Metaglossia: The Translation World
367.2K views | +9 today
Follow
Metaglossia: The Translation World
News about translation, interpreting, intercultural communication, terminology and lexicography - as it happens
Curated by Charles Tiayon
Your new post is loading...

Facebook est parvenu à créer une IA capable de traduire 200 langues automatiquement

Traduire automatiquement des conversations en plusieurs langues sans apprentissage au préalable, voici la nouvelle prouesse des chercheurs de Facebook. S’appuyant sur des algorithmes divers, la traduction grâce à l’intelligence artificielle a fait un pas de géant, tout comme la reconnaissance faciale. Explications. Facebook, entre mine d’or et dérives Dans une interview donnée à nos confrères …
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Pakistan Journal of Languages and Translation Studies (PJLTS) - University of Gujrat

The Pakistan Journal of Languages and Translation Studies (PJLTS) is an annual blind peer reviewed publication of the University of Gujrat, Pakistan. PJLTS is also included in the University Grants Commission’s List of approved journals in India with other reputed national and international journals in the field of Translation Studies. The prime objective of this journal is to provide the research scholars an independent and trans-disciplinary forum for discourse on issues in Translation, Linguistics and related disciplines. It deals with the rising questions in Theoretical and Applied Translation. The trans-disciplinary nature of Translation Studies encourages researchers from fields like Art and History of Translation and its applications in various fields of knowledge and human endeavor, Linguistics, Language Learning, Comparative Literature, Literary History and Theory, Computational Linguistics, Machine Translation, Localization, Arts, Humanities and Social Science. We welcome research articles, empirical reports, reviews from the authors interested in any of these areas.



Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

10 Unforgettable Translators of Jewish Texts - Jewish History

Moses

Not only did we receive the Torah from G‑d through Moses, but our sages tells us that Moses was the first one to translate the Torah as well. Just weeks before his passing (on his 120th birthday), on the first day of the 11th month (Shevat), Moses reviewed the Torah and translated it into the 70 languages that existed then.

Commentaries explain that although the Jews at the time had no need for the translation and didn’t even necessarily know those languages, they would eventually be exiled and scattered among the nations. Moses translated the Torah into all languages to indicate that no matter where they were or what language they spoke, the Torah was relevant to them.

Read: Is it Torah if It’s Not in Hebrew?

Onkelos the Convert

In this standard edition of the Five Books of Moses with commentary, one can see the translation of Onkelos to the immediate left of the main Hebrew text.

Onkelos was the nephew of the Roman Emperor Titus (according to another opinion, Hadrian) and converted to Judaism (XXX). When his uncle learned of his conversion, he sent a number of emissaries to dissuade him, but not only were they not successful, Onkelos ended up persuading the Roman messengers to convert themselves. Ultimately, his uncle gave up.

Onkelos became a student of the leading sages of his day, Rabbi Eliezer and Rabbi Yehoshua. When Onkelos saw that many Jews had forgotten their holy language, he decided to translate the Torah into Aramaic. The Talmud points out that the translation already existed at the time of Ezra the Scribe, but it had been forgotten among the people, and Onkelos recorded it so it would not be forgotten again.1

Onkelos’s translation is often referred to simply as targum (“translation”) and is printed alongside most editions of the Chumash.

Read: Onkelos

Jonathan ben Uzziel

In this edition of Mishlei (Proverbs) with classic commentaries and Yiddish translation, the Aramaic rendering of Jonathan appears directly beside the text.

Jonathan ben Uzziel (1st century CE) was considered the greatest of Hillel the Elder’s students.

Jonathan ben Uzziel wrote his translation of the Prophets based on traditions going back to the prophets HaggaiZechariah and Malachi. Unlike the translation of Onkelos, Jonathan’s translation includes select elucidations and commentary as well.

There is also a translation of the Five Books of Moses attributed to Jonathan. However, the Talmud only mentions his translating the Prophets. As such, many are of the opinion that the translation printed in some Chumashim under his name, while also from around that era, was not actually authored by him.2

The Talmud tells us that when he wrote his commentary on the books of the Prophets, the Land of Israel trembled and a heavenly voice called out: "Who has dared to reveal My secrets to mortal men?" R’ Jonathan ben Uzziel then arose and declared: "I am the one responsible for revealing Your holy secrets to mankind. But not to do myself honor, nor for the glory of my ancestors did I do this, but solely so that the Jews may understand what the Prophets have told them."

He originally intended to write his translation on the Ketuvim (Writings) as well. When he was about to write it, a heavenly voice called out, “You have done enough,” lest he reveal the secret of when the Messiah is meant to come, which is hidden in the book of Daniel.3

Read: Jonathan ben Uzziel

Rabbi Saadia Gaon

This handwritten edition features vowelized Hebrew verses (in large type), followed by Arabic translation (in smaller type), formatted to be used in the weekly review of the Torah portion as per the ancient custom of chanting the original Hebrew two times and a translation once.

Rabbi Saadia Gaon (882-942) authored many works, including writings on Jewish philosophy, grammar and Jewish law. Perhaps his most famous work was Emunot Vede’ot(“Beliefs and Opinions”), the first systematic treatment of Jewish philosophy, written in Judeo-Arabic.

What is perhaps less known is that he authored an Arabic translation and commentary of the Torah known as the Tafsir (Tafsir is Arabic for “biblical commentary”).

His commentary on the Torah is divided into two parts: 1) Peirush Hakatzar (“The Short Commentary”), the translation of Tanach into Arabic, including some brief explanations. 2) Peirush Ha’aroch (“The Long Commentary”), which includes discussion and analysis of linguistics, halachah and philosophy.

Read: Rendering an Epic Commentary into Modern Arabic

Ibn Tibbon Family

A page from an early draft of Maimonides's “Guide for the Perplexed.”

In earlier generations, books needed to be translated from Hebrew into other Semitic languages. Eventually, the pendulum swung the other way. Jews migrated to Europe and could not read Arabic, so Hebrew once again became the lingua franca of the Jewish world. This brings us to the Ibn Tibbon family.

The Ibn Tibbon family lived in southern France during the 12th and 13th centuries. Their translations of some of the most classic Jewish works into Hebrew from the original Arabic made these works accessible to the wider Jewish audience.

Judah ben Saul ibn Tibbon (1120–c. 1190) was the first in the illustrious line of translators. In addition to authoring his own works, he is best known for translating classic works such as Rabbi Saadiah Gaon's Emunot Vedeiot (“Beliefs and Opinions”), Rabbi Bahya Ibn Paquda's Chovot Halevovot (“Duties of the Heart”) and Rabbi Yehuda Halevi's Kuzari.

Shmuel ibn Tibbon (c. 1165–1232), like his father Judah, was a merchant, and translator. He is perhaps most famous for rendering Maimonides's Moreh Nevuchim (“Guide for the Perplexed”) into Hebrew. He also translated smaller works of Maimonides such as Shemoneh Perakim (“Eight Chapters), the commentary on AvotIggeret Techiyat Hameitim(“Letter on Resurrection”), and Iggeret Teiman (“Letter to Yemen”).

