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English-medium education to put more emphasis on Welsh

English-medium education to put more emphasis on Welsh | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Welsh will no longer be classed as a second language in English-medium schools, under new proposals.
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Three-quarters of adults 'cannot speak a foreign language' - Telegraph

Three-quarters of adults 'cannot speak a foreign language' - Telegraph | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Research by the British Council finds that three-quarters of UK adults cannot
hold a conversation in a foreign language, with fears that public apathy
towards the subject risks harming the economy
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The fight over the right to name Australian places

The fight over the right to name Australian places | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Many Australians would like to see place names reflect a more modern, equal nation.
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Finland: Where second-hand comes first

Finland: Where second-hand comes first | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
As concern grows about climate change and resources, is it time to re-use more of our junk?
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Edinburgh's road signs hacked by artist

Edinburgh's road signs hacked by artist | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Art experts say they hope the signs in the centre of Edinburgh will not be removed.
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What should I do with my broken kettle?

What should I do with my broken kettle? | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Our household appliances could have much longer lives if they were designed to be easily repaired.
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Lidl launches new scholarship for Oxford University students to study German

Lidl launches new scholarship for Oxford University students to study German | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Budget supermarket Lidl have launched a new scholarship for students at Oxford University to study German. The supermarket chain will fund one master’s degree for a student of Modern German whilst sponsoring competitions with cash prizes for undergraduates from next year.
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Scientists discover what shapes language diversity

Scientists discover what shapes language diversity | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
A team of international researchers, led by Colorado State University's Michael Gavin, have taken a first step in answering fundamental questions about human diversity.

 

Humans collectively speak nearly 7,000 languages. But these languages are not spread evenly across the globe. Why do humans speak so many languages, and why are there so many languages in some places and so few in others?

 

In a new study published in Global Ecology and Biogeography, the team was the first to use a form of simulation modeling to study the processes that shape language diversity patterns. Researchers tested the approach in Australia, and the model estimated 406 languages on the continent; the actual number of indigenous languages is 407.

 

The team - which includes linguists, geographers, ecologists, anthropologists and evolutionary biologists based in the United States, Brazil, Germany, Canada, and Sweden - adapted a form of modeling first created by ecologists to study the processes shaping species diversity.

 

The researchers began with a grid on a blank map. The computer model placed a population of people in one cell on the grid and then used a series of simple rules that defined how the population grew, spread across the map, and divided into separate populations speaking different languages.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The bang on the head that knocked English out of me

The bang on the head that knocked English out of me | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Hannah Jenkins speaks English in the morning and German in the afternoon - it all started with a cycling accident.
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In pictures: Autumnal colours across the UK

In pictures: Autumnal colours across the UK | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
We look at misty sunrises, fields of ripening pumpkins and leaves of red, orange and gold.
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Mid-Autumn mooncakes: Tasty treats and fancy packaging

Mid-Autumn mooncakes: Tasty treats and fancy packaging | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Chinese people around the globe are celebrating the Mid-Autumn festival, with mooncakes centre stage.
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Why do we hate wasps and love bees?

Why do we hate wasps and love bees? | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Both are as ecologically useful, say scientists, and the same effort must be made to protect them.
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12-year-old engineer invents device to combat ocean #microplastic #pollution

12-year-old engineer invents device to combat ocean #microplastic #pollution | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it

"Du created an underwater remotely operated vehicle that uses infrared light to detect, photograph and help remove microplastics from marine environments without harming living creatures.

“Plastics are already a huge problem, and then there are microplastics,” Du told AccuWeather. “When fish eat it, they get a toxin called bisphenol A inside their bodies, and even if they poop the plastics out, they still keep the toxin inside of them.”

The health of humans also faces detrimental impacts from consuming plastic-contaminated fish.

Anna chose to use infrared in her remotely operated vehicle because it can help scientists distinguish microplastics from other nonhazardous materials underwater without having to send samples to a lab.

“I first decided I wanted to do an ocean-related project when I found out that plastics in the ocean were a big problem; I went to the beach at Boston Harbor and I saw plastics everywhere,” Du said."


