Virtual Teamworking
1.7K views | +0 today
Follow
Virtual Teamworking
Working together, while apart
Curated by Arie Baan
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

How politeness can ruin your team's meetings

How politeness can ruin your team's meetings | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Wayne Turmel - Management Issues blog]

While I have occasionally ( and probably accurately) described as rude, it has never been intentional. Seriously. That being said, I firmly believe that being too concerned about being polite and nice has, in fact, had a negative impact on your ability to truly lead your remote or virtual team and get the most from them in virtual meetings. 

 

In particular, there are two concepts that have reached mythical status that need to be re-examined. Not overturned completely, because they arose for good reason, but looked at a little more critically.

 

The reasons are simple. If the biggest complaints about webmeetings and remote teams are 1) a lack of participation or input, and 2) a lack of accountability - when people don't participate, contribute or follow up - then we have to examine how to change those problems. In the process, especially as you try to change the culture of your team, some tension is inevitable.

Arie Baan's insight:

Highlights the virtual leader's dilemma: "in a virtual team every member is a leader" vs. "be a more outspoken leader to off-set the impact of being invisible". No best practices here, use your common sense and experience.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team VIII

[Gina Abudi - Abudi Consulting blog]

Decision making on any team can be a difficult process, and managing a virtual team increases those challenges! More coordination and facilitation on the part of the team leader is required to ensure success in decision making in a virtual environment.

Consider the following decision-making styles that you might use depending on the situation:

Arie Baan's insight:

Useful framework for getting clarity on the "model" that will be used for the current decision by a team. It will be time well spent to make sure that all team members understand this - not easy in the case of diverse cultural backgrounds in a global team.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

3 More Tips for Working with Virtual Teams

[Elizabeth Harrin - PMTips.net blog]

Yesterday I looked at the roles that a clear project vision, excellent communication, motivational strategies and recognising individual differences have on successfully managing a virtual team.  To recap, a virtual team is one where not all the team members are based in the same location: a non-colocated team.  More and more project teams are like this now, as we work in an global marketplace, and with third-party partners.  Here are three more tips for making sure that your virtual team is as successful as possible:

Arie Baan's insight:

See also previous post "4 Tips for Working with a Virtual Team". Together 7 useful checklist items, for a quick health check of your virtual team

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Nine Hidden Assumptions That Can Kill (Virtual) Collaboration

[Nancy Settle-Murphy - Guided Insights e-zine]

[...]

So why don't leaders trust the concept of a virtual workplace? I think it's because they hold hidden (and in many cases, invalid) assumptions that guide their behavior and shape their attitudes toward virtual work. When assumptions stay hidden, they can't be validated or explored. The result: Senior leaders approach virtual work with a skeptical eye, making it almost impossible for virtual teams to live up to expectations.

 

Here are some of the big hidden assumptions from a virtual leader's point of view, which if not acknowledged and discussed, can bring the progress of a virtual team to a screeching halt - that is, if it's ever allowed to get off the ground. 

Arie Baan's insight:

Although this post starts with a reference to the recent Yahoo kerfuffle - which I said I would not give attention to anymore - this article presents an excellent overview of hidden motives around non-acceptance of the virtual mode of working. Worthwhile checklist, whether you're leading or led.

Nuala Dent's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:36 PM

It would be great to test these.

Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team VI

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team VI | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Gina Abudi - Abudi Consulting blog]

Resolving Team Member Conflicts

 

Conflicts are a part of any project team and can occur more often with virtual teams as it is sometimes easier to have a conflict with someone that is not working alongside you. I have found that conflicts occur more often on those virtual project teams that have not had the opportunity to get to know each other beforehand (a bit of socializing before getting down to project work!)

When a conflict cannot be resolved by the two or more individuals who are having a conflict, it is essential that the project manager step in to help resolve the conflict. For virtual meetings to resolve conflict I prefer to use a virtual meeting platform where we can (ideally) see each other rather than just talking over a phone.

 

Follow these best practice steps to collaboratively resolve conflicts on the virtual project team:

Arie Baan's insight:

One of the trickiest areas of virtual team leadership, particularly in truly multicultural teams. Good checklist presented here by Gina

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Why Purely Virtual Teams Don't Work

Why Purely Virtual Teams Don't Work | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Erika Andersen - Forbes blog]

Ten years ago today, on April 1, 2003, these things did not exist: facebook, youtube, twitter, linkedin.  Google had not yet gone public, and Wikipedia was in its infancy.  The smartphone was just coming into the market with limited capability.

The phrase “cloud computing” didn’t come into common usage till around 2006.

