WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo
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What Do We Write to Convey? - MethodSpace

What Do We Write to Convey? - MethodSpace | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
MethodSpace is a multidimensional online network for the community of researchers, from students to professors, engaged in research methods. Sponsored by SAGE Publishing, a leading publisher of books and journals in research methods, the site is created for students and researchers to network and share research, resources and debates. MethodSpace users have free access to selected journal articles, book chapters, etc which highlight emerging topics in the field.
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Citation: what you might cite for and how you might show critical analysis

Citation: what you might cite for and how you might show critical analysis | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
By Alistair Kwan Alistair Kwan is Susan Carter’s colleague and his thoughts on citation in a recent conversation prompted this post. Alistair envisions a workshop from his thoughts, and you could respond with a comment to let us know whether you agree. He provides the learning objectives and enough examples to prompt substantial thinking. I…
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Get writing: routine, re-mix, rebel & read!  

Get writing: routine, re-mix, rebel & read!   | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
This post is by Associate Professor Evonne Miller, Interim Director of QUT Design Lab, Queensland University of Technology (and one half of the Supervision Whisperers editorial team). Are you or your thesis students struggling to 'find the time' to write? In Helen Sword's latest book^, she destroys the myth that there is ONLY one way to…
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Metadiscourse

Metadiscourse | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
The longer that I teach academic writing to graduate students, the more time I find myself spending on metadiscourse. Over time, I've come to the conclusion that metadiscourse has a bad name—in the sense of a dubious reputation—and an actual bad name. The dubious reputation is presumably connected to both a general suspicion of academic writing and the many instances of…
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Critical Review – five tips to help supervisors get the balance right

Critical Review – five tips to help supervisors get the balance right | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
This post is written by Prof Parkinson, a population health gerontologist focused on chronic disease; and optimising aged care practice, and regional health care delivery. She is a Professorial Research Fellow at Central Queensland University, based in Rockhampton. She has been the editor in chief of Australasian Journal on Ageing since 2009. While critical review is a core element of supervision,…
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being ‘critical’ – starting the phd

being ‘critical’ – starting the phd | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
At the start of the PhD, your supervisor will almost undoubtedly ask you to critically evaluate some literatures. This reading is so that you can prepare a more detailed proposal than you initially submitted. And it you are doing courses at the start of your PhD, you will probably be asked to critically evaluate a…
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How to Write an APA Style Research Intro - NeoAcademic

How to Write an APA Style Research Intro - NeoAcademic | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
Writing an APA style introduction requires writing in a way most people didn't learn to write - structurally, piece by piece, logically, without a story.
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A to Z of English usage myths

A to Z of English usage myths | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
English usage lore is full of myths and hobgoblins. Some have the status of zombie rules, heeded by millions despite being bogus and illegitimate since forever (split infinitives, preposition-stranding). Other myths attach to particular words and make people unsure how to use them ‘properly’ (decimate, hopefully), leading in some cases to what linguists call ‘nervous…
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Author discusses her new book on writing advice for academics

Author discusses her new book on writing advice for academics | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
Author discusses her new book of writing advice for academics.  
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10 Words About The Writing Life That Aren’t In The Dictionary

10 Words About The Writing Life That Aren’t In The Dictionary | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
Have you ever tried to accurately describe to a non-writer what it’s like to have a mini attack of writer’s block, or to stare at a blank computer screen? You might have thought…there should be a…
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Becoming kind to your writing

Becoming kind to your writing | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
Academic writing is a key challenge in academia. Yet there is no reason why it shouldn’t bring you joy. Here Aya Nassar reflects on how creative analytical writing helped her approach her writing with kindness... I have always regarded writing as an obstacle, a sort of annoying action I had to put up with, a…
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Resources for Organizing Your Writing Projects - MethodSpace

Resources for Organizing Your Writing Projects - MethodSpace | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
MethodSpace is a multidimensional online network for the community of researchers, from students to professors, engaged in research methods. Sponsored by SAGE Publishing, a leading publisher of books and journals in research methods, the site is created for students and researchers to network and share research, resources and debates. MethodSpace users have free access to selected journal articles, book chapters, etc which highlight emerging topics in the field.
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Doctoral writing: developing metacognitive awareness

Doctoral writing: developing metacognitive awareness | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
By Susan Carter, with thanks to Peter Arthur, UBC One of the most important things learned when writing a doctoral thesis is the kind of self-knowledge that enables self-management. That skill alone makes the doctoral experience worthwhile, even when the journey is arduous and frustrating. A recent seminar by Peter Arthur on undergraduate metacognitive skills…
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Understanding the Needs of Your Reader

Understanding the Needs of Your Reader | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
This blog is grounded in three principles that I see as crucial for strong academic writing. The first stresses the connection between writing and thinking; the second emphasizes the importance of extensive revision; and the third underscores the value of understanding the needs of your reader. ♦ The third principle that informs my approach to academic writing is understanding the…
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How successful academics write

How successful academics write | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
Helen Sword is, hands down, one of the best writers on academic writing working today. The difference between Sword and other people working the writing advice patch is that she uses an interesting range of research approaches to inform her work. A new book from Sword is a nerdishly exciting moment for research educators like…
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Michael McQuarrie on writing for blogs: “the most utility comes from allowing me to think through a problem that is bugging me and then publish something about the result”

