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On discovering David Bowie in ESL/EFL

On discovering David Bowie in ESL/EFL | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Bowie was “one of Britain’s most influential cultural icons” with a “flair, originality and gift for reinvention” that “influenced countless artists from around the world.” Daily Express He didn’t just create a huge body of music, didn’t just release a bunch of singles and albums which influenced people at formative stages of their lives. “He…
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The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page
A companion page to EFL SMARTblog http://efllecturer.blogspot.com/ - EFL, ESL and ESOL learning and practice activities for smart students of English.
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Radio 4 - Radio 4 in Four - Mizzle and smirr: 13 British words and phrases for rain

Radio 4 - Radio 4 in Four - Mizzle and smirr: 13 British words and phrases for rain | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Fine drizzle or a wet-to-the-undies downpour, the Brits know a thing or two about rain.
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How to Interrupt Someone in a Nice Way

How to Interrupt Someone in a Nice Way | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
There are many reasons that interrupting a speaker or group of speakers may be necessary.
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Misinformation or Disinformation

Misinformation or Disinformation | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Many people mix up the meaning of misinformation with the word disinformation. They sometimes use one term in place of the other.
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From gaslighting to gammon, 2018’s buzzwords reflect our toxic times | Emma Brockes | Opinion | The Guardian

From gaslighting to gammon, 2018’s buzzwords reflect our toxic times | Emma Brockes | Opinion | The Guardian | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Oxford Dictionaries’ words of the year are products of our heightened politics, says Guardian columnist Emma Brockes...
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Halloween - Vocabulary Lessons, Online Exercises and Worksheets

Free online lessons about Halloween and Halloween exercises for English language learners, elementary ESL students and kids - resources include picture vocabulary word banks and word lists with definitions, reading, listening, spelling and matching exercises, crossword puzzles, gap fill quizzes,...
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Study: Air Pollution Reduces Intelligence

Study: Air Pollution Reduces Intelligence | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Air pollution makes our bodies sick. But a new study shows that it can also affect our brains and our ability to learn.
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800 Free eBooks for iPad, Kindle & Other Devices

800 Free eBooks for iPad, Kindle & Other Devices | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
This collection features 800 free eBooks, mostly classics, that you can read on your computer, Kindle, iPad or smart phone. It includes great works of fiction, non-fiction & poetry.
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Kids' TV did a Brexit explainer that's so simple it's brilliant The Poke

Kids' TV did a Brexit explainer that's so simple it's brilliant The Poke | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Children’s TV in Ireland did this 2-minute Brexit explainer and it went viral because it’s so well done. There's been a lot of talk in the news about Brexit recently and you've probably heard a lot of words like 'backstop' and 'Chequers' – but what does it all mean? Here's one of RTÉ's political experts …
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Personality tests: Are you average, self-centred, role-model or reserved?

Personality tests: Are you average, self-centred, role-model or reserved? | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Researchers identify four new types after studying the results of more than one million people.
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6 Minute English / Dating apps: How our brains react

6 Minute English / Dating apps: How our brains react | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
What does our brain tell us to do when faced with a dating app?
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Why We Say “OK”: The History of the Most Widely Spoken Word in the World

Why We Say “OK”: The History of the Most Widely Spoken Word in the World | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it

Ok, not to be contrary, but anyone else worry that we may be getting punked here?

Is Coleman Lowndes' clever collage-style video on the ubiquity and origins of the word “ok” a bit too clever for its own good?
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Mmm, That's Good! Using Interjections