 

It’s really astonishing that all this has happened in such a short period of time. After tens of thousands of years of interacting with each other in pretty much the same way – face-to-face, or through a physical device (pictures, words, smoke signals) –  we’ve suddenly become able to communicate over long distances instantaneously.  This communication evolved quickly: from telegraph, to telephone, and then to computers. But it’s only over the past 10 or 15 years that our capabilities have allowed us to communicate so seamlessly that we can actually build pretty robust and 3-dimensional relationships – including work relationships – with people we never meet in person.

Arie Baan's insight:

Provocative, somewhat black-and-white, title: there are plenty examples around where purely virtual teams did work and do work. But the point is indeed that most virtual teams do work better if they have the opportunity to meet face-to-face as needed, if only at the beginning of their cooperation. 

 

The term TaaS (Talent as a Service) is new to me, I knew the concept, but I never found a catchy phrase for it. Until now....

 

 

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

How to Evaluate Virtual Employee Engagement

How to Evaluate Virtual Employee Engagement | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Seth Weedin - Spotlight blog]

These days, businesses are going to hire the talent they want, regardless of location. This means they are more willing to fill a job with a person who is thousands of miles away if they are indeed the best candidate.

When people of a project team are scattered throughout the world, the door opens a little wider for virtual employee problems and disconnect from the team. That’s why it’s so important for managers to make sure team members stay engaged and productivity remains high. If motivation is starting to lack and virtual employees are becoming distant, it’s important to learn how to recognize it and take action.

 

So how do managers recognize this change in behavior? It can be difficult at times but there are some ways to hone in on virtual employees having issues: Level of communication, tone of voice, and body language.

Arie Baan's insight:

This is an important skil for leaders of virtual teams - and not only for the leaders... 

In my experience it is not easy to generalize on'how to monitor the team's engagement 'health', because this sort of sensitivity depends on the skills of the leader, the character of the team (how long the team exists, history of face-to-face contacts, timeline of the project, and many more).

Some relevant thoughts here, though, and there are more interesting posts on this blog.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Six Types of Virtual Teams

Six Types of Virtual Teams | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Kimball and Maureen Fisher - OSP blog]

Virtual teams cross three types of boundaries:

time,space, andorganization

Understanding these variables helps determine the kinds of virtual teams you are leading and how to improve them. For example, a team that has members working in the same place at different times (such as a technical support service team working from the same bank of telephones, but with a day, afternoon, and night shift crew) might be able to meet some of their communication needs by updating a large chart located in their office each shift. However, a team distributed across several sites needs a different communication strategy.[Kim,ball & 

Arie Baan's insight:

Interesting and workable model for classification of virtual teams, based on their 2001 book "The Distance Manager".

This book is no longer in print, though you can get it 2nd hand, and also as a Kindle e-book from Amazon

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team III

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team III | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Gina Abudi - Abudi Consulting blog] 

 

Effective Virtual Team Meetings

 

Virtual team meetings need to be structured and formalized to ensure they are successful and accomplish what needs to be accomplished. It is often easier to manage a face-to-face meeting than it is to manage a virtual team meeting.  Face-to-face we can more easily manage conversations, see team members’ reactions to what is being said, and keep the attention of those in the room. Virtually – as the project manager – you are more challenged with managing the meeting and accomplishing the goals of the meeting. The use of virtual platforms (Skype, Adobe Connect Pro, WebEx, etc.) enable for more interactive virtual meetings

Arie Baan's insight:

I have involved team members in setting up a Code-of-Conduct - CoC - for effective virtual team meetings by asking them to individually list those elements of a CoC that they would like to see, then bring these together, prioritize them and introduce them a couple of rules at the time. Ownership of the CoC is then obtained easier and faster.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team I

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team I | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Gina Abudi - Abudi Consulting blog] 

Over the next few weeks we’ll be posting best practices focused on successfully leading your virtual project team. These best practices will help you increase the success of your team overall – working together, meeting goals, sharing information, etc. Project teams can be challenging in general, add a virtual component to that team and the complexity just increases! 


Today we’ll cover “roles and responsibilities.” Specifically – for a virtual project team to be successful you must ensure that every team member is clear on their roles and responsibilities on the project. I assign roles and responsibilies based on expertise, skills, past experiences, and – when you do it right and plan early – you can also assign roles and responsibilities enabling junior team members to gain essential new skills while working on the project.

