressed in the very nations that need it the most. Terrorist organizations and religious extremists fear education and empowerment more than any army, as only those two factors can truly combat these movements effectively, and they will show no mercy should they ever be given the chance to cease the production of this program. I applaud its creators for their bravery, and hope that they are able to get their message across.

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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:05 AM

This superhero is more than just something to bring joy to children in Pakistan. This hero empowers women to think they can be strong like the Burka Avenger.

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'I was 14 when I was sold'

'I was 14 when I was sold' | Young Professor | Scoop.it
Laxmi's story of being kidnapped and trafficked in Nepal is not an isolated case but, as this graphical account shows, things are not always what they seem.
Chris Costa's insight:

It's heartbreaking to see the plight children living in other parts of the globe, making me all the more appreciative of my uneventful upbringing in the US. Child labor is a practice that many Americans associate with the 19th century, but it continues to be widespread in many parts of the world, as is the case in Nepal. Educational opportunities are few and far in between for many Nepalese, who's short-term financial struggles rob their children of long-term opportunities for success. Many are kidnapped from their homes, or sold by their families to pay off debt with skyrocketing interest rates. The same also holds true for young female sex workers, who suffer an enormous amount of physical and psychological harm at the hands of their kidnappers and their clients. Economic pitfalls and a lack of access to education helps to perpetuate this cycle of abuse, as people are unaware of their rights in addition to lacking the education to advance economically in their societies. The Nepalese national government and several international rights groups are hard at work to combat these harmful practices, but they are fighting an uphill battle against an illicit institution that has ingrained itself in Nepalese society and culture. Great strides are being made, but much still has to be done for the youth of Nepal.

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Ssekyewa Charles's curator insight, April 24, 2013 9:03 AM

Where is Human Rights Watch? Human trafficing is a crime to humanity!!

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:14 PM

It is sad to see the many different ways the poverty stricken and uneducated regions of the world are exploited, especially the children. Nepal is so poor that most of the recruiters for the predatory foreign networks are often locals who either take their relatives or abductees sent back to find a replacement. The animation helps add clarity and approachability to a bleak and difficult topic.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:22 AM

Teaching about human trafficking and child slavery can be very disconcerting and uncomfortable.  How much of the details regarding these horrific situations is age-appropriate and suitable for the classroom?  The BBC is reporting on events with sensitive stories to both give a human face to the story, while protecting the identity of under-aged victims (to read about the production of this comic, read Drawing the News.)  I encourage you to use your own discretion, but I find this comicbook format an accessible, informative and tasteful way to teach about human trafficking in South Asia to minors.  It is a powerful way to teach about some hard (but important) aspects of globalization and economics. 


As geographer Shaunna Barnhart says concerning this comic, "It moves from trafficking to child labor to pressures for migration for wage labor and the resulting injustices that occur. There's differential access to education, gender inequality, land, jobs, and monetary resources that leads to inter- and intra-country trafficking of the vulnerable. In the search for improved quality of life, individuals become part of a global flow of indentured servitude which serves to exploit their vulnerabilities and exacerbate inequalities and injustice. Nepali children 'paid' in food and cell phones that play Hindi music in 'exchange' for work in textile factories - cell phones that are themselves a nexus of global resource chains and textiles which in turn enter a global market - colliding at the site of child labor which remains largely hidden and ignored by those in the Global North who may benefit from such labor."


Tags: Nepal, labor, industry, economic, poverty, globalization, India.


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China Fences In Its Nomads, and an Ancient Life Withers

China Fences In Its Nomads, and an Ancient Life Withers | Young Professor | Scoop.it
The Chinese government is in the final stages of a 15-year-old effort to transform millions of pastoralists who once roamed China’s vast borderlands.

 

Tags: Central Asia, culture, folk cultures, ecology, China.

Chris Costa's insight:

Discrimination exists in every industrialized society in every part of the globe, the result of poverty, ignorance, and hatred. The US is guilty of it just as much as any other nation, evident by the continued existence of income gaps between whites and blacks in the US, as well as the policy of the US in its handling of our native populations. Chinese discrimination against ethnic Tibetans has long been documented and observed within the West, meeting the condemnation of much of the Western world, and such cultural discrimination has continued in other provinces within China. As the coast has exploded in wealth per capita, and the culture there becomes increasingly westernized, these other cultures and peoples are in danger of inevitably being wiped out. This is the result of Chinese policy, which has actively worked to suppress and kill of these resistant cultures, for the sake of national identity and unity. Is America in a position to judge others for how they treat their ethnic minorities? Not at all- just look at the demographics of our prison system and our families who fall below the poverty line. Such racism has long been a facet of human civilization, and it is up to us to make it a thing of our past and not of our future. For these cultures in China, I fear the worst will inevitably pass, and the world will sit passively by as they are lost forever. It saddens me, and I hope that I am proven wrong.

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brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 2018 3:10 PM
China is gaining control of a whole group of people who some have changed their nomadic way of life to that of a more current and modern lifestyle, but others feel forced and unable. China is not giving the pastoralists the help they need, but still want them to assimilate to the country's currently way of life. Geography is important because it is important to understand that these nomadic people are losing their land, or rights to roam their country's land.
David Stiger's curator insight, October 22, 2018 5:04 PM
The Chinese communist government is predicated on power and control. Its philosophy of governance runs counter to freedom, liberty, and openness. Once again, this dark reality has been evidenced by China's treatment of its nomadic-pastoral people. Citing bogus scientific research that herding and grazing is detrimental for the environment, Chinese authorities have forced minority indigenous groups (often descendants of the Mongols) to surrender their traditional ways of life and sedentary, modern people who participate in a monetary-based economy. A gaping problem with these dramatic changes is that these new relocation centers for settlement are highly inadequate. The former herders were coerced into settling down and discovered the promises of good jobs, optimistic modern living, and benefits like healthcare were lies. The ethnic Han majority, which dominates all aspects of Chinese life, may not feel obligated to provide adequate and sustainable resources for these ethnic minority groups. Cultural reasons aside, the drive behind the Communist Party's decision to relocate these nomads is geographic. 40 percent of China's territory is open grassland in central Asia. Its unfettered access is hindered by the occupation of roaming nomadic herders. For public relations reasons, China cannot simply eliminate these people, but China wants them gone in order to expand and develop out west. With no true love for these ethnic minorities, China has decided it has the resources and willpower to finally bring these people into the modern world and take their ancestral lands and their herds in exchange for a subpar home and small amount of money. It is a tragic game of deception and greed. 
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China's Maritime Claims

