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Opportunity for Israeli startups: Japan is seeking innovative green technologies with a new $19 billion government fund - CTech

Opportunity for Israeli startups: Japan is seeking innovative green technologies with a new $19 billion government fund - CTech | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
"Our country needs a source of growth in the post-corona era", said Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga at a press conference on December 4th, "and the core of that growth will be green and digital.”
 

Digital-related efforts have already begun immediately after the Suga administration was inaugurated in September 2020. Japan has been lagging far behind other countries in digitizing procedures, as exemplified by its stamp culture, but the Covid-19 pandemic has made it imperative for Japan to take action.
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IEA calls for $3 trillion global investment in COVID-19 recovery

IEA calls for $3 trillion global investment in COVID-19 recovery | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
The International Energy Agency has unveiled a global COVID-19 recovery plan for the global energy sector which outlines a three-year series of actions designed to revitalize economies, boost employment and make energy systems cleaner and more resilient.

At a live-streamed press briefing, IEA executive director Dr Fatih Birol said: “Our numbers show that there has been a huge impact across the energy sector, some parts more, some parts less, and a big decline in carbon usage.

“We are putting on the table a road-map of how to get out this crisis in better shape, [meaning] a much more modern, cleaner, more resilient energy system, while energy policies give a boost to economic growth, and help to create new jobs.”
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IEA unveils framework for future government energy action – Kallanish Energy News

IEA unveils framework for future government energy action – Kallanish Energy News | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
The International Energy Agency has released an energy sector framework for governments to boost economic growth, create new employment opportunities and accelerate cleaner energy infrastructures.

The World Energy Outlook Special Report on Sustainable Recovery was published on Thursday by the IEA, based on analysis conducted in cooperation with the International Monetary Fund, Kallanish Energy learns.

The framework includes a series of actions that could be implemented within governmental policies and targeted investments between 2021 and 2023, the IEA said, as policymakers seek to address the consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic.
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IEA Details $3 Trillion Sustainable Recovery Plan to Revitalize Economies

IEA Details $3 Trillion Sustainable Recovery Plan to Revitalize Economies | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
The International Energy Agency (IEA) published a new plan for governments worldwide that outlines policies and investments for making energy systems cleaner and more resilient.

“Special Report on Sustainable Recovery,” from the IEA’s World Energy Outlook series, is based on an analysis completed in coordination with the International Monetary Fund. The plan details a set of policy actions and targeted investments from 2021 to 2023 that could achieve a number of significant outcomes as governments respond to the economic effects of the covid-19 pandemic.
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The climate crisis will profoundly affect the health of every child alive today, report says

The climate crisis will profoundly affect the health of every child alive today, report says | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
The climate crisis is already hurting our health and it could burden generations to come with lifelong health problems, a new report finds. It could challenge already overwhelmed health systems and undermine much of the medical progress that has been made in the last century.
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Last year there were 220 million more people in danger from heat waves than in the 90s

Last year there were 220 million more people in danger from heat waves than in the 90s | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Climate change has health consequences and increasingly threatens more people with premature death . In terms of heat waves alone, last year there were 220 million more elderly people exposed than in the 90s. It is the highest figure recorded so far and it is not trivial, since these episodes of cannula generated generate in the older population a stress to the organism that can trigger death. But, as the "The Lancet Countdown" report warns on Thursday, it is the children born today who will suffer the worst consequences , since they will live them at all stages of their lives, from childhood to old age, multiplying health risks in each of them if climate change is not stopped.

 

Original is in Spanish. Tranlsation by Google Translate.

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The health of future generations is likely to be affected by climate change

The health of future generations is likely to be affected by climate change | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
If nothing is done against climate change, the health of children born today will be increasingly threatened over their lifetime, experts say in a report released Thursday, November 14.

"Climate change will define the health of an entire generation," said Dr. Nick Watts, responsible for this report. Published in the medical journal The Lancet a few weeks before the international climate conference (COP25), it resonates like an echo of the fears of which the Swedish Greta Thunberg has become the emblem in the world.

 

Original is in French. Translation of these paragraphs by Google translate.

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How Climate Change Will Destroy Children's Health

How Climate Change Will Destroy Children's Health | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it

Let’s pretend the 195 nations that signed the 2016 Paris Climate Accord really do take all of the steps necessary to reach the agreement’s key goal: limiting the increase in global temperature to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels.

