GMOs, NBT & Sustainable agriculture
13.7K views | +0 today
Follow
GMOs, NBT & Sustainable agriculture
Site with information in English and French, used for teaching and educational purposes. Information about sustainable development, mainly related to agriculture, as well as assessment of [CO2] and climate change impact on plants;  or methods to decrease the use or the amount of  pesticides will be included on this site. Because biotechnologies are a part of the answer to these agricultural challenges, information about GMOs will be largely reported here.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Christophe Jacquet from NBT - New breeding techniques
Scoop.it!

Genome editing could save 'genetically decaying' cassava staple that feeds 1 in 10 people | Genetic Literacy Project

Genome editing could save 'genetically decaying' cassava staple that feeds 1 in 10 people | Genetic Literacy Project | GMOs, NBT & Sustainable agriculture | Scoop.it
For breeders of cassava, a staple food for hundreds of millions in the tropics, producing improved varieties has been getting harder over time. A team at C

Via NBT
NBT's curator insight, May 10, 2017 3:16 AM
“In the long run, using genome editing, we could provide the equivalent of personalized medicine to breeding lines,” Buckler said.
Rescooped by Christophe Jacquet from NBT - New breeding techniques
Scoop.it!

Building on nature's design

Building on nature's design | GMOs, NBT & Sustainable agriculture | Scoop.it
In 1996, a breakthrough was achieved when the sequence of ∼12 million base pairs, divided among 16 chromosomes, was reported for baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Now, some 20 years later, the Synthetic Yeast Genome Project (Sc2.0) reports on five newly constructed synthetic yeast chromosomes, advancing efforts to substantially reengineer all 16 yeast chromosomes with the goal of creating a fully synthetic eukaryotic genome.

Via NBT
NBT's curator insight, March 13, 2017 8:25 AM
In 1996, a breakthrough was achieved when the sequence of ∼12 million base pairs, divided among 16 chromosomes, was reported for baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Now, some 20 years later, the Synthetic Yeast Genome Project (Sc2.0) reports on five newly constructed synthetic yeast chromosomes, advancing efforts to substantially reengineer all 16 yeast chromosomes with the goal of creating a fully synthetic eukaryotic genome.