ONE reason China’s spectacular rise sometimes alarms its neighbours is that it is not a status quo power. From its inland, western borders to its eastern and southern seaboard, it claims territory it does not control.
Chris Costa's insight:

Chinese expansion into the South Sea has been a longtime coming, and China's actions in the region are both a reflection of its growing strength and a huge diplomatic headache for the US and every other nation in the region. China's construction of artificial islands allows it to claim autonomy over a larger body of water, challenging the maritime power of every other nation in South East Asia, many of whom have economies reliant on the waters China now claims as its own, some 500 miles away from the Chinese mainland. With the emergence of the Chinese economy as a global power, its ambitious leaders have made plans to transform China from a regional military force to a new superpower- one that the established order, the US included, is entirely unsure of. Which of these nations can truly challenge China's decision to make these waters it's personal pond? It would be economic and political suicide, as China is an enormous global trading power, and has the potential to crush any of these nations in a military engagement. Could Japan? Perhaps, but the Chinese have already pressed ahead with their plans, regardless of Japanese political pressure. Involvement of the US is perhaps the last thing anyone wants- particularly both the US and China- but it is perhaps the only way China will heed pressure from abroad and cease  Chinese expansion in the region. The US and China must be allies, for the sake of global prosperity, but actions like these cannot be tolerated, by either party.

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Sarah Cannon's curator insight, November 25, 2015 9:52 AM

This is one  geopolitical conflict that I really do not understand why this is happening. There are so many more important things that should be addressed rather than fighting over sections of water. What should be on the top of the priority list is how to clean the environment and waters from the nuclear plant explosion. The ignorance that people have for the environment, not just China, but the whole world, is not good.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:51 PM

One reason to care about minor islands is the 200 nautical miles off the coast for the EEZ. This would give china more water territory for drilling of oil which I believe is there in those waters. Flexing more muscle for their navy to grow. Strategically the Chinese could take over these small islands and build air strips for future which would give them a chance to reach places they wouldn't be able to before and this would be good supply transactions during war, fueling, maneuver of man power. The other small countries also would lose their independence and would have to fall under china's rule. With the building of the man made islands and the Chinese navy protecting their people while they continue to build these islands and daring anyone to try and stop them is a sign that china is trying to dominate and expand with muscle. It is their time they have the economic, and military power to do so. Of course they don't want to deal with the u.s. and their allies militarily but it doesn't benefit the u.s. either. I don't believe u.s. wants to get involved in a battle with china and their allies.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:17 PM

Claiming territory it does not control, causes a lot of controversy with other country. The main problem here now is China is having a dispute with Japan about some islands. There could possibly be oil or natural resources.Japan says that the land was always theirs. China clearly likes to just put itself out there and make claims or place oil rigs wherever. This could be a big problem for them because if someone gets too offended by their actions there could end up being a war or some sort of conflict. Especially since they like to use military forces such as navy and air guarding "territory." 

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Chinese forces 'used flamethrowers' in Xinjiang operation

Chinese forces 'used flamethrowers' in Xinjiang operation | Young Professor | Scoop.it

"A Chinese military newspaper gives graphic details of a raid in Xinjiang province against suspected militants." http://wp.me/p2Ij6x-60y ;

Chris Costa's insight:

China's show of force was, according to Chinese officials, directed at foreign terrorists within the region of Xinjiang, in the northwestern corner of the nation. However, the region has a significant Uighur minority, who have called the province their home for hundreds of years. With Uighur nationalist waves crashing within the province, there has been some limited violence over the course of the last decade. However, China's claim that these terrorist groups are foreign-born is contentious at best, as they are most likely as "Chinese" as the ethnic Han majority that inhabit the nation. Inter-ethnic violence breed atrocities that are inevitably committed by both sides, and the use of flamethrowers to attack any militant groups in the region will only facilitate greater violence when these Uighur groups retaliate. Extremism breeds further extremism, and I don't know if the strategy adopted by the Chinese army is the right approach. While I hope both sides are able to find a solution to this conflict, it is far more likely that the Uighur's will face further discrimination until they are either assimilated to Han culture, killed, or forced out of the country. Without a free press to criticize these government actions, China has the power to make the lives of its ethnic minorities particularly rough.

