:: The 4th Era ::
113.5K views | +4 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Jim Lerman
onto :: The 4th Era ::
Scoop.it!

Goodbye, Password. Banks Opt to Scan Fingers and Faces Instead.

Goodbye, Password. Banks Opt to Scan Fingers and Faces Instead. | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Some of the nation’s largest banks, acknowledging that traditional passwords are either too cumbersome or no longer secure, are increasingly using fingerprints, facial scans and other types of biometrics to safeguard accounts.

Millions of customers at Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo routinely use fingerprints to log into their bank accounts through their mobile phones. This feature, which some of the largest banks have introduced in the last few months, is enabling a huge share of American banking customers to verify their identities with biometrics. And millions more are expected to opt in as more phones incorporate fingerprint scans.

Other uses of biometrics are also coming online. Wells Fargo lets some customers scan their eyes with their mobile phones to log into corporate accounts and wire millions of dollars. Citigroup can help verify 800,000 of its credit card customers by their voices. USAA, which provides insurance and banking services to members of the military and their families, identifies some of its customers through their facial contours.
No comment yet.
:: The 4th Era ::
Impact of the internet age on human culture and K-20 education policy/administration
Curated by Jim Lerman
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Introducing this work

Introducing this work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

For the purposes of this site, the history of human interaction with information may be divided into 4 eras. The first (spoken) era ended with the invention of writing around 3000-4000 BC. The second era ended with the invention of the printing press in 1440. The third era ended, and the fourth began, with the invention of the Internet (depending how one defines its operational beginning) somewhere between 1969 and 1982. We now exist early, but decidedly, in the fourth era.

 

All readers may not agree with this interpretation of the history of information, especially with the division and numbering of the eras. That is not the main point. Rather, it is that humankind presently exists in an era distinctly different from the one that preceded it -- that in fact, this new era is accompanied with, and characterized by, a new - and quite different - information landscape. This new Internet information landscape will challenge, disrupt, and overpower the print-oriented one that came before it. It will not completely obliterate that which preceded it, but it will render it to a subsidiary, rather than primary, level of influence.

 

Just as the printing press altered humanity's relationship with information, thereby resulting in massive restructuring of political, religious, economic, social, educational, cultural, scientific, and other realms of life; so too will the advance of digital technology occasion analogous transformations in the corresponding universe of present and future human activity.

 

This site will concern itself primarily with how K-20 education in the US, and the people who comprise its constituencies, may be affected by this transformative movement from one era to the next. All ideas considered here appear, to me at least, to impact the learning enterprise in some way. Accordingly, this work looks at the present and the future through a lens that is predominantly, but far from entirely, a digital one. -JL

Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

Beautiful!

gurlcases's comment, July 3, 12:52 AM
good
VGLawGroup's comment, September 3, 8:20 AM
NICE
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

Are Schools Overlooking An Obvious Strategy They Can Implement Immediately To Accelerate Learning? Peer Tutors! :: Larry Ferlazzo

Are Schools Overlooking An Obvious Strategy They Can Implement Immediately To Accelerate Learning? Peer Tutors! :: Larry Ferlazzo | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
I do think, though, that one very doable strategy that many schools are overlooking, and which could be implemented immediately, is the use of peer tutors to assist younger students.

For example, at our school I always have had one-or-two peer tutors in all my English Language Learner classes, and they have always been invaluable.

This year, however, my extraordinary colleague Katherine Bell has increased that number five-fold in each of my three ELL classes.  These peer tutors, generally either my former ELL students who are now advanced or my IB Theory of Knowledge classes from last year, have provided an extraordinary amount of assistance to Beginner and Intermediate students.  Their progress has clearly exceeded what would have been achieved in previous years.

In addition to having ELLs read to them daily to improve comprehension and prosody, practice oral language,  develop mentor relationships to provide social/emotional, as well as academic, support,  and having them practice the public presentations my students do regularly, I have created a flow of providing a mini-lesson, followed by peer tutors working in small groups to reinforce the lesson, followed by another mini-lesson, followed by peer tutors working in small groups again.
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

Stress and Short Tempers: Schools Struggle with Behavior as Students Return - MindShift

Stress and Short Tempers: Schools Struggle with Behavior as Students Return - MindShift | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Schools across the country say they’re seeing an uptick in disruptive behaviors. Some are obvious and visible, like students trashing bathrooms, fighting over social media posts, or running out of classrooms. Others are quieter calls for help, like students putting their head down and refusing to talk.

“This is a prolonged adjustment period,” said Dr. Tali Raviv, the associate director of the Center for Childhood Resilience at Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago. As children return to school, “There’s much more interaction, there’s much less downtime to recharge, there’s much less flexibility.”

