:: The 4th Era ::
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:: The 4th Era ::
Impact of the internet age on human culture and K-20 education policy/administration
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind presently exists in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

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Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:43 AM
Jim - I like your perspective. Great subject matter here!
Margaret Waage's comment, June 20, 2013 7:46 AM
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Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

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Welcome to The Moonshot Catalog - The Moonshot Catalog

Welcome to The Moonshot Catalog - The Moonshot Catalog | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Ending the threat of pandemic disease. That’s a moonshot. Fighting climate change with new energy and industrial systems that reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rather than increase it. That’s a moonshot. Feeding the projected population of 10 billion people in 2050 without wrecking the planet. That’s a moonshot. Opening the way for people to live with longer healthspans — that is, longer proportions of their lifespans without arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, dementia, and other maladies of aging. That’s a moonshot.

"President Kennedy introduced his call for the origial moonshot in an address to Congress in May 1961. The United States finally pulled off his vision off 50 years ago when the country landed astronauts on the moon on July 20, 1969, and then returned them to Earth safely four days later. The moonshot-caliber challenges you will read about in The Moonshot Catalog in the coming months share the seminal feature of that decades-old mission: they are daunting, but they are doable.

 

"They are daunting in that each one requires a unique, creative, and sustained synthesis of science, engineering, entrepreneurship, collective will, and resources to pull off. They are doable in that researchers, innovators, entrepreneurs, governments, and other stakeholders have taken real initial steps toward the moonshots’ must-go destinations. Each moonshot that humanity can pull off will yield a world of good, both for the planet and for all of us. Each success will contribute to our sense of promise about the future and fight a corrosive sense of cynicism.


"These challenges are at the heart of The Moonshot Catalog, a communications project funded by the philanthropic organization Schmidt Futures in collaboration with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). We want to highlight opportunities to:


Set more ambitious goals: We want to highlight that recent scientific and technological advances may make it possible to “dream bigger.” What might have been impossible 5–10 years ago may now be within reach, allowing us to accelerate progress on some of our toughest challenges. By calling attention to these goals and the advances that make them possible, we hope to create positive, self-fulfilling prophecies.


Build a moonshot culture: We want to call attention to opportunities for leaders in business, government, academia, and philanthropy to pursue these moonshots. 

 

"Join the conversation: We hope that you, our readers, will provide suggestions for additional moonshots, as well as alternative paths to achieving some of the goals that will be described in the catalog.

 

"Every few weeks or so following the rollout, we will add another moonshot article or two to the catalog. We invite you to come back again and again to read these articles. We also invite you to engage us with your reactions to the articles and your own ideas for moonshots. You can contribute to the conversation by using the comments boxes at the end of each article."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Interesting initiative. Inspiring creativity. It might be cool to follow this with your students over the course of the year. If this gives you an idea, please share here!

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Exclusive: Ex-Puerto Rico Schools Chief Julia Keleher, Indicted in Corruption Probe, Previously Denied She Was Federal Target :: The 74

Exclusive: Ex-Puerto Rico Schools Chief Julia Keleher, Indicted in Corruption Probe, Previously Denied She Was Federal Target :: The 74 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Julia Keleher, Puerto Rico’s former education secretary, was arrested Wednesday on charges that she participated in a conspiracy to steer millions of dollars in government contracts to unqualified, politically-connected organizations. Federal Bureau of Investigation agents arrested Keleher in Washington, D.C., where she was freed pending her surrender to officials in Puerto Rico within the week.

"An indictment puts Keleher and five others — including the former head of the island’s health insurance administration and an executive with a major accounting firm — at the center of a conspiracy to illegally direct more than $15 million in federal funds through contracts to organizations with which prosecutors said the defendants had personal ties.

"From 2017 until her resignation in April, Keleher led wide-scale education reform efforts in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria shuttered the island’s schools. She was widely viewed as a controversial lightning rod for her push to adopt charter schools and private school vouchers, in addition to her decision to close hundreds of public schools on the island.