During the course of his work of translating “Guide for the Perplexed,” he consulted and corresponded with Maimonides regarding some difficult passages. Maimonides responded with praise and gave some guidelines for translating his work.

Moses ibn Tibbon (fl. 1244–1283), son of Shmuel, was a physician and followed the family tradition of both authoring original works as well as translating various works into Hebrew. He is perhaps most famous for his translation of Maimonides’s Sefer Hamitzvot(“Book of Commandments”) into Hebrew.

Rabbi Yaakov ben Yitzchak Ashkenazi

Tze'ena Ure'ena was printed and reprinted dozens of times. This edition was printed in Solanka (Salzbach) in 1798. (Image: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research)

Rabbi Yaakov ben Yitzchak Ashkenazi (1550–1625) lived in Janów, Poland. Although most Jewish works at the time were written in Hebrew, the common spoken language among Jews was Yiddish (see Why Do Jews Still Insist on Speaking Yiddish?). As such, Rabbi Yaakov Ashkenazi wrote a work calledTze’ena Ure’enah. In addition to translating the weekly Torah portions and haftarahs into Yiddish, it mixes biblical passages with translations of teachings from the Talmud, Midrash and commentaries on the verses. Until recently, this was common in Jewish homes and often served as the base for women’s study groups.

Rabbi Yosef Qafih (Kapach)

Maimonides' original commentary to Mishnah in the original Arabic, written in Hebrew characters.

Rabbi Qafih (1917–2000) was born in in Sana’a, Yemen. He eventually emigrated to Mandatory Palestine (Israel) in 1943. A leading scholar on Jewish law and thoroughly proficient in both Hebrew and Arabic, he found many of the earlier translations of classic Jewish works wanting. Additionally, he was in possession of what is said to be Maimonides’s own manuscripts. As such, he set about creating new translations of many of the classic Jewish works, including “Book of Beliefs and Opinions,” “Duties of the Heart,” Kuzari, “Guide for the Perplexed,” Sefer Hamitzvot and Maimonides’s commentary on the Mishnah. He translated some works from Arabic to Hebrew for the first time. Included with many of his translations is his own commentary culled from various commentators. His translations are considered by many to be the definitive translations of these works.

Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan

Living Torah provides a translation that is accessible to the beginner and enlightening to the accomplished scholar.

Rabbi Aryeh Moshe Eliyahu Kaplan (1934–1983) was born in the Bronx, New York, to a non-religious family of Sephardic descent (the family name was originally Carmona, after a city in southern Spain. His grandfather, upon arriving in the United States around the turn of the century, changed the name to the more Ashkenazic-sounding Kaplan). His mother died when he was only 13, and he attended synagogue to recite Kaddish for her. A chassidic teenager noticed that he was out of place, not wearing tefillin or even holding a siddur, and befriended him. Eventually, he went on to embrace Jewish observance and go to yeshivah as well as university, becoming proficient in both physics and Kabbalah. He authored over 50 works, including introductory pamphlets on Jewish beliefs and philosophy. He is equally famous for translating many works into English, including the kabbalistic works Sefer Yetzirah (“Book of Formation”) and Sefer Habahir (Book of the Bright), as well as the Five Books of Moses (entitled “Living Torah”).

He is also famous for his translation of the classic work by Rabbi Yaakov Culi (d. 1732) called Me'am Lo'ez, which was originally written in Ladino (Judeo-Spanish). The work is mostly written as a commentary on the Torah but includes Midrash, Talmud commentary, relevant halachah, as well as other areas of Jewish thought. Me'am Lo'ez had been previously translated into Hebrew, but Rabbi Kaplan taught himself Ladino in order to translate this monumental work straight from the original. This 45-volume work is known as the "Torah Anthology."

 
 
FOOTNOTES
1.

Megillah 3a.

2.

See Shem Hagedolim, Ma’arechet Seforim, Targum Yonatan.

3.

See Talmud, Megillah 3a, and Rashi ad loc.

A noted scholar and researcher, Rabbi Yehuda Shurpin serves as content editor at Chabad.org, and writes the popular weekly Ask Rabbi Y column. Rabbi Shurpin is the rabbi of the Chabad Shul in St. Louis Park, Minn., where he resides with his wife, Ester, and their children.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Yahoo fait désormais partie d’Oath

Hong Kong (AFP) - Hong Kong social media lit up on Friday when protesters noticed Google's translation software was briefly churning out a rather odd suggestion during a week that has seen the worst political violence to hit the city in decades.

Eagle-eyed Google users discovered that when people entered the phrase "I am sad to see Hong Kong become part of China" the suggested translation in both Simplified and Traditional Chinese converted the word "sad" to "happy".

"Oh my god, I can't believe my eyes," one Facebook user commented under one of the many screen grabs of the false translation that went viral on Friday.

"The app intentionally mistranslates the English to 'so happy/content' instead of 'so sad'," added student Rachel Wong on Twitter. "I hope Google fixes this."

When AFP entered the sentence "I am sad to see Hong Kong become part of China" on Friday morning it did show the wrong translation, replacing sad with happy.

Searches involving some other combinations of countries or territories also reproduced the error.

An hour later, a correct translation was showing.

The company's hugely popular software tool uses complex algorithms and deep learning, as well as allowing users to make suggested translations to improve accuracy.

"Google Translate is an automatic translator, using patterns from millions of existing translations to help decide on the best translation for you," a spokesman for Google told AFP.

"These automatic systems can sometimes make unintentional mistakes like translating a negative to a positive."

The international finance hub has been rocked this week by political violence as protesters opposed to a proposed China extradition law clashed with police.

On Thursday, the popular encrypted messaging app telegram, which is being used by protesters to coordinate, announced it had suffered a major cyber-attack that originated from China.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Yahoo fait désormais partie d’Oath

Hong Kong (AFP) - Hong Kong social media lit up on Friday when protesters noticed Google's translation software was briefly churning out a rather odd suggestion during a week that has seen the worst political violence to hit the city in decades.

Eagle-eyed Google users discovered that when people entered the phrase "I am sad to see Hong Kong become part of China" the suggested translation in both Simplified and Traditional Chinese converted the word "sad" to "happy".

"Oh my god, I can't believe my eyes," one Facebook user commented under one of the many screen grabs of the false translation that went viral on Friday.

"The app intentionally mistranslates the English to 'so happy/content' instead of 'so sad'," added student Rachel Wong on Twitter. "I hope Google fixes this."

When AFP entered the sentence "I am sad to see Hong Kong become part of China" on Friday morning it did show the wrong translation, replacing sad with happy.

Searches involving some other combinations of countries or territories also reproduced the error.

An hour later, a correct translation was showing.

The company's hugely popular software tool uses complex algorithms and deep learning, as well as allowing users to make suggested translations to improve accuracy.

"Google Translate is an automatic translator, using patterns from millions of existing translations to help decide on the best translation for you," a spokesman for Google told AFP.

"These automatic systems can sometimes make unintentional mistakes like translating a negative to a positive."

The international finance hub has been rocked this week by political violence as protesters opposed to a proposed China extradition law clashed with police.

