Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración
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Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración
Un lugar para compartir técnicas, herramientas e información para  creadores de universos y escritores que buscan los nuevos caminos de la literatura en la era digital.
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murosYredes by Guillermo Miranda

murosYredes by Guillermo Miranda | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
UN ESPACIO PARA #REPENSARELMUSEO
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Análisis Ni No Kuni II: El Renacer de un Reino - PC

Análisis Ni No Kuni II: El Renacer de un Reino - PC | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
¿Merece la pena comprar Ni No Kuni II: El Renacer de un Reino para PC? Te lo contamos todo en nuestro análisis: Gráficos, sonido, jugabilidad y todo lo que necesitas saber.
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Recorrido digital interactivo y personalizado por el mercado de valores tecnológico Nasdaq

Recorrido digital interactivo y personalizado por el mercado de valores tecnológico Nasdaq | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
Digital AV Magazine, portal especializado en información sobre tecnologías y tendencias en audio y video en entornos profesionales
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Homo Videoludens 2.0. De Pacman a la gamification

Homo Videoludens 2.0. De Pacman a la gamification | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
Este volumen es la edición ampliada de un libro publicado en el año 2008 por la editorial catalana Eumo. Esta nueva edición de Homo Videoludens, uno de los primeros textos publicados en España que afrontaba los videojuegos desde una perspectiva teórica y metodológica, propone nuevos capítulos y autores, presenta una mirada más actualizada e incorpora las últimas reflexiones en el campo de la ludología y la semiótica de los videojuegos. En 'Homo Videoludens 2.0' confluyen enfoques provenientes de diferentes rincones de las humanidades y las ciencias sociales. El libro cubre un amplio espectro de producciones y procesos que van de Pacman a Heavy Rain e Imperium III, pasando por la gamification, el newsgaming y el advergaming.
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Is the Marvel Cinematic Universe on the point of collapse?

Is the Marvel Cinematic Universe on the point of collapse? | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
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Emotional Intelligence Needs a Rewrite - Issue 51: Limits - Nautilus

Emotional Intelligence Needs a Rewrite - Issue 51: Limits - Nautilus | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
You’ve probably met people who are experts at mastering their emotions and understanding the emotions of others. When all hell breaks loose, somehow these individuals remain calm. They know what to say and do when their boss is moody or their lover is upset. It’s no wonder that emotional intelligence was heralded as the next big thing in business success, potentially more important than IQ, when Daniel Goleman’s bestselling book, Emotional Intelligence, arrived in 1995. After all, whom would you rather work with—someone who can identify and respond to your feelings, or someone who has no clue? Whom would you rather date?

The traditional foundation of emotional intelligence rests on two common-sense assumptions. The first is that it’s possible to detect the emotions of other people accurately. That is, the human face and body are said to broadcast happiness, sadness, anger, fear, and other emotions, and if you observe closely enough, you can read these emotions like words on a page. The second assumption is that emotions are automatically triggered by events in the world, and you can learn to control them through rationality. This idea is one of the most cherished beliefs in Western civilization. For example, in many legal systems, there’s a distinction between a crime of passion, where your emotions allegedly hijacked your good sense, and a premeditated crime that involved rational planning. In economics, nearly every popular model of investor behavior separates emotion and cognition.

These two core assumptions are strongly appealing and match our daily experiences. Nevertheless, neither one stands up to scientific scrutiny in the age of neuroscience. Copious research, from my lab and others, shows that faces and bodies alone do not communicate any specific emotion in any consistent manner. In addition, we now know that the brain doesn’t have separate processes for emotion and cognition, and therefore one cannot control the other. If these statements defy your common sense, I’m right there with you. But our experiences of emotion, no matter how compelling, don’t reflect the biology of what’s happening inside us. Our traditional understanding and practice of emotional intelligence badly needs a tuneup.