"After stepping down, Keleher consistently painted herself as a heroic fighter against the island’s anti-reform forces. As recently as April, following local news reports that Keleher was under federal investigation, she denied the allegations. In an exclusive interview with The 74, Keleher claimed that she sounded the alarm on irregularities involving a contract, which she said was discovered during an internal audit."

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[PDF] Realising the potential of technology in education: A strategy for education providers and the technology industry

[PDF] Realising the potential of technology in education: A strategy for education providers and the technology industry | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
England has a world-class education system. From teachers in early years settings supporting children’s cognitive, social and emotional development to universities preparing adults for active participation in further education, research and work, our teachers and lecturers are second to none. At the same time, we have a flourishing EdTech business sector, punching above our weight internationally and with a steadily growing export market.
 
Technology is often associated with increased automation and reduced human interaction, although within the education sector it will never replace the role of our great teachers. However, I believe technology can be an effective tool to help reduce workload, increase efficiencies, engage students and communities, and provide tools to support excellent teaching and raise student attainment.
 
I have seen first-hand, the difference that good use of technology can have in helping tackle some of the challenges we face in education. I visited Woodberry Down Primary School in London where teachers use cloud technology to share resources and collaborate, saving teachers hours of time a week. Grimsby Institute of Further and Higher Education uses virtual and augmented reality to better prepare students for vocational careers. Nottingham Trent University is using data to help understand their student's engagement with their chosen degrees, allowing tutors to target interventions to better support their students.
 
These institutions face their own daily challenges, but they are all using technology for a purpose: to drive student engagement and attainment and to support effective working environments where staff can focus on teaching.
 
Yet all too often technology initiatives have failed to deliver value for money and, crucially, failed to have a positive impact. We know that not all education settings benefit from the modern broadband infrastructure needed to capitalize on the use of technology. It can be hard for leaders to understand how technology can support positive change and teachers are often told to just 'find a way to integrate technology or devices in the classroom'. It can be difficult for education leaders to separate evidence-based practice and products from a vast range of gimmicks. This strategy starts to address these challenges.

Via Edumorfosis
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 15, 8:06 AM

Free to download.

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(PDF) Navigating the Bumpy Road to Student-Centered Instruction :: Richard M. Felder and Rebecca Brent 

(PDF) Navigating the Bumpy Road to Student-Centered Instruction :: Richard M. Felder and Rebecca Brent  | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"We use student-centered instruction extensively in our courses and discuss it in teaching workshops we present to faculty members and graduate teaching assistants. The workshop participants generally fall into two categories. On the one hand are the skeptics, who come up with all sorts of creative reasons why student-centered methods could not possibly work. On the other hand are the converts, who are sold on SCI and can't wait to try it. We know the fears teachers have about the instructional methods we advocate, having had most of them ourselves, and we can usually satisfy most of the skeptics that some of the problems they anticipate will not occur and the others are solvable. We worry more about the enthusiasts who leave the workshop ready to plunge right in, imagining that the spectacular results promised by the literature will show up immediately.

 

"The enthusiasts may be in for a rude shock. It's not that SCI doesn't work when done correctly-it does, as both the literature and our personal experience in two strikingly different disciplines richly attest. The problem is that while the promised benefits are real, they are neither immediate nor automatic. The students, whose teachers have been telling them everything they needed to know from the first grade on, don't necessarily appreciate having this support suddenly withdrawn. Some students view the approach as a threat or as some kind of game, and a few may become sullen or hostile when they find they have no choice about playing. When confronted with a need to take more responsibility for their own learning, they may grouse that they are paying tuition-or their parents are paying taxes-to be taught, not to teach themselves. If cooperative learning is a feature of the instruction, they may gripe loudly and bitterly about other team members not pulling their weight or about having to waste time explaining everything to slower teammates. Good lecturers may feel awkward when they start using student centered methods and their course-end ratings may initially drop.