On Thursday, the popular encrypted messaging app telegram, which is being used by protesters to coordinate, announced it had suffered a major cyber-attack that originated from China.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Translation system for academic lectures created by Japanese researchers – Xaralite

Scientists at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Japan have developed a new machine learning that will help students to listen live to lectures by Nobel Prize Laureates. Moreover, they can even earn credits from some of the most reputable universities. Scientists found that although a number of students have access to online academic information, a major barrier is the language of the videos which is not comprehensible to foreign students.

Advancements in communication technology have made it easy to locate an address in a foreign city. These commands are usually precise- about a sentence or two. Hence the translation systems are also competent. However, this is not the case when it comes to the translation of academic lectures, which last for at least an hour. Here the communication becomes less coherent.

“NAIST has 20% foreign students and, while the number of English classes is expanding, the options these students have are limited by their Japanese ability,” reports NAIST Professor Satoshi Nakamura, who is also one of the lead authors of the study.

The research group led by Nakamura produced a learning-based system which translated Japanese lecture speeches into English. This they achieved by archiving 46.5 hours of lecture videos from NAIST, together with their transcriptions and English translations. The end result is presented with subtitles in English as well as in Japanese, which were synched with the lecturer’s speech.

According to reports, the team has used archived videos with subtitles, this helps with better processing time and accurate translation, in comparison to simultaneous streaming of translation with live presentations. The lectures that were achieved and used for the study were based on robotics, software engineering, and speech processing. The team reports of various error rates while working on the project. One of the major error rates was the length of time speaking without pause. The team adds that the corpus of the project could be further improved for efficiency.

NAIST presented the study at the 240th meeting of the Special Interest Group of Natural Language Processing, Information Processing Society of Japan (IPSJ SIG-NL). “Japan wants to increase its international students and NAIST has a great opportunity to be a leader in this endeavor. Our project will not only improve machine translation, it will also bring bright minds to the country,” Nakamura concluded.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

'Happy to see Hong Kong become part of China': Social media alarmed over Google mistranslation

Hong Kong social media lit up on Friday when protesters noticed Google’s translation software was briefly churning out a rather odd suggestion during a week that has seen the worst political violence to hit the city in decades. Eagle-eyed Google users discovered that when people entered the phrase “I am sad to see Hong Kong become part of China” the …
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Asylum seekers: Lost in translation?

In France, asylum seekers who do not speak French - or who don’t speak it well enough - must use interpreters to tell their story at Ofpra (French Office for Protection for Refugees and Stateless people) or the CNDA (France's National Court of Asylum). Interpreting requires rigor and neutrality. However, in practice, and despite the importance of the issue, translation errors do occur.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Asylum seekers: Lost in translation?

In France, asylum seekers who do not speak French - or who don’t speak it well enough - must use interpreters to tell their story at Ofpra (French Office for Protection for Refugees and Stateless people) or the CNDA (France's National Court of Asylum). Interpreting requires rigor and neutrality. However, in practice, and despite the importance of the issue, translation errors do occur.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Asylum seekers: Lost in translation?

In France, asylum seekers who do not speak French - or who don’t speak it well enough - must use interpreters to tell their story at Ofpra (French Office for Protection for Refugees and Stateless people) or the CNDA (France's National Court of Asylum). Interpreting requires rigor and neutrality. However, in practice, and despite the importance of the issue, translation errors do occur.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Institut Cervantès d’Alger : Voix poétiques et passerelle culturelle entre l’Algérie, l’Espagne et la Tunisie - Algérie360.com

Leïla Zaïmi L’Ambassade d’Espagne en Algérie et l’Institut Cervantès, ont organisé, avant-hier, une table ronde autour de la thématique «Dialogue poétique, Nouvelles voix», avec les poètes Juan Carlos Abril (espagnol), et Achref Kerkeni (tunisien) et les poétesses algériennes Nosaiba Attallah et Amina Mekahli. Cette rencontre a été l’occasion d’aborder la résidence culturelle de deux jours, …
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

La traduction d'ouvrages arabes a permis l'introduction de termes techniques et scientifiques dans les langues latines

ORAN - La traduction d'ouvrages de l'arabe vers le latin durant la présence arabe en Andalousie a permis l'introduction de nombreux termes techniques et scientifiques dans les langues espagnole, française et italienne, a indiqué l'universitaire espagnol Luis Fernando Bernabé Pons lors d'une conférence qu'il a animée mercredi à Oran.

"La traduction de l’arabe vers le latin a eu un impact sur la langue espagnole et a permis le transfert de la science ainsi que l’entrée de nombreux termes scientifiques, médicaux et techniques arabes dans les langues espagnole, française et italienne, a souligné le conférencier de l’université d’Alicante (Espagne) dans sa conférence intitulée "Impact de la langue arabe sur la langue espagnole parlée", animée au Centre de recherche en anthropologie sociale et culturelle (CRASC) d’Es Sénia (Oran).

M. Bernabé a cité, à titre d'exemple, un ouvrage médical de Lopez Via Lagos, paru en 1489, adopté des livres d'Ibn Sina où il a traduit tous les termes de l'arabe vers l'espagnol.

"L'arabe, qui est une langue de science, avait suscité l'engouement des Espagnols pour l’apprendre, influencés en cela par la culture arabe, ce qui explique la forte influence de cette culture sur la littérature espagnole au Moyen âge", a-t-il dit, affirmant que "l'influence de la culture arabe s'est étendue même aux régions où les Arabes avaient peu séjourné tels les localités frontalières au Portugal", a-t-il affirmé.

Cet universitaire d’études arabo-musulmanes à l’université d’Alicante a aussi fait savoir que la langue arabe "était depuis le 7e siècle une langue de prestige dans la péninsule ibérique, où la langue castillane devenue un mélange d'arabe et d'espagnol s'écrivait en caractères arabes."

Il a ajouté que plus de 4000 mots arabes utilisés en espagnol ont été recensés dans divers domaines dont, notamment, des expressions religieuses telles que "Ala Allah " et "Machae Allah".

Luis Fernando Bernabé Pons a également fait observer que la langue espagnole s’est développée au Moyen âge d'une manière différente aux langues européennes de par l'influence de la langue arabe.

"Les Espagnols commençaient après la chute de Grenade, surtout au 16e siècle de se démarquer de l’impact de la langue arabe avec comme leitmotiv que c'est la langue de la religion musulmane ou de l’ennemi", a rappelé le conférencier, signalant toutefois que l'utilisation de la langue arabe a perduré grâce aux mauresques qui résidaient notamment à Cordoue et Valence.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Sault text-translation startup secures $900,000 in federal funds

Skritswap will use capital to advance artificial intelligence platform
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Deaf Bible Society celebrates progress, aims for “God-sized” goals

95% of the world’s 400+ sign languages have no Scripture. Thankfully, Deaf Bible Society notes significant progress in sign language Bible translation.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Microsoft diseñando una IA para aprender a traducir –

En anteriores ocasiones te hemos expuesto la utilidad que posee la tecnología de Inteligencia Artificial, impactando en una diversidad de áreas como medicina, manufactura y computación. Sin embargo, existe uno que no hemos expuesto hasta los momentos, siendo lo académico. Para esto te mostraremos como Microsoft está desarrollando una IA para mejorar sus traducciones.

