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NIH is asking for feedback on using smartphones and wearables to collect medical information

NIH is asking for feedback on using smartphones and wearables to collect medical information | Wearables | Scoop.it

The NIH is currently asking for pubic feedback on using smartphones and wearables to collect health and lifestyle data for its Precision Medicine Initiative — an initiative that hopes to collect data on more than 1 million individuals. The NIH’s Precision Medicine Initiative is described as:

 

a bold new enterprise to revolutionize medicine and generate the scientific evidence needed to move the concept of precision medicine into every day clinical practice

 

What exactly that means is a bit nebulous, but a New England Journal of Medicineperspective sheds some light:

 

Ultimately, we will need to evaluate the most promising approaches in much larger numbers of people over longer periods. Toward this end, we envisage assembling over time a longitudinal “cohort” of 1 million or more Americans who have volunteered to participate in research.

 

Qualified researchers from many organizations will, with appropriate protection of patient confidentiality, have access to the cohort’s data, so that the world’s brightest scientific and clinical minds can contribute insights and analysis.

 

The NIH is specifically asking the following:

 

Willingness of participants to carry their smartphone and wear wireless sensor devices sufficiently throughout the day so researchers can assess their health and activities.Willingness of participants without smartphones to upgrade to a smartphone at no expense.How often people would be willing to let researchers collect data through devices without being an inconvenience.The kind of information participants might like to receive back from researchers, and how often.Other ways to conveniently collect information from participants apart from smart phones or wearable devices.

 

It’s exciting to see the NIH see the potential of digital health. They specifically mention how smartphones and wearables can be utilized to collect a wide variety of data: location information, mobile questionnaires, heart rate, physical activity levels, and more.

 

There is already a robust discussion taking place in the comments section at the NIH website, and we encourage our readers to contribute.


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Heather Taylor's insight:

#wearables #healthcare #wearabledevices

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Richard Platt's curator insight, July 30, 2015 7:37 PM

The NIH is specifically asking the following:

  • Willingness of participants to carry their smartphone and wear wireless sensor devices sufficiently throughout the day so researchers can assess their health and activities.
  • Willingness of participants without smartphones to upgrade to a smartphone at no expense.
  • How often people would be willing to let researchers collect data through devices without being an inconvenience.
  • The kind of information participants might like to receive back from researchers, and how often.
  • Other ways to conveniently collect information from participants apart from smart phones or wearable devices.
Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek's curator insight, July 31, 2015 1:31 AM

The NIH is specifically asking the following:

  • Willingness of participants to carry their smartphone and wear wireless sensor devices sufficiently throughout the day so researchers can assess their health and activities.
  • Willingness of participants without smartphones to upgrade to a smartphone at no expense.
  • How often people would be willing to let researchers collect data through devices without being an inconvenience.
  • The kind of information participants might like to receive back from researchers, and how often.
  • Other ways to conveniently collect information from participants apart from smart phones or wearable devices.
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Rescooped by Heather Taylor from Technology in Business Today
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Designed in Ireland: Irish chip drives Intel’s Wearables Revolution

Designed in Ireland: Irish chip drives Intel’s Wearables Revolution | Wearables | Scoop.it
This morning at the Maker’s Faire in Rome a design team at Intel in Ireland once again found themselves at the heart of Intel’s march into the future.

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Toshiba Announces Near-Infrared Iris Scanner for Mobile Devices - findBIOMETRICS

Toshiba Announces Near-Infrared Iris Scanner for Mobile Devices - findBIOMETRICS | Wearables | Scoop.it
In another sign that iris scanning could soon become a major biometric modality on mobile devices, Toshiba has announced its new CMOS image sensor.
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Rescooped by Heather Taylor from Latest M2M & IoT News
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New collars monitor pets for pain, problems

New collars monitor pets for pain, problems | Wearables | Scoop.it
Get local news from Boise, Meridian, Nampa, Caldwell and more at Idaho Statesman and IdahoStatesman.com