 

"It's tempting for instructors to give up in the face of all that, and many unfortunately do. Giving up is a mistake. SCI may impose steep learning curves on both instructors and students, and the initial instructor awkwardness and student hostility are both common and natural. The key for the instructors is to understand how the process works, take some precautionary steps to smooth out the bumps, and wait out the inevitable setbacks until the payoffs start emerging. "

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Future of work in America | McKinsey

Future of work in America | McKinsey | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The US labor market looks markedly different today than it did two decades ago. It has been reshaped by dramatic events like the Great Recession but also by a quieter ongoing evolution in the mix and location of jobs. In the decade ahead, the next wave of automation technologies may accelerate the pace of change. Millions of jobs could be phased out even as new ones are created. More broadly, the day-to-day nature of work could change for nearly everyone as intelligent machines become fixtures in the American workplace.

"Until recently, most research on the potential effects of automation, including our own, has focused on the national-level effects. Our previous work ran multiple scenarios regarding the pace and extent of adoption. In the midpoint case, our modeling shows some jobs being phased out but sufficient numbers being added at the same time to produce net positive job growth for the United States as a whole through 2030.

"The day-to-day nature of work could change for nearly everyone as intelligent machines become fixtures in the American workplace."

"But the national results contain a wide spectrum of outcomes. A new report from the McKinsey Global Institute, The future of work in America: People and places, today and tomorrow (PDF–4.41MB), analyzes more than 3,000 US counties and 315 cities and finds they are on sharply different paths. Automation is not happening in a vacuum, and the health of local economies today will affect their ability to adapt and thrive in the face of the changes that lie ahead.

"The trends outlined in this report could widen existing disparities between high-growth cities and struggling rural areas, and between high-wage workers and everyone else. But this is not a foregone conclusion. The United States can improve outcomes nationwide by connecting displaced workers with new opportunities, equipping people with the skills they need to succeed, revitalizing distressed areas, and supporting workers in transition. Returning to more inclusive growth will require the combined energy and ingenuity of business leaders, policy makers, educators, and nonprofits across the country."

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

This report, released on July 11, concludes: "...that 25 cities and high-growth hubs could generate 60% of the job growth in the U.S. through 2030. The 54 trailing cities and rural areas, where 25% of Americans live, could have no growth in jobs."*

 

Given the source of the report (McKinsey), it is likely to be widely quoted and exercise considerable influence.

 

*NY Times, 7/12/19, p. A15.

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Elementary-School Curriculum Is All Wrong :: Natalie Wexler

Elementary-School Curriculum Is All Wrong :: Natalie Wexler | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"American elementary education has been shaped by a theory that goes like this: Reading—a term used to mean not just matching letters to sounds but also comprehension—can be taught in a manner completely disconnected from content. Use simple texts to teach children how to find the main idea, make inferences, draw conclusions, and so on, and eventually they’ll be able to apply those skills to grasp the meaning of anything put in front of them.

 
"In the meantime, what children are reading doesn’t really matter—it’s better for them to acquire skills that will enable them to discover knowledge for themselves later on than for them to be given information directly, or so the thinking goes. That is, they need to spend their time “learning to read” before “reading to learn.” Science can wait; history, which is considered too abstract for young minds to grasp, must wait. Reading time is filled, instead, with a variety of short books and passages unconnected to one another except by the “comprehension skills” they’re meant to teach.
 

"As far back as 1977, early-elementary teachers spent more than twice as much time on reading as on science and social studies combined. But since 2001, when the federal No Child Left Behind legislation made standardized reading and math scores the yardstick for measuring progress, the time devoted to both subjects has only grown. In turn, the amount of time spent on social studies and science has plummeted—especially in schools where test scores are low.