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Bobbi Dunham's curator insight, August 14, 2017 11:02 AM
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K.I.R.M. God is Business " From Day One"'s curator insight, December 30, 2017 3:20 AM

Emotional games were played even back in the Bible days, oh boy got tricked and treated worse than the lowest of low, Inslaved, picked at, tortured, beaten, sight taken and no strength at all to one point but he had not lost his connection with God and on the low low God restored him a new as his only desire was to take all of them that had done that to him out but rest assured God knew his heart and intent was right but in order to make it happen he asked God to let that be his last request of prayer. God to be for sure answered his prayer by restoring his strength but he kept it all as a secret as muc h as on boy loved to talk to the ladies but God restored all that the just when they all gathered and had the nerve to unchain oh boy as he requested so he could lean upon a certain pedistal that he knew because his strength was renued but they didn't know it and he had SK God to forgive him restore him and vindicate him by giving him his one last prayer of request and let him take them out and he was doing to go with them to make it happen because he wanted it as an atonement for his own sins, weaknesses but look at God he made the emotional games played by others straight they got treated by their own tricks and was so busy looking at what they saw because they did It by working oh boy emotional weakness a d him not knowing who was behind the game so he played to , that they failed to see that God had restored oh boy and answered his last prayer, but not every prayer is a last prayer but God still answers just the same. 

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Juego de Tronos: la lucha por captar usuarios en todas las plataformas

Juego de Tronos: la lucha por captar usuarios en todas las plataformas | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
La serie de HBO fue el primer gran éxito de las llamadas narrativas transmedia . Preguntamos a expertos hacia dónde se encamina esta práctica.
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Facebook Launches "Moon Shot" Effort to Decode Speech Direct from the Brain

Facebook Launches "Moon Shot" Effort to Decode Speech Direct from the Brain | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
As if Facebook wasn’t already pervasive enough in everyday life, the company’s newly formed Building 8 “moon shot” factory is working on a device they say would let people type out words via a brain–computer interface (BCI). If all goes according to plan—and that’s a big if—Building 8’s neural prosthetic would strap onto a person’s head, use an optical technique to decode intended speech and then type those thoughts on a computer or smartphone at up to 100 words per minute. This would be an order-of-magnitude faster than today’s state-of-the-art speech decoders.

The use of light waves to quickly and accurately read brain waves is a tall order, especially when today’s most sophisticated BCIs, which are surgically implanted in the brain, can translate neural impulses into binary actions—yes/no, click/don’t click—at only a fraction of that speed. Still, Facebook has positioned its Building 8 as an advanced research and development laboratory launched in the model of Google’s X, the lab behind the Waymo self-driving car and Glass augmented-reality headset. So it is no surprise Building 8’s first project out of the gate proposes a pretty far-fetched technology to tackle a problem that neuroscientists have been chipping away at for decades.

Here’s how the proposed device would work: the BCI will use optical fibers to direct photons from a laser source through a person’s skull into the cerebral cortex, specifically those areas involved in speech production. The BCI would “sample groups of neurons [in the brain’s speech center] and analyze the instantaneous changes in optical properties as they fire,” says Regina Dugan, head of Building 8 and a former executive at both Google and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Light scattering through the neurons would reveal changes in their shape and configuration as the brain cells and their components—mitochondria, ribosomes and cell nuclei, for example—move.

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The Human Brain Can Create Structures in Up to 11 Dimensions

The Human Brain Can Create Structures in Up to 11 Dimensions | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists have used a classic branch of maths in a totally new way to peer into the structure of our brains. What they've discovered is that the brain is full of multi-dimensional geometrical structures operating in as many as 11 dimensions.

We're used to thinking of the world from a 3-D perspective, so this may sound a bit tricky, but the results of this new study could be the next major step in understanding the fabric of the human brain - the most complex structure we know of.

This latest brain model was produced by a team of researchers from the Blue Brain Project, a Swiss research initiative devoted to building a supercomputer-powered reconstruction of the human brain.

The team used algebraic topology, a branch of mathematics used to describe the properties of objects and spaces regardless of how they change shape. They found that groups of neurons connect into 'cliques', and that the number of neurons in a clique would lead to its size as a high-dimensional geometric object.

"We found a world that we had never imagined," says lead researcher, neuroscientist Henry Markram from the EPFL institute in Switzerland.

"There are tens of millions of these objects even in a small speck of the brain, up through seven dimensions. In some networks, we even found structures with up to 11 dimensions."

Human brains are estimated to have a staggering 86 billion neurons, with multiple connections from each cell webbing in every possible direction, forming the vast cellular network that somehow makes us capable of thought and consciousness.

With such a huge number of connections to work with, it's no wonder we still don't have a thorough understanding of how the brain's neural network operates. But the new mathematical framework built by the team takes us one step closer to one day having a digital brain model.

To perform the mathematical tests, the team used a detailed model of the neocortex the Blue Brain Project team published back in 2015. The neocortex is thought to be the most recently evolved part of our brains, and the one involved in some of our higher-order functions like cognition and sensory perception.