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Rescooped by Heather Taylor from Healthcare and Technology news
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NIH is asking for feedback on using smartphones and wearables to collect medical information

NIH is asking for feedback on using smartphones and wearables to collect medical information | Wearables | Scoop.it

The NIH is currently asking for pubic feedback on using smartphones and wearables to collect health and lifestyle data for its Precision Medicine Initiative — an initiative that hopes to collect data on more than 1 million individuals. The NIH’s Precision Medicine Initiative is described as:

 

a bold new enterprise to revolutionize medicine and generate the scientific evidence needed to move the concept of precision medicine into every day clinical practice

 

What exactly that means is a bit nebulous, but a New England Journal of Medicineperspective sheds some light:

 

Ultimately, we will need to evaluate the most promising approaches in much larger numbers of people over longer periods. Toward this end, we envisage assembling over time a longitudinal “cohort” of 1 million or more Americans who have volunteered to participate in research.

 

Qualified researchers from many organizations will, with appropriate protection of patient confidentiality, have access to the cohort’s data, so that the world’s brightest scientific and clinical minds can contribute insights and analysis.

 

The NIH is specifically asking the following:

 

Willingness of participants to carry their smartphone and wear wireless sensor devices sufficiently throughout the day so researchers can assess their health and activities.Willingness of participants without smartphones to upgrade to a smartphone at no expense.How often people would be willing to let researchers collect data through devices without being an inconvenience.The kind of information participants might like to receive back from researchers, and how often.Other ways to conveniently collect information from participants apart from smart phones or wearable devices.

 

It’s exciting to see the NIH see the potential of digital health. They specifically mention how smartphones and wearables can be utilized to collect a wide variety of data: location information, mobile questionnaires, heart rate, physical activity levels, and more.

 

There is already a robust discussion taking place in the comments section at the NIH website, and we encourage our readers to contribute.


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Heather Taylor's insight:

#wearables #healthcare #wearabledevices

more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, July 30, 2015 7:37 PM

The NIH is specifically asking the following:

  • Willingness of participants to carry their smartphone and wear wireless sensor devices sufficiently throughout the day so researchers can assess their health and activities.
  • Willingness of participants without smartphones to upgrade to a smartphone at no expense.
  • How often people would be willing to let researchers collect data through devices without being an inconvenience.
  • The kind of information participants might like to receive back from researchers, and how often.
  • Other ways to conveniently collect information from participants apart from smart phones or wearable devices.
Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek's curator insight, July 31, 2015 1:31 AM

The NIH is specifically asking the following:

  • Willingness of participants to carry their smartphone and wear wireless sensor devices sufficiently throughout the day so researchers can assess their health and activities.
  • Willingness of participants without smartphones to upgrade to a smartphone at no expense.
  • How often people would be willing to let researchers collect data through devices without being an inconvenience.
  • The kind of information participants might like to receive back from researchers, and how often.
  • Other ways to conveniently collect information from participants apart from smart phones or wearable devices.
Rescooped by Heather Taylor from EHR and Health IT Consulting
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Wearables Data May Prevent Health Plan Denials

Wearables Data May Prevent Health Plan Denials | Wearables | Scoop.it

This story begins, as many do, with a real-world experience. Our health plan just refused to pay for a sleep study for my husband, who suffers from severe sleep apnea, despite his being quite symptomatic. We’re following up with the Virginia Department of Insurance and fully expect to win the day, though we remain baffled as to how they could make such a decision. While beginning the complaint process, a thought occurred to me.

 

What if wearables were able to detect wakefulness and sleepiness, and my husband was being tracked 24 hours a day?  If so, assuming he was wearing one, wouldn’t it be harder for a health plan to deny him the test he needed? After all, it wouldn’t be the word of one doctor versus the word of another, it would be a raft of data plus his sleep doctor’s opinion going up against the health plan’s physician reviewer.