La tecnología que están desarrollando es una plataforma que permita realizar traducciones automáticas, con una IA que aprende de muestras previas y la experiencia con los usuarios, implicando que evoluciona paralelamente con el lenguaje.

Resaltando que la tecnología actual de traducción automática de Microsoft ha superado ocho de los 19 desafíos diferentes de traducción de idiomas en una competencia anual de traducción automática. El resultado ganador de Microsoft Research Asia fue para las tareas de traducción automática para chino-inglés, inglés-finlandés, inglés-alemán, inglés-lituano, francés-alemán, alemán-inglés, alemán-francés y ruso-inglés.

Microsoft también se ubicó en segundo lugar en inglés-kazajo, finlandés-inglés y lituano-inglés.

La competencia tuvo lugar antes de la cuarta Conferencia de Traducción Automática (WMT19) de 2019. La competencia WMT, ahora en su 14º año, brinda a investigadores académicos y firmas de tecnología como Yandex, Microsoft e IBM la oportunidad de mostrar su tecnología de traducción en un entorno competitivo.

Hubo diecinueve categorías de traducción automática en WMT este año, de las cuales Microsoft participó en once.

Los organizadores de WMT de Apple, IBM, Microsoft y varias universidades de Asia Pacífico, Europa y Estados Unidos querían evaluar técnicas de traducción automática para otros idiomas además del inglés. También querían explorar los desafíos entre los idiomas europeos, incluidos los «lenguajes de bajo recurso y morfológicamente ricos», según Microsoft.

«Este año, el equipo de Microsoft Research Asia aplicó algoritmos innovadores a su sistema, lo que mejoró significativamente la calidad de los resultados de la traducción automática», dijo Tie-Yan Liu, director gerente adjunto de Microsoft Research Asia.

«Estos algoritmos se utilizaron para mejorar el mecanismo de aprendizaje de la plataforma, la capacitación previa, la optimización de la arquitectura de la red, la mejora de datos y otros procesos necesarios para que el sistema pueda funcionar mejor».

Los resultados siguen a Microsoft el año pasado, que ofrece el primer sistema de traducción automática que puede traducir artículos de noticias chinos al inglés con el mismo nivel de precisión que un traductor humano.

Ese desafío se basó en el conjunto de datos más reciente de 2017, que incluye 2.000 oraciones de una muestra de periódicos en línea.

 

 
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

La sangrienta historia de las primeras traducciones de la Biblia | Mundo | Actualidad | El Comercio Perú

 

En 1427, el papa Martín V ordenó que los huesos de John Wycliffe fueran exhumados de su tumba, quemados y arrojados a un río. Wycliffe había estado muerto por 40 años, pero la furia que causó su ofensa seguía viva.

 

John Wycliffe (circa 1330-1384) era un destacado pensador inglés en el siglo XIV.

Teólogo de profesión, fue llamado para asesorar al Parlamento en sus negociaciones con Roma.

Quién es Emanuela Orlandi y cuáles son las teorías sobre su misteriosa desaparición

Los escándalos de pederastia que acabaron con uno de los cardenales más poderosos

"El Vaticano es una organización gay": el polémico libro sobre la Iglesia Católica

En ese tiempo, la iglesia era todopoderosa, y cuanto más contacto tenía Wycliffe con Roma, más indignado se sentía. El papado -pensaba- apestaba a corrupción e interés propio. Y él estaba decidido a hacer algo al respecto.

Wycliffe comenzó a publicar folletos argumentando que, en lugar de buscar riqueza y poder, la iglesia debería preocuparse por los pobres.

En una ocasión, describió al Papa como "el anticristo, el orgulloso sacerdote mundano de Roma y el más maldito de los esquiladores".

En 1377, el obispo de Londres exigió que Wycliffe compareciera ante su corte para explicar las "asombrosas cosas que habían brotado de su boca".

 

El juicio contra John Wycliffe en la catedral St Paul de Londres tuvo lugar el 3 de febrero de 1377.

La audiencia fue una farsa.

Comenzó con una pelea violenta sobre si Wycliffe debería sentarse o no. Juan de Gaunt, hijo del rey y aliado de Wycliffe, insistió en que los acusados ​​permanecieran sentados; el obispo le exigió que se pusiera de pie.

Cuando el Papa se enteró del fiasco, emitió una bula papal [una carta o documento papal oficial] en el que acusó a Wycliffe de "vomitar de la mazmorra sucia de su corazón las más perversas y condenables herejías".

Wycliffe fue acusado de herejía y puesto bajo arresto domiciliario y más tarde se vio obligado a retirarse de su puesto como Maestro del Colegio Balliol, Oxford.

La Biblia para la emancipación

Wycliffe creía firmemente que la Biblia debería estar disponible para todos. Veía la alfabetización como la clave para la emancipación de los pobres.

Aunque partes de la Biblia se habían traducido previamente al inglés, todavía no había una traducción completa.

La gente común, que ni hablaba latín ni podía leer, solo podía aprender del clero. Y gran parte de lo que creían saber, ideas como el fuego del infierno y el purgatorio, ni siquiera formaban parte de las Escrituras.

Así que, con la ayuda de sus asistentes, Wycliffe produjo una Biblia en inglés, durante un período de 13 años a partir de 1382.

 

"Al principio, Dios creó los cielos y la tierra" y demás, en inglés, en la Biblia de Wycliffe.

Era inevitable que esto produjera una reacción violenta: en 1391, antes de que se completara la traducción de la Biblia, se presentó un proyecto de ley ante el Parlamento para prohibir la Biblia en inglés y encarcelar a cualquiera que poseyera una copia.

El proyecto de ley no fue aprobado, John de Gaunt se encargó de eso en el parlamento, pero la iglesia reanudó su persecución contra Wycliffe, a pesar de que había muerto hacía 7 años, en 1384.

Sin otras alternativas, lo mejor que podían hacer era quemar sus huesos [en 1427], así fuera sólo para asegurarse de que su lugar de descanso no fuera venerado.

El Arzobispo de Canterbury explicó que Wycliffe había sido "ese desgraciado pestilente, de condenable memoria, sí, el precursor y discípulo del anticristo que, como complemento de su maldad, inventó una nueva traducción de las Escrituras a su lengua materna".

Jan Hus

En 1402, el sacerdote checo recién ordenado, Jan Hus, fue designado a un púlpito en Praga para ministrar en la iglesia.

Inspirado por los escritos de Wycliffe, que ahora circulaban en Europa, Hus usó su púlpito para hacer campaña en favor de una reforma administrativa y contra la corrupción de la iglesia.

 

Jan Hus (1369-1415) era un reformador de la iglesia y seguidor de John Wycliffe. Además fue un defensor de la Independencia de Bohemia y por lo tanto contra el Imperio de Alemania. Grabado coloreado, Alemania siglo XVI.

Al igual que Wycliffe, Hus creía que la reforma social sólo podía lograrse mediante la alfabetización.

Darle a la gente una Biblia escrita en el idioma checo, en lugar del latín, era un imperativo.

Hus reunió a un equipo de eruditos y en 1416 apareció la primera Biblia checa.