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

PlayDecide

PlayDecide | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by The Scout Report

 

"PlayDecide is a free card game in which players learn about a particular topic, engage with different perspectives, and discuss the topic to refine their opinions and seek group consensus. Each 90-minute game can accommodate 4-8 players (recommended for ages 13 and up), which makes PlayDecide an excellent classroom resource for teachers or a team-building tool for professionals, organizations, and administrators. The gameplay (which is explained in a handy PDF guide, found by clicking "PlayDecide basics" on the page linked above) consists of three phases. In the first phase, players familiarize themselves with the issue at hand (e.g., "Young people in the media," "Future food systems," "Plastic pollution"). In the second phase, players share their opinions, listen to others, and refine their perspectives. In the final phase, the group approaches the issue together and players vote on their positions. PlayDecide games cover more than 350 topics and are available in 30 languages. The game is available under a Creative Commons license and materials for different topics are freely available to download (note: to download games, users will need to create a free account). PlayDecide was developed as part of a project funded by the European Union and coordinated by Ecsite, the European network of science centers and museums."

 

Jim Lerman's insight: This could be very engaging and productive for students, as well as a welcome change of pace.

Pat Heffernan's curator insight, October 23, 5:17 PM

Agreed. PlayDecide sounds like a refreshing new option for mixed and multiple generations.

Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Seven Spooktacular Activities for the Elementary Classroom :: Texas Computer Educators Assn.

Seven Spooktacular Activities for the Elementary Classroom :: Texas Computer Educators Assn. | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
It's fall, ya'll, and that means it's almost Halloween. Get ready to have some fun with these seven spooktacular elementary activities!

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

Some very clever and engaging ideas. They're not just for elementary kids and they're not just for Halloween, either. Don't miss this.

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

60+ of the Best Siri Commands to Use on Your iPhone :: MakeUseOf

60+ of the Best Siri Commands to Use on Your iPhone :: MakeUseOf | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Siri might be the most frequently overlooked feature on your iPhone. Apple's digital personal assistant gets a bad rap from time to time, but it's actually an incredibly valuable tool when you start taking advantage of it.

If you feel tongue-tied when talking to Siri, here are all the best commands you can use to make the most of it instead. Don't be afraid to experiment outside of these suggestions either!
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

WordPress vs. Wix: The Key Differences :: MakeUseOf

WordPress vs. Wix: The Key Differences :: MakeUseOf | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
You often face the classic dilemma while building a website for yourself or your business. WordPress vs. Wix—which one to pick and what would be the best choice for you?

It becomes even acute when you are short on budget. Unfortunately, searching randomly on different search engines like Google, Yahoo, or Bing could lead you to more profound confusion.

Considering all the inevitable conflicts, we have drawn a detailed illustration to clarify your selection process between WordPress and Wix.
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

IoT Hacking and Rickrolling My High School District

IoT Hacking and Rickrolling My High School District | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
This is the story of how I created a botnet of IPTVs to rickroll 10,000+ students for my senior prank.

 

Description by Stephen Downes

 

"This is a great story of how students hacked the bells and display system in their school division, replacing the usual messages with a rickroll. The article tells us almost everything (it keeps some of the exploits under wraps) including even some of the code. The author was also at great pains to show how they were careful to avoid any disruption or damage, and how they documented every step and (eventually) worked with administrators to secure the system. There are many great lessons in this post and it should be shared widely with computing science teachers and enthusiastic student programmers. Via Twit."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Great story, no matter how you look at it. Well worth reading.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Part 2: A Goldmine For Computational Thinking: Over 50 Resources To Teach CT Across The Curriculum :: Michael Gorman

Part 2: A Goldmine For Computational Thinking: Over 50 Resources To Teach CT Across The Curriculum :: Michael Gorman | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Keep in mind that Computational Thinking can use devices, robots, and computers to support learning. It also is valuable to do some “unplugged” activities that allow students to dive deep into their own thinking leaving the digital object to the side. I have tried to provide resources that support both. Last, the ability to understand the workings of a computer is only half of the algorithm. Keep in mind that human element. How do we find a way to use the power and speed of the computer along with the comprehension and metacognitive ability of the human mind? Enjoy the quote and resources that follow.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

District Administrator Details How She Reimagines, Redefines, and Redesigns Education through the School Library - Knowledge Quest :: Dr. April Grace