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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 12:11 PM

As a student who someday wants to teach social studies at the high school level, this article brought to light one of the hardest concepts to teach. There are always two sides to every story. While the victors get to write history, the victims are often silenced over time. One man's violent rebellion is another man's treasonous operations. Honestly, the Chinese have done an excellent job of keeping this out of the western media. The only real struggle we ever hear about in China that of Tibet and Taiwan.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:37 PM

This is really disturbing to know that China is attacking their ethnic minority who is just protesting for what they believing in. To make things worst, the Chinese government controls the media and they basically can say whatever they want. For example, referring to these ethnic minority as foreign terrorist. That changes the perspective on how people view and perceive the situation happening in Xinjiang.

tyrone perry's curator insight, April 24, 2018 5:13 PM
The Chinese government is on an all out mission to eradicate terrorizism from the Uighur and anyone else for that matter.  Thou news reports are controlled by China its tough to get accurate reports.  But their use of force shows they are not playing.  Uighurs are suspected Turkish militant Muslims that have been forced out over the years.  China has said they have been terrorizing and attacking the people of Xinjiang. 
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Korea and the Yellow Sea

Korea and the Yellow Sea | Young Professor | Scoop.it
While city lights at night serve as a good proxy for population density, North Korea provides a dark exception.
Chris Costa's insight:

Devastated by the war that secured its independence, South Korea entered the 1960's as a third world country. Today, it is one of the strongest economies in the world, with a vibrant culture and strong allies in the US and Japan. The economic growth it experienced in the final decades of the 20th century is nothing short of remarkable, thoroughly earning its title as an "Asian Tiger" economy. The quality of life enjoyed by its citizens, and the nation continues to prosper in the face of aggression shown by its northern neighbor. The leaps and bounds made in the South Korean economy and its infrastructure is highlighted by this map, showing the intense amounts of development that have occurred all over the country- there isn't a dark spot in the entire southern half of the Korean peninsula. Contrasted to North Korea, its particular striking- the two nations have really taken opposite paths since the end to hostilities between the two in 1953. Should they be able to avoid another conflict, South Korea will only continue to prosper as we push forward into the 21st century.

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Ju Hui Judy Han's comment, January 7, 2013 12:26 AM
It also regurgitates troubling metaphors of darkness as backwardness.
서병기's curator insight, November 6, 2014 7:03 PM

We should try to alleviate the great difference of the North and South Korea. It's time to cooperate.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 25, 2014 10:59 AM

The contrast between North and South Korea in this Earth at Night image shows just how different these countries are. South Korea, with aid from the United States, is becoming a highly developed and prosperous power, with a impressive economy compared to what it was just decades ago. On the other hand, North Korea is dark, both literally and figuratively. North Korea's economy remains highly undeveloped, and the few utilities that the country provides are unreliable and not far stretching. The only visible bright light in North Korea is the city of Pyongyang, and even that is nothing compared to Seoul.

 

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Military Shift For Japan?

Military Shift For Japan? | Young Professor | Scoop.it

"Citing threats from China and North Korea, a government-appointed panel is urging Japan to reinterpret its pacifist constitution to allow the use of military force to defend other countries."

Chris Costa's insight:

Since the end of the Second World War, Japan has remained out of external military engagements, the result of a clause in its constitution drafted to prevent a reoccurrence of the Japanese aggression that sparked the war in the Pacific. However, with both China and North Korea displaying some concerning foreign policy, with China in particular flexing its muscles in the South Pacific, Japan has taken measures to expand its military capacity. There has been open debate in Japan over whether or not to expand its military power, with public opinion being relatively split; in the US, there has been widespread approval for the decision, in the hopes that Japan, long since a regional power, will take more responsibility for both its own defense and the defense of its neighbors. With the expansion of China's naval power recently- with the artificial islands appearing all over the Pacific, and them recently establishing their first naval base on the African continent- perhaps it is time for Japan, one of the US's staunchest allies, to step up to the plate and flex its own muscles. If this push is successful in giving the Japanese military more bite, it will be interesting to see China's response to the measure, and if its foreign policy will change accordingly.

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David Lizotte's curator insight, April 23, 2015 1:42 PM

This is an extremely important event in Japanese history. What's neat is how America is in support of japan having a great military role both nationally and internationally. Yes, it is up to the Japanese to deliberate and set forth this plan, so one will see what comes of it. I believe they will decide engaging in the constructing of a greater military force will be the way to go. It makes sense.

This article was very suggestive in referring to the growing threats that exist in the East China Sea. If Japan wants to increase its military power and become a player in defense of itself and other countries then the situation must be worsening. North Korea and China has been growing and are now a threat to Japan, which in a way makes them a threat to America too (which is no secret). Now, Japan is saying the expansion of a military is strictly for defense and they do not want to engage in any war. And by "they"/"Japan"  I mean the Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

He does not want a military appearance that existed prior and during WWII. 

America benefits from this greatly. Yes the Pacific Ocean is a pretty big buffer between China and America however the presence of Japan acts as a buffer too. If Japan were to increase its military they would prove to be an even bigger buffer. Japan and America would be able to work in unison against Chinese and North Korean threats. Perhaps America would even gain more intelligence on the region, if they haven't gotten top of the line intelligence already. Japan wants to be able to protect itself from said threats. By doing so it would act as an initial first line of defense for America. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:37 AM

Even though it has been 70 years since Japan was waging war across the world, it still should be a little concerning to anyone who has studied and understands how World War II played out and its' ramifications.  Japan is, essentially, making a move to slowly move away from their war-inducing military restrictions.  While, I don't think anyone should "dictate" what Japan does, I think this needs to play out transparently and collectively for the world to see. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:12 AM

This move by the Japanese government was inevitable and nessacary. Japans neighbors are becoming more hostile by the day. China and North Korea are both stepping up their military might. Both nations are clear threats to the peace and security of Japan. The natural response, would be to counter the growing militarism of China and North Korea by building up your own arm forces to serve as deterrent. The old article pacifying Japan  no longer makes sense in our current world environment.  Japan is now one of the United States strongest allies. Allowing Japan to raise an army, would take pressure off are already overextended military.

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Can India become a superpower?