Mmm, That's Good! Using Interjections | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Your browser doesn’t support HTML5 Oops! I spilled some coffee. Hmm… Let me think about it. Woohoo! That’s great news. Let’s celebrate. To the untrained ear, sounds like “oops” “hmm” and “woohoo” may seem like nonsense. But in English, these sounds carry a lot of meaning. We call them “interjections.” And the English language has hundreds of them. Interjections are informal sounds, words or phrases that express the reactions or emotions of the speaker. There are interjections for nearly any feeling or response, such as excitement, happiness, surprise or disappointment. Because there are so many English interjections, the best way to learn them is to hear how they’re used. For example, if I accidentally spilled coffee, my reaction would probably be one of regret. So, I might say, “Oops!” Listen to how it is used: Oops! I spilled some coffee. But don’t worry—I’ll clean it up. We use “oops” to show regret for having done or said something wrong. It’s like saying, “I made a mistake.” When do we use them? Native English speakers use interjections every day. And that includes everyone from babies to older adults. In fact, a baby’s first word might be an interjection. A baby might say “ow” or “ouch!” when they touch something too hot or “yum!” when their food tastes delicious. But an adult might, too. Interjections are used in spoken English, informal writing and creative writing, including in books, films and songs. You may remember American singer Britney Spears’ most famous song, “Oops! ...I Did It Again” in which she shows regret for breaking someone’s heart. We do not use interjections in formal writing, such as essays or research papers. And, we usually avoid them in professional messages, such as business letters or emails. Yet, their informal status does not make them any less useful of a communication tool. Even respected dictionaries now include their meanings. Primary vs. secondary There are two types of interjections: primary and secondary. Primary interjections are individual words and sounds that are used only as interjections. They have no other meanings or uses, such as the words from earlier in our program: “oops,” “hmm,” “woohoo,” “ow,” “ouch,” and “yum.” Secondary interjections are words or phrases that already belong to other parts of speech, such as “boy,” “awesome,” and “oh my God.” These words all have separate meanings as interjections. For example, the original meaning of the word “boy” is male child. But as an interjection, its meaning is completely different. It is used to express a strong reaction, such as interest or surprise. Here's an example: My cat destroyed my roommate’s favorite plant. Boy, was he mad! But I promised to replace it by Sunday. Using the interjection “boy” brings attention to the extent of the roommate’s anger. Parts of speech Even though interjections are informal, they are parts of speech. They can be nouns, verbs or adverbs. Here is an interjection as a noun: Baloney! That’s the stupidest thing I’ve ever heard. Using the word “baloney” is a direct – and somewhat confrontational – way of saying, “I don’t agree with that.” …as a verb: Get out! The tickets sold out in 15 minutes. That’s impossible. “Get out” means “I don’t believe it” and is usually used in a friendly way. …and as an adverb: Uh-uh. I can’t make it today. I have a meeting at 5pm. “Uh-uh” simply means “no” but is usually used to emphasize a negative answer to a question, request or offer. But be careful not to mistake “uh-uh” with an interjection that sounds and looks similar but has the opposite meaning: “Uh-huh.” It means yes. It can also be used to show that you agree or understand. Here’s an example: Do you know what I mean? Uh-huh. I feel the same way. Punctuation Interjections do not follow usual English rules of punctuation. They mostly have no relationship to other parts of a sentence. So, they are usually written separately and followed by an exclamation point or a period. This is because their meanings alone can often express a complete thought. Earlier in the program, for example, we told you that “oops” means “I made a mistake.” That is a complete thought, so it does not need to be part of a sentence. Still, we can follow them with a comma. You could, for example, write, “Oops, I spilled some coffee” with a comma following “oops” instead of a period or exclamation point. The punctuation usually depends on the emotion you are expressing. To show excitement, we usually use an exclamation point after an interjection, which keeps it separate from sentences. Common interjections OK, now let’s learn a few more common interjections: If something is generally unpleasant, whether in appearance, taste or smell, you can say “yuck,” “eww,” “ick,” or “blech.” If you want to say something tastes or smells good, you can use “mmm” or “yum.” If you are frustrated or upset about something, you might say “ugh” or “argh.” One thing to note: Different parts of the United States may use different interjections. Listen again to the example with “baloney.” Baloney! That’s the stupidest thing I’ve ever heard. The word “baloney” is most common in the northeastern United States. And, other forms of English, such as British English, share only some interjections with American English. Listen for American English interjections the next time you are watching a movie or television show or listening to music. And let us know what you find. I’m Alice Bryant. Alice Bryant wrote this story for Learning English. Ashley Thompson was the editor. Now, you try it! Try using a few of the interjections from today’s program. You can also use the table below. Write your answers in the Comments section. ______________________________________________________________ Words in This Story informal – adj. relaxed in tone : not suited for serious or official speech and writing phrase – n. a group of two or more words that express a single idea but do not usually form a complete sentence essay – n. a short piece of writing that tells a person's thoughts or opinions about a subject dictionary – n. a reference book that contains words listed in alphabetical order and that gives information about the words' meanings, forms, pronunciations, etc. original – adj. happening or existing first or at the beginning emphasize – v. to give special attention to (something) punctuation – n. the marks (such as periods and commas) in a piece of writing that make its meaning clear and that separate it into sentences, clauses, etc. frustrated – adj. very angry, discouraged, or upset because of being unable to do or complete something
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Jobcentre joke is the funniest at the Edinburgh Fringe