Now, I realize this is a big leap in several ways.

 

For one thing, today doctors are very skeptical about the value generated by patient-controlled smartphone apps and wearables. According to a recent survey by market research firm MedPanel, in fact, only 15% of doctors surveyed see wearables of health apps as tools patients can use to get better. Until more physicians get on board, it seems unlikely that device makers will take this market seriously and nudge it into full clinical respectability.

 

Also, data generated by apps and wearables is seldom organized in a form that can be accessed easily by clinicians, much less uploaded to EMRs or shared with health insurers. Tools like Apple HealthKit, which can move such data into EMRs, should address this issue over time, but at present a lack of wearable/app data interoperability is a major stumbling block to leveraging that data.

 

And then there’s the tech issues. In the world I’m envisioning, wearables and health apps would merge with remote monitoring technologies, with the data they generate becoming as important to doctors as it is to patients. But neither smartphone apps nor wearables are equipped for this task as things stand.

 

And finally, even if you have what passes for proof, sometimes health plans don’t care how right you are. (That, of course, is a story for another day!)

 

Ultimately, though, new data generates new ways of doing business. I believe that when doctors fully adapt to using wearable and app data in clinical practice, it will change the dynamics of their relationship with health plans. While sleep tracking may not be available in the near future, other types of sophisticated sensor-based monitoring are just about to emerge, and their impact could be explosive.

 

True, there’s no guarantee that health insurers will change their ways. But my guess is that if doctors have more data to back up their requests, health plans won’t be able to tune it out completely, even if their tactics issuing denials aren’t transformed. Moreover, as wearables and apps get FDA approval, they’ll have an even harder time ignoring the data they generate.

 

With any luck, a greater use of up-to-the-minute patient monitoring data will benefit every stakeholder in the healthcare system, including insurers. After all, not to be cliched about it, but knowledge is power. I choose to believe that if wearables and apps data are put into play, that power will be put to good use.


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Jawbone is building a health tracker you can swallow

Jawbone is building a health tracker you can swallow | Wearables | Scoop.it
In the future, consumers will monitor their health by swallowing health sensors.

Via Olivier Janin
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Olivier Janin's curator insight, October 16, 2015 4:42 AM

The concept of embedding a chipset into a pill is not new. Proteus already get an approval from the FDA in 2012 for a system that use pills+patch that communicates with the chipset +iPhone App.


The news is more that Jawbone, a mass-market brand, intends to develop such product.  That means something, like an intrusion in the Pharma walled garden.

But how to reinsure the consumers to make them swallow a pill in their body ? 


Read also this article about Christopher Bettinger of Carnegie Mellon Univ. who presents a vision for creating safe, consumable electronics.

Richard Platt's curator insight, November 30, 2015 5:42 PM

Consumable electronics are on the way to you via Jawbone, albeit this is likely to infringe on big Pharma's move into this space, interesting vision presented on where this technology is going and how it can help us.

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Wearables Are Revolutionizing Healthcare, Not Just Fitness - Content Loop

Wearables Are Revolutionizing Healthcare, Not Just Fitness - Content Loop | Wearables | Scoop.it
fitness trackers, healthcare, Technology and Transformation, wearables
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Jay Kim (CTO, APX Labs) - Moving towards Hands-free wearables For Enterprise AR

AWE 2015 featured over 200 companies leading the charge in augmented and virtual reality, wearable tech and the internet of things. Nearly 3000 tech ...
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Rescooped by Heather Taylor from Electronics
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Flexible Batteries And What's Next In Wearables

Flexible Batteries And What's Next In Wearables | Wearables | Scoop.it
Flexible Batteries And What's Next In Wearables

Via Ensil
Heather Taylor's insight:

#wearables #smartwatch #fitnessband

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Ensil's curator insight, August 4, 2015 1:44 PM

Might smartphones become obsolete in their time, and give way to some kind of wearable? 

http://www.ensil.com/electronic-parts-sales