Chris Costa's insight:

I really enjoyed this video; it's packed with a lot of information, but all of it is relevant to its main discussion of India as a potential superpower. In class, we discussed the importance of the Mississippi River Valley and the Great Lakes Basin played in the development of the US economy and the rise of the US as a global superpower, and this does not differ very much from the intricate river systems that litter the Indian subcontinent. The Ganges River Valley has historically been home to millions of people, facilitating agricultural development as well as trade. The lack of natural boundaries within the nation has allowed for the diffusion of the thousands of different cultures, customs, religions, and languages that find their home within India, although this has lead to division amongst its people. Internal disputes have paved the way for foreign leaders to seize control of the subcontinent, as evidenced by the Mughal Empire, and the eventual control of India by the British. Independence has lead to huge political and economic developments, as well as forming a distinct national identity that has, so far, risen above the petty sectionalist and race-related squabbles of yesteryear, but sectional rivalries continue to be had between the various Indian states. All the tools needed to become a superpower are at India's disposal; all it must do is seize the opportunity.

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Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 2015 11:29 AM

If you were to ask me before watching this video, i would say absolutely. They have the capability because they are full of intelligent people, they also have enough people to do it. Something is just holding them back from moving forward...

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:48 AM

anyone who doesn't think that India can become a superpower is insane. they already are one. they have nukes. they have a billion people. they have massive industry, and they have a history of conflict with their neighbors.

David Stiger's curator insight, November 12, 2018 4:47 PM
This video did an excellent job of explaining the nature and essence of India in three ways for me. First, it outlined how India is truly a subcontinent. The oceans to the south and the long mountain ranges to the north isolate India from the rest of Asia. Add the fact that it is on a separate continental plate and it seems obvious that India is a mini continent that was pushed into Asia. The second area is India's political and cultural makeup. India is far from monolithic or homogeneous. I did not realize there were so many ethnic groups and factions that divided the region into constantly warring kingdoms. This factionalism paved the way for two foreign powers to divide and conquer the entire region - the Islamic empires and the British Empire. Even though India achieved independence, this old history carries on today as India a collection of states loosely held together by a republican national government. The factionalism is still highly present preventing coherent cooperation and reform. Thirdly, I did not realize the extent of the rivalry between India and China. This animosity has reached the point where China refuses to grant autonomy to its buffer regions for fear that India might ally with Tibet and pose a threat. On the other end of this is China's good relationship with Pakistan and the issue of Kashmir. India does not want Pakistan to dominate and control Kashmir because this would give China a strategic opening to India's doorstep. 

Despite India's size, it looks like it has too many internal problems to ever become a superpower. 
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Which country has the biggest economy?

An animated infographic showing the top three economies throughout history. Does China have the world's largest economy? Is China's economy bigger than America's?

 

Tags: economic, China, development, India.

Chris Costa's insight:

I think this was honestly super cool. It was interesting to see the massive size of the economies of China and India throughout history, especially coming from a background of eurocentric approaches to history in our education system. It's interesting to grow up hearing about the formidable size and power of the Roman Empire, only to discover that its power was dwarfed by two other empires, who have dominated their part of the globe for much of human history. It was stunning to see just how much the industrial revolution changed the geopolitical landscape; we learn about it and its affects in school, but I feel like the fact that it very much was a "revolution" is lost on kids. The world was completely altered by the advent of mass production, as evidenced by the swing of economic power from East to West following the revolution. It was also impressive to see just how large the American economy was in the 1950's. However, the tides have begun to turn, as we are quickly seeing the ascent of the Chinese economy once again, with India slowly getting back on track as well. With a population of over 1 billion people, India is the world's largest democracy, and has the potential to be a superpower on a scale that the world has never seen before.

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Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:47 PM

i would never have thought that china and india would have dominated would economy throughout the past, now it is not that much of a suprise, but especially during the times where france britain and italy (romans) dominated the world, how is it possible that india and china were so far ahead of them economically?

Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 20, 2018 12:45 PM
China has historically been one of the world's largest economies. The fact that the US has claimed that position for the last century is more of an anomaly than some may expect. China has always been an integral player in global trade, from the silk road to the spice trade, so their reemergence to be one of the world's largest economies is more of a return to normalcy than an unforeseen circumstance. 
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Urban growth takes heavy toll on native animals

Urban growth takes heavy toll on native animals | Young Professor | Scoop.it
Eight koalas have been hit by cars in the past month near the town of Gisborne, 10 kilometres north-west of the Melbourne boundary.

Via Hannah Rizzo
Chris Costa's insight:

As urban population centers expand in junction with our ever-increasing overall population, humans are altering the geographical landscape to a degree previously unseen in our development. While geography still reigns supreme over mankind, we are increasingly finding cracks in her armor, and we're finding that our tampering with the outside world has disastrous effects for the very things we hope to preserve- our planet and her wildlife. This is especially true for Australia, which has some of the most unique wildlife on the planet as a result of its separation from much of the rest of the world. The article talks about the increasing threat motorists pose to native wildlife, particularly koalas, which often find themselves on roads as they migrate between trees. Other species are also coming under threat, as is the Great Barrier Reef, as I discussed in my review of another ScoopIt article. While the Australian government as agreed to pour a significant amount of its resources towards conservation efforts, the effects of said efforts have yet to be seen, with more and more species disappearing from Australia- and the world, for that matter- everyday. What may seem like an isolated incident of motor accidents is actually indicative of a worldwide problem; we are killing the planet, and we're now unsure if we're ever going to be able to really save it. I don't know either, but I believe that it is up to all of us to do everything in our power to try.

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Lauren Fiedler's comment, July 23, 2013 11:53 PM
Urban growth and developmental spread into bush areas that are habitat for native Australian animals has caused rates of injuries and fatalities to koalas to rise higher than ever. This article reflects the ecological dimensions of spacial inequality in relation to Australia's population growth and spread of housing to accommodate for these figures.
Hannah Rizzo's curator insight, July 28, 2013 6:29 PM

This article explores the ecological and spatial dimensions of urban growth in Melbourne, which due to population increase has been spreading beyond the official urban growth boundary into the natural habitats of native Australian animals, and resulted in the injury of animals such as koalas.