Fue un desafío directo para aquellos a quienes llamó "los discípulos del anticristo" y la consecuencia era previsible: Hus fue arrestado por herejía.

El juicio de Jan Hus, que tuvo lugar en la ciudad de Constanza, es uno de los más espectaculares de la historia.

 

La crema y nata de la sociedad -y quienes les servían- acudió al juicio.

Fue más parecido a un carnaval: casi todos los peces gordos de Europa asistieron.

Llegó un arzobispo con 600 caballos; 700 prostitutas ofrecieron sus servicios; 500 personas se ahogaron en el lago; y el Papa se cayó de su carruaje y aterrizó en un montón de nieve.

El ambiente era tan estimulante que la eventual convicción de Hus y su brutal ejecución debieron parecer un anticlímax.

El condenado fue quemado en la hoguera.

 

Hus murió como todo un hereje, condenado por el Concilio de Constanza en 1415.

Su muerte galvanizó a sus partidarios en la revuelta. Sacerdotes e iglesias fueron atacados, las autoridades tomaron represalias. En pocos años, Bohemia entró en guerra civil.

Todo porque Jan Hus tuvo el descaro de traducir la Biblia.

William Tyndale

En lo que respecta a la Biblia en inglés, el traductor de más alto perfil que perdió la vida por ese crimen fue William Tyndale.

Corría el siglo XVI y Enrique VIII estaba en el trono.

La traducción de Wycliffe aún estaba prohibida y, aunque las copias de los manuscritos estaban disponibles en el mercado negro, eran difíciles de encontrar y costosas de adquirir. La mayoría de las personas todavía no tenía ni idea de lo que realmente decía la Biblia.

Pero la impresión en papel se estaba convirtiendo en algo más común, y Tyndale pensó que era el momento adecuado para una traducción accesible y actualizada.

 

Se le dijo.

Sabía que podía crear una. Todo lo que necesitaba era la financiación y la bendición de la iglesia.

No obstante, rápidamente se dio cuenta de que nadie en Londres estaba dispuesto ayudarlo. Ni siquiera su amigo, el obispo de Londres, Cuthbert Tunstall. La política de la iglesia se aseguró de eso.

El clima religioso parecía menos opresivo en Alemania.

Lutero ya había traducido la Biblia al alemán; la Reforma protestante se estaba acelerando y Tyndale creyó que tendría más chance de realizar su proyecto allá. Así que viajó a Colonia y comenzó a imprimir.

Esto resultó ser un error. Colonia todavía estaba bajo el control de un arzobispo leal a Roma.

Cuando estaba en medio de la impresión del evangelio de Mateo se enteró que estaban a punto de allanar la imprenta. Agarró sus papeles y huyó.

Esa historia se repetiría varias veces. Tyndale pasó los años siguientes esquivando espías ingleses y agentes romanos.

Pero logró completar su Biblia y las copias pronto inundaron Inglaterra, ilegalmente, por supuesto.

 

Grabado que muestra cómo las copias de la Biblia vernácula de Tyndale llegaba a Inglaterra escondida en fardos de diversos bienes.

El proyecto estaba completo, pero Tyndale era un hombre marcado... y no era el único.

El cardenal Wolsey estaba realizando una campaña contra la Biblia de Tyndale. Nadie relacionado con Tyndale o su traducción estaba a salvo.

Thomas Hitton, un sacerdote que había conocido a Tyndale en Europa, confesó haber contrabandeado dos copias de la Biblia a Inglaterra. Fue acusado de herejía y quemado vivo.

Thomas Bilney, un abogado cuya conexión con Tyndale era tangencial a lo sumo, también fue arrojado a las llamas en 1531.

Richard Bayfield, un monje que había sido uno de los primeros partidarios de Tyndale, fue torturado incesantemente antes de ser atado a la estaca. Y un grupo de estudiantes en Oxford fueron dejados en un calabozo que se usaba para almacenar pescado salado hasta que se pudrieron.

 

Todo por esto: la Biblia traducida al inglés de Tyndale.

El final de Tyndale no fue menos trágico.

Fue traicionado en 1535 por Henry Phillips, un joven aristócrata disoluto que había robado el dinero de su padre y lo había perdido en apuestas.

Tyndale estaba escondido en Amberes, bajo la protección casi diplomática de la comunidad mercantil inglesa. Phillips se hizo amigo de Tyndale y lo invitó a cenar. Cuando salieron juntos de la casa del comerciante inglés, Phillips le hizo señas a un par de matones que atraparon de Tyndale.

Fue el último momento libre de su vida.

Tyndale fue acusado de herejía en agosto de 1536 y quemado en la hoguera unas semanas después.

 

"Dios ábrele los ojos al rey de Inglaterra", ruega Tyndale antes de que prendieran el fuego que lo consumió.

En Amberes, la ciudad donde Tyndale creía que estaba a salvo, Jacob van Liesveldt produjo una Biblia en holandés.

Como tantas traducciones del siglo XVI, su acto fue tanto político como religioso.

Su Biblia fue ilustrada con grabados en madera: en la quinta edición, representó a Satanás con la apariencia de un monje católico, con pies de cabra y un rosario.

Fue un paso demasiado lejos.

Van Liesveldt fue arrestado, acusado de herejía y condenado a muerte.

Una era asesina

El siglo XVI fue, de lejos, la época más sangrienta para los traductores de la Biblia.

Pero las traducciones de la Biblia siempre han generado emociones fuertes y continúan haciéndolo.

En 1960, la Reserva de la Fuerza Aérea de Estados Unidos advirtió a los reclutas contra el uso de la Versión Estándar Revisada recientemente publicada porque, según afirmaron, 30 personas en su comité de traducción habían sido "afiliadas a los frentes comunistas".

En 1961, el estadounidense T.S. Eliot, uno de los principales poetas del siglo XX, se opuso a la Nueva Biblia en inglés y escribió que "asombra en su combinación de lo vulgar, lo trivial y lo pedante".

 

Hasta el poeta estadounidense TS Eliot tuvo algo que ver en esta historia.

Y los traductores de la Biblia todavía están siendo asesinados. No necesariamente por el hecho de traducir la Biblia, sino por ser una de las cosas que hacen los misioneros cristianos.

En 1993, Edmund Fabian fue asesinado en Papua Nueva Guinea, por un hombre local que lo había estado ayudando a traducir la Biblia.

En marzo de 2016, cuatro traductores de la Biblia que trabajaban para una organización evangélica estadounidense fueron asesinados por militantes en un lugar no revelado en el Medio Oriente.

Traducir la Biblia puede parecer una actividad inofensiva, pero la historia muestra que es cualquier cosa menos eso.

*El escritor británico Harry Freedman se especializa en historia de religión y cultura y es autor de The Murderous History of Bible Translations (Bloomsbury, 2016).

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

ASL interpreter had the 'The Right Stuff' at New Kids on the Block show

Up in the main concourse at Pinnacle Bank Arena, Carla Engstrom had a good seat at the New Kids on the Block show on Saturday. But she wasn't facing the stage.

With her back to the reunited 1980s boy band, Engstrom was interpreting their lyrics in American Sign Language to two deaf super fans.