After developing their mathematical framework and testing it on some virtual stimuli, the team also confirmed their results on real brain tissue in rats.

According to the researchers, algebraic topology provides mathematical tools for discerning details of the neural network both in a close-up view at the level of individual neurons, and a grander scale of the brain structure as a whole.

By connecting these two levels, the researchers could discern high-dimensional geometric structures in the brain, formed by collections of tightly connected neurons (cliques) and the empty spaces (cavities) between them.

"We found a remarkably high number and variety of high-dimensional directed cliques and cavities, which had not been seen before in neural networks, either biological or artificial," the team writes in the study.

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bachelorreporter's comment, June 17, 2017 3:29 AM
good
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Algorithms decode complex thoughts from brain scans - Futurity

Algorithms decode complex thoughts from brain scans - Futurity | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
Scientists can now use brain activation patterns to identify complex thoughts like “The witness shouted during the trial.”

The research uses machine-learning algorithms and brain-imaging technology to “mind read.”

The findings indicate that the mind’s building blocks for constructing complex thoughts are formed by the brain’s various sub-systems and are not word-based. Published in Human Brain Mapping, the study offers new evidence that the neural dimensions of concept representation are universal across people and languages.

“One of the big advances of the human brain was the ability to combine individual concepts into complex thoughts, to think not just of ‘bananas,’ but ‘I like to eat bananas in evening with my friends,'” says Marcel Just, professor of psychology in Carnegie Mellon University’s Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

“We have finally developed a way to see thoughts of that complexity in the fMRI signal. The discovery of this correspondence between thoughts and brain activation patterns tells us what the thoughts are built of.”

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Landscaping Lehi's curator insight, June 28, 2017 6:19 PM
A good front yard landscaping idea can improve the appearance of the home and make it seem like a more inviting place. Using a front yard landscaping idea for the front yard of a home may benefit the homeowner in more ways than they think. Great home landscaping idea is to use different colors in the area around the home to make the open areas appear larger and more spacious. If the landscaping design places dark colors in the center of the area and pight colors around the edges, it will give the area around the home some definition and will create the illusion that the area around the home is bigger than it truly is. Having lighter colors on the edged of the yard and darker colors in the center causes the eye to move from the inside to the outside of the area and moving the eyes outwards creates the appearance of more space. This technique can be used for areas inside the home as well to make small rooms appear more spacious than they really are. Visit http://www.lakehavasulawnservice.com to learn about more.
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The sixth mass genesis? New species are coming into existence faster than ever thanks to humans

The sixth mass genesis? New species are coming into existence faster than ever thanks to humans | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
Animals and plants are seemingly disappearing faster than at any time since the dinosaurs died out, 66m years ago. The death knell tolls for life on Earth. Rhinos will soon be gone unless we defend them, Mexico’s final few Vaquita porpoises are drowning in fishing nets, and in America, Franklin trees survive only in parks and gardens.

Yet the survivors are taking advantage of new opportunities created by humans. Many are spreading into new parts of the world, adapting to new conditions, and even evolving into new species. In some respects, diversity is actually increasing in the human epoch, the Anthropocene. It is these biological gains that I contemplate in a new book, Inheritors of the Earth: How Nature is Thriving in and Age of Extinction, in which I argue that it is no longer credible for us to take a loss-only view of the world’s biodiversity.

The beneficiaries surround us all. Glancing out of my study window, I see poppies and camomile plants sprouting in the margins of the adjacent barley field. These plants are southern European “weeds” taking advantage of a new human-created habitat. When I visit London, I see pigeons nesting on human-built cliffs (their ancestors nested on sea cliffs) and I listen out for the cries of skyscraper-dwelling peregrine falcons which hunt them.

Climate change has brought tree bumblebees from continental Europe to my Yorkshire garden in recent years. They are joined by an influx of world travellers, moved by humans as ornamental garden plants, pets, crops, and livestock, or simply by accident, before they escaped into the wild. Neither the hares nor the rabbits in my field are “native” to Britai

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The future of translation is part human, part machine

The future of translation is part human, part machine | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
Imagine a world where everyone can perfectly understand each other. Language is translated as we speak, and awkward moments of trying to be understood are a thing of the past.

This elusive idea is something that developers have been chasing for years. Free tools like Google Translate – which is used to translate over 100 billion words a day – along with other apps and hardware that claim to translate foreign languages as they are spoken are now available, but something is still missing.

Yes, you can now buy earpiece technology reminiscent of the Hitchiker’s Guide to the Galaxy babel fish – a bit of kit which claims to so a similar job to that a university-trained, professionally-experienced, multilingual translator – but it’s really not that simple.