KaitlynandSydney's curator insight, December 18, 2013 8:54 PM

This goes under the geography catagory for Australia because it explains how the urbanization is effecting the way that the native animals live and how some are being driven out of their land

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Papua New Guinea

"Papua New Guinea gained independence from Australia in 1975 and has over 800 languages;  87% of the population lives in rural areas." 


Tags: Papua New Guinea, Oceania.

Chris Costa's insight:

I found this video to be very interesting, providing a brief overview of contemporary Papua New Guinea and the struggles the nation faces as we push deeper into the 21st century. Once a colonial possession of Australia, the nation gained its independence in 1975, although it retains close relations with its former colonizer; Australia is the nation's greatest provider of foreign aid. Although great strides have been made in areas such as education, health, and infrastructure, the nation lags far behind the West in terms of industrial development; just 58% of Guineans are literate, with a meager 3% of reads being paved, and the average Guinean having a lifespan some 20 years shorter than their Australian contemporaries. Although this may seem backwards to many Westerners, Guineans are proud of a rich, vibrant culture, with some 800 languages being spoken on the island. With each language representing a different culture, it becomes apparent how diverse the population really is, achieving a level of cultural complexity that has oftentimes been discouraged in today's Western world. We would do well to embrace the differences that are celebrated today in Papua New Guinea. While it is hoped that improved education will ultimately lead to a higher standard of living for all the people of Papua New Guinea, this writer hopes they don't lose track of the differences that make them so wondrous in a world that is oftentimes so intolerant of others.

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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 7, 2015 2:49 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon's page, some of the stats are mind boggling and they are actually portrayed as being good. For example, while 87% of the population is rural, 58% are literate. I figured the literacy numbers would be rather poor in a country where the entire population lives in rural areas, but I didn't think that 58% literacy would be something worth bragging about. Maybe except in North Korea.

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, May 3, 2018 12:55 PM
Papua New Guinea is a very unique country, it has an extremely diverse population and speaks more languages than any other country in the world. There are over 800 languages spoken in Papua New Guinea. This country is very interesting, they became independent from Australia in 1975 and have been slow to urbanize. Many of the countries villages are so un-urbanized that they can only be reached on foot, and many of the hundreds of languages that are spoken are only spoken on one of the villages that does not connect with another village. The country also struggles with clean drinking water and bathroom facilities. There is malnutrition across the country, but despite the difficulties the country faces they are improving their education and becoming a better country. 
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 2018 10:37 PM
This video let’s us see into the world of Papua New Guinea. Even though it is Australia’s neighbor, the video focuses on the poverty and inequality that plagued the nation. PNG has extremely low life expectancies, birth and literacy rates. The country has over 800 languages and cultures that are all significantly different. Nearly half of the girls have not been educated, and some people experience extreme poverty without access to clean water and plumbing.
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Aborigines threaten to shut Uluru

Aborigines threaten to shut Uluru | Young Professor | Scoop.it
Aboriginal leaders threaten to ban tourists from a top Australian landmark in protest at "racist" government policies.
Chris Costa's insight:

It's interesting to see how similarly awful the integration of Australian aborigines into mainstream society has been to that of the US's own Native American population. Chronic social problems plague Australia's native peoples, with centuries of systematic racism contributing to decreased educational, social, and economic opportunities for those of aboriginal descent. This has left these communities today with serious problems, such as rampant alcoholism, issues of child abuse, and high crime rates. The problem has become so bad that the average life expectancy of an aborigine is 17 years younger than that of the average Australian. Government interventions in response to the high crime rates in aborigine communities has sparked outrage amongst their residents, who cite systematic racism in the approaches the government has taken to address said issues. Threatening to shut down the popular tourist attraction at Uluru is indicative of greater, more widespread animosity between the Australian government and its indigenous population, and such animosity will continue until opportunities for advancement are equal for both white Australians and its aborigines. 

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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 10, 2015 7:08 PM

the government punishing a whole culture for crimes is outrageous. Not all are guilty but all are punished. it is proven fact that more minorities in this country are incarcerated for drug usage than whites but that doesn't mean you jail all black people. The government is being racist because the aboriginal are poverty stricken group who do not contribute to society, they only have a population of 300,000 people. In the governments eyes they just exist on the land and do nothing for the economy. Well it must have some influence because they are protesting by not allowing tourists climb Uluru or Ayers rock. I guess the government will not be collecting permit fees or other fees associated with the climbing of the rock. Tourism should take a hit from hotel accomendations  to hiking tour guides to purchasing gear etc...

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:22 PM

Australia has always had troubles dealing with their past actions against the native population of their island, and this will hopefully be a wake up call on the policies they have taken.

Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 2, 2018 5:24 PM
Interesting how the Aboriginal people of Australia are using geography as a form of protest, claiming that they will close down a popular tourist attraction in response to legislation.  Additionally, this article tackles the issue of race; the Aboriginal people were angry with the government in the first place was as a result of prejudiced legislation that targeted Aboriginal communities. It banned pornography and alcohol in 70 communities in an effort to curb the sexual abuse of children, which is reported at rates seven times higher among the Aboriginal people than the Australian average.  Although this is a serious problem that must be addressed, biased legislation is not the answer.
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China's Xi Jinping agrees $46bn superhighway to Pakistan

China's Xi Jinping agrees $46bn superhighway to Pakistan | Young Professor | Scoop.it
China's President Xi Jinping has signed a deal with Pakistan promising $46bn (£30.7bn) of investment.

 

China plans to inject some $46bn - almost three times the entire foreign direct investment Pakistan has received since 2008. Many say Mr Sharif's penchant for "thinking big" and China's increasing need to control maritime trade routes may well combine to pull off an economic miracle in Pakistan.