In that world, any children born today would grow up to witness some happy milestones. If they lived in the United Kingdom, they’d see their country phase out the use of coal by the time they turned six. If they lived in France, they would see gasoline-powered cars eliminated by their 21st birthday. And, as all of the 195 countries similarly reached their individual targets, all of the children born today would be 31 when the world reached net-zero greenhouse emissions.

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IEA releases Sustainable Recovery Plan with strong focus on hydropower modernisation | International Hydropower Association

IEA releases Sustainable Recovery Plan with strong focus on hydropower modernisation | International Hydropower Association | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
In response to the Covid-19 pandemic and economic crisis being felt across the world, today the IEA released its Sustainable Recovery Plan.

It seeks to show governments what they can do to boost economic growth, create jobs and put global greenhouse gas emissions into structural decline. 

IHA Chief Executive Eddie Rich welcomed the report: “Trillions of dollars will be spent by governments on the economic recovery. As the report demonstrates, sustainable hydropower can not only deliver long term cheap and clean energy, but also tens of thousands of skilled jobs with the right support. It should be near the top of the shopping list.”
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IEA: ‘Green’ coronavirus recovery would keep global emissions below 2019 peak

IEA: ‘Green’ coronavirus recovery would keep global emissions below 2019 peak | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
The world has a “once-in-a-lifetime opportunity” to pour investment into clean energy and create millions of new jobs, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA).

Its “sustainable recovery plan” for the coronavirus pandemic lays out a series of measures that the agency says would ensure 2019 was the “definitive peak” for global emissions.
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Oil and gas producers' methane emissions could rise in COVID-19 aftermath: IEA | S&P Global Platts

Methane emissions by the global oil and gas industry could rise rather than fall in the aftermath of the COVID-19 crisis, contrasting with an expected reduction in CO2 emissions, as weak prices and policy shifts hamper efforts to contain the potent greenhouse gas, the IEA said June 18.
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Global energy demand to plunge this year as a result of the biggest shock since the Second World War - News

The Covid-19 pandemic represents the biggest shock to the global energy system in more than seven decades, with the drop in demand this year set to dwarf the impact of the 2008 financial crisis and result in a record annual decline in carbon emissions of almost 8%.

A new report released today by the International Energy Agency provides an almost real-time view of the Covid-19 pandemic’s extraordinary impact across all major fuels. Based on an analysis of more than 100 days of real data so far this year, the IEA’s Global Energy Review includes estimates for how energy consumption and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions trends are likely to evolve over the rest of 2020.
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Climate change: 4C temperature increase by 2090 'will have catastrophic impact on children' | Climate News

Climate change: 4C temperature increase by 2090 'will have catastrophic impact on children' | Climate News | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
Climate change could wipe out 50 years of public health gains unless we take urgent action to stop global warming, leading medical authorities have warned.

The World Health Organization, along with more than 30 other global institutions that collaborated on a new report for The Lancet medical journal, says climate change will have a life-long impact on children born today.
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Brazilians born today will have difficulty breathing in the future, climate study says

Brazilians born today will have difficulty breathing in the future, climate study says | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
A child born today in Brazil will probably have difficulty breathing during his or her growth and life. It will also face mosquitoes that carry disease such as dengue and extreme events such as burning, drought and flooding in greater numbers.

These are some of the health problems associated with climate change presented in the new version of the Lancet Countdown report: Tracking Progress on Health and Climate Change, released on Wednesday evening. fair (13).

 

Original is in Portugese. Translation by Google Translate.

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Health impacts of climate change on children don't need exaggerating

Health impacts of climate change on children don't need exaggerating | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
A child born today faces far-reaching health impacts from living through a world 4°C warmer than humans have ever experienced, according to a major assessment released today. But the research doesn’t support claims by some climate activists that children may not grow up at all.

The 2019 report of the Lancet Countdown on health and climate change, put together by doctors and researchers, warns that children are particularly vulnerable to climate change, because a warming world exposes them to more infectious diseases, malnutrition and stunted growth, and dirty air that hinders the development of their lungs.
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Climate Change Poses Threats to Children’s Health Worldwide - The New York Times

Climate Change Poses Threats to Children’s Health Worldwide - The New York Times | In the news: data in the UK Data Service collection across the web | Scoop.it
The health effects of climate change will be unevenly distributed and children will be among those especially harmed, according to a new report from the medical journal The Lancet.

The report compared human health consequences under two scenarios: one in which the world meets the commitments laid out in the Paris Agreement and reins in emissions so that increases in global temperatures remain “well below 2 degrees Celsius” by the end of the century, and one in which it does not.
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