Arie Baan's insight:

In the results of the diagnostic survey that I have used with several hundred virtual teams over the years, unclear roles and responsibilities were the most common complaint by team members. It is not easy to get this sorted initially, and also to accommodate the changes overe time, but it is in my experience time well spent

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Ten Characteristics That Make Some Virtual Teams More Effective Than Others

[Richard Lepsinger - OnPoint consulting blog]

- blog post + video + transcript -

"Excellence is a better teacher than mediocrity. The lessons of the ordinary are everywhere. Truly profound and original insights are to be found only in studying the exemplary.” - - Warren G. Bennis

 

As Warren Bennis suggests, there are numerous benefits associated with “studying the exemplary.” We at OnPoint believe that, too. And so do our clients—we are frequently asked to describe how top performing virtual teams benchmark effectiveness.

We’re regularly asked, What team size is optimal? Do cross-functional teams have more challenges? How often should virtual teams meet face-to-face? These and similar questions led to our research study, in which we collected data to better understand high performing virtual teams so that we could provide practical research-based recommendations to leaders and managers.

As part of our study, we profiled top performing virtual teams and found that the characteristics that emerged fell into three categories: team composition, communication and training, and leadership. Each one is explored in more detail in the following video clip.

Arie Baan's insight:

Solid, relevant material!

Use the 10 points as a checklist for how your own organization / team is doing.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Gina Abudi - Abudi Consulting blog]

Over the next few weeks we’ll be posting best practices focused on successfully leading your virtual project team. These best practices will help you increase the success of your team overall – working together, meeting goals, sharing information, etc. Project teams can be challenging in general, add a virtual component to that team and the complexity just increases! Today we’ll cover “roles and responsibilities.” Specifically – for a virtual project team to be successful you must ensure that every team member is clear on their roles and responsibilities on the project. I assign roles and responsibilies based on expertise, skills, past experiences, and – when you do it right and plan early – you can also assign roles and responsibilities enabling junior team members to gain essential new skills while working on the project.

Arie Baan's insight:

Whether these practices are best for your team or not, this post lists a couple of relevant items to discuss and agree in your virtual team. Whatever you agree collectively will be a best practice for your team.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Telecommuting Works If You Intentionally Design It

Telecommuting Works If You Intentionally Design It | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Daniel W. Rasmus - Fast Company blog]

Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer made a very 20th-century management decision when she decided to recall the company’s telecommuters and revoke their remote work privileges. She could have offered industry leadership for distributed workforce management, but instead, she acted like a typical industrial age manager by deciding that seeing people’s butts in seats would result in a better managed workforce.

Arie Baan's insight:

OK, one more (and this will really be the last) on the Meyer-homeworking controversy ....

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

How to Avoid Virtual Miscommunication

How to Avoid Virtual Miscommunication | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Keith Ferrazzi - HBR blog]

Why is miscommunication common in the virtual workplace? Lack of context. And it's not just that e-mails and phone conversations lack a person's visual reaction to what you've said.

Think about the information you can glean just from the seating arrangement in a physical conference room — who sits next to whom, who's at the head of the table, who has put a little extra distance between herself and her neighbor, and so on. All those cues are missing in a typical teleconference.

As a result, even the simplest of things can be misinterpreted. For instance, does the use of an exclamation mark in a text message ("I didn't know that!") indicate that the writer is excited, surprised, or angry? Before sending an important e-mail, ask someone else to read it just to make sure it won't be misconstrued. Moreover, I strongly advise that virtual communications use respect, positive affirmations, and gratitude to set the right tone and proper context. "When you have shared context and you exchange information, you'll have a shared understanding," says Karen Sobel-Lojeski, a professor at Stony Brook University. To achieve that shared understanding, I recommend the following best practices:

Arie Baan's insight:

Virtual communication can be a minefield. Some practical suggestions here to help you navigate.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team VII

[Gina Abudi - Abudi consulting blog]

Evaluating the effectiveness of your virtual team meetings is essential to ensure that:

Team members felt that they were able to effective contribute to the virtual meetingThe team felt comfortable and confident with any decisions made during the virtual meetingThe objectives were accomplished to team members’ satisfaction

Use any of the following methods to evaluate virtual team meetings:

Arie Baan's insight:

Virtual meetings can be nightmare-ish if not actively owned by the participants.

 

One approach that I found to be successful: I have been advocating a continuous-improvement process by having one of the participants after each meeting ask the others for the one key thing they would like to do in the next meeting to make it better, and the one key thing they would want to stop or avoid. Collate the list, and collectively choose one thing to do, and one thing to avoid, and stick to them. Sounds boring and a lot of work, but actually takes very little time after having done it 2 or 3 times. 