 

"And yet, despite the enormous expenditure of time and resources on reading, American children haven’t become better readers. For the past 20 years, only about a third of students have scored at or above the “proficient” level on national tests. For low-income and minority kids, the picture is especially bleak: Their average test scores are far below those of their more affluent, largely white peers—a phenomenon usually referred to as the achievement gap. As this gap has grown wider, America’s standing in international literacy rankings, already mediocre, has fallen. “We seem to be declining as other systems improve,” a federal official who oversees the administration of such tests told Education Week.

 

"All of which raises a disturbing question: What if the medicine we have been prescribing is only making matters worse, particularly for poor children? What if the best way to boost reading comprehension is not to drill kids on discrete skills but to teach them, as early as possible, the very things we’ve marginalized—including history, science, and other content that could build the knowledge and vocabulary they need to understand both written texts and the world around them?"

 

Comments anyone?

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Free Download: ISTE 2019 Show Report

Free Download: ISTE 2019 Show Report | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Futuresource analysts attended the ISTE education show in July 2019 and reported in detail on the exhibitors, new technologies and industry sentiment."

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SEL in the House: Democrats Approve Millions in Landmark Federal Funding for Social-Emotional Learning in Bill That Now Faces Test in Senate | The 74

SEL in the House: Democrats Approve Millions in Landmark Federal Funding for Social-Emotional Learning in Bill That Now Faces Test in Senate | The 74 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"HOUSE APPROVES LANDMARK FUNDS: In a historic win for the increasingly popular social-emotional learning, the House of Representatives approved an appropriations bill that includes $260 million to support the social, emotional and cognitive development of students. The money would go toward funding innovation and research, supporting teacher professional development, and increasing school counselors and mental health professionals in schools. However, with contentious budget negotiations looming in Congress, the Democratic-approved funding faces an uphill battle. “It really is a turning point,” said Rep. Tim Ryan, a longtime SEL proponent who is running for president. “But we’ve got a long way to go.”

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Take Control of Your Digital Legacy :: Interesting Thing of the Day :: Joe Kissell

Take Control of Your Digital Legacy :: Interesting Thing of the Day :: Joe Kissell | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
How do you want to be remembered by future generations? You can make a will to handle your physical possessions, but what about your digital life—photos, videos, email, documents, and the like? What about all your passwords, social media accounts, backups, and every other aspect of your digital life? Over the years, I got so many questions about this sort of thing that I decided to write a book about it—Take Control of Your Digital Legacy—and it has turned out to be one of my post popular titles.

If you’re not at the stage of life where you can think about this for yourself, consider that you may have to do so for your parents or other relatives. It’s not all about posterity either, since following my advice will also help loved ones access your key accounts and important info if you’re incapacitated, which can happen at any time—or even if you just decide to go on a long vacation.

This book, like all Take Control titles, comes as an ebook, and you can download any combination of formats—PDF, EPUB, and/or Kindle’s Mobipocket format—so you can read it on pretty much any computer, smartphone, tablet, or ebook reader. The cover price is $15, but as an Interesting Thing of the Day reader, you can buy it for 30% off, or just $10.50.

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

I rarely highlight items that cost anything, but this intrigued me a great deal, seeing as I'm contemplating my mortality a bit more these days.

 

I note this ebook merely FYI, without approval or rejection. If I ever take the plunge and buy it, I'll write a review. And of course, there have got to be people that have written about this topic online and offer their thoughts for free.

 

This website, "Interesting Thing of the Day," is brand new to me. On first glance, it seems kind of...well, interesting, and I'll follow it along for awhile.

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Inside the Elementary School Where Drug Addiction Sets the Curriculum - The New York Times

Inside the Elementary School Where Drug Addiction Sets the Curriculum - The New York Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Inside an elementary school classroom decorated with colorful floor mats, art supplies and building blocks, a little boy named Riley talked quietly with a teacher about how he had watched his mother take “knockout pills” and had seen his father shoot up “a thousand times.”