It's something she's been doing for three decades, and she can still remember working her first concert ⎼⎼ Kris Kristofferson in 1988.

 

She was one of two ASL interpreters signing Kristofferson's lyrics that night, and she had no idea what to expect.

"I started practicing and didn't know what was going to happen," she said. "All I knew was that I had a partner."

Since then, Engstrom has acted as an ASL interpreter for at least two or three concerts a year, totaling more than 60 shows in her career. Each one gives her a chance to improve her interpreting ability, and she never runs out of those chances.

"I’ve taken workshops on learning how to do it," Engstrom said. "The opportunities come up in various places like Pinnacle, or when there used to be shows at the Pershing Center or really anywhere a deaf person can purchase a ticket."

The Americans with Disabilities Act requires at least 1% of Pinnacle Bank Arena's seats to be able to accommodate audience members with disabilities, according to arena manager Tom Lorenz. It currently has seats for more than 220 people, usually those with mobility issues.

Lorenz said the arena asks that people who need accommodations contact the arena at least two weeks before the show, but the earlier the better.

"We highly recommend and really appreciate it if they do it before or right when the tickets are on sale so we give the interpreters time to prepare," Lorenz said.

Show's don't bring their own interpreters, so the arena staff choose from a pool of about a dozen interpreters in Lincoln when they're needed. Engstrom often acts as the pool's contact point for the arena and she sometimes helps coordinate the right interpreter for the job, Lorenz said.

And she enjoys her work. At Saturday's show she bopped her hips and nodded her head to the music while she signed to the two fans, smiling as she mouthed along.

 
 

spaceplay / pause

 

qunload | stop

 

ffullscreen

shift + slower / faster

volume

 

mmute

seek

 

 . seek to previous

12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60%

"Carla's really hooked into it, and she does a great job," Lorenz said.

 
 
 

But Engstrom and other interpreters don't just walk into concerts and sign for bands on the spot. When she's assigned to a show, usually two or three weeks in advance, Engstrom starts listening to the artist's music on Spotify repeatedly.

"We try to get the set list ahead of time if we can, but bands usually try to keep that a secret, so I usually make a set list of my own on Spotify," Engstrom said. "... I print out my lyrics and begin listening to the songs again and again."

And all that practice is important.

Even though Engstrom has been fluent in ASL for more than 30 years, interpreting a song is far different than interpreting a conversation or in a classroom setting, commonly referred to as "platform interpreting."

 

"Songs are not like platform interpreting at all. It’s a lot different," Engstrom said. "Lyrics are much more like poetry and one word can mean two or three things. Sign language isn't word for word, it's more focused on the meaning. To the best of our abilities, we have to get that meaning across."

And part of being able to get the meaning across is being in a place where they can be seen clearly.

Lorenz said setting up an area for interpreters is a complex system. They need enough space in front of the section to stand without blocking the view of the stage for their deaf audience members or anyone else around them. The arena must also provide lighting for the signer so audiences can see their gestures.

But all the work pays off for Engstrom. She said it's gratifying and sometimes artists even show their appreciation, especially one country music icon.

"Willie Nelson was here once at the Pershing," she said. "It was really nice that he came down and put his arms around the interpreters. It was really sweet."

In her off hours, Engstrom listens to a wide variety of music, from underground garage rock to Jimmy Buffet. Recently, she's been a big Bo Burnham fan and works on interpreting his sets for fun.

She shares that variety of musical taste with the people she interprets for as well.

"I've seen them run the gamut from heavy metal, to hip hop, to a pop show," Engstrom said. "A lot of times deaf people love the vibration. They crank up the bass whenever they have dances. They like to feel the vibrations, but it’s different for everybody."

But there are some genres and shows Engstrom chooses to pass on, like next month's appearance of Grammy-winning hip-hop artists Cardi B. But New Kids on the Block is exactly the kind of show she enjoys working, just like Kris Kristofferson was 30 years ago.

"I don't think I can do serious rap. It's fast and I think when younger people grow up with things it's a lot easier for them to rehearse for it," she said. "I'm from the 80s, so I remember New Kids on the Block. I do remember most of these songs. They're great."

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Fabula agitur - La traduction pour la scène et la dramatisation, deux alliées précieuses dans l’enseignement des langues classiques : le projet Schola cothurnata - UGA Éditions

Cet article rend compte du projet intitulé Schola cothurnata, expérimentation didactique dont j’ai été responsable scientifique. Il a obtenu un cofinancement de la part de la fondation bancaire Caritro, dans le cadre d’une action qui s’était donné comme objectif de sélectionner des projets innovants d’un point de vue didactique. Cette présentation voudrait, à partir de ce cas d’espèce, proposer des éléments de réflexion sur l’utilité de la dramatisation pour l’apprentissage non seulement des l...
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Maestro de la Sierra Norte traduce «El principito» al totonaco

**El libro fue presentado en el marco del Año Internacional de las Lenguas Indígenas 2019. El proceso no fue nada fácil, ya que entre las dificultades que se presentaron en la traducción, hubo conceptos complejos, como “desierto de Sahara” y “elefante”.
La Crónica de Chihuahua
9 de junio, 22:44 pm

Con el objetivo de acercar a los niños de su comunidad a los cuentos en su lengua materna, Pedro Pérez Luna se convirtió en el primer traductor de “El Principito” en lengua totonaco.

De acuerdo con el último censo del INEGI, 10% de nuestra población son indígenas y según el Instituto Nacional de Lenguas Indígenas, cerca de 6 millones de mexicanos hablan alguna lengua de este tipo, no obstante, 40 de las 68 lenguas que se hablan en el país están a punto de desaparecer, puesto que cada vez son más los niños y jóvenes de las comunidades que tienen que abandonar su lengua originaria para comunicarse en castellano.



Con el objetivo de acercar a los niños de su comunidad a los cuentos en su lengua materna, Pedro Pérez Luna se convirtió en el primer traductor en lengua totonaca de la famosa obra literaria “El Principito”.

Pérez Luna es originario de la Sierra Norte de Puebla y desde pequeño se enfrentó a la discriminación que sufren los hablantes de idiomas indígenas en el país. Hijo de padres monolingües del totonaco, tuvo que aprender el español como segundo idioma ante las carencias de condiciones y materiales para estudiar, así como a la falta de oportunidades por el arraigo a su lengua materna.

“Tuve muchos problemas en la escuela por lo mismo de que yo no entendía las clases, en español me costaba mucho porque mi lengua materna siempre fue el totonaco. Me llamó la atención retomar el mundo de la lectura, acercarme a poder observar los libros, los textos, aunque no entendiera lo que significaba”.



Es así que, vislumbrando mejores condiciones y aportando nuevos materiales para los miembros de su comunidad, el ahora profesor de educación bilingüe decidió traducir la obra de Antoine de Saint-Exupéry a su lengua materna, el totonaca.

El libro fue presentado en el marco del Año Internacional de las Lenguas Indígenas 2019, sin embargo, el proceso no fue nada fácil, ya que entre las dificultades que se presentaron al traducir el trabajo, Pedro se encontró con la complejidad de transportar algunos términos del español a la lengua totonaco, como “desierto de Sahara” y “elefante”.