But there are questions over Pakistan's ability to absorb this investment given its chronic problems with militancy, separatism, political volatility and official corruption.

China is worried about violence from ethnic Uighurs in its mostly Muslim north-western Xinjiang region and fears hard-line separatists could team up with Uighur militants fighting alongside members of Pakistan's Taliban.

Chris Costa's insight:

$46 billion is a substantial amount of money- in fact, it is a larger sum than all the aid Pakistan has received since 2008, all from a single nation. The project will undoubtedly help the struggling Pakistani economy, proving a much needed injection of cash, business, and will hopefully put the nation's power shortages to an end. With all the motions being set into place, the agreement could shock the Pakistani economy into life, fulfilling its goal of one day becoming an "Asian Tiger," and perhaps bringing to an end the decades of religious militants and extremism that has shaped the nation at home. For China, this is yet another show of strength to the rest of the world, further cementing its place as the regional power in Central, South, and Southeastern Asia as India falls further and further behind China in terms of sheer growth. The move allows China to surpass the US as the undisputed number 1 provider of foreign aid in Pakistan, and provides the nation with much-needed access to the Indian ocean, allowing it to engage in greater amounts of trade, as well as giving it a foot hold in the region, along with its military base in Africa. China is slowly creating a military ring around itself, flexing its economic and military muscles. For both parties, this is a great move- it will be interesting to see what such a move will have in store for the West.

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Booming Bhutan

Booming Bhutan | Young Professor | Scoop.it
Long impoverished and isolated, tiny Bhutan is finally booming. This onetime absolute monarchy has also made important democratic reforms and major improvements in quality of life.
Chris Costa's insight:

With a severe lack of arable land-representing less than 5% of the nation's total area- Bhutan has struggled to provide for its population of some 700,000, the result of the geographical realties inclosed by its borders. A small, impoverished nation, many sectors of its economy are ailing as a result of a lack of an agricultural base, and the nation is highly reliant on foreign aid in order to feed its people. However, this may soon change, as the nation is experiencing such a powerful economic burst that it has now become one of the top 4 fastest growing economies in the world. The exportation of hydroelectric energy to India has become a vital hub of the Bhutanese economy, with some 20% of its GDP reliant on the trade alone. With plans to open several more dams in the nation, there is hope that the increased revenue will continue to raise improving standards of living for the nation's people, as well as stimulating other sectors of the economy. There is still much work to be done, and there are several problems the tiny Asian nation must still face- an ever-rising national debt and inflation rate are just two issues that must be dealt with in the coming years- but Bhutan's prospects look bright.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:31 PM

Bhutan has made some money selling hydropower to India and they plan to use that money to build more hydropower plants to increase their wealth. The country is also emphasizing happiness of its citizens over material wealth. All of these things will continue to provide growth and opportunity to Bhutan and its citizens.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, November 2, 2014 2:32 PM

Culture

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:13 PM

Bhutan should consider themselves lucky that their country is located between China and India, two of the most powerful economic countries of the world. Without China and India, Bhutan's economy would be extremely poor because of it's size but because India agreed to assist Bhutan with grants, Bhutan has a successful economy. It's not one of the strongest but it's gratefully acceptable. Also, because manufacturing spread throughout southeast Asia, Bhutan is credited for manufacturing goods and manufacturing companies which helps build its economy.

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Why Earthquakes Are Devastating Nepal

Why Earthquakes Are Devastating Nepal | Young Professor | Scoop.it
The May 12 7.3 magnitude aftershock was one of many that followed the April 25 earthquake that shook Nepal. Why is this part of the world such a hotbed of tectonic activity?
Chris Costa's insight:

Geography determines human activity, and not the other way around; that has been the theme of this course, and it holds true as we look at the devastating impacts of earthquakes in the nation of Nepal. Sitting right over one of the most active plate boundaries in the world, with the Indian subcontinent being violently forced under the rest of Asia, Nepal is therefore the home of both the infamous Himalayan Mountains and numerous earthquakes, varying in severity and frequency. As violent and as costly as they are, violent earthquakes are just another part of life in Nepal, as are other natural events in other parts of the globe, and the people who call it home adjust their lives accordingly, through a variety of means. However, nothing can prepare anyone for the extremes of earth's power, and the violent earthquake that shook the nation to its very core in May has left behind a great deal of human suffering and destruction. I hope that those who lost their homes and businesses are already well along on their path to recovery, although I don't think it's possible to every truly heal from such a traumatic experience, at least not completely.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 9:44 AM

Summer reading, tectonic plates

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30 charts and maps that explain China today

30 charts and maps that explain China today | Young Professor | Scoop.it

"China's mind-boggling size, economy and history, visualized.""

Chris Costa's insight:

China's rise over the past few decades has been truly remarkable, and, while expected to slow down, should continue as we progress further into the 21st century. Historically, China has been one of the largest economies in the world, so this recent growth is more of a return to the norm rather than a new development, as many Americans may perceive it. There are a number of factors at play that have lead to China's resurgence, and this article does a very good job of breaking it down into a series of easily-digested images. Having lifted 500 million people out of poverty via its development, China today is still a highly stratified society, with many inhabitants of the interior provinces continuing to live without any of the benefits being enjoyed along the coast. China serves as the world's "middle class," but much work remains to be done for the average Chinese citizen to enjoy the standard of living that we are accustomed to in the West. In the meantime, however, China is a force in the global economy, and will continue to expand and rival the US.

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 30, 2016 12:10 PM

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:05 AM

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.