"Riley, who is 9 years old, described how he had often been left alone to care for his baby brother while his parents were somewhere else getting high. Beginning when he was about 5, he would heat up meals of fries, chicken nuggets and spaghetti rings in the microwave for himself and his brother, he said. “That was all I knew how to make,” Riley said.

"Riley — who is in foster care and who officials asked not be fully identified because of his age — is among hundreds of students enrolled in the local school district who have witnessed drug use at home. Like many of his classmates at Minford Elementary School, Riley struggles with behavioral and psychological problems that make it difficult to focus, school officials said, let alone absorb lessons.

“If you’re worried about your parents getting arrested last night, you can’t retain information,” said Kendra Rase Cram, a teacher at Minford Elementary who was hired this past academic year to teach students how to cope with trauma. Over the past nine months, she led several classes a day, and met every week in one-on-one sessions with up to 20 students who have experienced significant trauma.

"Indeed, the classroom is becoming the battleground in the war against drug addiction where the next generation will be saved or lost in Ohio, which in 2017 had the second highest rate of opioid overdose deaths in the country."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Heartbreaking, but real -- almost beyond belief. Rural Ohio, OMG. God bless these teachers.

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We Need Emotional Intelligence with our Edtech

We Need Emotional Intelligence with our Edtech | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"If we expect students to interact appropriately with others, make good decisions, and manage stress, we must teach them emotional intelligence. Several characteristics make up emotional intelligence; they are a set of soft skills that have been acknowledged as important, but have been set aside to pursue other learning objectives."


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Charter Schools Face New Challenges- The New York Times

Charter Schools Face New Challenges- The New York Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"When the charter school movement first burst on to the scene, its founders pledged to transform big urban school districts by offering low-income and minority families something they believed was missing: safe, orderly schools with rigorous academics.

"But now, several decades later, as the movement has expanded, questions about whether its leaders were fulfilling their original promise to educate vulnerable children better than neighborhood public schools have mounted."

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Tuition-Free College Could Cost Less Than You Think - The New York Times :: David Deming

Tuition-Free College Could Cost Less Than You Think - The New York Times :: David Deming | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Making a tuition-free college education available to everyone who wants one is an immensely worthwhile — and realistic — goal, a Harvard economist says.

 

"The long-term payoff of these policies could be enormous. Considerable research shows that public and private benefits greatly exceed the costs when students are nudged toward obtaining a college degree. Yet at the moment, only 37 percent of Americans between the ages of 25 and 29 have a four-year college degree, and completion rates are lower for poorer students.

 

"Dollars and cents aside, there is a strong ethical case for devoting more public spending to policies that encourage poorer students to get a college education, giving them some of the opportunities that richer students receive as a matter of birth.

 

"But budget hawks should know that making all public colleges tuition-free could be relatively inexpensive — or even revenue-neutral — if this initiative replaced other less-effective programs."

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A Molecular Hurdle Might Make Weight Loss Even More Difficult :: The Atlantic

A Molecular Hurdle Might Make Weight Loss Even More Difficult :: The Atlantic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Endocrinologists have known for decades that the science of weight is far more complicated than calorie deficits and energy expenditures. And in 2016, the fickle complexity of weight came to broad national attention. In a study of former contestants on a season of the weight-loss reality show The Biggest Loser, scientists found that years later, the contestants not only had gained back much or all of the weight they’d lost on the show, but also had far weaker metabolisms than most people their size. The contestants’ bodies had fought for years to regain the weight, contrary to the contestants’ efforts and wishes. No one was sure why.

"Along with a team of researchers, Ann Marie Schmidt, an endocrinologist at the New York University School of Medicine, has been unraveling the mystery. In a new study published today, Schmidt and her team have unlocked a molecular mechanism controlling weight gain and loss in mice: a protein that shuts down the animals’ ability to burn fat in times of bodily stress, including when dieting or overeating. This discovery might hold the key to understanding why it’s so hard for humans to lose weight, and even harder to keep it off."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Yes, yes. This one is not about education per se. However, as so many of us are concerned about ours and others' weight and this article seems so significant, I decided to scoop it.