No obstante, bajo el título de Xa’púxku’ a’ktsú qa’wa’sa, el libro ya se ha presentado en Huehuetla (tierra originaria del traductor) y han sido repartidos ejemplares a niños y jóvenes que por primera vez han tenido la oportunidad de tener en sus manos una obra en su lengua.



“Ellos aprecian mucho al haberlo recibido, lo leen y dicen que es muy entendible; se divierten mucho porque el zorro, la naturaleza, el principito, todo el contexto se les ha hecho fácil y no tienen problema. Me siento satisfecho por haber hecho esta labor y llegar a los niños y gente adulta”

¡Sea el primero en escribir un comentario!

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

The 2018 Gratiaen Prize goes to Arun Welandawe- Prematilleke

The 2018 Gratiaen Prize was carried off by Arun Welandawe- Prematilleke, whose play The One Who Loves You So was adjudged for being ‘a consummate work of art in one of the hardest genres to realize success, both on the stage and on the page’.

The Gratiaen prize, founded in 1992 by Michael Ondaatje in memory of his mother Doris Gratiaen, each year recognizes the best work of creative writing in English by a resident of Sri Lanka. 


Also awarded this year was the H. A. I. Goonetileke Prize for Translation, won by Prof. Vinnie Vitharana for his translation of the medieval Sinhalese work of poetry the Kav Silumina, ‘the crest gem of poetry’. 

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

La Pentecôte et les robots traducteurs

Au premier regard, on ne voit pas forcément le rapport entre ce long week-end qui nous attend et  les progrès actuels de l'intelligence artificiell e dans le domaine la traduction automatique. Pourtant, un lien existe. Il peut même se révéler instructif, pour peu qu'on prenne soin de l'examiner.

La Pentecôte, dans le monde déchristianisé qui est le nôtre, voit sa signification fréquemment ignorée. Or c'était une fête charnière, dont le sens et la portée se trouvaient étroitement liés à la question des langues et de la communication. Selon les Actes des Apôtres (2 1-13), cinquante jours après la résurrection du Christ (pentacota, en grec ancien, signifie « cinquantième »), nombre de ses disciples étaient réunis, parmi lesquels les douze apôtres, quand se produisit une forme singulière de miracle : « Leur apparurent des langues qu'on aurait dites de feu, qui se partageaient, et il s'en posa une sur chacun d'eux. »

Une fois ces langues de feu positionnées au-dessus de la tête de chaque personne présente, elles se mirent toutes à parler d'autres langues que le galiléen. Et les étrangers présents à Jérusalem comprenaient directement leurs propos. Venus de Mésopotamie ou d'Asie, d'Egypte ou de Lybie, Crétois ou Arabes, ils s'émerveillaient d'entendre parler, dans leur langue, des « merveilles de Dieu ».

Peu importe que l'on croie ou non à la véracité de ce récit. Car, si l'on peut raisonnablement en douter, sa portée n'en demeure pas moins puissante. Il esquisse en effet l'image d'un monde où chacun parlerait aux autres sans barrières ni obstacles, sans que personne ait besoin de faire l'apprentissage des idiomes multiples qui se partagent le monde. En ce sens, le mythe de la Pentecôte est bien l'inverse de celui de la tour de Babel.

 

La communauté des humains est morcelée, séparée par la multiplicité des langues

Dans ce dernier, la communauté des humains se trouve, d'un seul coup, morcelée, séparée par la multiplicité des langues. L'humanité devient, au sens propre, incapable de s'entendre. La Pentecôte annule miraculeusement ces divisions, restaure une unité perdue. C'est d'ailleurs pour ce motif qu'elle marquait aussi, dans la théologie chrétienne, le commencement de l'Eglise, institution censée délivrer un message universel, ce qui se disait, en grec, « catholique ».

Nous voilà dans la même situation, mais de manière fort différente. Par la grâce du numérique, de l'intelligence artificielle et des microprocesseurs, nous sommes aujourd'hui en mesure de nous faire entendre dans des dizaines et des dizaines de langues que nous ne connaissons pas et n'avons jamais pratiquées. Plus besoin pour cela de l'Esprit Saint ni des langues de feu : on trouve dans le commerce, pour quelques dizaines d'euros seulement, des traducteurs automatiques de poche permettant de dialoguer dans le monde entier. Le phénomène s'accentue : des applications efficaces pour les smartphones servent d'interface entre idiomes dissemblables, des logiciels de traduction automatique de plus en plus fiables et performants sont disponibles. Il est possible de dialoguer, sur Skype et autres, en laissant les robots assurer le travail de traduction en direct. Et ce n'est, bien sûr, qu'un début.

Grâce à l'IA, on peut se faire entendre par tous

Nous avons donc les moyens techniques d'effacer la barrière des langues et de surmonter le handicap de leur pluralité. « Les langues imparfaites en cela que plusieurs », écrivait Mallarmé. Voilà qui est virtuellement fini. Toutefois, la vraie question demeure : qu'avons-nous à nous dire ? Nos robots ne servent qu'à amplifier ce que Mallarmé appelait aussi « l'universel reportage », c'est-à-dire le rabâchage insignifiant de n'importe quoi, le règne planétaire des « foutaises » et autres bullshits.

Les miraculés de la Pentecôte annonçaient au monde une nouvelle inouïe, l'arrivée d'une délivrance, le début d'une autre histoire. Nous sortons de nos poches nos machines à traduire pour demander où est le fast-food, le musée ou l'aéroport. Si nous avons gagné en puissance mécanique comme en pouvoir de calcul, il n'est pas évident, en termes de sens cette fois, que nous ayons fait de réels progrès.

Peut-être faudrait-il voir tout autrement, et ne pas laisser les langues s'effacer. La Pentecôte était commode, nos robots le sont aussi, différemment. Mais l'expérience humaine de la traduction, de sa difficulté, de ses tâtonnements, constitue une richesse irremplaçable. Les passages d'un univers mental à un autre, les voyages instructifs qui en découlent, les écarts qu'on y explore ne doivent pas être annulés. On y perdrait en humanité.

Roger-Pol Droit

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Officialisation de l'amazigh. Parlement: pourquoi ce lundi 10 juin sera historique | www.le360.ma

La Chambre des représentants a décidé de convoquer une session plénière le lundi 10 juin pour adopter définitivement le projet de loi organique sur l'officialisation de l’amazigh et celui relatif à la création du Conseil national des langues et des cultures marocaines. Les explications.



Ces deux textes, longtemps bloqués, ont été finalisés et adoptés le lundi 3 juin par la Commission parlementaire de l'enseignement, de la culture et de la communication issue de la chambre basse.

 

A cette occasion, les députés ont unanimement introduit à l'article 1 du projet de loi un principal passage stipulant que l'amazigh doit se lire et s'écrire en caractère tifinagh.

 

 Vidéo. Contre le PJD, le RNI fait de l'amazigh et des langues étrangères son cheval de bataille 
 

Pour rappel, un blocage de trois ans, dû notamment à des divergences avec le PJD, avait gelé le projet de loi organique sur la mise en oeuvre du caractère officiel de la langue amazighe.

