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Robot valet parking

Robot valet parking | Facility management | Scoop.it

Meet Stan, the first outdoor valet robot in the world!

Frank Boross's insight:

This valet robot technology means that you can just leave your vehicle at the parking entrance. No more manoeuvring into tight spaces. You save time and avoid unnecessary stress, all while keeping your keys in your pocket! This is a space and time saver that will revolutionise parking, especially for multi-story developments. See this concept in action https://stanley-robotics.com/solutions/how-it-works/ (scroll down for video).

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Termite drones: Harvard unveils swarm construction robots - This is REAL Genius

Harvard University's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have unveiled a swarm of simple robots which can build large, complex structure
Frank Boross's insight:

Biologically inspired engineering - robotic swarm construction


Developed by researchers at Harvard, robotic swarm construction was designed based on how termites work. Termites work together like a ‘swarm’ and construction robotics are programmed to work together in this manner. Four-wheeled robots are programmed in each instance to build a certain design and come with sensors to detect the presence of other robots, so that they can work together.


It’s no secret that technology is revolutionising literally every aspect of our lives. The construction industry, which is continually being updated and upgraded with the latest technology, has some exciting new construction technology trends that are paving the way for future construction ... and the inspirational use of a termite army as a robotic swarm is just the start!

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Predicting The Future Impact of Robotics In Construction

Predicting The Future Impact of Robotics In Construction | Facility management | Scoop.it
BuildingTech INSIDER looks into the crystal ball in attempt to predict the role of robotics in construction and the modern jobsite.
Frank Boross's insight:

Robots will not take over the workforce. That is my belief at this time. In multi story construction, for robotics the “intent is to boost production, reduce job site injuries, and shorten project schedules. Until automated intelligence is able to adapt and react to unforeseen job site situations or conditions, like complicated brick-laying or understanding aesthetics, we will still see traditional construction workers playing integral roles. Robotics are mechanical innovations aimed to maximize efficiency so workers can focus on the complex tasks requiring creative thought, which cannot be performed by a machine. The human mind is still needed for finish details.”


 


Creativity is a human phenomenon. There is no scientific theory that can explain how life creates itself or where creativity even comes from. Intelligent machines may be predictive but they lack the creativity and desire to break the rules defined by humans. The role of the worker will definitely change, but in a way that reduces job site injury, eliminates inefficiencies and shortens project schedules.

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Australian Robot Builds First House in Three Days

Australian Robot Builds First House in Three Days | Facility management | Scoop.it
Australia’s robot bricklayer has built its first house in less than three days, a milestone described by FBR as a "world first".
Frank Boross's insight:

Fastbrick Robotics is a company we featured last year. They are now known as FBR. Importantly they have just successfully constructed a 180sq m, three-bedroom, two-bathroom house using the world’s only fully automated, end-to-end bricklaying solution. This company has a massive future ahead!

 

You can see it happening here.

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AI in Construction Forecast to Grow 450% Over the Next Five Years

AI in Construction Forecast to Grow 450% Over the Next Five Years | Facility management | Scoop.it
Researchers estimate that AI within construction will balloon from AU$537 million in 2018 to AU$2.41 billion by 2023.
Frank Boross's insight:

AI technologies are already being effectively used for numerous applications in construction, such as project management, field management, risk management, schedule management, supply chain management, equipment and materials management, resource management, subcontractor management, and cost management.


According to the report, the Asia Pacific region is set to grow at the fastest rate, with construction companies in rapidly growing economies, such as China, Japan, and Singapore, using AI tools via AI platforms across different industries to provide effective solutions.


Recently, Australian robotic technology company, Fastbrick Robotics Limited, have consulted with construction giant Caterpillar, to discuss and develop a potential framework for collaboration regarding AI in development, manufacturing, sales, and services.

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How robots are reshaping one of the dirtiest, most dangerous jobs

How robots are reshaping one of the dirtiest, most dangerous jobs | Facility management | Scoop.it
Garbage-sorting robots featuring artificial intelligence and fast-moving arms are now on the job at many recycling centers across the U.S. and around the world.
Frank Boross's insight:

"China, the world's leading importer of recyclable materials, sparked a global crisis last January when it stopped accepting some items due to environmental concerns and tightened its contamination standards for others.


Some recycling facilities in the U.S. closed, and mounds of waste piled up as exporters scrambled to find new buyers for bales of mixed paper, plastics, and other materials."


Some years ago Finnish company ZenRobotics was first on the waste management scene with their robotic waste sorter. The initial system used a combination of  computer vision, machine learning, and artificial intelligence (AI) to run synchronized robotic arms to sort and pick recycled materials from moving conveyor belts. The company broke ground by using recycling stations tied together in a neural network so that the AI could learn. The AI learns to select and sort the right items from the belt from real-time feeds that provide data from metal sensors, 3D laser cameras and spectroscopic cameras.


Beyond taking over the worst jobs on the sorting lines, ZenRobotics' CEO said that "the increased efficiency may cut recycling costs and create more jobs at paper mills, plastic recyclers, and other firms that reuse raw materials."


And if the robots prove effective, the environmental payoff could be even bigger because, as greater quantities of waste get recycled and reused, less will end up in landfills.

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