Olivia Campanella's curator insight, December 14, 2018 10:09 PM
In this article shows a map of how incredibly huge the Chinese population really is. each country and land area is sized proportionate to the population of each
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China's one-child policy and the lessons for America

China's one-child policy and the lessons for America | Young Professor | Scoop.it
Let's review exactly what population has to do with economic growth
Chris Costa's insight:

I found this article absolutely fascinating. In the 2016 presidential race, Democratic candidate (and, arguably, frontrunner) Bernie Sanders has pledged to raise corporate taxes in order to provide for social programs, better education, and universal healthcare for all its citizens. Critics have pointed to the failure of such a plan when he attempted to implement it in his home state of Vermont, where the working class was simply not large enough to support the retirement system Sanders attempted to put in place. Defenders of Bernie have argued that what's true of Vermont's demographic- the second least populated state in the country- will not hold true for the nation as a whole, and this article suggests that these defenders have a point. While economic growth may not be as fast for younger American workers, by 2040 these welfare programs will still be running under any additional strain. The same cannot be said for the Chinese, where the disproportionate number of males being born- 119 for every 100 female children- means that a huge population gap will emerge between younger and older Chinese. Without being able to father a new generation, this group of mostly-male Chinese will age and be an enormous burden on the Chinese economy, to an extent that's almost unfathomable here in the US. China has since revered its One Child Policy that put itself in its current predicament, but it may well be a case of too little, too late.

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Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, December 3, 2015 8:03 AM

añada su visión ...

Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 29, 2018 9:49 AM
For years growing up you always heard about China's one child policy. It was well known growing up that China was trying to limit its population. However, that practice in China has finally come to an end. After years of trying to limit the population they have finally run into the problem they all should have seen coming. The population simply has become to old to support itself. Eventually, if you limit the amount of births you end up with more older people that can work than younger people supporting them. This eventually could cause a major economic slip and as China continues to try to gain in the global world this could really hinder their efforts. The US always worries about when all the baby boomers retire and how will we keep up social security, but China's problems far outlast the United States at the is point. China now should see a slowly growing work force, but it will take years before they see the outcome of removing their one child policy. Countries through the years have continued to try to control population and worries about population however every time they try to correct it they see a bounce in a direction that cannot be sustainable. Like the economic system it should be a free market in the baby market.
Olivia Campanella's curator insight, December 14, 2018 9:46 PM
In 1997 the policy of just one chid was instituted , preventing an estimated 400 million births by either abortion, infanticide, forced sterilization, and a dramatic gender imbalance. Ironically, the policy was inspired wholly based out of paranoia that population growth would stifle the Chinese economy
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Why Little Kids in Japan Are So Independent

Why Little Kids in Japan Are So Independent | Young Professor | Scoop.it
In Japan, small children take the subway and run errands alone, no parent in sight. The reason why has more to do with social trust than self-reliance.
Chris Costa's insight:

It's interesting to see the cultural differences that facilitate these drastically different parenting strategies held by the Japan and the United States. In the US, our capitalistic society puts every man on his own- we are told not to help others, nor to ask for help. From the treks we made across the continent to our reluctance, as a society, to accept welfare programs as a necessity in an industrialized democratic society, Americans strive for solitude and independence. There isn't a sense of community in many parts of the country, and as a result, we are less likely to trust one another- I remember reading about two parents being invested by Child Services because they allowed their 9 year old child to walk with his younger sister to school. To think that such attitudes could be held on such a large scale, as they are in Japan, is laughable. We are told as we grow up how unsafe we really are. In Japan, the community- the collective- is held as the ideal, and people are taught to be able to trust strangers, to expect the best from them. The result? A safer society and the perception that Japanese society as a whole is safer. Children are able to walk freely in public and not be afraid, and public transit and walking are more widely accepted in urban areas. Tokyo may or may not be the world's safest large city, but it certainly feels so for its inhabitants, and I fail to see how that isn't better than the fear Americans have for our neighbors. This is something we need to address as a society, and we should start by looking at our ally across the Pacific. 

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:59 AM

unit 3

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:49 AM

If this happened in the United States, it would lead the cable news channels for about a year. Most Parents in our country will hardly ever let their small children leave the house, never mind actually be by themselves for a long time period. This video is an excellent showcase of the differences between western and eastern cultures. The eastern culture prioritize independence at an early age. They make a point of making sure that children can become self sustainable. In the west, we go to extraordinary links to shield our children from the ugliness of every day society. We are more fearful of the horrors that might occur to our children if we allow them to explore society. Neither approach can be judged as correct or wrong. They are just two different ways of raising children in a complex and often freighting world.

tyrone perry's curator insight, April 24, 2018 6:16 PM
The term “it takes a village to raise children” is completely at work in Japan.  Parents allow their children to ride the subway as early as 6.  People in japan rely on a community as a whole to not only watch out for the children but each other as a whole.  They believe that kids are self reliant and they instill it at a young age.  When they are at school they are all depend on to clean up after themselves.  This mindset stays with the kids and public.  That’s why Japans streets are clean. 
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North Korea threatens to strike without warning

North Korea threatens to strike without warning | Young Professor | Scoop.it
North Korea turned up the temperature yet another degree on its neighbors Monday, warning that it would not give any advance notice before attacking South Korea.
Chris Costa's insight:

Since the ceasefire was declared in 1953, tensions have always ran high between the democratic South and the communist North of the Korean peninsula. Petty threats are the norm, with either side threatening to destroy the other should they continue to escalate tensions, occasionally made worse by the stray shot that makes its way across the border. North Korea has been the more aggressive of the two, using threats of violence to force the West to provide its starving masses with foreign aid. Any hopes that new North Korean leader Kim Jong Un would be less extreme than his father have since been extinguished, as Un has further ruined relations between his government and his southern neighbors. Both China and the US have condemned the North's actions, with China hoping its smaller ally will cease its irrational foreign policy as the Chinese attempt to cement their place as a global power. There has been over 60 years of relative peace between the two countries, with most Koreans today having never seen the conflict itself, and it is hoped that this peace will continue. However, for as long as Un and his communist party maintain their vice-like grip on their nation's peoples, the threat of violence- and the violation of human rights within their own borders- will continue.