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

4 Tips for Working with a Virtual Team

[Elizabeth Harrin - PMTips.net blog]

A virtual team is one where not all the team members are in the same place.  This could be across several buildings in the same town, or across several timezones.  The most extreme examples would be a ‘follow the sun’ type team, with team members in Australia, the US and Europe/Middle East/Africa.  In this team example, you will find it difficult to get all the team members together as someone will be going to bed just as someone else is getting into the office!  However, you can successfully manage virtual teams.  Here are some tips.

Arie Baan's insight:

Good point to add to a "checklist" that you can use to see how your virtual team is doing as a whole - and therefore where to focus efforts to improve team effectiveness.

Also usueful to assess how individuals - team leader and members are doing.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Virtual Work Works, But Don’t Confuse Technology with Change Management

Virtual Work Works, But Don’t Confuse Technology with Change Management | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Ron Ricci - Cisco blog]

I was in a brainstorm meeting about my team’s next-generation strategy last week, and we made a number of random connections that knitted together a pretty big idea — the kind of dot-connecting that only happens when people with different (and sometime conflicting) perspectives trust each other in the pursuit of an important goal.

 

Five of us worked on the idea, but only two of us were in the room physically together. Yes, I’ll say it out loud:  three people were working from home.

 

Much has been said and written recently about the value of working virtually, and I don’t think you can sub-divide mobility into “at home” and “on the road.” Social technologies, video and mobile platforms make it easy to work from just about anywhere.

 

But as leaders, we have to resist the temptation to confuse technology with change management -- despite our love affair with technology. Any time technology brings a sea-change transformation to the way humans do stuff, especially work stuff, we can’t forget that people work in organizations — and organizations are an amalgam of culture, processes and technology.

All of Cisco’s experience has taught us that technology alone does not create sustainable productivity; it is the way culture supports the behaviors needed to make the technology effective and processes that support and optimize it. Ultimately any organization needs to determine its “system” for collaborating as teams, whether those teams are in the same room all the time or working virtually anywhere in the world. No model is right or wrong; it is what works for the mission of that organization.

 

For those organizations where work is an outcome, not a place, here are some best practices from The Collaboration Imperative on making virtual work work:

 

Arie Baan's insight:

A couple of years ago I had the opportunity to do some work together with Cisco on the way that they had embedded the virtual element in their working practices. I was impressed.

 

Some thougfhtful recommendations here from that organization

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team V

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team V | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Gina Abudi - Abudi Consulting blog]

It is essential to set up processes and procedures for effective communications early on in virtual teams. Involve the virtual team members in determining processes and procedures for effective communications as undoubtedly each team member has a preferred way of communicating. I try to accommodate the team members’ individual preferences as much as possible in mapping out the communication plan for the project. When the team is involved in developing processes and procedures to communicate, they are more apt to follow those processes and you are more likely to have processes that work for the entire team.

 

One way to communicate is never sufficient for a virtual team. Communications may be inconsistent when working globally and team members are used to certain methods of communicating. Always set up communications via a number of channels such as email, phone, instant messaging, virtual meetings, collaboration portals, social media, etc. This variety enables for more effective communications overall. Be sure that you work with the team to determine when you will communicate via a certain method – e.g., email for “need to know” information, instant messaging for emergencies, collaboration portal to share documents, etc.

Arie Baan's insight:

In my experience, there are never enough time  / resources available to do the communication you need to do in the virtual world. A communications plan is therefore essential to ensure that you make the most of what you have got. My approach is to base the communications plan on an analysis of the stakeholders of the virtual team. Setting priorities ther will help you to set up an effective communications plan.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

5 Uncommon Tips for Managing Your Virtual Team

5 Uncommon Tips for Managing Your Virtual Team | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Hassan Osman - Wamda.com]

Typical “how-to” advice on managing virtual teams goes something like this:

 

Have clear objectives. Use video. Communicate efficiently. Use the right technology.

 

All of that is great advice (and should certainly be followed), but you might want to know a little bit more than your traditional pointers about how to effectively manage your team.

Here are five uncommon tips that will help you out:

Arie Baan's insight:

Solid advice, well worth considering!

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

How to lead in a virtual team

How to lead in a virtual team | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Nathan Waterhouse - Organizational Design blog]

You are standing at the end of a road before a small brick building. Around you is a forest. A small stream flows out of the building and down a gully. Enter Command >

This is how the first arcade text-based adventure game began. You played by entering 5 letter commands – there were no visuals whatsoever, you had to use logic and your imagination to figure out what might happen next. Your navigation of the game were  limited by a range of cryptic text-commands. It is also exactly how working in and managing a virtual team feels.