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A Reminder That 'Fake News' Is An Information Literacy Problem - Not A Technology Problem - FORBES

A Reminder That 'Fake News' Is An Information Literacy Problem - Not A Technology Problem - FORBES | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Beneath the spread of all “fake news,” misinformation, disinformation, digital falsehoods and foreign influence lies society’s failure to teach its citizenry information literacy: how to think critically about the deluge of information that confronts them in our modern digital age. Instead, society has prioritized speed over accuracy, sharing over reading, commenting over understanding. Children are taught to regurgitate what others tell them and to rely on digital assistants to curate the world rather than learn to navigate the informational landscape on their own. Schools no longer teach source triangulation, conflict arbitration, separating fact from opinion, citation chaining, conducting research or even the basic concept of verification and validation. In short, we’ve stopped teaching society how to think about information, leaving our citizenry adrift in the digital wilderness increasingly saturated with falsehoods without so much as a compass or map to help them find their way to safety. The solution is to teach the world's citizenry the basics of information literacy.

Via John Evans
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, July 15, 3:09 AM

Thanks to John Evans.

Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, July 19, 2:09 PM

The ability recognize fake news can be taught and learned.  For all those who say,  '...There's no time to do this, there's no place to fit it in the curriculum!'  .... WAKE UP.

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Why TEAL works :: Ryan Normandin (Technology Enabled Active Learning)

Why TEAL works :: Ryan Normandin (Technology Enabled Active Learning) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"In the years leading up to 2000, the MIT Physics Department realized it had a problem. Despite great lecturers such as Walter Lewin, attendance at physics lectures fell 40 percent by the end of the term. In addition, an average of 10 percent of students failed 8.01 (Mechanics) and 14 percent of students failed 8.02 (Electricity and Magnetism). So MIT did what it does best: It solved the problem.

"Professor John Belcher, frustrated with the failure of the lecture/recitation format, decided to try something new. He teamed up with Senior Lecturer Peter Dourmashkin and Professor David Litster to implement a major change in the way freshman physics was taught. Borrowing from education research done by Carl Wieman and changes already implemented in other schools, like North Carolina State’s “Scale-Up” program, TEAL was born. From their research, the trio knew that one of the problems with the traditional format of teaching physics was the fact that it was a passive style of teaching.

“TEAL, which stands for technology-enabled active learning, is more about learning the information instead of just distributing it,” Dourmashkin explained."

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The Truth About Busing: It Works :: Nikole Hannah-Jones :: The New York Times

The Truth About Busing: It Works :: Nikole Hannah-Jones :: The New York Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"When Senator Kamala Harris confronted former Vice President Joe Biden at the second Democratic presidential debate about his support of bills to ban busing for school desegregation during the 1970s and early ’80s, he gave a sort of denial. “I did not oppose busing in America,” he said. “What I opposed is busing ordered by the Department of Education. That’s what I opposed.”

"This quickly became one of the most talked-about moments of the debate. Many pundits suggested it was unwise for Ms. Harris to dredge up the racial hurts of a decades-old “failed” policy at a time when the Trump administration is caging children along the border and when Democrats are seeking to retake the White House.

"But tellingly, there was little discussion about busing’s efficacy, at least not with facts, or about whether or not busing served its purpose of breaking apart the educational caste system.

"That we even use the word “busing” to describe what was in fact court-ordered school desegregation, and that Americans of all stripes believe that the brief period in which we actually tried to desegregate our schools was a failure, speaks to one of the most successful propaganda campaigns of the last half century. Further, it explains how we have come to be largely silent — and accepting — of the fact that 65 years after the Supreme Court struck down school segregation in Brown v. Board of Education, black children are as segregated from white students as they were in the mid-1970s when Mr. Biden was working with Southern white supremacist legislators to curtail court-ordered busing.