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Dakota Swank's comment, April 18, 2013 11:03 AM
yea knesel. Weird huh? Well the armisist treaty involves the US so, lets be honest, nothing is going to happen there because all this is is little Kim Jong Un in his big boy britches, they're just empty threats. So why waste the nuke? it will just be devistating and tragic for the whole world, you can't just wipe out an entire population like that. It's not human.
Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 5:29 AM

Kim Jung-Un's reckless actions and threats that were the highlights of the beginning of his regime was nothing more than a frivoulous attempt at displaying his power.  He wanted the world to see his legitimacy as a leader, whether or not it was known he is the leader of a cult of personality. He wanted us to take him seriously, and in a way we did, as these threats were the talk among the nation for a bit.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:31 AM

The situation in North Korea is becoming increasingly troubling. Kim Jon Un has proven himself to be an unstable actor on the world stage. By all reports, it seems that the young leader is crazy. In this case, this nut case has a nuclear arsenal to play with. An attack on South Korea would trigger an automatic response from the U.S.  The Korean war could literally resume in a matter of minutes. Negotiating with the North Korean regime is futile at best. How can you negotiate with a nation that refuses to honor any type of international agreement? North Korea survives, because China allows it to. If the North Korean threat is ever eliminated, it will be China, not the United States that eliminates it.

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What it would look like if the Hiroshima bomb hit your city

What it would look like if the Hiroshima bomb hit your city | Young Professor | Scoop.it

"Maps bring the horror of Hiroshima home -- literally.  

Alex Wellerstein, a nuclear historian at the Stevens Institute of Technology, created a NukeMap that allows you to visualize what the Hiroshima and Nagasaki explosions would look like in your hometown. Kuang Keng Kuek Ser at Public Radio International has also developed a version, using slightly different estimates.

Here is what Little Boy, the Hiroshima bomb, would look like on Wellerstein's map if detonated in New York City."

Chris Costa's insight:

I highly suggest tinkering around with "NukeMap," as I have spent the last 30 minutes seeing how different bombs would destroy my neighborhood and the surrounding areas- it will even adjust for varying casualty rates in areas with higher or lower populations, even just by moving the detonation site a couple of streets away. It's pretty cool at the surface, but to examine the destructive capabilities of some of these weapons is downright terrifying. You view the blast radius encompassing your home, your entire existence, on a computer screen, and its easy to forget the devastation of it all disappearing. For those who survived the atomic bombs dropped at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there was no simulation to tinker with, but instead a reality more terrible than anything I've ever had to endure in my own personal life. Thousands of lives lost, thousands more left irreversibly shattered, never to be the same again. All because men in government buildings on opposite sides of the ocean couldn't get along. No one wins in war.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, August 7, 2015 11:12 AM

The NukeMap allows you to set different determinations such as bomb size, etc, as well.  

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 8, 2015 11:53 AM

Human Nature!

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Why caste still matters in India

Why caste still matters in India | Young Professor | Scoop.it

INDIA’S general election will take place before May. The front-runner to be the next prime minister is Narendra Modi of the Bharatiya Janata Party, currently chief  minister of Gujarat. A former tea-seller, he has previously attacked leaders of the ruling Congress party as elitist, corrupt and out of touch. Now he is emphasising his humble caste origins. In a speech in January he said 'high caste' Congress leaders were scared of taking on a rival from 'a backward caste'. If Mr Modi does win, he would be the first prime minister drawn from the 'other backward classes', or OBC, group. He is not the only politician to see electoral advantage in bringing up the subject: caste still matters enormously to most Indians."

Chris Costa's insight:

It was interesting to read about Modi's run for prime minister- I recently read a TIME magazine article about him, his original platform, and his subsequent work in office- and to see so much of Obama's run for office in Modi's struggle. Modi's support among his own caste, traditionally one that has been discriminated against in Indian society, is not at all different from Obama's support among the African American community. It goes to show that, for all our differences, people are a lot more alike then we'd care to think. Beyond that, it was interesting to see how much power the old caste system continues to hold in Indian society, much like the issues with race that Americans continue to struggle with within our own society. Appeals to different castes have been employed successfully by politicians and other forms of media; I once read that the most popular Indian films are often love stories revolving around "forbidden love" between two members of different, opposite castes. In a society that is so rich and complex, with hundreds of different languages and beliefs, it is so easy for lines to be drawn and for differences to be focused upon in a negative light. Happily for India, it has come a long way to address these problems and to move forward. While not perfect, India's future looks bright.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 8, 2015 9:18 PM

I agree that until there are more jobs created for the people of India, the slower the caste will fade out.  Over time it will fade out eventually, but the creation of jobs and more social interaction will help the process move along faster.  

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:34 PM

i dont understand how a country like india that is mostly modern and on the world scale can still have such an ancient system of labeling people be such a prominent practice in their society, i hope modi gets elected so he can start to eliminate this

Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, December 9, 2018 4:58 PM
The caste system in India still takes place today because it is slow to change. Even though Gandhi went to extreme measures to end the caste system. A caste system is a hierarchy of beings based on heredity. So if your not one of the lucky ones who is born into a top caste there is virtually no way of climbing the social ladder. In elections in particular voters all across the nation are swayed by the caste of the candidates. Caste is also very prominent in rural areas. If someone were to marry someone of a lower caste in rural areas they could face death because that is disrespectful to the norms of these particular areas. Even though many caste laws have been eradicated to benefit the people its still the people that are practicing this tragic system. Its tradition to them, some cannot see past the social injustices that this type of system permits.