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China reports two human H9N2 avian flu cases

China reports two human H9N2 avian flu cases | Virology News | Scoop.it
By NewsDesk   @bactiman63 Taiwan health officials reported today (computer translated) on two human H9N2 avian influenza on Mainland China. The cases, from November 12th and 22nd, are the first reported in China this season.
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Virology News
Topical news snippets about viruses that affect people.  And other things. Like Led Zeppelin. And zombies B-)
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Why the Covid-19 coronavirus is worse than the flu, in one chart

Why the Covid-19 coronavirus is worse than the flu, in one chart | Virology News | Scoop.it
It’s more contagious, more deadly (particularly for older people), and it has a greater potential to overwhelm our health care system.
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GREAT graphic!!
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Relaxing IP restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic

Relaxing IP restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic | Virology News | Scoop.it
In the race to find both a vaccine and cure for COVID-19, the tension between monopoly rights and public access to crucial medicines, diagnostics and medical devices has been pushed into the spotlight.
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Sounds like a damn good idea?
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Coronavirus Vaccines May Not Work for the Elderly--and This Lab Aims to Change That

Coronavirus Vaccines May Not Work for the Elderly--and This Lab Aims to Change That | Virology News | Scoop.it
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
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This method extends life of critical N95 face masks

This method extends life of critical N95 face masks | Virology News | Scoop.it
Hospitals facing the COVID-19 pandemic are in desperate need of N95 face masks are desperately needed as .
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Dragon lizard is a brand new species in the Smaug family

Dragon lizard is a brand new species in the Smaug family | Virology News | Scoop.it
Researchers have found a new species in the Smaug genus, named for the deadly dragon in J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit.
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What the cruise-ship outbreaks reveal about COVID-19

What the cruise-ship outbreaks reveal about COVID-19 | Virology News | Scoop.it
Close confines help the virus to spread, but closed environments are also an ideal place to study how the new coronavirus behaves.
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...and that the real CFR for a mainly elderly cohort that were ALL tested, is probably ~1% - because of the ~40% of infected who showed no symptoms.
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Coronavirus Treatment’s “Rare Disease” Status Could Make It Unaffordable

Coronavirus Treatment’s “Rare Disease” Status Could Make It Unaffordable | Virology News | Scoop.it
A promising anti-viral developed by Gilead Sciences, remdesivir, has received lucrative “orphan” drug status.
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COVID-19 needs a Manhattan Project

COVID-19 needs a Manhattan Project | Virology News | Scoop.it
There is an unprecedented race to develop a vaccine against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). With at least 44 vaccines in early-stage development, what outcome can we expect? Will the first vaccine to cross the finish line be the safest and most effective? Or will it be the most well-funded vaccines that first become available, or perhaps those using vaccine technologies with the fewest regulatory hurdles? The answer could be a vaccine that ticks all these boxes. If we want to maximize the chances for success, however, and have enough doses to end the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, current piecemeal efforts won’t be enough. If ever there was a case for a coordinated global vaccine development effort using a “big science” approach, it is now. There is a strong track record for publicly funded, large-scale scientific endeavors that bring together global expertise and resources toward a common goal. The Manhattan Project during World War II didn’t just bring about nuclear weapons quickly; it led to countless changes in how scientists from many countries work together. The Human Genome Project and CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) engaged scientists from around the world to drive basic research from their home labs through local and virtual teamwork. Taking this big, coordinated approach to developing a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine will not only potentially save hundreds of thousands of lives, but will also help the world be better prepared for the next pandemic. An initiative of this scale won’t be easy. Extraordinary sharing of information and resources will be critical, including data on the virus, the various vaccine candidates, vaccine adjuvants, cell lines, and manufacturing advances. Allowing different efforts to follow their own leads during the early stages will take advantage of healthy competition that is vital to the scientific endeavor. We must then decide which vaccine candidates warrant further exploration purely on the basis of scientific merit. This will require drawing on work already supported by many government agencies, independent organizations like the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations, and pharmaceutical and biotech companies to ensure that no potentially important candidate vaccines are missed. Only then can we start to narrow in on those candidates to be advanced through all clinical trial phases. This shortlist also needs to be based on which candidates can be developed, approved, and manufactured most efficiently. Trials need to be carried out in parallel, not sequentially, using adaptive trial designs, optimized for speed and tested in different populations—rich and developing countries, from children to the elderly—so that we can ultimately protect everyone. Because the virus is spreading quickly, testing will be needed in communities where we can get answers fast—that means running trials anywhere in the world, not just in preset testing locations. Working with regulators early in the process will increase the likelihood of rapid approvals, and then once approved, a coordinated effort will ensure that sufficient quantities are available to all who need the vaccine, not just to the highest bidder. All of this will require substantial funding, which is the big ask of big science. Late-stage clinical trials are not cheap, nor is vaccine manufacturing. Although new modular manufacturing methods may speed up the process and cut costs, a single vaccine facility can cost half a billion dollars. Distribution comes at a cost, too. So, to guarantee sufficient production of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, incentives are needed to engage manufacturers for large-scale capacity. As for dissemination, those organizations with experience in global vaccine distribution, like Gavi, will be at the ready. Ideally, this effort would be led by a team with a scientific advisory mechanism of the highest quality that could operate under the auspices of the World Health Organization (WHO), for example. But none of this will be possible without political will and a global commitment from leaders of the G7 and G20 countries and multilateral organizations, like the WHO and the World Bank. A pandemic of this magnitude, affecting so many lives, livelihoods, and economies, demands this. In many ways, COVID-19 is more like the Manhattan Project than other big science efforts, not just because it involves the application of science and not just in terms of scale, but because it is a global security issue. In the race to develop a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, everyone must win. ↵* Hear more from the author about a vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 at go.ted.com/sethberkley.
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Moderna CEO Stéphane Bancel outlines a short path for emergency use of a coronavirus vaccine 