District Administrator Details How She Reimagines, Redefines, and Redesigns Education through the School Library - Knowledge Quest :: Dr. April Grace | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
My more than 30 years of service in education have taught me the value of a strong school library program. I was blessed to attend and later teach in a school system that valued its school libraries. I knew from those experiences the transformative learning power that lived within school libraries.  To me, the library is the heartbeat and central hub of the school. It is a place for the entire school to gather and collaborate, a place where learning is enhanced and the classroom extended. It is a place where learning can come alive and help each student make real-world connections. It is a place where all learners can dream, create, grow, and connect. It is an inclusive place where every child can feel safe and seen and valued. Robust school libraries are a catalyst for creating inclusive learning environments, and every learner deserves access to a quality library. When I became superintendent of my own school district, I knew investing in school libraries was nonnegotiable.
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

Families Continue to Value Higher Ed, but Miss Out on FAFSA, Scholarships :: Sallie Mae

Families Continue to Value Higher Ed, but Miss Out on FAFSA, Scholarships :: Sallie Mae | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Students shouldn’t pay more for college than they have to, but more and more families are leaving money on the table each year. Nearly a third of students skipped the Free Application from Federal Student Aid or FAFSA® last year, and the form’s complexity is a big reason why. To help students maximize federal financial aid, which is important to do before considering other options, including private student loans, Sallie Mae launched a free suite of financial education tools and planning resources, including a FAFSA support tool that can help families complete the form in minutes. See how Sallie Mae makes sense of the FAFSA."

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

Visual Story Lab :: Story Telling for Non-Profits

Visual Story Lab :: Story Telling for Non-Profits | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Visual Story Lab is Resource Media's visual storytelling resource hub-a place for nonprofits to hone their infographics and image strategy.

 

Description by The Scout Report

 

"Nonprofit outreach coordinators, social media managers, and fundraisers will find much useful information in Visual Story Lab (VSL). The project, created by Resource Media and funded by the Brainerd Foundation, the Compton Foundation, and the Seattle Foundation, was sparked after staff at the non-profit realized that policy and consumer arenas were being dominated by corporate communications. They decided to start leveling the playing field by providing the best knowledge, ideas, and experience they could tap through visual storytelling. In a media environment that bombards users with visual messages, VSL aims to seize these opportunities to deliver compelling messages and drive social change.

 

"VSL offers three main services on the page linked above: "Reports" on various socially-conscious topics and strategies for visually representing them; a "Toolbox" that contains guides for utilizing social media, making effective infographics, managing photo libraries, and more; and a "Blog" that features real-world accounts from visual storytelling professionals, including reflections on what has and has not worked. Readers looking to learn how to improve and expand the reach of their visual storytelling will find VSL a great place to start."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Numerous excellent resources; most are free.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Cybersecurity Resources for Planning, Prevention, and Safeguarding Data • TechNotes Blog Cybersecurity Resources for Planning, Prevention, and Safeguarding Data :: Texas Computer Educators Assn.

Cybersecurity Resources for Planning, Prevention, and Safeguarding Data • TechNotes Blog Cybersecurity Resources for Planning, Prevention, and Safeguarding Data :: Texas Computer Educators Assn. | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
As Cybersecurity Month 2021 looms, I am reminded of two incidents that occurred under my watch as a technology director. The first was a ransomware attack due to a Yahoo email attachment. At an elementary school, the ransomware knocked the point of sale food service computers offline. The problem had hit right after lunch. But no one reported it until late in the day. Consequently, I scrambled the team and descended on the campus at 4 p.m. on a Friday afternoon. Then, the second ransomware attack came. As a result of this attack, five years of federal reporting data went missing. With a data protection impact assessment or privacy impact assessment, the issues might have been lessened. It was all preventable if only district staff had listened to recommendations.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

How arts practices can be the foundation of teaching and learning - MindShift

How arts practices can be the foundation of teaching and learning - MindShift | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Arts education is often an afterthought in schools, but Erica Rosenfeld Halverson, Professor and Chair of the Department of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, thinks we’ve got it all wrong. In her new book, "How the Arts Can Save Education: Transforming Teaching, Learning and Instruction," Halverson argues not only do the arts belong in schools, but the core tenets of arts learning belong in every classroom. Education should use the arts—and especially the process of how artists create their work—as a blueprint to re-make more effective learning. 

Halverson’s arts experience comes from Whoopensocker, an arts-based organization she founded that teaches elementary school students the process of writing and performing original plays. Through that work, she came to a realization: using standardized test scores as the measure for learning limits what students have the opportunity to learn, and gives students the impression that test scores are the final destination.

But the arts offer a new way of looking at learning. Her thesis resembles project-based learning: if classrooms embraced the cyclic process artists use to create new work—beginning with an idea, finding a way to express that idea (something she refers to as a “representation”), and then presenting the finished product to an audience—more real learning can flourish.

The following conversation has been edited for length and clarity.