"The term “busing” is a race-neutral euphemism that allows people to pretend white opposition was not about integration but simply about a desire for their children to attend neighborhood schools. But the fact is that American children have ridden buses to schools since the 1920s. There is a reason the cheery yellow school bus is the most ubiquitous symbol of American education. Buses eased the burden of transportation on families and allowed larger comprehensive schools to replace one-room schoolhouses. Millions of kids still ride school buses every day, and rarely do so for integration."

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Questions academics can ask to decolonise their classrooms

Questions academics can ask to decolonise their classrooms | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

The curriculum is not just the “stuff” that students must learn to be knowledgeable and skilled in a particular discipline. It’s about more than just content.

Sociologists of education argue that “curriculum” is a highly ideological hybrid discourse. This means that it includes implicit ways of knowing, ways of doing and ways of being – as well as content.


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Better Public Schools Won’t Fix Income Inequality :: Edmon De Haro :: The Atlantic

Better Public Schools Won’t Fix Income Inequality :: Edmon De Haro :: The Atlantic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Long ago, i was captivated by a seductively intuitive idea, one many of my wealthy friends still subscribe to: that both poverty and rising inequality are largely consequences of America’s failing education system. Fix that, I believed, and we could cure much of what ails America.

 

"This belief system, which I have come to think of as “educationism,” is grounded in a familiar story about cause and effect: Once upon a time, America created a public-education system that was the envy of the modern world. No nation produced more or better-educated high-school and college graduates, and thus the great American middle class was built. But then, sometime around the 1970s, America lost its way. We allowed our schools to crumble, and our test scores and graduation rates to fall. School systems that once churned out well-paid factory workers failed to keep pace with the rising educational demands of the new knowledge economy. As America’s public-school systems foundered, so did the earning power of the American middle class. And as inequality increased, so did political polarization, cynicism, and anger, threatening to undermine American democracy itself.

 

"Taken with this story line, I embraced education as both a philanthropic cause and a civic mission. I co-founded the League of Education Voters, a nonprofit dedicated to improving public education. I joined Bill Gates, Alice Walton, and Paul Allen in giving more than $1 million each to an effort to pass a ballot measure that established Washington State’s first charter schools. All told, I have devoted countless hours and millions of dollars to the simple idea that if we improved our schools—if we modernized our curricula and our teaching methods, substantially increased school funding, rooted out bad teachers, and opened enough charter schools—American children, especially those in low-income and working-class communities, would start learning again. Graduation rates and wages would increase, poverty and inequality would decrease, and public commitment to democracy would be restored.

 

"But after decades of organizing and giving, I have come to the uncomfortable conclusion that I was wrong. And I hate being wrong.

 

"What I’ve realized, decades late, is that educationism is tragically misguided. American workers are struggling in large part because they are underpaid—and they are underpaid because 40 years of trickle-down policies have rigged the economy in favor of wealthy people like me. Americans are more highly educated than ever before, but despite that, and despite nearly record-low unemployment, most American workers—at all levels of educational attainment—have seen little if any wage growth since 2000.

 

"To be clear: We should do everything we can to improve our public schools. But our education system can’t compensate for the ways our economic system is failing Americans. Even the most thoughtful and well-intentioned school-reform program can’t improve educational outcomes if it ignores the single greatest driver of student achievement: household income."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Captivating analysis, especially coming from a high-level philanthropist. Well worth reading.

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Booker, Norcross, Pascrell Introduce Legislation to Address Growing Teacher Shortage

Booker, Norcross, Pascrell Introduce Legislation to Address Growing Teacher Shortage | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Teacher Shortage Bill: New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker and Reps. Donald Norcross and Bill Pascrell have reintroduced the Supporting the Teaching Profession Through Revitalizing Investments in Valuable Educators (STRIVE) Act, which would overhaul the student loan forgiveness program by “providing incremental loan forgiveness each year to public school teachers who teach in low-income schools."