 

Une accélération du débat sur les deux projets de loi a été constatée la semaine dernière au terme d'une réunion entre les chefs de groupes parlementaire avec le président Habib El Malki.

 

Lors du débat au sein de la commission parlementaire, il a été décidée la mise en oeuvre "progressive de l'enseignement de la langue amazigh" dans les secteurs privés et publics en particulier dans le système de l'éducation nationale.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

La loi organique sur le Conseil des langues adoptée en commission

Après le projet de loi organique sur l'officialisation de la langue amazighe, celui sur le Conseil national des langues a été lui aussi été adopté par la commission de l'enseignement et de la culture.
Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

L’ENFFADA réclame un statut officiel pour toutes les langues autochtones

OTTAWA — L’Enquête nationale sur les femmes et les filles autochtones disparues et assassinées (ENFFADA) a accouché de 231 recommandations, demandes qu’on a baptisées «appels à la justice».

Un de ces appels: que les langues autochtones soient reconnues comme des langues officielles.

«Nous demandons à tous les gouvernements de reconnaître les langues autochtones comme langues officielles, et de veiller à ce qu’elles bénéficient du même statut et des mêmes protections que le français et l’anglais», peut-on lire dans le rapport.

Il est ainsi demandé aux gouvernements fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux de légiférer pour que «les langues autochtones soient reconnues comme langues officielles dans leur territoire respectif» et ce statut s’accompagnerait du financement nécessaire pour «rétablir et revitaliser les cultures et les langues autochtones».

À la longue cérémonie qui a accompagné le dépôt du rapport, le premier ministre Justin Trudeau a promis que cette enquête et ses recommandations auront des lendemains.

«Je vous donne ma parole que mon gouvernement va donner suite aux appels à la justice énoncés dans le rapport de l’enquête», a-t-il promis sur un ton solennel.

Mais ses ministres ont vite fait d’admettre qu’on est loin de répondre à cet appel-ci.

«On va regarder l’ensemble des recommandations, incluant celle-ci», a assuré le ministre du Patrimoine canadien, Pablo Rodriguez, intercepté à sa sortie des Communes, lundi après-midi.

«Ce qu’on fait actuellement (…) est déjà énorme», a-t-il ajouté, en guise de bémol, faisant référence à un projet de loi qu’il a déposé et qui en est à l’étape de l’étude en comité sénatorial.

Il a tenu à rappeler que lorsqu’il s’agit de langue officielle, il faut «une masse critique» et «la capacité de livrer la langue». «C’est une discussion pour beaucoup plus tard», a-t-il conclu.

Le projet de loi du ministre, C-91, se contente de créer un Bureau du commissaire aux langues autochtones qui a pour mandat de «soutenir les peuples autochtones dans leurs efforts visant à se réapproprier les langues autochtones et à les revitaliser, les maintenir et les renforcer».

On est loin du statut de langue officielle pour les quelque 70 langues autochtones — environ 90 en comptant les dialectes.

Invités à dire si cette demande de l’enquête de l’ENFFADA était réaliste ou pas, M. Rodriguez et sa collègue ministre des Langues officielles, Mélanie Joly, ont préféré contourner la question et parler plutôt de C-91.

«Ce qu’on vient de faire avec cette loi-là, c’est de reconnaître que les langues autochtones (…) font partie directement des droits constitutionnels que les Autochtones ont au pays», a tenu à souligne la ministre Joly.

«Et en ce sens-là, c’est la plus grande force qu’on peut leur donner», a-t-elle dit.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.

Le parlement introduit le tifinagh dans la loi organique sur l'amazigh

Lors de l'examen et du vote du projet de loi organique sur l'amazigh, un amendement principal a été présenté par la majorité et adopté à l'unanimité : la langue amazighe s'écrit en tifinagh.

Le parlement introduit le tifinagh dans la loi organique sur l'amazigh

Lors de l'examen et du vote du projet de loi organique sur l'amazigh, un amendement principal a été présenté par la majorité et adopté à l'unanimité : la langue amazighe s'écrit en tifinagh.

 

Le 03 juin 2019 à15:41

Modifié le 03 juin 2019 à 19:38
 
 

Le projet de loi organique sur la mise en oeuvre du caractère officiel de l'amazigh avait pris beaucoup de retard. Il connaît une accélération à la Chambre des Représentants.

Ce lundi 3 juin 2019, le projet et ses amendements étaient soumis au vote en commission de l'enseignement, de la culture et de la communication. Un second projet de loi organique était également sur la table des députés en même temps: celui du conseil national des langues.

Les deux projets de loi devraient être votés dans la journée, selon nos sources à l'intérieur de la commission.

Le premier à être étudié est le projet de loi organique sur le caractère officiel de la langue amazighe. Le premier amendement à être adopté concerne l'article 1 de cette loi organique. Il l'a été adopté à l'unanimité.

La majorité a ajouté au projet initial, une phrase précisant que la langue amazighe s'écrit et se lit en tifinagh. Ce point faisait l'objet d'un désaccord entre les groupes parlementaires.

La commission poursuivra le vote des articles du projet de loi organique ainsi que des amendements, un par un, au cours de ce lundi.

Pour ce qui concerne le projet de loi organique sur le Conseil des langues, l'amendement le plus important est le suivant : création de "l'instance des langues étrangères et de la traduction" au lieu de "l'instance des langues étrangères" proposé par le texte initial (article 17 du projet de loi organique).

Il s'agit du principal amendement présenté selon notre propre constat sur place. Un membre du bureau de la commission a estimé dans une déclaration à Médias24 que le reste des propositions d'amendements concerne des aspects techniques.

L'amazigh obligatoire dans l'enseignement et la formation professionnelle

Au moment où nous rédigions ces lignes, les députés poursuivaient le vote des propositions d'amendements. On en était encore à l’article 9. Le texte en contient 35. On compte à 83 le nombre d'amendements proposés. Le groupe PAM en a avancé 34, celui du PI 27 et les groupes de la majorité 22. 

Comme indiqués par nos sources, la majeure partie des amendements proposés et adoptés tiennent à des détails techniques, souvent de formulation. L’article 4 fait exception puisqu’il est concerné par un amendement de fond, qui tient aux mesures permettant l’intégration « progressive » de l’amazigh dans le système de l’éducation et de la formation, secteurs privé et public.

Adopté à la majorité, l’amendement en question instaure « l’obligation de l’enseignement de l’amazigh et sa généralisation sur l’ensemble du territoire et sur l’ensemble des filières de l’ensemble des filières d’enseignement. »

 L’amendement vise aussi  à garantir aux MRE le droit à  l’apprentissage de cette langue, et ce à travers des programmes dédiés mis en place par l’Etat.

Le contrat de mariage en amazigh

Les contrats de mariage font leur entrée dans la liste des documents officiels (CIN, passeport, permis de conduire, carte de séjour etc.)  dont le contenu doit être rédigé en amazigh, en plus de l'arabe. 

Cette disposition ne figurait pas dans la version initiale du projet, précisément dans son article 21. Elle a été introduite par la majorité et l'amendement a été adopté par cette même majorité.

Scoop.it!
No comment yet.