Via ThePlanetaryArchives - BlackHorseMedia - San Francisco
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Periodic table found at St Andrews University 'is world's oldest'

Periodic table found at St Andrews University 'is world's oldest' | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Experts who dated the teaching chart found at St Andrews University said it was printed between 1879 and 1886.
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Climate change: EU aims to be 'climate neutral' by 2050

Climate change: EU aims to be 'climate neutral' by 2050 | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
The European Union says it wants to become the first major economy to achieve net zero emissions by 2050.
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World Diabetes Day: 'What I wish people knew about my condition'

World Diabetes Day: 'What I wish people knew about my condition' | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
On World Diabetes Day, we speak to three people who live with the condition.
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China's Xinhua agency unveils AI news presenter

China's Xinhua agency unveils AI news presenter | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
The state news agency Xinhua says the nameless presenter will help reduce news production costs.
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Duolingo Makes a Bid to Help Dying Languages Flourish in a Digital World

Duolingo Makes a Bid to Help Dying Languages Flourish in a Digital World | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Duolingo is branching out into endangered languages, but can it save under-spoken languages from extinction?

Via Charles Tiayon
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Dutch language besieged by English at university

Dutch language besieged by English at university | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
So extensive is the spread of English, a group of lecturers warns of a looming "linguicide".
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Macro Photographs Composed of Nearly Ten Thousand Images Show the Incredible Detail of Insect Specimens

Macro Photographs Composed of Nearly Ten Thousand Images Show the Incredible Detail of Insect Specimens | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it

Commercial photographer Levon Biss typically shoots portraits of world-class athletes—sports players caught in motion. His new series however, catches subjects that have already been paused, insect specimens found at the Oxford Museum of Natural History. The series originally started as a side-project capturing the detail of bugs that his son would catch at home, and is now displayed at the museum in an exhibition titled Microsculpture.

 

During the course of his selection from the museum’s collection Biss rejected more than 99% of the bugs he came across, only choosing those that were of the right size and color. To capture these subjects in such immense detail, each part of the insect required a completely different lighting setup.

 

“I will photograph an antenna and light that antenna so it looks as best as it possibly can,” said Biss. “Once I move onto the next section, for example the eye, the lighting will change completely. I work my way across the whole body of the insect until I end up with 30 different sections, each photographed individually.”

 

Working in this comprehensive manner required between 8,000 and 10,000 shots for each final image, moving the camera just ten microns (1/7th of the width of a human hair) between each shot. With this volume of imagery, it takes over two weeks for Biss to complete each photograph start to finish.

 

You can see Microsculpture through October 30th at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History where the images are displayed next to their actual specimens. In case you can’t make it to the UK, you can take a detailed look at all 22 of Biss’s images on his interactive Microsculpture website. (via PetaPixel)


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Dyson chooses Singapore for new electric car plant

Dyson chooses Singapore for new electric car plant | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Work will start on a new factory later this year with car production scheduled to begin in 2021.
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Why you have (probably) already bought your last car

Why you have (probably) already bought your last car | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
A growing number of tech analysts are predicting that in less than 20 years we'll all have stopped owning cars.
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How translation apps are ironing out embarrassing gaffes

How translation apps are ironing out embarrassing gaffes | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
The goal of real-time natural language translation is getting closer, but mistakes still happen.
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Cathay Pacific spells own name wrong on new plane

Cathay Pacific spells own name wrong on new plane | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Cathay Pacific misspelled its name as "Cathay Paciic" on the side of one of its planes.
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A Town in Norway Heated Entirely by a Data Center

A Town in Norway Heated Entirely by a Data Center | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it

In a new town called Lyseparken, being built from scratch on vacant land near Bergen, Norway, a data center will help heat surrounding businesses–part of a design that could create the world’s first energy-positive city.

 

As data centers use energy (globally, they used 416 terawatt-hours of electricity in 2016, more than the entire United Kingdom), one big chunk of that electricity is used to keep servers cool. In the design for the new data center at Lyseparken, instead of fans, a liquid cooling system will send extra heat to a district heating system, which connects to businesses in the area, heating each building via the floor. The liquid loses heat as it travels, so the buildings that need heat most are located closest to the data center. Eventually, the liquid is cool enough that it can loop back to the data center to cool it down–and as that happens, it heats up again to start the process over.

 

In Lyseparken, the data center will sit at the heart of a new business park with 600,000 square meters of office space. The businesses will each have a stake in a local power company, and will each produce and consume electricity from a mix of renewable sources including solar and thermal energy. The data center–which can handle data for businesses or government–will buy solar energy from the power company, and then sell heat back. The arrangement offers low power bills, dividends from the power company for building owners, and, for the data center and other businesses with waste heat, the opportunity to make money from that energy. The new development will also include 3,000-5,000 new houses, which will house people working in the new area. The new town will be close enough to the city of Os that people can bike there.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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