Despite the rather interesting claim in 1958 that translation is a Roman invention, it’s likely that it has been around as long as the written word, and interpretation even longer. We have evidence of interpreters being employed by ancient civilisations. Greece and Rome were, like many areas of the ancient world, multilingual, and so needed both translators and interpreters.

The question of how one should translate is just as old. Roman poet Cicero dictated that a translation ought to be “non verbum de verbo, sed sensum exprimere de sensu” – of expressing not word for word, but sense for sense.

This brief trip into the world of theory has one simple purpose: to emphasise that translation is not just about the words, and automating the process of replacing one with another could never be a substitute for human translation. Translation is about the words’ meaning, their connotative as well as their denotative sense, and how to express that meaning in such a way that it is both readable and comprehensible.

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densesmew's comment, July 18, 2017 5:27 AM
awsome
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Llegó a Canadá en forma de códice la historia de los 43 de Ayotzinapa (fotos) - »

Llegó a Canadá en forma de códice la historia de los 43 de Ayotzinapa (fotos) -  » | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
(https://moa.ubc.ca/exhibition/arts-of-resistance/ ).
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Videojuegos, un negocio con mucho ‘punch’

Videojuegos, un negocio con mucho ‘punch’ | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
México ha logrado romper el paradigma de que en este país los videojuegos no son buen negocio. Año con año más gamers se suman a esta industria logrando posicionar al mercado nacional como uno de los más rentables en el mundo
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Un nuevo informe sobre los riesgos de la IA pinta un futuro aún más negro para la humanidad

Un nuevo informe sobre los riesgos de la IA pinta un futuro aún más negro para la humanidad | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
Acaba de publicarse un nuevo informe firmado por dos docenas de expertos sobre las consecuencias de las tecnologías emergentes relacionadas con la Inteligencia Artificial. ¿Estás preparado para nuevas formas de cibercrimen, ataques físicos y disrupción política en cinco o diez años?
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Google's prototype machine learning software lets you enhance low-res photos

Google's prototype machine learning software lets you enhance low-res photos | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
Pulling up a low-quality image and telling the computer to "enhance" the resolution has long been the stuff of TV fantasy. But, thanks to machine learning, we are actually getting much bette
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“Los medios que hacen clickbaiting están condenados a desaparecer”

“Los medios que hacen clickbaiting están condenados a desaparecer” | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
ENTREVISTA a Susana Pérez-Soler, periodista y profesora de Blanquerna - Universidad Ramon Llul. Acaba de publicar "Periodismo y Redes Sociales" en Editorial
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Protanopia de Andre Bergs. Un webcómic diferente

Protanopia de Andre Bergs. Un webcómic diferente | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
En un artículo reciente que escribimos para Cómic digital hoy (ACDCómic, 2017), hablábamos de webcomics y de cómo, pensamos nosotros, las expectativas creadas en torno a los cómics online no se hab…
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The novel is dead (this time it's for real)

The novel is dead (this time it's for real) | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
Literary fiction used to be central to the culture. No more: in the digital age, not only is the physical book in decline, but the very idea of 'difficult' reading is being challenged. The future of the serious novel, argues Will Self, is as a specialised interest
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Your Brain Doesn't Contain Memories. It Is Memories

Your Brain Doesn't Contain Memories. It Is Memories | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
Recall your favorite memory: the big game you won; the moment you first saw your child's face; the day you realized you had fallen in love. It's not a single memory, though, is it? Reconstructing it, you remember the smells, the colors, the funny thing some other person said, and the way it all made you feel.

Your brain's ability to collect, connect, and create mosaics from these milliseconds-long impressions is the basis of every memory. By extension, it is the basis of you. This isn't just metaphysical poetics. Every sensory experience triggers changes in the molecules of your neurons, reshaping the way they connect to one another. That means your brain is literally made of memories, and memories constantly remake your brain. This framework for memory dates back decades. And a sprawling new review published today in Neuron adds an even finer point: Memory exists because your brain’s molecules, cells, and synapses can tell time.

Defining memory is about as difficult as defining time. In general terms, memory is a change to a system that alters the way that system works in the future. "A typical memory is really just a reactivation of connections between different parts of your brain that were active at some previous time," says neuroscientist Nikolay Kukushkin, coauthor of this paper. And all animals—along with many single-celled organisms—possess some sort of ability to learn from the past.

