Sustainability Science
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Sustainability Science
How might we keep the lights on, water flowing, and natural world vaguely intact? It starts with grabbing innovative ideas/examples to help kick down our limits and inspire a more sustainable world. We implement with rigorous science backed by hard data.
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Nestlé ceases to source Brazil soy from Cargill

Nestlé ceases to source Brazil soy from Cargill | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) recently reported that the world’s largest food and beverage company, Nestlé, has stopped buying Cargill’s Brazilian soy because of concerns about the link to deforestation.

Via EcoVadis
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How a Dam Building Boom Is Transforming the Brazilian Amazon

How a Dam Building Boom Is Transforming the Brazilian Amazon | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
Brazil is in the midst of a hydropower construction boom that is inundating large areas of rainforest and driving indigenous people from their lands — all while failing to fully develop the country’s vast potential for solar and wind energy.

 
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What's Driving Deforestation?

What's Driving Deforestation? | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
Just four commodities—beef, soy, palm oil, and wood products—drive the majority of global deforestation. And consumers can help stop it.
PIRatE Lab's insight:
As I was getting a ride home from the car repair shop today, the shuttle had an interesting radio show on.  It was a discussion with a person of a particular political persuasion saying how "doom and gloom" and "naysayers" get too much press and are a part of the problem with the world these days.

While we can of course swerve too far down the "world is ending" path, simply saying that key drivers of degradation are not happening is a childish or cynical ploy.  But one example of the challenges we face is this brief overview of drivers of forest conversion to human-dominated landscapes.

While I generally do not like these "info graphics," in cases such as the dork on the radio, these might be the right level of tone and complexity.
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They razed paradise and put up a soybean lot

They razed paradise and put up a soybean lot | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
Brazil's agro powers are excited to be edging closer to soy giant the United States. But environmentalists say there's another reason to be very afraid for the rain forest.
PIRatE Lab's insight:

What a disappointing joke: the wholesale conversion of tropical forest to agriculture is continuing unabated.  The recent declines in deforestation rate are occurring as so much has already been lost.  To allow the relatively successful moratorium to wane will only foster greater destruction with all the familiar victims and impacts.

Colin Jonaon's curator insight, April 7, 2014 3:29 PM

rescooped from Sean

 

-Colin

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Amazon deforestation dropped 19 pct between August and January

Rio de Janeiro, Feb 22 (EFE).- Brazil's portion of the Amazon rainforest lost between August 2013 and January this year some 1,162.5 sq. kilometers (448.8 sq. miles) of woodland, an area 19 percent less than the amount deforested between August 2012 and January 2013, which was 1,427 sq. kilometers (551 sq. miles), the government said.
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'Our wealth is the forest': Indigenous tribes are the last best hope for the Amazon

'Our wealth is the forest': Indigenous tribes are the last best hope for the Amazon | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
Indigenous people are engaged in a fierce battle to defend the Amazon forest from illegal logging and it’s working. Deforestation in indigenous territories is much lower than in other areas. But those efforts are now threatened.
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Ecuador Pays $112 mln Award to Chevron

Ecuador Pays $112 mln Award to Chevron | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
Ecuador has paid $112 million to energy company Chevron Corp over a four-decade-old contract dispute, even though it remains in
PIRatE Lab's insight:
This is unrelated to the oil spill case still working its way through the courts.
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Tropical deforestation threatens global food production

Tropical deforestation threatens global food production | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
ROME (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Tropical deforestation in the southern hemisphere is accelerating global warming and threatening world food production by distorting rainfall patterns across Europe,
PIRatE Lab's insight:

I'm not sure I would characterize Brazilian management as a "wonderful success story" but the overall global pattern is clear.  We simply don't have the capacity to stop altering these systems and we beginning to see real, realized feedback loops on larger atmospheric patterns necessary for food production, silvaculture, etc.

 

Here is the original paper:

 

http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/v5/n1/full/nclimate2430.html

 

If you would like to see the current boogy man for deforestation (and want to be kept up at night with worry) check out the latest disappointing news from Indonesia:

 

http://www.eco-business.com/news/half-indonesias-deforestation-occurs-outside-concession-areas/

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Light pollution impairs rainforest regeneration: Seed-dispersing bats avoid feeding in light polluted areas

Light pollution impairs rainforest regeneration: Seed-dispersing bats avoid feeding in light polluted areas | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
Increasing light pollution in tropical habitats could be hampering regeneration of rainforests because of its impact on nocturnal seed-dispersers. These new findings show that seed-dispersing bats avoid feeding in light-polluted areas.
PIRatE Lab's insight:

Yet another reason to be pushing for dark skies policies.

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Marauders Are Overwhelming Beaches in Rio as Brazil Takes a Dangerous Turn

Marauders Are Overwhelming Beaches in Rio as Brazil Takes a Dangerous Turn | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
The return of violent mobs to Rio's most populated beaches is a sign of what's to come. And none of it's good.
PIRatE Lab's insight:

The beaches of Rio have long been a place where tourists and the well off could be relatively confidant that the poor would not show up (or at least not do so visibly on the highest "rent" locales).  This appearrs to be changing and falling back into some of the anarchy and in-your-face inequality that has in recent years been motly confined to the hillside slums.  

 

It is clear from my travels and work over the past many years that inequality and corruption must be solved and justly addressed before any true semblance of effective management can be brought to bear across any particular segment of the coastal zone. 

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