 

For most of the day, you have to rely on text-based cues from emails that you catch from people you care about separated by multiple time zones. Even when you speak with them during your weekly video calls you have to uncompress their week’s experience from the limited time you have together. How are they feeling, what’s going on at home you wonder, are they happy, are they overstretched, are they inspired by their work – these are just some of the questions that regularly cross your mind when you are running through the laundry list of tasks and team priorities. If you’ve ever had to work with someone who is not physically in the same room as you on a regular basis you know what it’s like to work in a virtual team. Why do we work like this and what can be done to make the experience smoother and more enjoyable for everyone?

Arie Baan's insight:

Some reflections on virtual teamworking. (Difficult to read, though, I had to fire up my Clearly plug-in - from Evernote - to have an easy read)

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Inquiring Minds: Sharing Knowledge Across Your Distributed Team

Inquiring Minds: Sharing Knowledge Across Your Distributed Team | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Julia Camenisch - oDesk blog]

What makes your business unique? Whether you realize it or not, your company has its own “secret sauce”: a competitive edge that generates revenue and wins new customers. While that success is partly built on external-facing factors (such as a stellar product or insanely great customer service), it also depends on something even more fundamental: specialized knowledge.

 

The knowledge that undergirds your company’s operations is an intangible asset, yet it clearly has an impact on tangible results. It encompasses the nitty-gritty details of your approach to source code, competitive market intelligence, accounting operations, data analytics – basically any and every process that keeps your business ticking.

Arie Baan's insight:

Building shared understanding is a key success factor for virtual teams, and one of the key ingredients for that is effective management of knowledge sharing.

This post present good background material and links for this topic.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team II

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team II | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Gina Abudi - Abudi Consulting blog] 

In today’s article on best practices to increase the success of your virtual project teams we’ll cover the “team kick off meeting.”

 

I strive to get clients to see the value of bringing a virtual team together for the initial kick off meeting. It is so much more valuable to have a face-to-face meeting. However, if I can’t sell the client on the benefit, or the funding just doesn’t exist, then I move to a virtual format. For a virtual team this team kick off meeting provides an opportunity for project team members to get to know each other and be comfortable with each other. When I working with a virtual team more likely than not there are a variety of cultures involved on the team. In such situations I prepare a few team building activities that enable individuals to share a bit about their cultural background. In addition, we share how we like to work with others, what our strengths are (what we bring to the project) and what excites us about working on projects. We also discuss challenges we have had working on projects.

Arie Baan's insight:

Essential ingredient for creating fast-moving, effective virtual teams. This can in my experience only be bypassed when the team members have extensive previous experience in working in virtual teams.

 

Another tip - reduce costs by involving a good travewl agent in finding the best place and time for a kick-off meeting. The center of gravity betwwen the various  locations of team members is not always the best....

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team IV

Best Practices to Increase the Success of Your Virtual Project Team IV | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Gina Abudi - Abudi Consulting blog] 

The larger the virtual team the more complex it becomes and the more difficult for one person to manage overall. I have found that any more than 8 members of the core project team is difficult for one person to manage effectively when the team is a remote or virtual team. Over 8 members and I prefer to have sub-team leads to help manage smaller teams.

Arie Baan's insight:

Good practice to keep the size of virtual teams small ... This is against some management approaches that aim to get all stakeholders represented in the team, leading to unwieldy team sizes of 15 or more.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

The Right Way to Build a Virtual Team

[Omin Tanner? - Blogymate blog]

In many ways it's a great deal easier to get a web business off the ground, today. If you want to experience real growth in your business, then you will figure out how to scale it up. No matter what niche you're targeting, and no matter what kind of products you're selling, if you know you can grow you'll be able to capture a good part of it in no time. Of course not all newer businesses have that luxury, but it all depends on many factors. There is a way out of this dilemma, and it involves creating your own virtual team that can be assembled from any time zone on the planet.

Arie Baan's insight:

A couple of good thoughts on building a virtual team. Have a look, and after reading it, think about what would be your key take-away.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Arie Baan
Scoop.it!

Tips for delegating to virtual team members

Tips for delegating to virtual team members | Virtual Teamworking | Scoop.it

[Michaela Clark - VirtualPA blog]

We all know that taking advantage of using virtual support staff, such as a virtual assistant or project manager,  is a smart move for business owners. But getting a good cohesive working relationship with someone that you may never meet or speak to, does take time.

 

When you have someone working in front of you, it’s much easier to get to know their personality and how they like to work. When working remotely the message can easily get lost in translation.

The good news is that there are a few things you can do to make it work sooner rather than later.

Arie Baan's insight:

5 topics worth considering. Not all will catch your imagination, but I guess at least one of them will resonate with your situation .....

No comment yet.