Jobcentre joke is the funniest at the Edinburgh Fringe | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Liverpool comedian Adam Rowe wins the award for his one-liner about being sacked by a Jobcentre.
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BBC - Culture - What the earliest fragments of English reveal

BBC - Culture - What the earliest fragments of English reveal | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
The earliest fragments of English reveal how interconnected Europe has been for centuries, finds Cameron Laux. He traces a history of the language through 10 objects and manuscripts.
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'Misinformation' picked as word of the year by Dictionary.com | Science | The Guardian

'Misinformation' picked as word of the year by Dictionary.com | Science | The Guardian | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Online resource picked the word over ‘disinformation’ where other dictionaries had opted for ‘toxic’ and ‘single-use’...
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'Leda and the Swan' Painting Found in Ancient Pompeii

'Leda and the Swan' Painting Found in Ancient Pompeii | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Scientists have uncovered a sensual drawing on a wall in the ruins of ancient Pompeii. The fresco represents the myth of Leda and the Swan.
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How to Make a Complaint in English

How to Make a Complaint in English | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Most of us do not enjoy complaining. But sometimes we must do it to get a solution. In this Everyday Grammar program, we will tell you how to make a complaint in English.
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Learn English With Songs - Boris The Spider, by The Who

An easy English grammar gap fill quiz for elementary English language students and upwards, on the song Boris The Spider, by The Who. Watch this fun video and listen to the song. Use the words from the word box to complete the lyrics, by typing in the missing prepositions.
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Free Philip K. Dick: Download 13 Great Science Fiction Stories

Free Philip K. Dick: Download 13 Great Science Fiction Stories | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Get acquainted with one of the great science fiction writers of our time, Philip K. Dick. Here we have gathered together 13 free stories, some in text, some in audio. Enjoy and share with a friend.
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Virtual Dice and Random Number Generators via @rmbyrne 

Virtual Dice and Random Number Generators via @rmbyrne  | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
On Wednesday morning I was looking for an online tool that would roll virtual dice for a game that I had designed for a faculty meeting

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Juergen Wagner
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More US Schools Teaching Skills to Recognize False News

More US Schools Teaching Skills to Recognize False News | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
An increasing number of American states are now requiring schools to teach skills for recognizing real and false news.
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The bridge that crossed an ocean

The bridge that crossed an ocean | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
The story of how an American bought London Bridge and moved it to Arizona
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Peng? Beef? The secret world of slang

Peng? Beef? The secret world of slang | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Police in Lancashire have compiled a list of slang words to help them understand teens. Do you know what they mean?
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Why Some Americans Keep Talking About Chicago 1968

Why Some Americans Keep Talking About Chicago 1968 | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
Fifty years ago, police and protesters clashed at a political meeting. The violence and debates of that time are still important today.
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Signs You May Be Dehydrated

Signs You May Be Dehydrated | The EFL SMARTblog Scoop.it Page | Scoop.it
We we don't drink enough water, our bodies don't work properly. But many people may not know that they are dehydrated. Read on to recognize signs of dehydration.
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