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Addy Park's curator insight, July 20, 2017 9:19 PM
Must-read.
tactlessbivy's comment, July 25, 2017 2:58 AM
fantastic
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Can this chatbot beat the bullies in online games?

Can this chatbot beat the bullies in online games? | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
n any fictionalized universe, the distinction between playful antagonism and earnest harassment can be difficult to discern. Name-calling between friends playing a video game together is often a form of camaraderie. Between strangers, however, similar words assume a different, more troublesome quality. Being able to distinguish between the two is crucial for any video-game maker that wants to foster a welcoming community.

Spirit AI hopes to help developers support players and discourage bullying behavior with an abuse detection and intervention system called Ally. The software monitors interactions between players—what people are saying to each other and how they are behaving—through the available actions within a game or social platform. It’s able to detect verbal harassment and also nonverbal provocation—for example, one player stalking another’s avatar or abusing reporting tools.

“We’re looking at interaction patterns, combined with natural-language classifiers, rather than relying on a list of individual keywords,” explains Ruxandra Dariescu, one of Ally’s developers. “Harassment is a nuanced problem.”

When Ally identifies potentially abusive behavior, it checks to see if the potential abuser and the other player have had previous interactions. Where Ally differs from existing moderation software is that rather than simply send an alert to the game’s developers, it is able to send a computer-controlled virtual character to check in with the player—one that, through Spirit AI’s natural-language tools, is able to converse in the game’s tone and style (see “A Video-Game Algorithm to Solve Online Abuse”).

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'Woke' and 'post-truth' added to Oxford English Dictionary

'Woke' and 'post-truth' added to Oxford English Dictionary | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
The Oxford English Dictionary is getting political in its latest update, with "woke" and "post-truth" now included.

The original meaning of woke is to awaken after sleep but the word now has other social connotations.

"By the mid-20th century," says the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), "woke had been extended figuratively to refer to being 'aware' or 'well informed' in a political or cultural sense."

Post-truth was 2016's word of the year.

It is defined as "relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping political debate or public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief".

These words are especially linked to recent events in the US, such as the last presidential campaign and issues around race and police shootings.

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The World May Be Headed for a Fragmented ‘Splinternet’

The World May Be Headed for a Fragmented ‘Splinternet’ | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it
The rulings on online speech are coming down all over the world. Most recently, on June 30, Germany passed a law that orders social media companies operating in the country to delete hate speech within 24 hours of it being posted, or face fines of up to $57 million per instance. That came two days after a Canada Supreme Court ruling that Google must scrub search results about pirated products. And in May a court in Austria ruled that Facebook must take down specific posts that were considered hateful toward the country’s Green party leader. Each of those rulings mandated that companies remove the content not just in the countries where it was posted, but globally. Currently, in France, the country’s privacy regulator is fighting Google in the courts to get the tech giant to apply Europe’s “right to be forgotten” laws worldwide. And, around the world, dozens of similar cases are pending.

The trend of courts applying country-specific social media laws worldwide could radically change what is allowed to be on the internet, setting a troubling precedent. What happens to the global internet when countries with different cultures have sharply diverging definitions of what is acceptable online speech? What happens when one country's idea of acceptable speech clashes with another's idea of hate speech? Experts worry the biggest risk is that the whole internet will be forced to comport with the strictest legal limitations.

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Are Humans Getting Smarter or Less Intelligent?

Are Humans Getting Smarter or Less Intelligent? | Taller de escritores el Telar de la Narración | Scoop.it


Observe the behavior of shoppers in a long supermarket line or drivers snarled in traffic, and you can quickly become disillusioned about humanity and its collective IQ. Reality TV and websites like People of Walmart inflame this consideration. Lots of songs, both popular and underground, even utter the phrase “only stupid people are breeding.” Apparently, many of us can relate.

And yet, we’re better at technology today than in times past. Never before have we been more productive, better educated, or more technologically savvy. I had a teacher in high school who said that at the time Einstein was considering relativity, few people in the entire world were intelligent enough to understand it. But just a generation later, everyone had the theory in high school and understood it well, or at least well enough to pass the test.

So at different times and in different ways, we get competing impressions as to whether humanity collectively is getting smarter or less intelligent than before. Of course, the problem with personal experience is that it’s myopic or shortsighted. So what do studies tell us? What’s really going on here? Well, things get more complex and thornier moving forward, as they often do.


go read this..


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Isaac Asimov, Visions For The Future (1992)

Isaac Asimov documentary
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