Michael McQuarrie on writing for blogs: “the most utility comes from allowing me to think through a problem that is bugging me and then publish something about the result” | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
In the wake of Donald Trump’s surprise election victory one year ago, LSE Sociology Associate Professor, Michael McQuarrie wrote on the regional nature of Trump’s win. His blog post, “Trump and the…
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Working on my grant application…

Working on my grant application… | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
I'm about 80% done my SSHRC Insight Grant application, the 80% where I made a serious go at getting all the moving pieces drafted and formatted and collated and sent it in for feedback. When it came the feedback was detailed, useful, and totally overwhelming and I pushed the whole thing away for a week…
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Against “reductionism”: envisioning each piece of writing in its own right, not as a version of something else

Against “reductionism”: envisioning each piece of writing in its own right, not as a version of something else | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
It’s not uncommon for authors to be asked to submit a shortened version of a research article or piece of writing. This, says Thomas Basbøll, is too often looked upon as a problem of “r…
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Four strategies to increase the likelihood of creating and sustaining successful research teams

Four strategies to increase the likelihood of creating and sustaining successful research teams | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
Modern scientific expertise rests heavily upon work carried out by teams, rather than scholars working on their own. Proper preparation is key, with some research suggesting that the effectiveness …
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Paragraphs

Paragraphs | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
A crucial strategy for improving academic writing is to pay attention to the importance of the paragraph as a unit of discourse. Novice writers tend to think of both full texts and sentences as areas for improvement, but they give less thought to the role of the paragraph. They recognize, of course, that a full text…
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What makes our writing ‘academic’?

What makes our writing ‘academic’? | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
Our guest blogger this week, Julia Molinari, is an EAP (English for Academic Purposes) Tutor and PhD Researcher at the University of Nottingham in the UK. She is bilingual English/Italian and teaches academic writing to Home and International undergraduate and postgraduate students. Her PhD research focuses on ‘what makes writing academic’ and is supervised by…
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Five top tips to apply for small grants

Five top tips to apply for small grants | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
Stephanie Zihms, the ECS Representative for the EMRP Division (and incoming Union Level Representative) has applied for a range of small scale grants (<£15,000, ca. 16,965 €). At this year’s General Assembly, she was one of two speakers at the ‘How to write a research grant’ short course, where she shared  insights from her successes and failures. In today’s post she tells us about the top five lessons she learnt in the process of applying for funds. Publications and grants are an important aspect in academia and success in both areas necessary for career progression. Frustratingly, many grants are only available to researchers with open-ended or permanent contracts and since practice makes perfect you don’t want your first grant proposal to be for a million pounds, dollars or euros. Instead, there are plenty of (often unknown) small scale grants available to fund anything from a trip to a conference through to a field campaign and to support some of your existing work. Applying for these gives you valuable insight when it comes to writing larger-scale grants and shows future employers you have a go-getting attitude. Start early – start small: Travel grants, internal support grants, field work grants – these all count and will help you get better at writing in a proposal style, learn the language of different panels and get used to the format of a proposal. You might also get a chance to learn how to budget and justify certain costs, a big aspect of proposal writing. Always ask for feedback: Not only on the grants you didn’t get but also on the ones you secured. It will tell you what the panel really liked about your proposal and you can highlight that even more next time. Some feedback from my successful Royal Academy of Engineering Newton Fund application. Credit: Stephanie Zihms Get training: See if your university or institution offers grant writing or academic writing courses – even if you’re not working on a proposal when you attend this training will come in handy when you do. You are also likely to make some good connections with people that will be able to help you when you do start applying. Get help: Either from colleagues, connections you made during a writing course, a specialised office within your university or even from the institution offering the grant. See if you can get previous applications that were successful to help you make sure you get the language right. Write, write, write: As an academic you will spend a lot of your time writing so it’s good to get lots of practice and make writing regularly a habit. I try and write for 1 hour every morning before I head to the office and I attend a weekly writing group on campus. Or join a virtual writing group via Twitter for example #AcWri or #AcWriMo for November – since it is Academic Writing Month. Set up for our weekly Hide & Write group. Credit: Stephanie Zihms Do you have any top tips for securing your first grants? If so, we’d love to hear them and share them with the GeoLog community. Please share your experiences and suggestions in the comments below! Stephanie’s full presentation can be downloaded here. At the upcoming General Assembly, Stephanie will be delivering a workshop on how to apply for small scale grants. Full details will be available once the conference programme launches, so stay tuned to the EGU 2018 website for more. By Stephanie Zihms, the ECS Representative for the EMRP Division (and incoming Union Level Representative) EGU 2018 will take place from 08 to 13 April 2017 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2018 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU18 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.
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How to Deal with Conflicting Reviewer Comments | Wiley

How to Deal with Conflicting Reviewer Comments | Wiley | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
    Anne Borcherds Managing Editor, Terranova Peer-review can sometimes feel like a lottery. On occasion, a paper may receive wildly
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don’t be a BAW – Badly-behaved Academic Writer

don’t be a BAW – Badly-behaved Academic Writer | WriteFest 2019 #AcWriFest19 #AcWriMo | Scoop.it
I was recently asked to talk to doctoral researchers about bad academic behaviour. Not in general, but bad behaviour specifically in relation to writing for publication. I came up with the following list. The Badly-behaved Academic Writer, or BAW for short - (1) has a hissy fit (that is, writes a hasty angry email to…
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