Moderna CEO Stéphane Bancel outlines a short path for emergency use of a coronavirus vaccine  | Virology News | Scoop.it
NIAID director Anthony Fauci has left no doubts that it takes 12 to 18 months to get a new vaccine tested and in commercial use, in the best of circumstances. But in times of a global emergency — like these — maybe there’s another, faster route to follow.
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Patients and doctors seem open to telemedicine

Patients and doctors seem open to telemedicine | Virology News | Scoop.it
New research finds that both physicians and patients in the UK are open to telemedicine. It's a timely finding as efforts to manage COVID-19 lead to more social distancing.
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Can a century-old TB vaccine steel the immune system against the new coronavirus?

Can a century-old TB vaccine steel the immune system against the new coronavirus? | Virology News | Scoop.it
Scientists launch trial of bacillus Calmette-Guérin, a vaccine made of living bacteria, to protect health care workers at risk of COVID-19 infection...
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Watch out for myths about COVID-19 'miracle cures'

Watch out for myths about COVID-19 'miracle cures' | Virology News | Scoop.it
Lots of people believe in misinformation and myths about COVID-19 causes and "cures," a new survey shows. But the results weren't all bad.
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'Do I have COVID-19?' Free online tool does triage

'Do I have COVID-19?' Free online tool does triage | Virology News | Scoop.it
If you find yourself asking "Do I have COVID-19?" consider this free online tool that sorts people into high, intermediate, and low risk.
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Not endorsed, just repeated.
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Coronavirus (COVID-19): The latest science & expert commentary | Frontiers

Coronavirus (COVID-19): The latest science & expert commentary | Frontiers | Virology News | Scoop.it
Trusted source for the latest science on SARS-CoV-2 & COVID-19
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COVID-19 infection growth rates, lagged mortality rates, and other interesting statistics

We evaluate COVID-19's global infection growth rate, lagged mortality rates, and other interesting statistics including the difference in mortality rates between countries.
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Should scientists infect healthy people with the coronavirus to test vaccines?

Should scientists infect healthy people with the coronavirus to test vaccines? | Virology News | Scoop.it
Radical proposal to conduct ‘human challenge’ studies could dramatically speed up vaccine research.
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COVID-19 threatens endangered great apes, too

COVID-19 threatens endangered great apes, too | Virology News | Scoop.it
Endangered apes also face the threat of COVID-19. And they'll need our help to stay safe and avoid extinction, experts warn.
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Coronavirus could become seasonal, top US scientist warns

Coronavirus could become seasonal, top US scientist warns | Virology News | Scoop.it
There is a strong chance the new coronavirus could return in seasonal cycles, a senior US scientist said Wednesday, underscoring the urgent need to find a vaccine and effective treatments.
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Anatomy of a killer - Understanding SARS-CoV-2 and the drugs that might lessen its power

Anatomy of a killer - Understanding SARS-CoV-2 and the drugs that might lessen its power | Virology News | Scoop.it
Modest improvements in treatment could make a big difference...
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100-year-old letter offers hope during COVID-19 outbreak

100-year-old letter offers hope during COVID-19 outbreak | Virology News | Scoop.it
In the North Valley, a 100-year-old letter is providing some hope for the future when it comes to COVID-19.
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Stress and poor sleep may boost your COVID-19 risk

Stress and poor sleep may boost your COVID-19 risk | Virology News | Scoop.it
Lost sleep, stress, and loneliness can up your chance of getting sick. That includes COVID-19 risk. There are, however, things you can do.
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5 ways to talk to your kids about COVID-19

5 ways to talk to your kids about COVID-19 | Virology News | Scoop.it
"We don't have to pretend that everything is okay.It's helpful for children to see behind the curtain right now."...
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'Guilty pleasures' can get us through social distancing

'Guilty pleasures' can get us through social distancing | Virology News | Scoop.it
Social distancing protects us from COVID-19. But how can we protect our mental health as we're isolating? One solution: Indulge in guilty pleasures.
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DOD grant accelerates SARS-CoV-2 vaccine manufacturing

DOD grant accelerates SARS-CoV-2 vaccine manufacturing | Virology News | Scoop.it
The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) has awarded Ology Bioservices and Inovio Pharmaceuticals an $11.9 million contract to rapidly manufacture DNA vaccines.
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How to talk to your older parents about the coronavirus

How to talk to your older parents about the coronavirus | Virology News | Scoop.it
Expert tips to help you navigate tough conversations with your parents and guide decisions about staying inside and staying healthy.
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Lost sense of smell or taste could signal you have COVID-19

Lost sense of smell or taste could signal you have COVID-19 | Virology News | Scoop.it
Sudden loss of sense of smell or taste could be the first symptoms of COVID-19. An expert explains why that is and what to do if it happens to you.
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