 

Description by The74

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In California, High Schools Are Partnering With Businesses, Community Colleges to Get Students College- and Career-Ready | The 74

In California, High Schools Are Partnering With Businesses, Community Colleges to Get Students College- and Career-Ready | The 74 | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Known nationally as P-TECH, short for the Pathways in Technology Early College High School, the program is now gaining a foothold in California. The six-year program teaches college courses to high school students and creates a smooth transition into a community college. That’s all en route to an associate’s degree for which there’s economic demand, with numerous job-training experiences during the process.

The P-TECH model first took root in Brooklyn eight years ago as a collaboration between IBM and the local K-12 and college systems. IBM then helped more than 100 P-TECH schools across the country and the world. Now hundreds of businesses serve as partners to P-TECH by mentoring students and offering paid internships, working with educators to design industry-relevant curricula, and being at the end of a school-to-workforce pipeline to hire P-TECH graduates. Early results suggest high school students in the program are college-ready at higher rates than students in other New York City schools.
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Why You Need Esports at Your School (And How to Start It) • Texas Computer Educators Assn.

Why You Need Esports at Your School (And How to Start It) • Texas Computer Educators Assn. | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
This last year has seen huge gains for competitive gaming, known as esports, in education. High schools are upgrading gaming clubs into competitive teams and playing in high school leagues. Universities are building custom esports labs for their new varsity gaming teams. Esports scholarships will be offered at several hundred universities in the 2019-2020 school year.  The activity has arrived in a big way within the educator’s realm of influence. Let’s embrace it.
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How Tech Is Taking Social-Emotional Learning out of Its Silo | EdSurge News

How Tech Is Taking Social-Emotional Learning out of Its Silo | EdSurge News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"This year’s ISTE 2019 conference in Philadelphia marked nearly 20 years since I entered the education profession, and I’m seeing a tidal shift in the approach to integrating technology in learning. No longer are social-emotional learning and edtech siloed, or even separate entities. In a way, you could say it’s all connected

 

"The meaning behind connected learning, and human connection itself, is taking center stage, with technology being used as a means to facilitate, expand and empower the mind and voice of every learner­—student and teacher alike. Just as edtech is blending with our pedagogical practices, social-emotional learning, or SEL, is also being approached in a more holistic way. Our approach to learning is undergoing a necessary sea change, at a point when it seems all parts of the educational ecosystem—students, teachers, parents and administrators—desperately need it."


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Middle Age and the Art of Self-Renewal: An Extraordinary Letter from Pioneering Education Reformer Elizabeth Peabody – Maria Popova

Middle Age and the Art of Self-Renewal: An Extraordinary Letter from Pioneering Education Reformer Elizabeth Peabody – Maria Popova | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"No being of a social nature can be entirely beyond the tendency to fall to the level of his associates."

 

"The antidote to stagnation, therefore, lies in surrounding oneself with people of creative vitality. The pioneering astronomer Maria Mitchell — a contemporary of Peabody’s and a key figure in Figuring — would articulate this beautifully two decades later in contemplating how we co-create one another and recreate ourselves through friendship: “Whatever our degree of friends may be, we come more under their influence than we are aware.

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Somewhere around one's 10th year as an educator, many of us begin to question whether our chosen position, or even profession, continues to fill our need for growth and variety. Some keep at what we're doing with renewed vigor, others strike out in new directions, and of course, sadly, some give up or burn out.

 

This brief and marvelous post by Popova offers sage advice, and from a 19th century educator no less.

 

A good read.

 

 

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The Common Sense Census: Inside the 21st-Century Classroom | Common Sense Media

The Common Sense Census: Inside the 21st-Century Classroom | Common Sense Media | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the benefits of teaching lifelong digital citizenship skills to the challenges of preparing students to critically evaluate online information, educators across the country share their perspectives on what it's like to teach in today's fast-changing digital world.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 11, 12:30 AM

An interesting study.